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robertogreco : melbourne   10

TOUCH MELBOURNE by Andrew Gleeson, haraiva
"Explore the city of Melbourne through its various, tiny everyday interactions."
melbourne  art  games  gaming  videogames  everyday  andrewgleeson  cecilerichard  illustration  toplay 
march 2019 by robertogreco
Innovative Learning Environments & Teacher Change
"The Innovative Learning Environments and Teacher Change (ILETC) project is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Project funded for 4 years from 2016-2019. It brings together the expertise of leading researchers in education and learning environments and partner organisations in education and learning environment design and technology.

The project will be lead by Associate Professor Wesley Imms, who heads a cross disciplinary team of researchers from the Melbourne Graduate School of Education and the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning at The University of Melbourne. The project is affiliated with the Learning Environments and Applied Research Network (LEaRN)."
via:cervus  australia  learning  schooldesign  melbourne  education  teaching  architecture 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Baugruppen model ditches developers so that apartment buyers save
"Baugruppen. It might sound like a mouthful but this German word could be the answer to Australia’s housing affordability woes — or at least a new way to look at the problem.

If you can’t afford a freestanding house in Australia’s capital cities, the choices for an apartment alternative are generally expensive and limited. Many of the units available are targeted to investors and are often said to be of poor quality.

Literally translating to “building group”, baugruppen in effect cuts out developers from developments. The idea is that a group of interested purchasers come together and collectively fund their own multi-unit housing project. They are often helped or led through the process by architects, and they get a say in what their resulting homes look like. Generally, these homes have a focus on quality, sustainability and shared community facilities.

“At the moment, middle to modest income earners cannot buy a decent apartment because all the stock that’s produced is generally for investors,” says RMIT housing lecturer Andrea Sharam. “But there’s now a lot of interest in different models, particularly from younger people.”

Her research has shown that apartment buyers can save up to 30 per cent through such “deliberative development” (the opposite of speculative development).

The model that took off in Germany (predominantly in Berlin) has made its way to Australia, with a handful of baugruppen-esque projects popping up throughout the country.

Two recent examples have come out of Western Australia. One is a co-housing project that was launched by the council in Fremantle, the other is an innovative collaboration between the WA government’s land development agency, LandCorp, and the University of Western Australia. Located in White Gum Valley near Fremantle, that project is targeting a 15 per cent saving for buyers.

It’s basically like paying wholesale prices on homes, rather than the marked-up retail price.

“[A group] is fundamentally assisted to become their own developer, and in doing that they save themselves the developer’s margin and the marketing costs,” says project leader Geoffrey London, Professor of Architecture at UWA.

Mr London, who was also the former Victorian government architect, says the main aims of the project are to provide more affordable higher density options, provide more sustainable unit designs, establish a community, explore shared amenities and improve the diversity and quality of designs available.

There are a few things holding the model back from taking off completely in Australia, according to Dr Sharam. One of those is the significant financing barriers, especially the high level of equity required to obtain debt financing from the banks.

Dr Sharam says this will require a whole shift in thinking from conventional development lending, understanding that buyers in baugruppen projects are not at the same risk of settlement defaults.

“It’s a whole different ball game,” she says. “Even if one buyer falls out for some reason, say they go through a divorce and can’t go through with the purchase, then you have a waiting list; a group of people waiting in the wings to come in.”

That has been true of popular baugruppen-style developments in Melbourne, such as the Nightingale series, where a waiting list was more than 800 strong.

“One of the other really big things holding us back is that prospective purchasers are failing to understand it’s up to them to initiate it,” she said.

Gerard Coutts, a project management consultant with an interest in bringing baugruppen to Australia, is on a tour of Europe studying co-housing models. He says there’s much Australia can learn from them.

“I think there is a compelling movement [towards baugruppen models] as land supply dwindles and people are pushed outwards,” Mr Coutts says. “Older people, who wish to stay in areas familiar to them, this may be the type of solution to that assists.”"
housing  germany  2017  baugruppen  community  parking  cars  development  apartments  sustainability  melbourne  commons  transportation  australia 
june 2017 by robertogreco
This is What Happened When an Australian City Gave Trees Email Addresses | Smart News | Smithsonian
"Trees get fan mail and even write back to Melburnian residents"

"They provide shade, air to breathe, and an undeniable sense of grandeur. But would you ever write a letter to the tree? Officials in Melbourne, Australia have discovered that for many, the answer is a resounding yes — The Guardian’s Oliver Milman reports that when they rolled out a program that assigned email addresses to trees in a bid to help identify damage and issues, they discovered that city residents preferred to write them love letters instead.

The city is calling it “an unintended but positive consequence” of their attempt to help citizens track tree damage. On their urban forest data site, Melbourne assigned ID numbers and email addresses to each of the city’s trees so it would be easier to catch and rehabilitate damaged trees.

Then the emails began to arrive. Milman writes that instead of damage reports, people began to write fan mail to trees, complimenting their looks and leaves and telling tales of how they’d helped them survive during inclement weather. Some trees even write back.

The effort is part of a larger initiative to protect Melbourne’s 70,000 city-owned trees from drought and decline. But it turns out that Melburnians have always been arboreal enthusiasts: the city council notes that in the 1880s, residents wrote begging for the planting of blue gum eucalyptus trees to “absorb bad gasses” emanating from a nearby manure depot."

[See also: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/07/when-you-give-a-tree-an-email-address/398210/ ]
australia  trees  internetofthings  email  2015  melbourne  plants  multispecies  iot 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Trees Returning Emails | Urban Forest Strategy - Broadsheet Melbourne - Broadsheet
"Did you know that you can email every single tree in the City of Melbourne – and they’ll write back?

Right now, you can log onto the City of Melbourne’s Urban Forest Visual map and email any tree you’d like within the council’s boundaries.

Yep, all 60,000 of them.

Each tree has a unique ID number and, theoretically speaking, each tree will get back to you. But don’t picture an elm sitting down in a special tree-friendly computer cafe – it’ll be council staff answering your messages (so behave, now).

“Some said we were wasting money, but the trees were always going to have individual ID numbers anyway. So it was only logical we’d assign the ID numbers to an email which connects these trees to the community,” says Melbourne city councillor, Arron Wood.

So far the messages have ranged from piss takes to genuine expressions of devotion. So, if you’ve ever used a tree to prop yourself up with on a night out, the world’s most liveable city is now giving you the chance to apologise the morning after.

The idea came about through the council’s Urban Forest Strategy, which was launched in 2007. It wants to make Melbourne a city within a forest. But converting this plan into action won’t be measured by a few emails. That’s just a way to get the public on board.

Melbourne is currently in the midst of a change that will affect most of the city’s streets, parks, and gardens. Emailing our trees is one way the council is trying to communicate this fundamental shift to all Melburnians."

[See also: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jan/29/city-of-melbourne-prepares-to-see-some-emails-lovely-as-its-trees ]
trees  melbourne  internetofthings  iot  data  cities  environment  plants  natue  email 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Mixtapes - Domus
[via http://danielperlin.net/?p=243 quoted here]

"I have been curating a series of mixtapes called Sound of the City for Domus Magazine. First online, it is now part of the print version as well.

The series is based on a simple principle. Pick a city. Pair a writer, designer or artist from that city with a dj or band from that city. Make a mixtape. All legal, all local, the task of meta curating is mine, and the fun parts come after you stick people together who might not normally hang out or work with each other. Cities featured so far have been Melbourne’s Architecture in Helsinki, New York’s dj /rupture and Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, Buenos Aires’ Leandro Erlich and ZZK records, Mexico City’s Daniel Hernandez with some help from Toy Selectah and DJ N-RON."
danielperlin  df  mexicodf  mexico  nyc  harlem  buenosaires  beijing  telaviv  lasvegas  moscow  johannesburg  london  milan  melbourne  cities  mixtapes  domus  mexicocity 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Art for kids in the heart of the city - playDUcation
"The Ark in Dublin was the world's first children's art centre. The City of Melbourne embraced the idea of creating a similar centre and ArtPlay was born: It resides in a big loft in the heart of the city, on the bank of Yarra River and right next to Federation Square. (Thankfully the square has a free public Wifi that I was able to use.)

What happens there? Basically workshops (or should we better call them playshops?) run by artists — painters, sculptors, media designers, dancers, musicians, and so on. The setting and Simon’s leadership are attracting some of Melbourne’s most recognized artists to be part of Artplay. Children up to 13, sometimes together with their families, or as school groups, are attending.

When I visited on a Sunday afternoon there was a group learning about to create a presence on the web: how to set up and maintain a blog, how to spread the word through social media…"

[See also: http://www.ark.ie/ AND http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/artplay/Pages/ArtPlayHome OR http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/artplay/about/Pages/about.aspx ]
artplay  ark  theark  community  children  artspace  ireland  australia  dublin  melbourne  glvo  learning  education  art  playducation  lcproject 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Dream it, build it - Arts - Entertainment - theage.com.au
"Architecture and art are being merged, in theory and practice, as never before, writes Ella Mudie."
art  architecture  glvo  urbanism  installation  melbourne  losangeles 
april 2009 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Lyons House, Sydney
"indicated value of client who knew what he wanted in terms of function...good fortune in meeting sympathetic architect at top of his craft...house faces inwards, with pool a form of courtyard - one side left open with view through trees to blue of bay beyond...more interested in...way building would perform....functional element to architecture. "As a machine"...As well as the Japanese influence, it’s also easy to correlate this space with promise of modernism...great open spaces w/out visible means of support...Peter Blake commented that Boyd’s houses were often “almost invisible from outside...isolationist suburban plot has done more harm than good. However...even with its back turned on audience like Miles Davis, this house still gives more back to this street than any of the houses surrounding it....examples of those everyday craftsmen of earlier age, when ability to design, build & repair physical material seemed widespread, useful & valued"
danhill  cityofsound  modernism  architects  architecture  design  homes  australia  sydney  melbourne  robinboyd 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Tourism Victoria Get Lost in Melbourne » Television Adverts at Duncan’s TV
"Tourism Victoria has Australians talking about getting lost in Melbourne with ‘Labyrinth’, the latest television commercial promoting the city of Melbourne."
video  advertising  place  labrynth  tourism  travel  wayfaring  australia  melbourne 
november 2006 by robertogreco

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