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robertogreco : migrations   3

The Spectre of Hope
"Over the past 30 years Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado's work has won every major award for excellence. His photographs have had an actual impact on the world and how it is seen, bringing conditions of famine and poverty to public attention in a profound and arresting way.

John Berger is one of the world's leading critics of art and photography. An artist himself, he is perhaps best known for "Ways of Seeing," his seminal book and BBC series on art criticism.

In THE SPECTRE OF HOPE, Sebastião Salgado joins Berger to pore over Salgado's collection "Migrations." Six years and 43 countries in the making (ranging across Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America), "Migrations" contains photographs of people pushed from their homes and traditions to cities and their margins—slums and streets and refugee camps.

Sitting at the kitchen table of Berger's home in Quincy, a village in the Swiss Alps, their intimate conversation, intercut with photographs from "Migrations," combines a discussion of Salgado's work with a critique of globalization, and a wide-ranging investigation of the power of the image."

[See also:
https://www.macfound.org/documentaryfilm/151/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsqlwmoME9k ]
sebastiãosalgado  johnberger  toatch  film  migrations  photography  hope  2001 
january 2017 by robertogreco
A Rising Share of the U.S. Black Population Is Foreign Born | Pew Research Center’s Social & Demographic Trends Project
us  data  immigration  population  demographics  caribbean  africa  migrations  blacks  race  2015  pew 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Flyways: Change Observer: Design Observer
"When the swallows twitter excitedly overhead, I envy how lightly they manage to live. I compare their tiny needs for external energy to the prodigious amounts needed to keep us humanoids fed and watered. I contrast the way the swallows throw their nests together — from found materials — with the billions of tons of resources, often gathered from faraway lands, that we pour into our own structures. And which we basically sit in, waiting to be provisioned.

For ninety nine percent of human existence we lived far more like the swifts than we do today. We had very few possessions. Materials for shelter, clothing, and tools were all at hand. Because we needed little, we wanted little. We got by without a state, a market, or advanced technology. We thrived in the absence of strategic visions, design thinking, concepts, plans, budgets, or controls. We worked, for the most part, cooperatively. We didn’t borrow from the future. We shared."
johnthackara  birds  swallows  nature  mobility  nomads  nomadism  lightness  simplicity  anarchism  self-organization  designthinking  strategicplanning  control  government  organizations  migrations  migration  cooperation  humans  slow  small 
september 2013 by robertogreco

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