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Should PoMo Architecture, at the 50-Year Mark, Be Saved? - The New York Times
"One significant Post-Modernist building hasn’t won the preservation battle. Despite a petition signed by 100 prominent architects and academics, a forecourt of pergolas with chubby columns completed in 1996 by the Philadelphia architects Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego is now being demolished for a major expansion by Annabelle Selldorf, the highly regarded New York architect. Inside, Ms. Selldorf is repurposing, intact, Venturi Scott Brown’s entry vestibule, with its Pop-art, WHAAM! VAROOM! neon starburst ceiling, as a meeting hall and event space.

It’s complicated. Venturi, who died this September, kicked off Post-Modernism with his hugely influential “Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture” (1966), a searing critique of Modernism’s failure to communicate and relate to its users.

The couple’s La Jolla addition belongs to a distinguished and historic portfolio. Ms. Selldorf specializes in quiet, abstract Minimalist designs especially suited to museums. She professes “huge respect” for Venturi Scott Brown’s buildings.

Ms. Selldorf’s 43,000 square foot, $75 million expansion is the museum’s fourth and largest, each addition gobbling up the last like a Russian doll. But the core remains a crisp cubic house built for the philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps in 1915 by Irving Gill, one of the world’s first Modernists. In a succession of additions over three decades, Mosher Drew, a San Diego firm, added gallery space and an auditorium, tying the composite of buildings together with a long colonnade. Venturi and Scott Brown removed the Mosher Drew colonnade in their expansion and painstakingly restored the Gill facade, which they then partially obscured by adding their pergolas for the museum’s entry and cafe.

Ms. Selldorf’s addition shifted the museum’s center of gravity, causing her to reposition the front door elsewhere, obviating Venturi and Scott Brown’s entrance pergola. Removing the cartoonish columns reveals Gill’s original facade.

Her clean-lined, geometrically disciplined buildings represent the Modernist architecture that Venturi famously criticized when he declared “Less is a bore.” As Ms. Selldorf removes the pergolas, she eliminates the complexity and contradiction Venturi Scott Brown layered into the ensemble, denaturing their eclectic addition. In a complex that otherwise remains a collage of architectural histories, the Minimalist chose to feature Gill’s early Minimalist icon. She subtracted rather than added.

In a case of competing histories, Ms. Selldorf had to make Sophie’s choice: which history? “The greater good was revealing the Irving Gill,” she decided.

Long after Post-Modernism’s retreat, the style wars continue."
mcasd  lajolla  sandiego  architecture  pomo  potmodernism  design 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Commentary: Critics say a San Diego museum's Postmodern entry should be preserved. But why keep what doesn't work? - Los Angeles Times
"Now, MCASD La Jolla is set to be reconfigured again. Selldorf, whose firm is known for work on historic museum buildings — including the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Mass., and the Neue Galerie in New York — has been charged with adding 30,000 square feet of gallery space — the museum currently has no dedicated space to show its permanent collection — which she will achieve by transforming the auditorium into galleries and by adding another hall on a newly acquired property to the south.

To weave this Franken-complex together, she is removing a portion of VSBA’s arched facade and the pergolas. She is also shifting the museum’s main entrance to the south, aligning it with Mosher Drew’s auditorium building, which means that Axline Court will no longer serve as the principal point of access — though it will remain as a gathering space. It is these latter moves that have raised a critical outcry.

First and foremost, there is the question of the entrance.

As part of their 1990s re-do, Venturi and Scott Brown placed the main doorway to the museum behind their concrete pergola, where it was not only difficult to find but also competed visually with the rebuilt arched sun porch of the newly uncovered Scripps house a few feet away — an entryway that, ironically, no longer served as entrance.

Confusion over the location of the entrance was such that about a year after the expansion was completed, the museum asked the architects to devise some sort of signage that would help point the way, hence the addition of the word “MUSEUM” in yellow capital letters above the correct doorway.

Goldberger, who was architecture critic for the New York Times and the New Yorker before becoming a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, is one of the major figures who signed the open letter condemning the Selldorf plan. In 1996, he wrote a glowing review of the Venturi Scott Brown expansion in the New York Times, describing it as “an exquisite project.” But in the piece, he also noted the awkward position of the entrance, which required visitors to “make an illogical turn to the left to arrive at the front door.”

Goldberger said this was a minor issue, in light of the museum’s “graceful composition” and its “public presence on the streets of La Jolla.” But as someone who has directed disoriented visitors to the entrance on numerous occasions, I would argue that an important part of a public institution’s public presence is a clear and welcoming doorway.

Then there is the matter of the pergolas.

In a 1996 review of the expansion, Los Angeles Times art critic Christopher Knight noted that the pergolas designed by VSBA echoed the delicate lines of a Gill-designed pergola that hugs the facade of the Scripps house, but that it did it on a much larger scale in “clever” “Toontown” fashion. The pergolas also serve to frame the Gill house, setting it apart from the street and the rest of the museum’s facade.

The petition argues that removing the Venturi, Scott Brown pergolas would “prevent visitors from experiencing [the Scripps house] in the way Gill intended: from the intimate, pedestrian-scaled space in front of it.”

But at this point, it’s hard to say what exactly we are experiencing of Gill’s original architecture.

When Mosher Drew wrapped its own building around the Scripps house in the 1950s, a portion of the Gill house was torn down during construction. This included demolishing the original sun porch, stripping part of the facade and filling in windows. In a lecture delivered in 1979, architecture critic Esther McCoy described watching pieces of the structure come down: “I saw the wrecking company razing it. Real labor to destroy a Gill building.”

So when VSBA uncovered the Gill structure, it wasn’t simply uncovering. It was also rebuilding. And to their credit, the architects went to terrific lengths to get it right: using poured concrete where Gill had used poured concrete and reinserting windows that matched the ones in historic photographs of the house.

The Scripps house now largely exists as fragments embedded in the larger museum, the most complete original portion of which is the entry foyer. And even that is not in its original state: It was refurbished first by Mosher Drew, then by VSBA, which added gray wainscoting. (One can only imagine what Gill, who was all about stripped-down Modernism, would make of wainscoting.)

Lastly, there are the issues of urban planning.

One of the principal arguments for leaving the current design untouched is to preserve the ways in which the museum relates to the streets of La Jolla. “Its street frontage, museum store and cafe extend the rhythm of Prospect Street’s lively storefronts,” reads the petition, “celebrating the museum’s location in the village commercial center and drawing visitors towards the building.”

In my experience, that is an optimistic view of how the museum relates to the street.

Although the museum sits within a commercial zone, it is at a point where the area grows increasingly residential. Pedestrian traffic tends to peter out two blocks away, both on Prospect Street to the north and Silverado Street to the east. One of the closest commercial sites to the museum is a restaurant more than a block away that was recently shuttered for renovations and shows no signs of reopening. Most folks who land at the museum arrive intentionally, not because they happen to wander in.

Moreover, the critical focus on the street ignores the site’s larger natural context: namely, the Pacific Ocean.

For whatever reason, MCASD La Jolla has historically turned its back on this incredible feature — with loading docks that offer views of the water and a sidewalk cafe that overlooks ... asphalt.

Moreover, if, as intended, you approach the museum by walking south on Prospect Street, the first thing you encounter on the museum’s property is not a garden, cafe or gallery. It’s the parking lot — a parking lot with resplendent views of the ocean where I’ve seen families (including my own) pose for group pictures amid the parked cars. It is absurd.

In their design, Venturi and Scott Brown smartly dealt with some of these challenges. The architects sliced windows into Mosher Drew’s more oppressive structures, allowing visitors glimpses of coastline in galleries that had once been boxed in. And they linked the ocean-view garden on the site’s eastern slope — now the Edwards Sculpture Garden — with the museum for easier access. (Previously, it was accessible to the public only from Coast Boulevard; the garden will remain unchanged in Selldorf’s design.)

In her redesign, Selldorf is working to reorient the entire museum complex to the ocean, its best asset. Parking will go underground, allowing for a public park, a more pastoral place to enjoy ocean views. Other spaces that engage the Pacific will include terraces, meeting rooms, an event space. In this regard, her makeover is overdue.

Postmodern architecture is experiencing a critical moment. It is at a point where it looks old enough to be outdated — too flamboyant in our age of austere iPhone minimalism — but not old enough to have achieved the status of venerable. Iconic structures, such as Michael Graves’ Portland Municipal Services Building in Oregon and Philip Johnson’s AT&T Building in New York (now the Sony building) have faced the threat of wrecking balls and ill-conceived renovations.

I am wary of erasing architectural history. But as Aaron Betsky noted in a column in Architect magazine about the case of MCASD La Jolla, “advocates are asking us to preserve a building that has a somewhat confused organization, banal spaces and ridiculous ornamentation.”

Selldorf’s plan holds on to elements of the site’s myriad design histories — to which she will add her own story. In a way, it’s in keeping with the museum’s own history as a place of continuous architectural evolution. There is no reason that evolution should stop in the 1990s."
2018  carolinamiranda  lajolla  mcasd  sandiego  architecture  design  history 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Memories of Underdevelopment | Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego
"In collaboration with Museo Jumex in Mexico City and the Museo de Arte de Lima, MCASD will present an exhibition examining the ways in which Latin American artists from the 1960s to the 1980s responded to the unraveling of the utopian promise of modernization after World War II, most notably in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela. In the immediate postwar period, artists had eagerly embraced the “transition to modernity,” creating a new abstract geometric language meant to capture its idealistic possibilities. As modernization failed, and political oppression and brutal military dictatorships followed, avant-garde artists increasingly abandoned abstraction and sought new ways to connect with the public, engaging directly with communities and often incorporating popular strategies from film, theater, and architecture into their work. Memories of Underdevelopment will be the first significant survey exhibition of these crucial decades and will highlight the work not only of well-known artists such as Hélio Oiticica and Lygia Pape but also lesser-known artists from Colombia, Peru, Chile, and Uruguay.

Memories of Underdevelopment is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego in partnership with the Museo de Arte de Lima and the Fundación Jumex Arte Contemporáneo. Lead support is provided through grants from the Getty Foundation. Additional support provided through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. This project has received generous underwriting support from Maryanne and Irwin Pfister and the LLWW Foundation. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture, and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund."
colombia  chile  uruguay  brazil  brasil  mexico  venezuela  latinamerica  argentina  héliooiticica  lygiapape  modernity  development  mcasd  tosee  togo  1960s  1970s  1980s  art  architecture  perú 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Why two artists surveyed the U.S.-Mexico border ... the one from 1821 - LA Times
"Two artists — one Mexican, one American — piled into a white Sprinter van stuffed with camping gear, photo equipment and art supplies for a 3,721-mile journey to mark the expanse of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Marcos Ramirez, known as “ERRE,” a Tijuana artist who tackles border topics in sculptural and conceptual works, and David Taylor, an Arizona photographer who has documented the border, began the first leg of their journey in July 2014 with a two-hour crossing from Tijuana into the U.S. at the international border.

But instead of heading east toward Arizona, the artists traveled north along Interstate 15 through the Mojave and the Owens Valley and up the eastern slopes of the Sierra Nevada, where they camped within view of Mt. Whitney. The pair then cut west toward the California coast, through the rolling hills of Mendocino County, and redwood forests, before landing at Crissey Field State Park, a small, coastal recreational area outside Brookings, Ore.

There, at 42 degrees latitude on a wild beach a few dozen feet from the California border, they planted — without permission — a 6-foot-6-inch steel obelisk to mark the divide between the U.S and Mexico.

Taylor and Ramirez, nearly 900 miles north of Tijuana, weren’t horribly lost. For they weren’t marking the heavily fortified U.S.-Mexico border of today, but the boundary established between the two nations in 1821. That’s when California, New Mexico, Texas, Utah and many other states, even slices of Oregon and Kansas, were part of the Mexican union.

The artists toasted their achievement at Crissey Field with a round of beers. Then they hotfooted it out of there, before park officials could get wind of what they were up to.

“It was so tentative,” Taylor says. “There are signs everywhere saying you can’t litter and you can’t leave stuff behind. The park is well attended. … But we were able to scoot off in time.”

For their project, “DeLIMITations,” the artists placed 47 steel obelisks along the route of the 1821 border, from the coast of Oregon to the Gulf of Mexico, stopping in Medicine Bow, Wyo.; Dodge City, Kan.; Waurika, Okla.; and many other towns. Before this undertaking, the 1821 border had never been formally surveyed in its entirety.

“There had been a short section of it between the headwaters of the Sabine River [on the Texas-Louisiana border] and the Red River, which divides Texas and Oklahoma, that had been marked,” Taylor says. “But the entire rest had not.”

The project was as much an opportunity to revisit history as it was to do what had never been done.

“Most of the historical markers you see on the road is for entertainment," Ramirez says. “Like, ‘Billy the Kid was shot here.’ We wanted to engage real history.”

It’s a past that will be revisited this week when “DeLIMITations” goes on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, which helped fund the project (along with a binational clutch of institutions that includes the Nevada Art Museum, the University of Arizona, SITE Santa Fe and the museum of the Autonomous University of Baja California in Mexicali).

The exhibition — with photography, video and a pair of stainless-steel obelisk sculptures — explores a fraught topic in this contentious election, in which presidential candidate Donald Trump has repeatedly called for the construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, an idea the Republican Party officially endorsed at its national convention.

Cris Scorza, who serves as curator on the show, says the exhibition couldn’t be timelier — and in taking the long view of history it shows the ways in which even the hardest borders can shift over time. “It changes how we see it because it seems so permeable,” she says. “It’s not a wall. It makes us aware of topography and landscape.”

Borders, in fact, are a relatively recent invention, says Taylor.

“There were not surveyed borders before European settlement in the Americas,” he says. “There were transition zones. You left one place and it blended into another.”

It’s a transition zone of sorts that the artists set out to map — the territory where the histories and notions of nationhood of two wildly distinct countries physically overlap.

“I was to be able to make the trip and see all of those landscapes that are not anymore Mexican,” says Ramirez. “But they are. In marking them, they are.”"
marcoserreramirez  mexico  us  history  border  borders  davidtaylor  california  geography  mcasd  delimitation  1821  treatyofadams-onís 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Carrito De Technologia | Facebook
"Carrito de Technologia was born June 11, 2010 as a Border Corps art project. It was conceived by Perry Vasquez and and designed and built by Armando de la Torre. It was part of the exhibition Here Not There at MCASD."

[Photos: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Carrito-De-Technologia/125698760795074?id=125698760795074&sk=photos_stream ]

[See also: http://www.perryvasquez.com/performance/bordercorps3.html ]
paleteros  perryvazquez  2010  bordercorps  art  sandiego  mcasd  armandodelatorre  technology 
may 2014 by robertogreco
44th and Landis | Margaret Noble
"This mixed media installation charts a psychogeographical path through the City Heights neighborhood of southern California, where the artist grew up. 44th and Landis combines visual traces of the neighborhood’s early Victorian years and motifs drawn from 1980s urban pop culture. This installation takes the form of an ephemeral sculptural environment comprising hundreds of cut paper forms divided into 5 structures. The installation also incorporates an experiential soundscape spread over fourteen handmade paper speakers.

Mixing imagery appropriated from video games, Victorian paper dolls, and 1980s urban pop culture, the work evokes the external and internal worlds of a child navigating the streets of a city pressured by waves of disinvestment and gentrification. Integrating memory and fantasy, and public and private histories, 44th and Landis offers insights into a complex American neighborhood’s past and present."
margaretnoble  cityheoghts  sandiego  art  mcasd  2012  installations 
march 2014 by robertogreco
MCASD's 'Very Large Array' celebrates regional artists | UTSanDiego.com
"Primary patrons

In conceiving the exhibition, Dawsey and Davies decided to represent every San Diego and Tijuana artist in the institution’s collection, built over the course of the last 50 years. The museum defined “San Diego artists” as artists who lived here, practiced here or taught here. Of the 102 artists it identified in its collection, about a quarter of them — 27 to be exact — are from Tijuana (their influence and concerns are one of the show’s most pervasive qualities).

“What distinguishes us from the San Diego Museum of Art, or the Timken Museum, or every other museum in town except perhaps the Mingei, is we are primary patrons of living artists,” Davies said. “And there’re no more important artists than our own artists.”

That statement might come as a surprise to some local artists, who have perceived the museum as somewhat removed from their everyday realities. But as the local art community has become more energized, so has the museum’s attitude toward it. Over the past year, MCASD invited representatives of local art spaces (from Agitprop to Space 4 Art) into the museum for conversations, which resulted in a loose coalition now called Think Tank.

During the recent Fall for the Arts events, the museum and Think Tank participated in the festival’s Pod Project and produced a zine, “Other Ideas,” which highlights the aspirations of some of the alternative arts spaces.

“The Think Tank is a good step,” said artist and Agitprop founder David White, who was involved in the museum’s 2010 show “Here Not There: San Diego Art Now” and the Orange County Museum of Art’s most recent California Biennial (he’s not represented in MCASD’s collection and therefore not in “The Very Large Array”). “It’s great there’s an acknowledgment from that institution toward what I think is a trend toward independently run spaces and artist-initiative-driven spaces in the city.”

“Here Not There,” which included approximately 40 artists, marked a coming-of-age moment for the San Diego scene. Unlike “Here Not There,” however, “The Very Large Array” is a timeline (to use Dawsey’s description), not a snapshot. It presents an even more impressive overview of the local art community.

“Every museum of contemporary art has this balancing act,” Davies said. “How much do you deal with, acknowledge, recognize, your local art community at the risk of becoming provincial and navel gazing? And how much do you bring in work from around the world that makes you cosmopolitan and makes you part of an international dialogue about art?

“My sense is, for a city like ours, which is very close to a major art capital, Los Angeles, we should probably err on the side of showing, patronizing, nurturing our own artists.”"

[Paginated version: http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/dec/07/MCASD-array/ ]
sandiego  mcasd  art  local  museums  glvo  thinktank  crissorza  agitprop  davidwhite  herenothere  contemporary  purpose  timkenmusuem  sdma  hughdavies  verylargearray  mingei  community 
april 2013 by robertogreco
brian dick = brothergeek
"No Rules Except…YARD
In 2008 I was invited by the New Children's Museum, San Diego and the Allan Kaprow estate to "Reinvent" one of two Kaprow Environments for the Museum's premier exhibition Childsplay. Initially I planned to reinvent one or the other, but then it occurred to me to combine them. Kaprow's 1960 seminal tire environment Yard and the 2000 pillow environment No Rules Except… created with Kaprow's son Bram Crane- Kaprow for LACMA Lab's Made in California: NOW exhibition, was reinvented as No Rules Except…YARD.

The installation includes 150 full sized canvas covered foam tires; over 30 mattresses, a climbing wall, sound element (designed by Bram Crane-Kaprow); two heavy bags, a climbing wall with rope (inspired by the work of Simone Forte ); flashing lights and mirrors.

To date the installation has had over 50,000 visitors."

[See also (Museum Mascot Project): http://www.kcet.org/arts/artbound/counties/los-angeles/nation-wide-museum-mascot-project.html ]
briandick  artists  sandiego  via:crisscorza  mascots  beds  bedmaking  ncm  monsters  art  lacmalab  allankaprow  mcasd  openstudioproject  lcproject 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Think Tank brings on the news
"The creative minds behind Think Tank include MCASD’s Robert Pincus, Jill Dawsey and Cris Scorza; Perry Vasquez, co-director of Southwestern College; and representatives of 20 of San Diego’s edgier arts organizations, including The Spot, Periscope Project and Double Break Gallery.

Think Tank had been working on a zine that explores these alternative art outlets when Laurie Mitchell from the city of San Diego’s Arts and Culture Commission reached out about a public art exhibit she’s helping organize called Art Boxed. The exhibit includes nine POD storage units that are being transformed by local artists into mini-galleries that will pop up throughout San Diego during Fall for the Arts month."
sandiego  art  thinktank  mcasd  robertpincus  jilldawsey  crisscorza  perryvasquez  thespot  periscopeproject  doublebreakgallery  lauriemitchell  publicart  artboxed  2012  galleries  glvo 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Margaret Noble
"I create experimental, interdisciplinary installations and performances. I use found and designed objects with time-based media to activate environments. My work is influenced by the power of sound and visual media to trigger human beings to physically move their bodies through gesture and dance. I push myself to create visceral moments; I work towards activating imaginations.

Underneath my art practices lies a series of narratives. These stories explore environments, societies and the problems of communication. My work plays with time travel as I move between historical myths and future fantasies. I use symbolic sound, image and text to uncover the manipulations of mankind upon nature, space and itself."

[See also:
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/mar/24/Museum-of-Contemporary-Art-San-Diego-Noble/
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/jun/16/MCASD-Noble/
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/jul/07/captured-soundscape-taps-the-pulse-of-a/
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/aug/11/San-Diego-Foundation-Margaret-Noble/ ]
margaretnoble  art  sandiego  interdisciplinary  installation  performance  narrative  sound  dance  mcasd 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Around the Counties: Mapping San Diego County Arts with Kinsee Morlan | San Diego | Artbound | KCET
"What makes San Diego County so attractive?

It's desert meets beaches. You can literally be out hiking in 100 degree temperatures, enjoy cacti and native scrub and later that day you'll be at the beach swimming in 60 degree water. I think that's unique to San Diego. San Diego is known as the "City of Villages." One complaint about San Diego is that there's no heart or soul of the city but really there's like 100 different little hearts and souls in San Diego. You've got South Park, Normal Heights, University Heights, Golden Hill. You'll definitely run into someone you know and it's like you're in a little town instead of this big ol' San Diego. I really like that about our city."

"Do you see any art trends in San Diego County?

• We've got these giant universities in San Diego. I think that's probably the biggest influence on our art scene here. UCSD is turning out these highly experimental conceptual artists. Point Loma Nazarene University (PLNU) also has this amazing art program and they're turning out some really interesting conceptual work. San Diego State University and Woodbury University, an architectural university, both are creating furniture designers. They make these pieces that I would categorize as art rather than design. So, in terms of trends we're seeing more experimental conceptual and then really high quality furniture art. We have a lot of active artists and it's hard to be a working and living artist but when you're in school you kind of have that time to dedicate to just doing your work.

• Tijuana, Mexico is right there so, I would say, you definitely see the Mexican influence on art in San Diego."
kinseemorlan  sandiego  art  tijuana  museums  galleries  vozalta  mcasd  sdsu  ucsd  quintgallery  thumbprintgallery  meyerfineart  jdcfineart  architecture  design  pointlomanazareneuniversity  periscopeproject  space4art 
march 2013 by robertogreco
James Enos talks about Clairemont on Vimeo
His informal presentation on the critique of Clairemont from Pecha Kucha on April 20th. The piece discussed in his rant is currently on show at MCASD in La Jolla's "Here Not There" opening.
1951  tracthomes  clairemont  jamesenos  informal  sandiego  architecture  herenotthere  mcasd  pechakucha  housing  alterations  art  design  vernacular  entitlement  dwellmagazine  dwell  clairemonterasure  suburbs  suburbia  parametricarchitecture  juxtaposition  realestate  commentary  tracthousing  criticalpractice  whatwewant  socal  buildingboom  southpark  humor 
june 2011 by robertogreco
UCSD by Design
"Beginning in fall of 2010 & continuing throughout UCSD's 50th anniversary year, the history & future development of UCSD's built environment will be explored & celebrated in UCSD by Design: Art, Architecture, & Urbanism in the Campus Context.

The UCSD Campus Guide by Dirk Sutro is latest addition to series of campus guides from Princeton Architectural Press…organized around 10 map-guided tours, & presents history of growth of campus & of its architectural landmarks…reveals stories behind architecture, landscapes, & sculptural works of UCSD’s contemporary built environment.

The centerpiece of UCSD by Design is a public lecture & moderated discussion series consisting of 5 events…At the moderated discussions, each keynote speaker will be joined, appropriate to the topic, by invited architects, architectural historians, landscape architects, art historians, Stuart Collection artists, urban planners, campus planners, and academics in related disciplines."

[See also: http://www.kpbs.org/news/2010/sep/22/mecca-modern-ucsd-art-and-architecture/ ]
sandiego  ucsd  mcasd  todo  togo  architecture  design  2010  lectures  campus  history  future  dirksutro  kurtforster  johnwalsh  robertstorr  jean-phillipevassal  gilleclément  charlesjencks  art  landscape 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Shepard Fairey, Street Art, And Viva la Revolución | KPBS.org
"The walls of San Diego have been known for Wyland's whales and Chicano murals. But as of this weekend, some of the world's most prolific street artists will be adding their work to our urban environment. It's all part of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego's new exhibit, "Viva la Revolución: A Dialogue with the Urban Landscape." We'll talk with the show's curator [Pedro Alonzo], along with Shepard Fairey, the artist behind the Obama Hope poster and Obey Giant, and French street artist, JR."
shepardfairey  vivalarevolución  mcasd  jr  streetart  sandiego  2010  graffiti 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Seeing the city through an artist's eyes - SignOnSanDiego.com
"But he believes that architects who look outside current models for both residential and commercial architecture can offer a communitarian alternative to profit-driven building.

One of his mentors in this respect is Teddy Cruz...Another was the late Petar Perisic, an architect who he worked for earlier in the decade and whose experimental downtown studio, the Periscope Project, endures. Enos is a partner in Periscope, as well as in Ens_Projects, which he and his wife Molly Enos, a practicing architect, manage.

“Clairemont Erasure,” like Enos’ other art projects, twists and morphs the urban landscape. Take “5 Points,” a construct in cardboard that consists of long strands of small, joined shapes, intertwining and separating as they rise and fall cross a large surface. It looks like an abstract work in relief, which it is. But it also a metaphor for the flow of human beings through the city."
teddycruz  sandiego  art  jamesenos  architecture  community  periscopeproject  peterperisic  urban  urbanism  cities  mcasd  design 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Museum of Contemporary Art: In the here and now - SignOnSanDiego.com
"This project was a kind of crash course for her in San Diego art & artists. “San Diego didn’t seem as exciting,” she says — sandwiched between Tijuana, a darling of theoreticians and journalists alike in recent years, & Los Angeles, in recent decades one of the international centers for contemporary art. The title of the show alludes to this cultural dynamic...

“When I first got here, I was stunned by San Diego, how beautiful it was,” says Sanroman, who grew up in Guadalajara & received both her bachelor’s degree in art and master’s degrees in art history from the University of Victoria in British Columbia. “It had the aura of a mirage to me.

“But there is a kind of vacuum in its identity that is filled by a focus on climate. So, the title of the show is interesting in relation to the idea of the disappearance of San Diego as a place. It has good schools for art and artists talk about wanting to live here, but it’s hard for anyone to clearly describe its identity as a place.”"
mcasd  sandiego  2010  luciasanroman  art  exhibits  togo  inthehereandnow  artists  place  identity  losangeles  tijuana  california 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Viva la Revolucion: A Dialogue with the Urban Landscape - Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego
"A multifaceted exhibition that explores the dialogue between artists and the urban landscape, Viva la Revolución: A Dialogue with the Urban Landscape features works both in the Museum’s galleries as well as at public sites throughout downtown San Diego.

The exhibition includes a diverse range of 20 artists from 8 countries that are linked together by how their work addresses urban issues -- Akay (Sweden), Banksy (U.K.), Blu (Italy), Mark Bradford (U.S.), William Cordova (U.S.), Date Farmers (U.S.), Stephan Doitschinoff [CALMA] (Brazil), Dr. Lakra (Mexico), Dzine (U.S.), David Ellis (U.S.), FAILE (U.S.), Shepard Fairey (U.S.), Invader (France), JR (France), Barry McGee (U.S.), Ryan McGinness (U.S.), Moris (Mexico), Os Gemeos (Brazil), Swoon (U.S.), and Vhils (Portugal)."
art  sandiego  lajolla  mcasd  togo  banksy  barrymcgee  datefarmers  blu  osgemeos  invader  swoon  urban  streetart 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Artists Announced For MCASD's Exhibit Showcasing Local Artists | KPBS.org
"The museum solicited submissions from local artists in the Fall of 2009 and received over 230 submissions. MCASD Associate Curator Lucía Sanromán also conducted studio visits and tapped into networks of local artists to flesh out the list.

In the end, Sanromán selected 43 artists and collectives to participate. Here's the list (note that Ricardo Dominguez, the UCSD professor whose art projects have become the subject of recent controversy is on the list):"
mcasd  ricardodominguez  art  local  sandiego  lajolla 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Ruben Ochoa: In a construction zone - latimes.com
"The machine -- a squat, metal box with several spool-shaped rollers on top -- is a rebar bender, and the only piece of major technology visible, save the laptop that's open on one of the tables. Most of the floor space is taken up by a piece called "three the hard way" -- three arcing metal poles on which are suspended rough chunks of seemingly uprooted concrete -- that's destined for the collection of the Miami Art Museum. In the lot behind the studio looms an immense piece made for a solo show opening at the San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art in March: 11 individual pallets suspended 10 to 16 feet off the ground on spindly, wavering rebar legs, like a throng of enormous, swaying spiders."
losangeles  sandiego  oceanside  art  mcasd  artists 
march 2010 by robertogreco
ULTRA BAROQUE: Aspects Of Post Latin American Art
"Foreword by Hugh M. Davies Written by exhibition curator Elizabeth Armstrong and Victor Zamudio-Taylor, with contributions by Miki Garcia, Serge Grunzinski, and Paulo Herkenhoff.
books  mcasd  latinamerica  art  ultrabaroque  glvo  tcsnmy 
september 2009 by robertogreco
TRANSACTIONS
"In a "post-Latin American" age, Latin American art has taken a postmodern tack, mindful of borders and identity politics but not determined by them. Many of the 42 artists featured here, including Francis Alÿs, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Daniel J. Martinez, Alfredo Jaar, Vik Muniz, Damián Ortega and Gabriel Orozco, infuse their work with social commentary from local and global perspectives, exploring and parodying cultural locations and identities even as they uphold and transgress them. All of them share an interest--beyond those borders--in revitalizing existing artistic language and forms."
art  latinamerica  glvo  books  postmodernism  borders  mexico  alfredojaar  francisalÿs  felixgonzalez-torres  danieljmartinez  vikmuniz  damiánortega  gabrielorozco  mcasd  tcsnmy 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Baja to Vancouver: The West Coast and Contemporary Art
"The artists in the exhibition are interested in popular forms and genres, from landscape and portraiture to vernacular signage and music videos. Their work thoughtfully reinterprets myths and reexamines histories related to West Coast cultures as diverse as the First Nations of British Columbia and the contemporary youth tribes of Los Angeles and San Francisco. The exhibition invokes patterns of immigration in the region as well as utopian visions of the "good life" and the unique topography of West Coast cities-part urban, part suburban and part wilderness. The art in B2V not only embodies a range of West Coast sensibilities, it also offers revealing portraits of the people and places on the western rim of North America and presents evidence of creative collaborations and shared aesthetic concerns among artists living and working in the region."
art  glvo  us  mexico  canada  westcoast  sandiego  vancouver  sanfrancisco  exhibitions  2004  northamerica  bajacalifornia  california  mcasd  seattle  cascadia 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Human/Nature: Artists Respond to a Changing Planet
"pioneering artist residency & collaborative exhibition project that, for the 1st time on this scale, uses contemporary art to investigate the changing nature of some of the most biodiverse regions on earth & the communities that inhabit those regions. Organized by UC Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA), Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, in partnership with international conservation organization Rare, Human/Nature sent eight of the world’s most thoughtful and innovative artists to eight UNESCO-designated World Heritage sites around the globe for two mini-residencies. Through harnessing the power of art, we hope to build global support for the protection of environmental biodiversity, & to create a new model promoting conservation worldwide. The project will address many themes, including: the relationship between the natural environment & human culture; assumptions about the value of preserving biological & cultural diversity; & global exploration & exchange."
art  environment  sustainability  activism  nature  artists  consumption  residencies  glvo  earth  exhibition  installation  mcasd  sandiego  conservation  contemporary  photography 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Automatic Cities: The Architectural Imaginary in Contemporary Art - Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego
"Automatic Cities: The Architectural Imaginary in Contemporary Art explores the myriad influences of architecture on contemporary art production. The architectural imaginary comprising images of sites and cities built and unbuilt, rising from collective experience and imagination.

The dynamic is mapped in an international context through the work of 13 individual artists (and one artists’ collective) hailing from around the globe: Michaël Borremans (Belgium), Matthew Buckingham (U.S.), Los Carpinteros (Cuba), Catharina van Eetvelde (France, born Belgium), Jakob Kolding (Germany, born Denmark), Julie Mehretu (U.S., born Ethiopia), Paul Noble (U.K.), Sarah Oppenheimer (U.S.), Matthew Ritchie (U.S., born U.K.), Hiraki Sawa (U.K., born Japan), Katrin Sigurdardottir (U.S. and Iceland, born Iceland), Rachel Whiteread (U.K.), and Saskia Olde Wolbers (U.K., born Netherlands)."
architecture  art  cities  imaginary  imagery  sandiego  exhibitions  mcasd  collectiveexperience  tcsnmy  imagination  unbuilt  togo 
august 2009 by robertogreco

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