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robertogreco : mismanagement   3

The tragedy of Cooper Union | Fusion
"Annals of Incompetence: How one of America’s last free colleges screwed its students and betrayed its legacy"
cooperunion  2015  felixsalmon  mismanagement  freecooperunion  small  education  management  administration  growth  scale  highered  highereducation 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Cooper Union May Charge Tuition to Undergraduates - NYTimes.com
"Facing serious financial trouble in a weak economy, Cooper Union, the New York City college founded in 1859 to provide free education for the working class, may begin charging undergraduate tuition for the first time in more than a century, its president said Monday…

In its first decades, Cooper Union collected tuition from students who had the means to pay. But since 1902, following major gifts from Andrew Carnegie and Cooper’s descendants, it has been free for all undergraduates. (Students enrolled in nondegree night programs do pay tuition and undergraduates pay for room and board.)

A result has been a student body that, for an elite college, is unusually diverse, ethnically and economically. Fewer than half of Cooper Union’s students are white, and almost two-thirds attended public high schools."

[See also: http://slavin.tumblr.com/post/12216224043/when-i-a-student-at-cooper-union-i-thought-i-was ]
cooperunion  education  highered  2011  tuition  highereducation  mismanagement 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Google+: Robin Sloan thread on the Borders bankruptcy
[See also: http://www.slate.com/id/2299642/pagenum/all/ ]

"Public service announcement: I think the Borders bankruptcy isn't essentially about the book business. In fact it's much more closely tied to the real estate business. Borders had a ridiculously expensive portfolio of stores: huge spaces on glitzy corners with long-term leases (and an average of ~8 years still left on the lease, per store) that they couldn't walk away from, even as the fundamentals of their business changed beneath them.

But!—that's not like The Inevitable Fate of Bookstores Everywhere. By all accounts, Borders was just really poorly managed. The company could have struck smarter deals for those spaces, or approached its lease portfolio more cautiously, etc., etc., but didn't. It was reckless and profligate.

This bums me out, b/c I feel like Borders' bankruptcy is now part of that Death of Bookstores narrative—when in fact it's much less exciting than that. It's just the story of a company run badly."

[Read the thread too.]
thisandthat  borders  business  bankruptcy  mismanagement  realestate  money  finance  internet  web  booksellers  books  retail  2011 
july 2011 by robertogreco

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