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Anne Galloway 'Speculative Design and Glass Slaughterhouses' - This is HCD
"Andy: You’ve got quite an interesting background. I’m going to ask you about in a second. I wanted to start with the quote from Ursula Le Guin that you have on your website. It’s from the Lathe of Heaven. “We’re in the world, not against it. It doesn’t work to try and stand outside things and run them that way, it just doesn’t work. It goes against life. There is a way, but you have to follow it, the world is, no matter how we think it ought to be, you have to be with it, you have to let it be.

Then on the More Than Human website, you have these three questions. What if we refuse to uncouple nature and culture? What if we deny that human beings are exceptional? What if we stop speaking and listening only to ourselves? The More Than Human lab explores everyday entanglements of humans and non-humans and imagines more sustainable ways of thinking, making, and doing. Anne, let’s get started by first talking about what do you mean by all of that?

Anne: The Ursula Le Guin quote I love mostly because a critical perspective or an activist perspective, anything that says we ought to be changing the world in any way, it always assumes that we need to fix something, that the world is broken and that designers especially are well-suited to be able to solve some of these problems. I like thinking about what it means to respond to injustice by accepting it, not in the sense of believing that it’s okay or right, because clearly, it’s been identify as unjust. I love Le Guin’s attention to the fact that there is a way to be in the world.

As soon as we think that we’re outside of it, any choices or decisions or actions that we take are, well, they sit outside of it as well. I like being embedded in the trouble. I like Donna Haraway’s idea of staying with the trouble. It’s not that we have to accept that things are problematic, but rather that we have to work within the structures that already exist. Not to keep them that way, in fact, many should be dismantled or changed. Rather, to accept that there is a flow to the universe.

Of course, Le Guin was talking about Taoism, but here what I wanted to draw attention to is often our imperative to fix or to solve or to change things comes with a belief that we’re not part of the world that we’re trying to fix and change. It’s that that I want to highlight. That when we start asking difficult questions about the world, we can never remove ourselves from them. We’re complicit, we are on the receiving end of things. We’re never distant from it. I think that subtle but important shift in deciding how we approach our work is really important."



"Andy: Yes, okay. I was thinking about this, I was reading, in conjunction, this little Le Guin quote, I was trying to think, it’s unusual in the sense that it’s a discipline or a practice of design that uses its own practice to critique itself. It’s using design to critique design in many respects. A lot of what speculative design is talking about is, look what happens when we put stuff into the world, in some way, without much thought. I was trying to think if there was another discipline that does that. I think probably in the humanities there are, and certainly in sociology I think there probably is, where it uses its own discipline to critique itself. It’s a fairly unusual setup.

Anne: I would think actually it’s quite common in the humanities, perhaps the social sciences, where it’s not common is in the sciences. Any reflexive turn in any of the humanities would have used the discipline. Historiography is that sort of thing. Applied philosophy is that sort of thing. Reflexive anthropology is that sort of thing. I think it’s actually quite common, just not in the sciences, and design often tries to align itself with the sciences instead.

Andy: Yes, there was a great piece in the Aeon the other day, about how science doesn’t have an adequate description or explanation for consciousness. Yet, it’s the only thing it can be certain of. With that, it also doesn’t really seem to come up in the technology industry that much, because it’s so heavily aligned with science. Technology, and you’ve got this background in culture studies and science and technology and society, technology is a really strong vein throughout speculative design. Indeed, your work, right? Counting sheep is about the Internet of Things, and sheep. Do you want to tell us a little bit about that and why I am talking to you from the picture things to the Lord of the Rings, it basically looks like you’re living in part of the Shire in Middle Earth?

Anne: I do live in a place that looks remarkably like the Shire. It’s a bit disconcerting at times. The science and technology question in speculative design I think is first of all a matter of convenience. Science fiction, speculation, they lean historically, habitually towards science and tech. It becomes an easy target for critique. Not that it’s not necessary, but it’s right there, so why not? There’s that element to it. It has an easier ability to be transformed into something fanciful or terrifying, which allows for certain kinds of storytelling through speculation, that I think people, both creators and audiences or readers really enjoy.

Now, the irony of all of this, of course is that arguably one of the greatest concerns that people have would be tied to technological determinism, the idea that we’re going to have these technologies anyway, so what are we going to do about it? Now, when you speculate using these technologies, what you’re doing is actually reinforcing the idea that these technologies are coming, you play right into the same technological determinism that you’re trying to critique. In fact, one of the counting sheep scenarios was designed specifically to avoid the technology. It was the one that got the most positive responses."



"Andy: With all of this, and I may this pop at the beginning, just before we were recording, that there’s a sense of, because of everything going on in the world, that if only designers could run the world, everything would be fine, right, because we can see all of the solutions to everything. What would you want designers to get out of this kind of work or this kind of perspective?

Anne: Humility. That simple. I am one of those people. It’s because of being an ethnographer as well and doing participant observation and interviewing many people and their ideas about design. I’ve run into far more people who think that designers are arrogant than ones who don’t. This has always really interested me. What is it that designers do that seems to rub non-designers the wrong way? Part of it is this sense of, or implication that they know better than the rest of us, or that a designer will come in and say, “Let me fix your problem”, before even asking if there is a problem that the person wants fixed.

I actually gave a guest lecture in a class just the other day, where I suggested that there were people in the world who thought that designers were arrogant. One of the post-graduate students in the class really took umbrage at this and wanted to know why it was that designers were arrogant for offering to fix problems, but a builder wasn’t, or a doctor wasn’t.

Andy: What was your answer?

Anne: Well, my answer was, generally speaking, people go to them first and say, “I have this problem, I need help.” Whereas, designers come up with a problem, go find people that they think have it and then tell them they’d like to solve it. I think just on a social level, that is profoundly anti-social. That is not how people enjoy socially interacting with people.

Andy: I can completely see that and I think that I would say that argument has also levelled, quite rightly, a lot of Silicon Valley, which is the answer to everything is some kind of technology engineering startup to fix all the problems that all the other technology and engineering startups that are no longer startups have created. It’s probably true of quite a lot of areas of business and finance, as well, and politics, for that matter. The counter, I could imagine a designer saying, “Well, that’s not really true”, because one of the things as human-centred designers, the first thing we do, we go out, we do design ethnography, we go and speak to people, we go and observe, we go and do all of that stuff. We really understand their problems. We’re not just telling people what needs to be fixed. We’re going there and understanding things. What’s your response to that?

Anne: Well, my first response is, yes, that’s absolutely true. There are lots of very good designers in the world who do precisely that. Because I work in an academic institution though, I’m training students. What my job involves is getting the to the point where they know the difference between telling somebody something and asking somebody something. what it means to actually understand their client or their user. I prefer to just refer to them as people. What it is that people want or need. One of the things that I offer in all of my classes is, after doing the participant observation, my students always have the opportunity to submit a rationale for no design intervention whatsoever.

That’s not something that is offered to people in a lot of business contexts because there’s a business case that’s being made. Whereas, I want my students to understand that sometimes the research demonstrates that people are actually okay, and that even if they have little problems, they’re still okay with that, that people are quite okay with living with contradictions and that they will accept some issues because it allows for other things to emerge. That if they want, they can provide the evidence for saying, “Actually, the worst thing we could do in this scenario is design anything and I refuse to design.”

Andy: Right, that and the people made trade-offs all the time because of the pain of change is much … [more]
annegalloway  design  2019  speculativefiction  designethnography  morethanhuman  ursulaleguin  livestock  agriculture  farming  sheep  meat  morethanhumanlab  activism  criticaldesign  donnaharaway  stayingwiththetrouble  taoism  flow  change  changemaking  systemsthinking  complicity  catherinecaudwell  injustice  justice  dunneandraby  consciousness  science  technology  society  speculation  speculativedesign  questioning  fiction  future  criticalthinking  whatif  anthropology  humanities  reflexiveanthropology  newzealand  socialsciences  davidgrape  powersoften  animals  cows  genevievebell  markpesce  technologicaldeterminism  dogs  cats  ethnography  cooperation  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  slow  slowness  time  perception  psychology  humility  problemsolving  contentment  presence  peacefulness  workaholism  northamerica  europe  studsterkel  protestantworkethic  labor  capitalism  passion  pets  domestication 
june 2019 by robertogreco
401(k)s, abortion, youth football: 15 things we do now that will be considered unthinkable in 50 years - Vox
[via: https://kottke.org/19/04/what-do-we-do-now-that-will-be-unthinkable-in-50-years ]

"Youth tackle football
Bosses
Eating meat
Conspicuous consumption
The drug war
The way we die
Banning sex work
401(k)s
Ending the draft
Facebook and Google
Abortion
Self-driving cars
Our obsession with rationality
Abandoning public education
The idea of a “wrong side of history”



"Some 50 years ago, in 1964, 42 percent of Americans smoked cigarettes. Smoking in bars and offices was normal and cigarettes were given to soldiers as part of military rations. Half of American physicians smoked. Ads for cigarettes bombarded the American public. That year, the surgeon general released a report outlining the health risks of smoking. Two years later, only 40 percent of Americans said that they believed smoking was a major cause of cancer.

Today, we know that smoking is bad for our health. We’ve banned smoking in most indoor public spaces. We stopped allowing tobacco companies to advertise and forced them to put warning labels on cigarette boxes. By 2001, 71 percent of the country said they recognized smoking was a major cause of cancer, and by 2017, the rate of smokers dropped to 14 percent. The habit is now looked at as a relic of the past, something we’ve come to accept as unquestionably harmful.

When we think about what common habits, social norms, or laws that are widely considered unthinkable in today’s world, a variety of past atrocities come to mind. We could point to bloodletting, Jim Crow-era segregation, and drinking and driving as being on the “wrong side” of history.

But what modern practices will we one day think of as barbaric? It’s a framework invoked frequently in political or scientific beliefs: Actor Harrison Ford recently said leaders who deny climate change are on the “wrong side of history.” President Barack Obama said Russia’s military intervention in Ukraine was on the “wrong side of history.” Filmmaker Spike Lee said that President Donald Trump himself is on the “wrong side of history.”

So what, by 2070 — some 50 years in the future — will join this group? We asked 15 thinkers, writers, and advocates to take their best guess.

Bioethicist Peter Singer says people will stop the habit of conspicuous consumption. “The ostentatious display of wealth, in a world that still has many people in need, is not in good taste. Within 50 years, we’ll wonder how people did not see that,” he writes.

Historian Jennifer Mittelstadt predicts that our volunteer army will be widely considered a mistake: “Fifty years from now Americans will observe with shock the damage to both foreign policy and domestic institutions wrought by our acceptance of an increasingly privatized, socially isolated, and politically powerful US military.”

For philosopher Jacob T. Levy, the very idea of there being a “wrong side of history” is wrong itself.

Other answers range from kids playing tackle football to expecting workers to invest in 401(k)s."
us  future  obsolescence  barbarity  draft  cars  self-drivingcars  retirement  saving  drugwar  football  americanfootball  conspicuousconsumption  capitalism  consumption  rationality  scientism  publiceducations  publicschools  schools  schooling  education  facebook  google  abortion  war  military  sexwork  death  dying  meat  food  howwelive  predictions  history  petersinger  kristatippett  jaboblevy  jennifermittelstadt  haiderwarraich  kathleenfrydl  meredithbroussard  chrisnowinski  adiaharveywingfield  bhaskarsunkara  horizontality  hierarchy  inequality  jacobhacker  economics  society  transportation 
april 2019 by robertogreco
Greening your grocery cart - UCLA IoES
"So if you drink instant coffee, eat chicken instead of beef, favor wild-caught salmon, avoid frozen meals, eat whole wheat bread, avoid bottled water, drink beer in cans instead of bottles, opt for soy milk, indulge in dark chocolate instead of milk chocolate, dry your hands with reusable towels and bring a reusable bag to the store, you have matched a pretty sizeable woodlot of 70 trees. And these are but a handful of the choices you make at the grocery store.

If ten million people—again, a little over three percent of the U.S. population—made those same climate-smart choices, it would be the equivalent of half a billion trees. Clearly, small decisions add up.

Unfortunately, grocery choices are not labeled with “CO2 equivalents” in the same way they are all labeled with calories. Without drastically changing your lifestyle, imagine how much you could do for climate if emissions information were routinely associated with the products we buy?"
food  emissions  climatechange  classideas  meat  dairy  coffee  chocolate  cans  bottles  beer  bags 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Francis Mallmann on the Art of Steak | NOWNESS
"Francis Mallmann: Carne Knowledge
The art of steak from the Argentinian super chef

In Argentina, meat is a matter of national pride. On average, each Argentinian eats 63kg of meat a year. And they do not only eat it, they celebrate it. Its production, consumption and export is the subject of serious national debates, pitched at the same level as reports on the GDP growth or the continuous disputes between Kirchnerist and Anti-Kirchnerist political factions. The preciseness of the statistics means people treat the meat industry with the same passion other nations would accord to sports.

“Mallmann insists that the macho and testosterone veneer that covers meat culture is a misconception”

Here, renowned chef and TV personality Francis Mallmann explains the importance of honoring the dead animal, by cutting and cooking its meat appropriately. “Killing an animal is killing an animal, even if you cover it with velvet,” he says. Once slaughtered, it should hang for approximately two weeks at 2°C. The butcher may divide it in two, so that it breathes more air. Cutting it is an art of surgical precision: if muscles get harmed, the meat will lose precious juices during the cooking process.

Mallmann insists that the macho and testosterone veneer that covers meat culture is a misconception. He sees cooking meat as a fragile, tender and feminine act. After all, within this apparent brutality, there is indeed room for a poetic vision of marble in the fatty veins of the beast."
francismallmann  meat  cooking  argentina  beef  video  2015  kayhanozmen 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Dario Cecchini: "Carne e Spirito" on Vimeo
"Descended from a long-line of Italian butchers, Dario Cecchini runs a butchery, Antica Macelleria Cecchini, alongside three restaurants all in the small town of Panzano, Chianti. In this presentation from MAD3, Cecchini guts a pig and discusses the importance of craft, of love and of respecting the animals we consume."

[More here: http://madfeed.co/post/61405594604 ]
video  dariocecchini  meat  food  butchers  tradition  respect  animals  pigs  edg  craft  love 
january 2014 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Spacesuit: An Interview with Nicholas de Monchaux
"I was looking for a way to discuss the essential lessons of complexity and emergence—which, even in 2003, were pretty unfamiliar words in the context of design—and I hit upon this research on the spacesuit as the one thing I’d done that could encapsulate the potential lessons of those ideas, both for scientists and for designers. The book really was a melding of these two things."

"But then the actual spacesuit—this 21-layered messy assemblage made by a bra company, using hand-stitched couture techniques—is kind of an anti-hero. It’s much more embarrassing, of course—it’s made by people who make women’s underwear—but, then, it’s also much more urbane. It’s a complex, multilayered assemblage that actually recapitulates the messy logic of our own bodies, rather than present us with the singular ideal of a cyborg or the hard, one-piece, military-industrial suits against which the Playtex suit was always competing.

The spacesuit, in the end, is an object that crystallizes a lot of ideas about who we are and what the nature of the human body may be—but, then, crucially, it’s also an object in which many centuries of ideas about the relationship of our bodies to technology are reflected."

"The same individuals and organizations who were presuming to engineer the internal climate of the body and create the figure of the cyborg were the same institutions who, in the same context of the 1960s, were proposing major efforts in climate-modification.

Embedded in both of those ideas is the notion that we can reduce a complex, emergent system—whether it’s the body or the planet or something closer to the scale of the city—to a series of cybernetically inflected inputs, outputs, and controls. As Edward Teller remarked in the context of his own climate-engineering proposals, “to give the earth a thermostat.”"

"most attempts to cybernetically optimize urban systems were spectacular failures, from which very few lessons seem to have been learned"

"architecture can be informed by technology and, at the same time, avoid what I view as the dead-end of an algorithmically inflected formalism from which many of the, to my mind, less convincing examples of contemporary practice have emerged"

"connections…between the early writing of Jane Jacobs…and the early research done in the 1950s and 60s on complexity and emergence under the aegis of the Rockefeller Foundation"

"Geoffrey West and Luis Bettencourt—who have gone a long way in showing that, not only should cities be viewed through the analogical lens of complex natural systems, but, in fact, some of the mathematics—in particular, to do with scaling laws, the consumption of resources, and the production of innovation by cities—proves itself far more susceptible to analyses that have come out of biology than, say, conventional economics."
militaryindustrialcomplex  tools  cad  gis  luisbettencourt  janejacobs  meatropolis  manhattan  meat  property  fakestates  alancolquhoun  lizdiller  cyberneticurbanism  glenswanson  parametricarchitecture  parametricurbanism  interstitialspaces  urbanism  urban  bernardshriever  simonramo  neilsheehan  jayforrester  housing  hud  huberthumphrey  vitruvius  naca  smartcities  nyc  joeflood  husseinchalayan  cushicle  michaelwebb  spacerace  buildings  scuba  diving  1960s  fantasticvoyage  adromedastrain  quarantine  systemsthinking  matta-clark  edwardteller  climatecontrol  earth  exploration  spacetravel  terraforming  humanbody  bodies  cyborgs  travel  mongolfier  wileypost  management  planning  robertmoses  cybernetics  materials  fabric  2003  stewartbrand  jamescrick  apollo  complexitytheory  complexity  studioone  geoffreywest  cities  research  clothing  glvo  wearables  christiandior  playtex  interviews  technology  history  design  science  fashion  nasa  books  spacesuits  architecture  space  bldgblog  geoffmanaugh  2012  nicholasdemonchaux  wearable  elizabethdiller  interstitial  bod 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Côte de bœuf - Principia Gastronomica
"But where do you turn when you want something more than a sirloin but less than a full-on standing rib roast? Something that’s marbled with delicious fat but doesn’t have to be cooked for hours? Something that can be served as easily for a fast mid-week dinner as it could for a lavish dinner party?<br />
<br />
You turn to the côte de bœuf.<br />
<br />
A côte de bœuf (also known as a cowboy steak) is basically a thick, bone-in rib steak. I’ve become obsessed with the côte de bœuf; no other piece of beef seems to cut it anymore. I dream about it, my mouth waters just thinking about it."<br />
<br />
[If there were only on cut of beef, this is the one I'd want.]
ribeye  meat  beef  food  edg  srg  glvo  cv 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Koopa, It’s What’s For Supper « Jude Buffum
"For the upcoming show Pixel Pushers, sponsored by SCION and curated by Giant Robot, I decided to explore the carnivorous side of the world of video games. Though I myself eat meat, enough of my friends and loved ones are now vegetarians or vegans, so it’s something I’ve been experimenting with. I suppose these pieces are a by-product of that exploration. That, and my long-time obsession with meat diagrams."
edg  nintendo  supermario  judebuffum  giantrobot  meat  humaor  illustration  glvo  videogames 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Chris Moss on Psychoanalysing Argentina | FiveBooks
"all about Buenos Aires & feature duals, mythical figures, places w/ patios & grilled windows, & are full of a sense of his native Palermo. He sets ‘The Gospel According to St Mark’ out in the province, another region he loved to imagine. Borges’s fiction amounts to a metaphorical universe & he evokes a place I dream of visiting when I’m homesick for BA…Infinity beguiled him & the metaphor of the labyrinth expresses that. Of course, that comes from Greek classical literature but I think it might also be a simple way of articulating the grid-like layout of Buenos Aires, a city surrounded by the infinity of the Pampas, an urban labyrinth. He doesn’t write strictly topographically about BA but distils it into a metaphoric landscape."

"You have to remember that Argentina is one of the biggest meatpacking nations in the world & the sense of that goes beyond cows to the humans too. It’s a carnal nation with a history based on slaughter – that’s why the theme is so important."
argentina  chrismoss  borges  estebanecheverría  marianoplotkin  robertfarristhompson  tango  exequielmartínezestrada  history  culture  psychology  psychoanalysis  meat  palermo  violence  cities  buenosaires  fiction  music  nonfiction  elmatadero  literature  labyrinths  classics  urban  urbanism  landscapes 
august 2010 by robertogreco
this is meatpaper
"Meatpaper is a print magazine of art and ideas about meat. We like metaphors more than marinating tips. We are your journal of meat culture."
meat  food  edg  glvo  cooking  beef  animals  art  writing 
august 2010 by robertogreco
stephanie casper: knitted meat [for Enzo]
"stephanie casper, an advertising and design student at pratt institute in new york city, has created a series of knitted meat products. ranging from sausage links to rotisserie chicken, each handmade object is packaged supermarket-style with a styrofoam base and transparent wrap."
knitting  meat  glvo  edg  stephaniecasper 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Backyard Bunnies Are the New Urban Chickens - GOOD Blog - GOOD
"Why rabbit is the most sustainable meat for the city farmer. (Plus: How to cook it, and how to raise your own.)"
animals  cooking  meat  rabbits  urbanfarming  sustainability  locavore  local  food  recipes  via:javierarbona 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Knight Salumi Company- Fine Artisan Meats
"Here at Knight Salumi Co. we are a small group of people who care about what we eat, and want to produce something that is pure and natural. By moving back to basics and with a little micro-biology we have discovered a way to make delicious chemical free cured meats. We are USDA inspected and do not add nitrates or nitrites to our products via: chemical additives, vegetable extracts, powders, or juices."

[see also: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/672107 ]
food  salami  edg  sandiego  local  meat 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Kogi | Korean BBQ-To-Go
"We take the taste of Korean BBQ and fuse it with select spices to create some of the most unique and savory bites in LA. We’re always on the go, which means we’ll be updating our new locations soon and you can always find us live on Twitter. Fusing the taste of Korean BBQ and the portability of tacos and burritos together doesn’t magically happen. In case you were wondering, here are the people who make all of this possible."
food  restaurants  losangeles  korean  california  meat  tacotruck 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Are Argentina's Cows Happy Eating Grain? - WSJ.com
"Argentina's fame as a home for happy cows wandering the lush pastures of the Pampas is being challenged as an increasing number of cattle are being crowded into feedlots for the last months of their lives before being served at the table." ... ""There is no turning back -- more than 50%, and likely 70% or 80%, of Argentina's cattle are going to be finished in feed lots within the next five years," the president of the Argentine Feedlot Chamber Juan Carlos Eiras told local daily La Voz del Interior."
argentina  meat  food  beef  cows 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Información Buenos aires Argentina Gastronomia [worth a look if you can get past the eye burning web design]
"Uno de los mejores resultados de toda esta mezcla étnica, es que paseando por la Reina del Plata, se puede encontrar en el rubro gastronómico con lo autóctono: una parrilla-restaurante que le sirven unos "asados" con las excelentes carnes argentinas acompañadas de su impresionante parrillada criolla o unas empanadas criollas y también un calórico " locro". También restaurantes árabes, las mejores pastas italianas, una paella a la valenciana espectacular, por citar sólo algunos ejemplos. Que indudablemente reflejan a las multitudinarias culturas y costumbres."
food  argentina  buenosaires  meat  asado  recipes  gastronomy 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Do food miles matter? | ES&T Online News
"The benefits of eating locally grown food may not extend to curbing global warming, according to a comprehensive study of greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. food." via: http://www.marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2008/06/the-carbon-foot.html
food  environment  energy  globalwarming  locavore  footprint  global  diet  emissions  sustainability  local  green  meat  nutrition  transport  transportation 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Butchering the pig - a set on Flickr
"On Tuesday I went to a butchering demo at Brooklyn Kitchen in, uh, Brooklyn, led by the butcher for Diner, Marlow and Sons, and the two Bonita restaurants. He led us through carving up half a pig, and we all got to take meat home at the end."
via:kottke  food  meat  pork  glvo  photography  process 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Cómo cambió la cara el Mercado de Liniers, tras 20 días de paro | LANACION.com
"El predio de 34 hectáreas del barrio de Mataderos está completamente inactivo desde hace 9 días; se dejaron de comercializar animales por unos 99 millones de pesos"
argentina  crisis  food  meat  markets  paro  buenosaires  politics 
april 2008 by robertogreco
SPAM/MAPS: Oceania
"maps made of Spam luncheon meat. Spam used as ration by the US Armed Forces during WWII...spread through Pacific Island nations...diasporic nature is symbolic of America’s ongoing influence...S-P-A-M is M-A-P-S in reverse."
maps  meat  mapping  art  food  us  geopolitics  history 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Argentina On Two Steaks A Day
"When the meat is cooked, it is roasted in thick pieces over open coals by obsessive meat chefs who have been cooking meat all their lives, for other people who have been eating meat all their lives, in a country that takes its meat extremely seriously. Y
argentina  food  travel  maciejceglowski  icecream  beef  meat  wine  maciejcegłowski 
april 2006 by robertogreco

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