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robertogreco : medicaid   7

A Decade of Liberal Delusion and Failure | The New Republic
"The Democrats’ fecklessness, in other words, did not flourish in a partisan vacuum. It has been, at every juncture, inspired and influenced by the complete failure of the right to self-police. The American right, like the housing market and the banks and the hedge funds and the health insurers and providers, simply could not be induced to check its basest instincts in the face of an opponent that staked its entire political credibility on the promise that it could make Republicans fall in line with realigned incentives or One Weird Trick. If liberals want to get the next decade right, after the previous one in which we repeatedly failed to save the world while telling ourselves we were doing so, we will need to stop nudging and begin fighting."
2019  liberalism  barackobama  hillaryclinton  donaldtrump  technocrats  alexpareene  policy  government  us  afghanistan  jonmeacham  economics  inequality  socialism  greatrecession  noamscheiber  franklinfoer  georgewbush  johnjudis  2009  newdeal  fdr  austangoolsbee  timothygeithner  affordablecareact  obamacare  healthcare  medicaid  democrats  republicans  suzannemettler  governance  medicare  socialsecurity  ashleyford  glennbeck  tuckercarlson  seanhannity  howardkurtz  michellegoldberg  alexjones  michellemalkin  ronpaul 
12 days ago by robertogreco
Getting poorer while working harder: The 'cliff effect'
"
Because so many American jobs don’t earn enough to pay for food, housing and other basic needs, many low-wage workers rely on public benefits that are only available to people in need, such as housing vouchers and Medicaid, to pay their bills.

Earning a little more money may not automatically increase their standard of living if it boosts their income to the point where they lose access to some or all of those benefits. That’s because the value of those lost benefits may outweigh their income gains.

I have researched this dynamic, which experts often call the “cliff effect,” for years to learn why workers weren’t succeeding at retaining their jobs following job training programs. Chief among the one step forward, two steps back problems the cliff effect causes: Low-paid workers can become reluctant to earn more money due to a fear that they will get worse off instead of better."
poverty  povertytrap  cliffeffect  medicaid  housing  inequality  foodstamps  section8 
june 2019 by robertogreco
OHCHR | Statement on Visit to the USA, by Professor Philip Alston, United Nations Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights*
[See also:

"A journey through a land of extreme poverty: welcome to America"
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/15/america-extreme-poverty-un-special-rapporteur

"Extreme poverty in America: read the UN special monitor's report"
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/dec/15/extreme-poverty-america-un-special-monitor-report

"Trump turning US into 'world champion of extreme inequality', UN envoy warns"
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/dec/15/america-un-extreme-poverty-trump-republicans ]

[Thread by Allen Tan:
https://twitter.com/tealtan/status/942934883244171264

"if a progressive party wanted to build a platform for 2020, it could just copy paste this

if a newsroom wanted to cover US poverty in a systematic and rigorous way, here is the blueprint

this is how you make a case for a social safety net when you don't assume that everyone is already on board with you ideologically

1) human rights
“the US is alone among developed countries in insisting that while human rights are of fundamental importance, they do not include rights that guard against dying of hunger, dying from lack of access to affordable healthcare, or growing up in…total deprivation.”

2) debunking myth of poor people as lazy or scammers
“poor people I met from among the 40 million living in poverty were overwhelmingly either persons who had been born into poverty, or those who had been thrust there by circumstances largely beyond their control such as…”

“…physical or mental disabilities, divorce, family breakdown, illness, old age, unlivable wages, or discrimination in the job market.”

3) disenfranchisement in a democratic society (just gonna screengrab this one)

4) children
“In 2016, 18% of children – some 13.3 million – were living in poverty, with children comprising 32.6% of all people in poverty.”

etc, etc, etc

stay for the extended section on homelessness and its criminalization

re: drugs testing [screen capture]

treating taxation as a dirty word and third rail means the state must raise money on the backs of the poor [screen capture]

Ok one last thing and then I’m done:
notice how you can talk about poverty and not make it just about white people, weird"]
philipalston  us  poverty  un  himanrights  policy  politics  inequality  2017  donaldtrump  mississippi  alabama  california  puertorico  housing  georgia  exceptionalism  democracy  employment  work  socialsafetynet  society  incarceration  warondrugs  criminalization  children  health  healthcare  dentalcare  disability  race  racism  fraud  privatization  government  governance  environment  sustainability  taxes  taxreform  welfare  hunger  food  medicare  medicaid  chip  civilsociety  allentan  journalism  homeless  homelessness 
december 2017 by robertogreco
Is Obamacare failing? - Vox
"Obamacare’s drafters didn’t envision the marketplaces looking so much like a Medicaid program. But is it a bad thing if that's how the exchanges ultimately shake out?

The answer likely depends on what you think is most important in creating universal coverage — and what metrics we use to judge whether the Affordable Care Act is working.

Obamacare’s marketplaces aimed to prioritize choice and a shopping experience as an important good to deliver to consumers. Legislators saw inherent value in letting consumers pick the plan that was right for them.

Consumers seemed to value the shopping experience too: Between 2015 and 2016, only one-third of marketplace enrollees kept the same plan. People who bought Obamacare coverage really did seem to shop for coverage that fit their needs.

If the marketplaces become more like Medicaid, that’s the type of experience that gets lost. The promise Medicaid makes isn’t one about choice. Medicaid enrollees get little say in what hospitals they can visit or which doctors will take them. It's much more of a one-size-fits-all program.

Medicaid doesn’t guarantee options, but it does promise coverage. It doesn’t provide access to all doctors, but it provides access to a doctor who, without the program, might be out of reach. When I’ve talked to people who have enrolled on both, some prefer the latter.

Earlier this year I spoke with Kaylynn Maxfield, who recently moved from Utah to Pennsylvania with her husband and young son. Maxfield generally found signing up for Medicaid a better experience than enrolling in the marketplace.

"With the marketplace, you have so many options that it's overwhelming, like which one do I choose, and how do I make sure I choose the right one," she says. "With Medicaid there are three options, and you know they’re all offering the same level of coverage. It was so much simpler."

For Maxfield, choice didn’t really matter that much. What she wanted was the ease of mind that comes with health coverage — and for her, Medicaid offered a better experience by that metric.

There are millions of shoppers who buy coverage who have different priorities when it comes to what they want from the marketplaces. There are those, like Maxfield, who just want a guarantee of coverage and find shopping a hassle. But there are many others who did shop, and took advantage of the choices the marketplaces offered. These are the losers of a Medicaid-style marketplace, as the law shifts from what drafters envisioned to what health insurers are actually willing to build."
healthcare  us  policy  obamacare  2016  insuarnce  healthinsurance  politics  switzerland  netherlands  medicaid 
september 2016 by robertogreco
Databite No. 62: Sha Hwang - YouTube
"Sha Hwang (@shashashasha) on building for the government in a time of precarity: Sha will discuss the ongoing work and discussions inside Nava as a way to open a conversation around the design of the government’s digital services for the public. He will use the architectural theorist Keller Easterling’s term “disposition” – the propensity of forms to produce actions – to understand what we encounter when we build with and for the government. These dispositions, both of the tech industry and the government, create a set of material constraints that shape issues around healthcare, taxation, and identity. This talk will discuss both the possibilities and implications of designing for the government, and the necessity of dialogue between research and practice. Nava is a public benefit corporation working to improve digital services at public-facing government agencies. It was formed out of the efforts to fix HealthCare.gov in late 2013, where Nava worked with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to streamline and redesign systems. Together they cut the time people take to submit an application in half and built an identity management backend system that has saved tens of millions of dollars in operating costs."
shahwang  nava  towatch  precarity  kellereasterling  2016  healthcare  government  taxation  identity  digitalservices  medicare  medicaid  healthcare.gov 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Does health coverage make people healthier? A new study provides a compelling answer to the vexing question underlying the health care debate. - By Ray Fisman - Slate Magazine
"There are limits to what you can extrapolate from one, single-year study of 10,000 Medicaid recipients in Oregon to health care reform more generally. If millions of poor Americans were enrolled in Medicaid tomorrow, it might overwhelm the system's capacity. And while the program might have longer-term effects not seen in a 1-year study, as preventive care starts to have an impact, it's also possible that the benefits of Medicaid may lessen with time…We'll have more information on these long-term effects as researchers survey participants in the Oregon Medicaid lottery in future years. They're also collecting data on physiological measures like cholesterol levels and blood pressure to measure more objectively participants' well-being.<br />
<br />
For now, though, the study represents the best evidence we've got. & based on its findings, Medicaid seems like a very cheap way of making Americans better off, and the goals of the Affordable Care Act well worth fighting to put into practice."
health  healthcare  medicaid  us  policy  stress  well-being  oregon  2011  research  medicine  healthinsurance 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Borderland › Rothstein on Accountability in Schools
"Approximately 30 well-spent minutes with Richard Rothstein, who patiently spells out what is happening as a consequence of using narrow measures of accountability for schools vs. what really needs to happen."
richardrothstein  policy  accountability  measurement  teaching  learning  schools  us  2010  obesity  children  afterschoolprograms  fitness  poverty  standardizedtesting  extendeddayprograms  health  achievementgap  dougnoon  math  mathematics  reading  crisis  achievement  media  politics  fear  education  ideology  medicaid  parenting  earlychildhood  teacherquality  economics  unemployment  race  wealth  language 
december 2010 by robertogreco

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