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robertogreco : method   26

Jonathan Rosa on Twitter: "When decolonial perspectives ground your research, they completely transform questions, methods, analyses, modes of representation, proposed interventions, and political commitments. A thread..."
"When decolonial perspectives ground your research, they completely transform questions, methods, analyses, modes of representation, proposed interventions, and political commitments. A thread...

Decolonial perspectives transform research questions by centering longstanding power relations in analyses of contemporary challenges, including racial inequity, poverty, labor exploitation, misogyny, heteronormativity, transphobia, trauma, migration, & ecological instability.

A normative research question vs. one framed from a decolonial perspective: What are the causes of educational achievement gaps? vs. How can “achievement gaps” be understood in relation to modes of accumulation & dispossession mainstream schools were designed to facilitate?

Methodologically, decolonial perspectives challenge positivist approaches to data collection that legitimate colonially constituted categories, boundaries, modes of governance, ways of knowing, and societal hierarchies.

As compared to normative Western scholarly methodologies, approaches informed by decolonial perspectives include collaborating with members of colonially marginalized communities as co-theorists to analyze & respond to the historically constituted challenges they face.

Whereas normative analytical logics narrowly frame what counts as legitimate evidence to make particular kinds of claims, decolonial analyses question conceptions of truth that have parsed the world in service of toxic modes of accumulation & dispossession.

While an analysis that presumes the legitimacy of normative scientific truth might seek to use evidence to disprove racial inferiority, a decolonial approach rejects such debates, instead investing in imagining and enacting forms of racial redress and reparation.

Whereas normative scholarly work adheres to rigidly defined representational genres & is often restricted to paywalled journals, decolonial approaches seek to fashion new modes of representation & strategies/platforms for circulation that redefine & redistribute knowledge.

Canonical anthropological uses of “thick description” often result in exoticizing & pathologizing representations of race, gender, & class; decolonial approaches enact a politics of refusal, challenging the demand for ethnographic disclosure, particularly in Indigenous contexts.

Normative scholarship often proposes interventions that focus on modifying individual behaviors rather than transforming institutions; decolonial scholarship challenges the fundamental legitimacy of prevailing societal structures that have led to the misdiagnosis of problems.

Normative scholarship might propose interventions encouraging civic participation to strengthen US institutions in the face of perceived threats to democracy; decolonial scholarship seeks to reimagine governance because the US never was nor could ever be a legitimate democracy.

Normative scholarship often seeks to establish objective facts & eschews explicit political commitments, thereby explicitly committing to political reproduction; decolonial scholarship owns its politics & engages in knowledge production to imagine & enact sustainable worlds.

Normative scholarship might seek to document, analyze, & even revitalize Indigenous languages; decolonial scholarship engages in Indigenous language revitalization as part of broader political struggles over sovereignty, historical trauma, dispossession, & sustainable ecologies.

In short, whereas normative scholarship invites you to accept, reproduce, or slightly modify the existing world, decolonial scholarship insists that otherwise worlds have always existed & demands a radical reimagining of possible pasts, presents, & futures."
jonathanrosa  2018  decolonization  norms  academia  highereducation  highered  dispossession  indigeneity  reproduction  colonization  form  writing  labor  work  convention  conventions  method  accumulaltion  sustainability  knoweldgeproduction 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Science and the Senses: Perturbation — Cultural Anthropology
"I vividly remember how, on certain nights in my childhood, my brother and I would be herded toward the entrance hall of my parents’ house, where the Carl Zeiss Ultraphot II microscope still stands. This was a huge machine from the 1960s, one of the relics that my father would rescue from the constant upgrading of his lab required by so-called scientific progress. To me, as a child, it was some sort of abstruse, mysterious device. Taking up a large portion of the hall, it was a massive object, coming with its own table, which was usually covered with a thick gray drape to protect it from dust. Above the oculars, there was a giant, round screen typical of the 1960s design, all curves and matte metal. On those nights, my parents—both freshwater microbial ecologists—would take off the drape, turn all of the lights off, and turn on the screen to show my brother and me the wonders of microscopic worlds.

Growing up with experiences like this, the notion that science forgets the sensory never made much sense to me. Perception was present and was much more than just that: it entailed the full spectrum of emotions, passions, senses, and the kind of fascination and wonder that only the natural world can inspire. Still now, when I converse with scientists in the course of my fieldwork, I see that wonder and I find the senses present in all kinds of ways. Yet the role of the sensory is shifting. I hear it whenever my mother discusses her work with me: so many of the younger scientists with whom she works are oblivious, she tells me, to the sensorial engagements that she grew up with. “They don’t even count them!” she exclaims, referring to the microorganisms in their samples. “How can you know what you have if you don’t even look in the microscope?” The sensory dimensions of molecular biology are replacing the time consuming, eye-wrenching work of counting by microscope. More advanced techniques allow the scientist to determine what is in a sample without ever putting it in a slide under a microscope. Or so their proponents claim.

The problem with these changes is not so much the depersonalization of sensorial experience. Rather, it is the increasing confidence in new methods and the assumption that these are unproblematic and fully objective. The story goes that 16S rRNA analysis tells you what organisms you are dealing with with the certainty of a fact. Of course, most people working with these techniques know better. But as students have less time to get their degrees and are pushed forward faster, they have less time to doubt and to fully grasp the limits of their newly acquired sensorium. Often these techniques rely on advanced knowledge in other fields, far from the expertise of those who use them, thus hiding their limitations by design. Those who depend on these prosthetics are easily alienated from the nitty-gritty details of the materialities in play, and have little sense of what the limits and constraints of those prosthetics might be."



"This re-scription is useful when considering the scale of the microbial and the scientific sensorial apparatuses proper to it. But it is equally useful for thinking and doing on another scale, which is central to my current work: that of the planetary. Having been sucked into the maelstrom of the Anthropocene, my research tries to resist the traction of this notion and its mainstream political currents. To do so, I attend to the figure of the planet. The planetary scale is the motor force of the Anthropocene, on which the gears of the vast machine of sustainability rely. The way in which the Anthropocene frames global environmental change depends on the same sensorial apparatuses that make the planet. But in the process of making environmental emergency, the Anthropocene also risks remaking the planet Earth in its own image, perpetuating dangerous elisions and tensions and forgetting the limits of its own planetary sensorium. In resisting the notion of the planetary, then, I attend to it historically and praxiographically—but also, one might say, scientifically. My aim is to flesh out not only the continuities in the histories of this notion and its object, but also the gaps, interruptions, and diversions that characterize it. In doing so, I aim to offer inspiration for unfolding alternative constellations of the planetary. Here, the planet emerges not only as an object; it complicates the clear distinction between subjects and objects that informs the official epistemology of modern science. Rethinking the sensory in terms of modes of attention (and distraction) can, I think, play a crucial role in this rearticulation of the planetary away from received theories of knowledge, toward a world in which knowing is just one among a multiplicity of practices and doings/undoings that make worlds in which living together, willy-nilly, is done.



Attending to the sensorium of the planetary highlights the technosocial apparatuses that are at work in making planetary vision possible. It imagines as nature not only the planet, but also satellites, spaceflight, remote sensing, radioisotope tracers, global circulation models; the vast machine of climate-change science policy; social phenomena like the green economy and austerity; and the discourses of extinction, loss, adaptation, and proliferation that characterize the Anthropocene. Considering these sensory mediations as relational and historical modes of attention and distraction inflected across heterogeneous materials and sites allows us to attend to how knowing, doing, and living with the planet are enacted in the same gesture. This move can restore the sense of wonder that I saw in the screen of my childhood to the sciences."
science  senses  wonder  method  sfsh  expeuence  2017  donnaharaway  anthropology  anthropocene  perception  doubt  prosthetics  technology  time  technoscience  attention  maríacarozzi  williamjames  vincianedespret  knowing  distraction 
february 2017 by robertogreco
Refusal as Research Method in Discard Studies « Discard Studies
"Researchers examining waste issues have the potential to uncover particularly sensitive information—that specific places, people or animals might be contaminated— that has very real social and material consequences for communities being studied. We also might be given access to report on potentially painful community events and experiences. As researchers interested in social justice, how do we proceed helpfully in our research?

The concept of ‘ethnographic refusal’ is one way forward. Ethnographic refusal is a practice by which researchers and research participants together decide not to make particular information available for use within the academy. Its purpose is not to bury information, but to ensure that communities are able to respond to issues on their own terms. An ethnographic refusal is intended to redirect academic analysis away from harmful pain-based narratives that obscure slow violence, and towards the structures and institutions that engender those narratives. It is a method centrally concerned with a community’s right to self-representation.

This method comes out of an ethical commitment to decolonize research. For example, the recent ‘ontological turn’ in discard studies encourages researchers to engage with Indigenous knowledge systems and ontologies, as a way of better understanding how issues of contamination and waste are understood and experienced within Indigenous communities—something that is easily (and often) misconstrued by non-community members, including academics. In turn, researchers might have access to internal conversations, knowledge that is considered sacred, or that the academy otherwise “doesn’t deserve” (Tuck and Yang 2014a: 813). Engaging in ethnographic refusal as method, then, is intended as an ethical intervention that provides research participants the opportunity to dictate whether knowledge is to be made available within the academy (among other places), how environmental and human health issues are responded to, and by whom.

The following annotated bibliography is an introduction to ethnographic refusal. The first two texts in this bibliography (Tuhiwai Smith 1999; Zavala 2013), provide overviews of decolonization as a methodology, outlining the colonial traditions that inform contemporary anthropological practices and the need for decolonizing research. Both texts indicate the importance of research collaboration and emphasize efforts by Indigenous people to take control over their representation in research. The more recent piece (Zavala 2013), suggests that decolonial research must place Indigenous perspectives and interests as the marker through which research is evaluated and practiced. Based on readings written primarily by Indigenous researchers, I suggest that ‘ethnographic refusal’— whereby certain information about Indigenous knowledge and experiences is kept out of the academy— is a method that helps keep researchers accountable to the communities they research. The different perspectives on ‘ethnographic refusal’ held by Ortner (1995) and Simpson (2007) showcase how the method developed through two different bodies of literature, driven by very different goals and objectives. The final papers by Tuck and Yang (2014a & b) provide examples of ways that researchers can incorporate ‘refusals’ throughout their research process."
ethnography  method  refusal  2016  via:javierarbona  research  representation  self-representation  fieldwork  decolonization  ethnographicrefusal  illegibility  legibility 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Against Method - Wikipedia
"Against Method: Outline of an Anarchist Theory of Knowledge is a 1975 book about the philosophy of science by Paul Feyerabend, who argues that science is an anarchic, not a nomic (lawly), enterprise.[1] In the context of this work, the term anarchy refers to epistemological anarchy."



"Feyerabend divides his argument into an abstract critique followed by a number of historical case studies.[2]

The abstract critique is a reductio ad absurdum of methodological monism (the belief that a single methodology can produce scientific progress).[3] Feyerabend goes on to identify four features of methodological monism: the principle of falsification,[4] a demand for increased empirical content,[5] the forbidding of ad hoc hypotheses[6] and the consistency condition.[7] He then demonstrates that these features imply that science could not progress, hence an absurdity for proponents of the scientific method.

The historical case studies also act as a reductio.[8] Feyerabend takes the premise that Galileo's advancing of a heliocentric cosmology was an example of scientific progress. He then demonstrates that Galileo did not adhere to the conditions of methodological monism. Feyerabend also argues that, if Galileo had adhered to the conditions of methodological monism, then he could not have advanced a heliocentric cosmology. This implies that scientific progress would have been impaired by methodological monism. Again, an absurdity for proponents of the scientific method.[9]

Feyerabend summarises his reductios with the phrase "anything goes". This is his sarcastic imitation of "the terrified reaction of a rationalist who takes a closer look at history".[10]"
philosophy  science  method  scientificmethod  paulfeyerabend  anarchism  monism  falsification  hypotheses  adhoc  consistency  rationalism  via:tealtan  galileso  againstmethod  knowledge  1975  toread  books 
october 2015 by robertogreco
whitney trettien on Twitter: "It continues to upset me how often I come across a digital humanities syllabus with all-but-0 women writers/thinkers/makers/educators."
“It continues to upset me how often I come across a digital humanities syllabus with all-but-0 women writers/thinkers/makers/educators.”

“@whitneytrettien Thank you Whitney. I finally understand why this word "maker" is so important to people.”
https://twitter.com/CaptDavidRyan/status/567768889506934784

“@whitneytrettien By using "Maker" instead of builder, mechanic, tinkerer, fabricator, etc...”
https://twitter.com/CaptDavidRyan/status/567770540010512384

“@whitneytrettien One implies the sort of meta-awareness of the activity (and accompanying prestige) that we associate with...”
https://twitter.com/CaptDavidRyan/status/567770713278402560

“@whitneytrettien that we associate with writers, artist, educators.”
https://twitter.com/CaptDavidRyan/status/567770804697440256

“@whitneytrettien I've always known that "Maker" was a fantastically class-conscious term, but could never put my finger on why exactly.”
https://twitter.com/CaptDavidRyan/status/567771011358023681

“@KellyPDillon @whitneytrettien @evalantsoght I wonder lately how to best combine these stories with courses on methods, too, you know?”
https://twitter.com/djp2025/status/567771031763693568

“@KellyPDillon @whitneytrettien @evalantsoght I mean, is the answer a separate course on Women in Comp? Or a module on comp hist in DH class?”
https://twitter.com/djp2025/status/567771246801469440

“@KellyPDillon @whitneytrettien @evalantsoght I mean, is the answer a separate course on Women in Comp? Or a module on comp hist in DH class?”

“@djp2025 @KellyPDillon @evalantsoght Historicize the methods and the making within/against other practices? "my mother was a computer," etc.”
https://twitter.com/whitneytrettien/status/567772121632632832

“@whitneytrettien @KellyPDillon @evalantsoght Indeed, and exactly.”
https://twitter.com/djp2025/status/567773158800101379

“@whitneytrettien Guilty, apart from the literary texts I teach.”
https://twitter.com/briancroxall/status/567768467655651328

“@briancroxall Which may be more problematic, no? Reinscription of the male gaze to dissect women writers. Not accusing, just musing.”
https://twitter.com/whitneytrettien/status/567768920455913472

“@whitneytrettien It could be. My application of “theory” to our texts is pretty loose. +”
https://twitter.com/briancroxall/status/567769131811086337

“@whitneytrettien It makes me wonder as well whether the idea of distant reading is a gendered gaze.”
https://twitter.com/briancroxall/status/567769298207535104

“@briancroxall Me too -- definitely something I've been thinking about recently.”
https://twitter.com/whitneytrettien/status/567769736176758784

“@briancroxall @whitneytrettien Can I interest you in an article on precisely that subject...”
https://twitter.com/ncecire/status/567769693927522304

“@briancroxall @whitneytrettien (forthcoming...) pic.twitter.com/wTVpR8L7AP ”
https://twitter.com/ncecire/status/567771149954973699

“@ncecire Excellent -- when/where is it out? I look forward to reading it. @briancroxall”
https://twitter.com/whitneytrettien/status/567771469862961153

“@whitneytrettien Oh, ha, would you look at that! Institutional repository at work. http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/52909/1/11_82.1cecire.pdf … @briancroxall”
https://twitter.com/ncecire/status/567772313060671488

“looks fantastic @ncecire's "Ways of Not Reading Gertrude Stein." ELH 82 (forthcoming 2015) http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/52909/1/11_82.1cecire.pdf ”**
https://twitter.com/pfyfe/status/567807396900315136

**Article now at:
http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/52909/
http://muse.jhu.edu/login?auth=0&type=summary&url=/journals/elh/v082/82.1.cecire.html
gender  makers  making  class  whitneytrettien  davidryan  2015  digitalhumanities  briancroxall  danielpowell  feminism  scholarship  academia  malegaze  genderedgaze  craft  thinking  education  tinkering  fabrication  mechanics  building  meta-awareness  art  writing  method  computation  computing  practice  nataliacecire 
february 2015 by robertogreco
what what. (Science is much closer to myth than a scientific...)
"Science is much closer to myth than a scientific philosophy is prepared to admit. It is one of the many forms of thought that have been developed by man, and not necessarily the best. It is conspicuous, noisy, and impudent, but it is inherently superior only for those who have already decided in favour of a certain ideology, or who have accepted it without ever having examined its advantages and its limits … The separation of state and church must be supplemented by the separation of state and science, that most recent, most aggressive, and most dogmatic religious institution."

—Paul Feyerabend, Against Method
oaulfeyerabend  method  science  scientism  myth  philosophy  ideology  religion  belief 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Three Uncertain Thoughts, Or, Everything I Know I Learned from Ursula Le Guin | Design Culture Lab
"One.

In her 1969 novel The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K Le Guin writes, “The unknown, [...] the unforetold, the unproven, that is what life is based on. Ignorance is the ground of thought. Unproof is the ground of action . . . [T]he only thing that makes life possible is permanent, intolerable uncertainty; not knowing what comes next.”

If the only certainty is death, then to deny uncertainty is to deny life.

My work (creative? social science?) is vital not in the sense of being necessary or essential, but energetic, lively, uncertain. In a short 2006 piece in Theory, Culture & Society, Scott Lash argues that the classical concept of vitalism has re-emerged in the face of global complexity and uncertainty, manifesting itself in cultural theory that acknowledges that “the notion of life has always favoured an idea of becoming over one of being, of movement over stasis, of action over structure, of flow and flux.”

In my research I take seriously the idea that what I am seeing, doing and making is emergent; I cannot know how — when, where, for whom or why — it will all end. I can only live with, and through, it. This means I do not want to convince others that I am right. (Have you ever noticed that Le Guin’s stories unfailingly explore ethics and morality without dealing in absolutes?)

I only — as if this were a small thing! — invite you to accompany me for a while, and see what we can become together. This is just — as if this too were a small thing! — one way of knowing the world.

Two.

In a 2014 interview for Smithsonian Magazine, Le Guin explains that the future is where “anything at all can be said to happen without fear of contradiction from a native. [It] is a safe, sterile laboratory for trying out ideas in, a means of thinking about reality, a method.”

My work makes things, and explicitly makes things up, in some near or far future. I practice different worlds.

Fictions and futures give me (you? us?) space to move, and be moved. This is the space of utopia, but not an idealist utopia set against a pessimist dystopia. Fictions and futures are literally no-places: real but not actual, and always vital. I feel as though I thrive in these spaces, both grounded and reaching toward the sky, open to the elements, potential.

But here’s something I’ve learned: I can’t make up anything and expect it to work. The stories need to resonate. And that means they need to be internally coherent and consistent, plausible. So I locate others and myself empirically, ethnographically. I look to the hopes and promises that bind us together, to the threats that rip us apart, and I look to the expectations that constrain and orient us along particular, but not certain, paths.

And then I imagine it (me, you, us) otherwise.

Three.

In her 2007 essay “The Critics, the Monsters, and the Fantasists,” Le Guin clarifies “although the green country of fantasy seems to be entirely the invention of human imaginations, it verges on and partakes of actual realms in which humanity is not lord and master, is not central, is not even important.”

My imagination has sought out this vital, “green country of fantasy” by focussing on possible futures for multispecies, more-than-human, agents. But I’ve yet to be successful in my quest to avoid anthropocentrism. (My dragons remain stubbornly human!)

Still: I follow Donna Haraway’s argument, in 2007’s When Species Meet, that “animals enrich our ignorance.” When I look at people and technology and design and everyday life with — and through — animals I am never more uncertain about what they all mean. To take animals (and other nonhumans) seriously forces me to let go of many preconceptions, even when I fail to imagine a plausible alternative.

But perhaps that uncertainty is only appropriate, too."
annegalloway  2014  ursulaleguin  unknown  uncertainty  unproven  certainty  death  life  scottlash  vitalism  complexity  culture  theory  morality  ethics  absolutism  knowing  unknowing  future  futures  fiction  worldbuilding  process  method  making  speculativefiction  designfiction  ethnography  imagination  utopia  dystopia  potential  fantasy  invention  design  anthropocentrism  multispecies  donnaharaway  ignorance  technology  preconceptions  posthumanism 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Why Good Classes Fail [Digital Ethnography blog]
"So rather than focusing on emulating particular techniques and methods, we should be doing everything we can to embrace, inspire, and use our own empathy in order to better understand and relate to our students. It is only from this space that we can effectively generate and use the appropriate techniques and methods for any particular task. In this way, there is no “recipe,” “secret sauce,” or “silver bullet” for teaching effectively that can be used by anybody, anytime, anywhere. Instead, I’m proposing a “generative” method, one in which we “generate” the appropriate method that takes into consideration the broadest range of factors that we can manage to accommodate."
howweteach  howwelearn  method  carlrogers  2012  listening  interestedness  disinterest  disconnection  disengagement  engagement  gardnercampbell  pedagogy  students  connection  reproductiion  scalability  personality  approach  silverbullets  de-scripting  unschooling  highereducation  education  learning  teaching  empathy  michealwesch  interested  scale 
february 2012 by robertogreco
X-skool: Not so much a finishing school — more a starting over again school.
"Most design and architecture schools, and design firms, contain one or two people who are ready to make a fundamental transition to a new kind of design – one that creates social value without destroying natural and human assets.

Xskool is for them. For you.

Xskool is the germ of an idea: a professional development programme for mid-career designers, architects and design professors. The idea is to equip you with the ideas, skills and connections you need to help your organization change course and engage with the restorative economy that is now emerging.

Participants in Xskool will ideally be sponsored; the idea is to transform design organizations and communities, not just the individual. Xskool is not another sustainable design course."
xskool  johnthackara  design  education  schools  business  sustainability  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  tcsnmy  socialvalue  society  altgdp  economics  restorativeeconomy  transformation  gamechanging  2011  place  land  perception  presence  diversity  method  solidarity  value 
june 2011 by robertogreco
The Socratic Method
"The following is a transcript of a teaching experiment, using the Socratic method, with a regular third grade class in a suburban elementary school. I present my perspective and views on the session, and on the Socratic method as a teaching tool, following the transcript. The class was conducted on a Friday afternoon beginning at 1:30, late in May, with about two weeks left in the school year. This time was purposely chosen as one of the most difficult times to entice and hold these children's concentration about a somewhat complex intellectual matter. The point was to demonstrate the power of the Socratic method for both teaching and also for getting students involved and excited about the material being taught. ... The experiment was to see whether I could teach these students binary arithmetic (arithmetic using only two numbers, 0 and 1) only by asking them questions. None of them had been introduced to binary arithmetic before."
math  binary  socraticmethod  education  learning  teaching  children  tcsnmy  pedagogy  mathematics  method  philosophy  psychology  howto 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Thinking by Design
"While the design-thinking approach may sound rather seat-of-the-pants, the truth is that it's surprisingly regimented, consisting of three phases: observation, ideation and implementation."
design  business  method  process  designthinking  tcsnmy  classideas 
november 2008 by robertogreco
design methods for everyone
"1. designing your design process 2. what to do first? 3. what if I can't think of a solution? 4. what if I have too many ideas? 5. what if my ideas seem good but do not fit 'the problem'? 6. what if my perception of the problem changes? 7. what if I get into a muddle? 8. how can a first attempt be improved?"
design  method  methodology  collaborative  approach  glvo  process  designthinking 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Legacy 4: In the Crumbling Temple of the Dead White Males (the College Years) | Beyond School
"they forgot about the learner in their zeal to be teachers. This is why their teaching failed to win me...they [need to] start with knowing their learners, with respecting & esteeming them, & whatever cultural scripts those learners bring into the class.
clayburell  pedagogy  teaching  learning  constructivism  literature  philosophy  history  adolescence  method  listening  respect 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Extract from What I Talk About When I Talk About Running, by Haruki Murakami | Health and wellbeing | Life and Health
"Author Haruki Murakami loves the loneliness of the long-distance run. Which is how he found himself tackling his 24th marathon. But what about his dodgy knee? Has he trained enough? And will the Rocky theme tune be playing in his head?"
harukimurakami  howwework  via:rodcorp  writing  running  japan  literature  discipline  concentration  method 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Notional Slurry » There are exactly two ways: one, and many
[link rot, so try this: https://archive.li/rKOiX ]

"In what way am I delayed by paying attention to more, different, inarguably interesting stuff? Gratifying stuff?"..."Called a flighty dreamer all too often, I think increasingly that I stand on the side of realism. I will be finished when I’m dead."
attention  collaboration  ideas  learning  cv  creativity  creative  generalists  failure  future  society  expectations  howwework  method  work  careers  via:hrheingold  gamechanging  culture  specialists  specialization  life  education  academia  schools  schooling  unschooling  freedom  allsorts  canon  williamtozier 
march 2008 by robertogreco
How People Count Cash?
"This video shows how people in all around the world count their cash in different ways."
culture  currency  geography  travel  technique  money  counting  method  norms  international  world  observation  countries 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Weekend America >> Saturday, March 03, 2007 >> Sister Corita
"When you think about pop art and counter culture, in all likelihood, you don't immediately think of a convent in Los Angeles in the 1960s."
sistercorita  graphics  design  art  california  progressive  education  losangeles  activism  religion  catholicism  observation  method  process  society  politics  coritakent 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Overview of Chinese mathematics
"The method of calculation is very simple to explain but has wide application. This is because a person gains knowledge by analogy, that is, after understanding a particular line of argument they can infer various kinds of similar reasoning ... Whoever ca
math  china  history  analogy  philosophy  method  via:mattwebb 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Design for the Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change - Google Book Search
"...examines the attempts by designers to combat the tawdry, the unsafe, the frivolous, the useless product, once again providing a blueprint for sensible, responsible design in this world which is deficient in resources and energy."
design  books  sustainability  scarcity  energy  necessity  method  process 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Beyond School: Overdrive: That Classroom Blogging Grail, and How Teaching and Grading Obstruct It
"Anybody who's taught high school English should know why most students hate to write in schools. It's because they're taught to write badly."
teaching  writing  schools  education  blogging  online  internet  voice  method  curriculum  failure  experimentation  lcproject 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Architect Steven Holls Combines Geeky Aesthetic, Environmental Elements
"Here's a look at the architect's passion for using new materials, incorporating existing landscape into new construction and finding inspiration in everything from sea sponges to Homer's The Odyssey."
steven  holl  architecture  design  materials  method  books 
june 2007 by robertogreco
IDEO's Jane Fulton Suri observes "thoughtless acts" - (37signals)
"IDEO designer Jane Fulton Suri figures out unmet consumer needs by watching ordinary people doing ordinary things."
design  human  inspiration  interdisciplinary  method  observation  consumer  research  howwelearn  ethnography  anthropology  interaction  user  experience  ux 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Evidence - Clay Shirky (World Question Center 2007)
"Most of the really important parts of our lives ·who we love and how, how we live and why, why we lie and when — have yet to yield their secrets to real evidence. We will see a gradual spread of things like evidence-based politics and law..."
thought  social  science  thinking  evidence  future  politics  law  statistics  method  truth  behavior  religion  human  society 
january 2007 by robertogreco

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