recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : mit   81

« earlier  
The Educational Tyranny of the Neurotypicals | WIRED
"Ben Draper, who runs the Macomber Center for Self Directed Learning, says that while the center is designed for all types of children, kids whose parents identify them as on the autism spectrum often thrive at the center when they’ve had difficulty in conventional schools. Ben is part of the so-called unschooling movement, which believes that not only should learning be self-directed, in fact we shouldn't even focus on guiding learning. Children will learn in the process of pursuing their passions, the reasoning goes, and so we just need to get out of their way, providing support as needed.

Many, of course, argue that such an approach is much too unstructured and verges on irresponsibility. In retrospect, though, I feel I certainly would have thrived on “unschooling.” In a recent paper, Ben and my colleague Andre Uhl, who first introduced me to unschooling, argue that it not only works for everyone, but that the current educational system, in addition to providing poor learning outcomes, impinges on the rights of children as individuals.

MIT is among a small number of institutions that, in the pre-internet era, provided a place for non-neurotypical types with extraordinary skills to gather and form community and culture. Even MIT, however, is still trying to improve to give these kids the diversity and flexibility they need, especially in our undergraduate program.

I'm not sure how I'd be diagnosed, but I was completely incapable of being traditionally educated. I love to learn, but I go about it almost exclusively through conversations and while working on projects. I somehow kludged together a world view and life with plenty of struggle, but also with many rewards. I recently wrote a PhD dissertation about my theory of the world and how I developed it. Not that anyone should generalize from my experience—one reader of my dissertation said that I’m so unusual, I should be considered a "human sub-species." While I take that as a compliment, I think there are others like me who weren’t as lucky and ended up going through the traditional system and mostly suffering rather than flourishing. In fact, most kids probably aren’t as lucky as me and while some types are more suited for success in the current configuration of society, a huge percentage of kids who fail in the current system have a tremendous amount to contribute that we aren’t tapping into.

In addition to equipping kids for basic literacy and civic engagement, industrial age schools were primarily focused on preparing kids to work in factories or perform repetitive white-collar jobs. It may have made sense to try to convert kids into (smart) robotlike individuals who could solve problems on standardized tests alone with no smartphone or the internet and just a No. 2 pencil. Sifting out non-neurotypical types or trying to remediate them with drugs or institutionalization may have seemed important for our industrial competitiveness. Also, the tools for instruction were also limited by the technology of the times. In a world where real robots are taking over many of those tasks, perhaps we need to embrace neurodiversity and encourage collaborative learning through passion, play, and projects, in other words, to start teaching kids to learn in ways that machines can’t. We can also use modern technology for connected learning that supports diverse interests and abilities and is integrated into our lives and communities of interest.

At the Media Lab, we have a research group called Lifelong Kindergarten, and the head of the group, Mitchel Resnick, recently wrote a book by the same name. The book is about the group’s research on creative learning and the four Ps—Passion, Peers, Projects, and Play. The group believes, as I do, that we learn best when we are pursuing our passion and working with others in a project-based environment with a playful approach. My memory of school was "no cheating,” “do your own work,” "focus on the textbook, not on your hobbies or your projects," and "there’s time to play at recess, be serious and study or you'll be shamed"—exactly the opposite of the four Ps.

Many mental health issues, I believe, are caused by trying to “fix” some type of neurodiversity or by simply being insensitive or inappropriate for the person. Many mental “illnesses” can be “cured” by providing the appropriate interface to learning, living, or interacting for that person focusing on the four Ps. My experience with the educational system, both as its subject and, now, as part of it, is not so unique. I believe, in fact, that at least the one-quarter of people who are diagnosed as somehow non-neurotypical struggle with the structure and the method of modern education. People who are wired differently should be able to think of themselves as the rule, not as an exception."
neurotypicals  neurodiversity  education  schools  schooling  learning  inequality  elitism  meritocracy  power  bias  diversity  autism  psychology  stevesilberman  schooliness  unschooling  deschooling  ronsuskind  mentalhealth  mitchresnick  mit  mitemedialab  medialab  lifelongkindergarten  teaching  howweteach  howwelearn  pedagogy  tyranny  2018  economics  labor  bendraper  flexibility  admissions  colleges  universities  joiito 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Stockyard Institute
"The Stockyard Institute , founded by Jim Duignan, associate professor, is an arts and pedagogical initiative that establishes collaborative, community-wide arts and education projects with youth, teachers, artists and residents deep inside Chicago communities. The Stockyard Institute coordinates with area schools, youth centers, cultural organizations, and community facilities to design and organize temporary public art projects and sustainable art and education programs. Since its inception in 1995, the Stockyard Institute has connected with thousands of DePaul University students, local teachers, youth and community residents building, teaching, exhibiting, exchanging and publishing projects in Chicago, the U.S. and around the world. Duignan’s work and models have been published by The Atlantic Monthy, A Blade of Grass Foundation, Prestel Publishing, New Art Examiner, Artforum, Chicago Reader, Whitewalls, Proximity Magazine, New City, Palm Press, Routledge, AREA Chicago, Green Lantern Press and the New York Times. Recent projects, artworks, and ideas of the Stockyard institute and Jim Duignan have been exhibited at the Hyde Park Art Center and Smart Museum (2017), Chicago Cultural Center, Reykjavik Art Museum, Public Art Saint Paul, (2016), Brooklyn’s interference Archive and 6018North in Chicago (2015), and Hul House Museum, Kochi-Muziris Biennial, Sullivan Galleries, EXPO Chicago, and Columbia College (2014).



(2017 MIT Nomination)

Over the past 20 years, across Chicago neighborhoods, Jim has been quietly leading an underground educational network called Stockyard Institute. Born and raised deep in the city, trained from self-education as an artist and from community education as an Eagle Scout, Jim took up residence in an abandoned school in the Back of the Yards neighborhood in 1995, where he began to work with community youth. In the early days, Jim invited youth to talk openly about the violence that marked their everyday lives– an unheard of practice in city pedagogy, which has always emphasized teaching children to look away from difficult knowledge and refrain from formally expressing emotionally-charged, authentic lived experiences– and invited them to express the needs that sprung from the everyday neighborhood through making collaborative sculpture. Together, they created the “gang-proof suit,” a symbol of the freedom youth yearned for, to walk without fear of being overtaken in the streets, to be liberated from the systems of schools and culture that made them feel locked in place with their fates sealed. From this initial gesture, Jim established Stockyard Institute as a vector space, bringing resources, knowledge, skill-building, and opportunities together from various parts of the city underground to create a network of civic love only seen at the street level, under the radar, and often against the rules of massive Chicago city institutions that direct from the top. Who gets to say what’s worth doing, being, or becoming? For whose benefit are they saying this? What happens when the neighborhood leads its own education? What happens when the youth are invited to make the tools they need to be liberated from cycles of oppression?

Over the past 20 years in Chicago, Jim has been a shadow helper of unparalleled impact, who is almost never seen in person except inside communities, and never seems to credit himself for his enormous efforts by name, only saying work is done by “Stockyard Institute.” When I asked him why he always says this name, or says that work is done, “by us,” he replied (and I must paraphrase), “I speak in collective terms because all of this work is equally shared. Youth risk something when we create a radio station and they speak their voices into the neighborhood, sharing their true stories. It empowers them, and it is a big deal to stake a claim to one’s own life experiences. All of our contributions are equally important.” Currently, at the age many people are considering retirement or have retired, Jim is quietly beginning a new project, building a new peace center inside the converted classroom of an operating public school in the Humboldt Park neighborhood, which ranks among the city’s neighborhoods most affected by violent crimes. These examples only reflect a tiny fraction of the number of works for goodness Jim has engineered over his lifetime, without monetary budget to speak of, but with strong networks of relationships and bonds between individuals committed to uplifting fellow Chicago residents, who scrap together what is needed from what is around in the urban plenty. This work is directly disobedient to the systems of education that say there is official knowledge that is most important, that schools have it, that all people must buy into it in order to ever have any chance of having “the American dream.” On the contrary, Jim has accumulated a life’s work of examples of what transformations are possible when the streets are not seen as a place of deficit but potential, when urban children are not seen as deficient people who need to be molded into proper citizens, but powerful people with vision, force, community spirit, civic pride, and the brightest possible future.

Where schools become pipelines to prisons, in a zero-tolerance society where students must accept a binary choice of either (1) blindly and uncritically complying with orders (which often reproduce oppression and disenfranchise kids of color, queer youth, immigrant youth, homeless youth, and others in the urban majority), (2) or dropping out of school and being cast out of social options, Jim Duignan is proposing that we have to look for a third option, and a fourth, and a fifth, and 3 million more: by creating meaningful, anti-institutional education that centers around the lives of urban youth, rebuilt from scratch in collaboration each time, mindfully embracing all of the complications of reality that mark survival tactics, he has transformed the lives of countless individual urban youth, like himself, and has been central to the creation of a network of resource sharing in the underground of civically-engaged creativity, ingenuity, and care in Chicago. This work is slow, patient, underground, durational, and built in bonds of keeping one’s word over decades.

-Rachel L. S. Harper

Nomination for the MIT Disobedience Award 2017

Contact Jim Duignan at stockyardinstitute@gmail.com"
jimduignan  mit  art  arts  education  lcproject  openstudioproject  youth 
may 2018 by robertogreco
MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies Special Collection
"Welcome to the online repository of MIT's Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS) Special Collection, part of the Program in Art, Culture and Technology (ACT) Archives and Special Collections.

The CAVS Special Collection documents a nearly 45 year history of collaborative and time-based productions generated by the tenure of over 200 internationally recognized artist-fellows. This digitized, “virtual museum” includes images, publications, posters, documents, portfolios, videos and other materials of historic importance documenting the process of creating art-science-technology projects at CAVS. This site presents experimental ways in which to explore collection materials.

The Works page connects users to CAVS art works and projects, which can be browsed chronologically, or by subject or format.

The People page provides several methods for browsing artists, scientists, and others affiliated with CAVS.

The About page includes more information about CAVS, ACT, and this project.

You may also browse a randomized 3-dimensional environment of collection materials below (double click an image to view the item record)."

[via https://twitter.com/paperarchitect/status/967563932620742656
".@ACTMIT launched the online repository of the CAVS (Center for Advanced Visual Studies) archive! Super excited for this weird and wonderful website, and the important works within: http://act.mit.edu/cavs/ "

via: https://twitter.com/shannonmattern/status/967656022058897409
"More Shannon Mattern Retweeted Ann Lui
So much amazing material here, documenting an important center for experimentation in art/science/tech -- and such a fitting interface. A great case study for ppl studying + developing digital collections." ]
archives  art  installation  cvs  mit  science  technology  experimentation  collections 
february 2018 by robertogreco
30 years of collaboration towards empowering children to be creative thinkers on Vimeo
"For the past 30 years, the LEGO Group and the MIT Media Lab have collaborated on projects based on a shared passion for learning through play. Today, the LEGO Foundation and MIT's Lifelong Kindergarten group continue this tradition, exploring new ways to engage children in creative, playful learning experiences."
seymourpapert  lego  mitchresnick  scratch  mindstorms  lifelongkindergarten  mit  medialab  mitmedialab  education  learning  children  coding  creativity  2015 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Ethan Zuckerman: Solving Other People's Problems With Technology - The Atlantic
"In other words, is it possible to get beyond both a naïve belief that the latest technology will solve social problems—and a reaction that rubbishes any attempt to offer novel technical solutions as inappropriate, insensitive, and misguided? Can we find a synthesis in which technologists look at their work critically and work closely with the people they’re trying to help in order to build sociotechnical systems that address hard problems?

Obviously, I think this is possible — if really, really hard — or I wouldn’t be teaching at an engineering school. But before considering how we overcome a naïve faith in technology, let’s examine Snow’s suggestion. It’s a textbook example of a solution that’s technically sophisticated, simple to understand, and dangerously wrong."



"The problem with the solutionist critique, though, is that it tends to remove technological innovation from the problem-solver’s toolkit. In fact, technological development is often a key component in solving complex social and political problems, and new technologies can sometimes open a previously intractable problem. The rise of inexpensive solar panels may be an opportunity to move nations away from a dependency on fossil fuels and begin lowering atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide, much as developments in natural gas extraction and transport technologies have lessened the use of dirtier fuels like coal.

But it’s rare that technology provides a robust solution to a social problem by itself. Successful technological approaches to solving social problems usually require changes in laws and norms, as well as market incentives to make change at scale."



"Of the many wise things my Yale students said during our workshop was a student who wondered if he should be participating at all. “I don’t know anything about prisons, I don’t have family in prison. I don’t know if I understand these problems well enough to solve them, and I don’t know if these problems are mine to solve.”

Talking about the workshop with my friend and colleague Chelsea Barabas, she asked the wonderfully deep question, “Is it ever okay to solve another person’s problem?”

On its surface, the question looks easy to answer. We can’t ask infants to solve problems of infant mortality, and by extension, it seems unwise to let kindergarten students design educational policy or demand that the severely disabled design their own assistive technologies.

But the argument is more complicated when you consider it more closely. It’s difficult if not impossible to design a great assistive technology without working closely, iteratively, and cooperatively with the person who will wear or use it. My colleague Hugh Herr designs cutting-edge prostheses for U.S. veterans who’ve lost legs, and the centerpiece of his lab is a treadmill where amputees test his limbs, giving him and his students feedback about what works, what doesn’t, and what needs to change. Without the active collaboration with the people he’s trying to help, he’s unable to make technological advances.

Disability rights activists have demanded “nothing about us without us,” a slogan that demands that policies should not be developed without the participation of those intended to benefit from those policies.

Design philosophies like participatory design and codesign bring this concept to the world of technology, demanding that technologies designed for a group of people be designed and built, in part, by those people. Codesign challenges many of the assumptions of engineering, requiring people who are used to working in isolation to build broad teams and to understand that those most qualified to offer a technical solution may be least qualified to identify a need or articulate a design problem. This method is hard and frustrating, but it’s also one of the best ways to ensure that you’re solving the right problem, rather than imposing your preferred solution on a situation."



"It is unlikely that anyone is going to invite Shane Snow to redesign a major prison any time soon, so spending more than 3,000 words urging you to reject his solution may be a waste of your time and mine. But the mistakes Snow makes are those that engineers make all the time when they turn their energy and creativity to solving pressing and persistent social problems. Looking closely at how Snow’s solutions fall short offers some hope for building better, fairer, and saner solutions.

The challenge, unfortunately, is not in offering a critique of how solutions go wrong. Excellent versions of that critique exist, from Morozov’s war on solutionism, to Courtney Martin’s brilliant “The Reductive Seduction of Other People’s Problems.” If it’s easy to design inappropriate solutions about problems you don’t fully understand, it’s not much harder to criticize the inadequacy of those solutions.

What’s hard is synthesis — learning to use technology as part of well-designed sociotechnical solutions. These solutions sometimes require profound advances in technology. But they virtually always require people to build complex, multifunctional teams that work with and learn from the people the technology is supposed to benefit.

Three students at the MIT Media Lab taught a course last semester called “Unpacking Impact: Reflecting as We Make.” They point out that the Media Lab prides itself on teaching students how to make anything, and how to turn what you make into a business, but rarely teaches reflection about what we make and what it might mean for society as a whole. My experience with teaching this reflective process to engineers is that it’s both important and potentially paralyzing, that once we understand the incompleteness of technology as a path for solving problems and the ways technological solutions relate to social, market, and legal forces, it can be hard to build anything at all.

I’m going to teach a new course this fall, tentatively titled “Technology and Social Change.” It’s going to include an examination of the four levers of social change Larry Lessig suggests in Code, and which I’ve been exploring as possible paths to civic engagement. The course will include deep methodological dives into codesign, and will examine using anthropology as tool for understanding user needs. It will look at unintended consequences, cases where technology’s best intentions fail, and cases where careful exploration and preparation led to technosocial systems that make users and communities more powerful than they were before.

I’m “calling my shot” here for two reasons. One, by announcing it publicly, I’m less likely to back out of it, and given how hard these problems are, backing out is a real possibility. And two, if you’ve read this far in this post, you’ve likely thought about this issue and have suggestions for what we should read and what exercises we should try in the course of the class — I hope you might be kind enough to share those with me.

In the end, I’m grateful for Shane Snow’s surreal, Black Mirror vision of the future prison both because it’s a helpful jumping-off point for understanding how hard it is to make change well by using technology, and because the U.S. prison system is a broken and dysfunctional system in need of change. But we need to find ways to disrupt better, to challenge knowledgeably, to bring the people they hope to benefit into the process. If you can, please help me figure out how we teach these ideas to the smart, creative people I work with—people who want to change the world, and are afraid of breaking it in the process."
technology  technosolutionism  solutionism  designimperialism  humanitariandesign  problemsolving  2016  ethanzuckerman  design  blackmirror  shanesnow  prisons  socialchange  lawrencelessig  anthropology  medialab  courtneymartin  nutraloaf  soylent  codesign  evgenymorozov  olcp  wikipedia  bias  racism  empathy  suziecagle  mitmedialab  mit  systems  systemsthinking  oculusrift  secondlife  vr  virtualreality  solitaryconfinement  incarceration  change  changemaking  ethnography  chelseabarabas  participatory  participatorydesign 
july 2016 by robertogreco
What We Can Learn from Homeschooling - Hybrid Pedagogy
"I explain all of this not to suggest that homeschooling creates prodigies. It doesn’t, although some homeschoolers are advanced students. My daughter is a regular, bright kid who is flourishing because she has had the opportunity to follow a personal educational path with guidance and participation from the adults in her life. She has had the opportunity to work several grades ahead in her areas of strength and take her time with math, ultimately winding up ahead there, too. In addition, she has far more options for elective study. When I was in high school, I had to choose between orchestra and chorus. There wasn’t time for both. Using free or low-cost resources, my daughter has been able to pursue subjects that are important to her: art, music, computer programming, creating videos, writing novels, and reading — lots and lots of reading. She earns PE credit by taking karate classes, where she is always working towards the next goal of a tournament or belt test. Offering a selection of electives that aren’t necessarily offered by the school, and allowing students to choose several of them would either be impossible in or highly disruptive to the current system. Most kids in traditional school are riding atop an educational super tanker, huge, powerful, and slow to stop or change course, but because we can work outside that system, we’ve been able to speed around on a jet ski.

Let me clarify that I am not using personal learning to mean “personalized learning,” the theory advocating adaptive learning as a panacea for the efficiency problems seen in educating children. Education is a messy process. Like human history itself, it’s not linear but iterative, and we need to pay attention to where each child is on that somewhat unpredictable journey. I am an educational technology advocate who would agree that adaptive learning software is good (even fun) for learning certain things, and technology, used thoughtfully, is a tremendous tool in the hands of practiced educators. However, I would also assert that personal learning ultimately prioritizes human relationships, both faculty/student and students/peers. As in the case of my daughter’s math class, using telecommuting technologies may simply allow us to extend our network of faculty and peers beyond geographical constraints.

If we build this kind of flexibility with accountability into the curriculum, will teaching look different? Yes, and in many ways it will be more difficult. It will require working one on one with students in a very intense way. The hours may be longer, the scheduling different, and more will be expected in terms of collaboration, preparation, and continuing professional development. Finally, because such highly qualified professionals will require more compensation, they may be working with larger class sizes. That’s not ideal, just realistic. I suggest, though, that being an educator in this sort of environment will also be infinitely more rewarding. When educators become facilitators or even, as Chris Friend and Sean Michael Morris argue, “lab managers,” the student truly moves to the center of his or her own learning. If we prepare them, over time, to take control of that learning, then even when some require additional help, students are more likely to thrive."



"The University of Pennsylvania admissions page welcomes homeschooled applicants as “academically talented and often courageous pioneers who chart non-conventional academic paths.” The University of Arizona has a dedicated recruiter for homeschooled students, just as they do for each county in the state. MIT claims that they have long accepted homeschooled students, who become “successful and vibrant members of our community.” If the point of an education is to foster the kind of “intellectual vitality” noted by Reider in his search for Stanford University applicants, why wouldn’t we take what we’ve learned from homeschooling successes and apply it to the education of all our students? Forget iPads. Students need what homeschooling offers: autonomy, versatility, and freedom — in other words, jet skis."
melanieborrego  education  srg  edg  glvo  unschooling  deschooling  learning  colleges  universities  admissions  2015  chrisfriend  seanmichaelmorris  autonomy  homeschool  versitality  freedom  howwelearn  howweteach  messiness  relationships  personalization  personalizedlearning  personallearning  flexibility  johnholt  stanford  ucriverside  mit  penn  leifnelson  finland 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Le Laboratoire Cambridge
"Le Laboratoire Cambridge is a unique art and design center that invites visitors to explore the experiments and wonders of innovators of all kinds discovering at frontiers of science - from leading artists and designers to chefs and master perfumers. Founded in 2007 in Paris by renowned inventor, writer, and Harvard Professor David Edwards, Le Laboratoire now opens in Cambridge as the new center of ArtScience Labs, a global organization dedicated to the development of the most radical ideas that transform the way we learn, imagine and evolve. The design, and architecture, of Le Laboratoire Cambridge, is the work of French designer Mathieu Lehanneur and the American architects Zeke Brown and Josh Fenollosa."

[via: http://www.wired.com/2014/10/on-learning-by-doing/ ]

[previously:
https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:a3d471d9f3f3
https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:2efadd789363 ]
cambridge  massachusetts  2014  2007  art  science  mathieulehanneur  zekebrown  joshfenollosa  davidedwards  lelaboratoire  design  lcproject  openstudioproject  boston  mit 
october 2014 by robertogreco
The Principles at MIT Media Lab
"There are nine or so principles to work in a world like this:

Resilience instead of strength, which means you want to yield and allow failure and you bounce back instead of trying to resist failure.

You pull instead of push. That means you pull the resources from the network as you need them, as opposed to centrally stocking them and controlling them.

You want to take risk instead of focusing on safety.

You want to focus on the system instead of objects.

You want to have good compasses not maps.

You want to work on practice instead of theory. Because sometimes you don’t why it works, but what is important is that it is working, not that you have some theory around it.

It disobedience instead of compliance. You don’t get a Nobel Prize for doing what you are told. Too much of school is about obedience, we should really be celebrating disobedience.

It’s the crowd instead of experts.

It’s a focus on learning instead of education."
mitmedialab  mit  joiito  openstudioproject  lcproject  resilience  failure  practice  praxis  crowds  expertise  education  learning  howwelearn  disobedience  compliance  compasses  safety  risk  via:sebastienmarion  medialab 
june 2014 by robertogreco
15-Yr-Old Kelvin Doe Wows M.I.T. - YouTube
"15-Year-Old Kelvin Doe is an engineering whiz living in Sierra Leone who scours the trash bins for spare parts, which he uses to build batteries, generators and transmitters. Completely self-taught, Kelvin has created his own radio station where he broadcasts news and plays music under the moniker, DJ Focus.

Kelvin became the youngest person in history to be invited to the "Visiting Practitioner's Program" at MIT. THNKR had exclusive access to Kelvin and his life-changing journey - experiencing the US for the first time, exploring incredible opportunities, contending with homesickness, and mapping out his future.

Here is a link to the Bobby Fala track in the video on SoundCloud: http://soundcloud.com/karen-kilberg/k...

Photos courtesy of Adam Cohn (http://www.adamcohn.com/) and Paula Aguilera


PRODIGIES is a bi-weekly series showcasing the youngest and brightest as they challenge themselves to reach new heights and the stories behind them.

Created and produced by @radical.media, THNKR gives you extraordinary access to the people, stories, places and thinking that will change your mind."
kelcindoe  africa  sierraleone  mit  engineering  electronics  edg  music  making  makers 
april 2014 by robertogreco
RADical Design for LEARNING -- Survey Seminar and Practical Action Laboratory
"Wtf is going on? Why are people limping out of 20 years of schooling without directed motivation, a solid internal compass, or a commitment to passionately pursuing their interests? Let's examine why in a cozy, edgy, authentic seminar where we balance theory with real-world action (praxis). We'll study the radical learning greats such as Illich, Papert, and Llewelyn, with focused readings and videos followed by discussion. Whenever possible we'll try to have the authors or their direct students available for Q&A&Q. And through hands-on labs and projects we'll design and enact experience-based transformations, like improvised music, consciousness altering strategies, electronics workshops etc. We can't wait to see you realize your wonderful ideas!"
unschooling  deschooling  education  syllabus  jaysilver  ericrosenbaum  mit  learning  mitmedialab  medialab  lifelongkindergarten  amosblanton  lego  seymourpapert  ivanillich  gracellewelyn  bilalghalib  jefflieberman  making  hackerspaces  lcproject  makerspaces  openstudioproject  grading  rubrics  assessment  diy  notbacktoschoolcamp  johnholt  piaget  mitchresnick  leahbuechley  eleanorduckworth  nuvu  nuvustudio  holeinthewall  sugatamitra  sprout  elsistema  theblueschool  computerclubhouse  drishya  bakhtiarmikhak  sudburyschools  sudburyvalleyschool  samcassat  seanstevens  frostburn  quaker  criticalmass  burningman  paulofreire  quakers  sprout&co  jeanpiaget  syllabi 
june 2013 by robertogreco
The Age of the Anti-Logo: Why Museums Are Shedding Their Idenities
"This month, the Whitney Museum… unveiled a newly revamped identity courtesy of Experimental Jetset (and a website designed by Linked by Air), a trio of Dutch designers known for their theory-based work. Experimental Jetset describe their design as a “toolkit,” which is easily adaptable to contexts ranging from buttons to stationary to games. The sparse logomark itself is based on a heavy black Neue Haas Grotesk text, while a system of jagged lines forming a “W” change based on context.

According to the designers, the “responsive W” is meant to fit around news, artwork, and other pieces of content, like a simple black-and-white frame. “One of the main subjects we tried to explore was the notion of a graphic identity that wouldn't consists of a static, single logo,” they told me over email, “but one that would be able to change shape, reacting to ever-changing proportions and surfaces.”



But these days, developing a museum “brand” is a complicated chore. The visual identity of an arts institution has attract visitors and donors, and it also has to say something about the curatorial stance of a museum. That’s a difficult thing to convey in a single shape or form—and many museums, instead, are turning to “flexible” identities.

For example, the Brooklyn Museum of Art adopted a flexible logomark in 2004, designed by 2x4 to “better reflect the visitor-centered goals of the Museum.” Then there’s the Museum of Arts and Design, which adopted a Pentagram-designed customizable logotype in 2008. Perhaps the most famous—and successful—example of a flexible identity is MIT Media Lab’s algorithmic logo, designed by E Roon Kang and Richard The. Sure, Media Lab isn't an arts institution, but the logo set the tone for dozens of identities that came after it. The design is based on three spotlights, which change according to each permutation—there are over 40,000 unique logos available—and it was so successful because it spoke to what makes Media Lab so successful.

The notion of adaptivity and flexibility in graphic design seems to appeal particularly to the art world, which makes a modicum of sense: galleries and modern museums focus on visual culture as it evolves, and their graphic representation should reflect that. But as logos and identities get less specific and more scalable, is something lost in the exchange?

The original purpose of arts organizations like the Whitney was to guide the unwitting public through the currents of contemporary art with an unpretentious, decisive voice. As far as we can intuit anything about a museum from its identity, are we witnessing a curatorial crisis of confidence? Maybe, but maybe not. Either way, it’ll be interesting to see whether this elegant new identity outlasts its predecessor."
whitney  branding  design  museums  identity  art  medialab  mit  experimentaljetset  brooklynmuseumofart  museumofartsanddesign  pentagram  customization  2x4  adaptability  flexibility  graphicdesign  2013  logos  mitmedialab 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Syllabus | Technologies for Creative Learning
"This course explores how new technologies can engage people in creative learning experiences – and transform the ways we think about learning. Students will experiment with new learning technologies, discuss educational ideas underlying the technologies, analyze design strategies for creating new technologies, and examine how and what people learn as they use these technologies."

[Wayback: http://web.archive.org/web/20120808072239/http://mas714.media.mit.edu/syllabus ]
syllabus  learning  creativity  mit  constructivism  coding  children  technology  computing  computers  scratch  mindstorms  ivanillich  davidresnick  seymourpapert  mimiito  henryjenkins  barbararogoff  alfiekohn  caroldweck  mihalycsikszentmihalyi  sherryturkle  jamespaulgee  via:dianakimball  readinglists  education  teaching  programming  syllabi 
february 2013 by robertogreco
MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism
"The Center for Advanced Urbanism is committed to fostering a rigorous design culture for the large scale; by focusing our disciplinary conversations about architecture, urban planning, and systems thinking, not about the problems of yesterday, but of tomorrow. Alan Berger, Director of Research, and myself are motivated by the radical changes in our environment, and the role that high design and research can play in addressing these. We embrace conversations with the world's absolute top experts in planning, engineering, and technology, all at MIT, to feed and foster the growing field of large-scale design and research. We take pride in the fact that participants in the center do not just talk about things; they do projects, build things, and actively change our society out in the real world; and then come together to learn from each other's experiences, publish, and debate about future directions. The Center for Advanced Urbanism has been established at the initiative of the Dean and Chairs of the School of Architecture and Planning and reflects a renewed drive to excellence in urbanism.

—Alexander D'Hooghe, Director, Center for Advanced Urbanism"

[A video introduction is here: http://cau.mit.edu/news/cau-releases-urbanism-film and here https://vimeo.com/59435045 ]
mit  cau  centerforadvancedurbanism  urbanism  urbanplanning  scale  environment  experience  cities  urban  systemsthinking  systems  interdisciplinary  future  infill  design  planning  engineering  interurbanism  suburbs  suburbia  society  technology  mitcau  architecture 
february 2013 by robertogreco
science cow: Dyslexia at MIT
"The ability to read has long been linked in society’s mind to intelligence, but dyslexia is surprisingly common at MIT, to such an extent that…Nicholas Negroponte (a dyslexic himself), called it the MIT disease in his autobiography. Recent research has found that dyslexia is not related to IQ. It is, however, the most common learning disability, at MIT and elsewhere, affecting between 5% and 20% of the population.

The latest research is finding dyslexia’s roots in unexpected places, with unexpected consequences, disproving common misconceptions about dyslexia and learning disorders in general. We are beginning to find that dyslexia is not a disorder but a different way of experiencing and understanding the world around us, created by a different wiring and development of the brain with benefits as significant as its downsides."

"It is important for us to stop seeing dyslexia as a learning disability and start seeing it as an alternative way of perceiving and processing the world…"
bennetshaywitz  neuropsychology  fumikohoeft  brain  speech  phonology  tylerperrachione  johngabrieli  manuelcasanova  xiaoluhis  nadinegaab  creativity  fernetteeide  writing  reading  literacy  nicholasnegroponte  mit  dyslexicadvantage  dyslexia  via:irasocol 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Open university: Joi Ito plans a radical reinvention of MIT's Media Lab (Wired UK)
"Welcome to Ito's vision for opening up the 27-year-old Media Lab, one in which — for example — urban agriculture might be researched in Detroit; the arts in Chicago; coding in London; and in which any bright talent anywhere, academically qualified or not, can be part of the world's leading "antidisciplinary" research lab. "Opening up the lab is more about expanding our reach and creating our network," explains Ito…

"Openness is a survival trait." …

By opening up the Media Lab, Ito hopes to move closer towards his goal of "a world with seven billion teachers", where smart crowds, adopting a resilient approach and a rebellious spirit, solve some of the world's great problems. His is a world of networks and ecosystems, in which unconstrained creativity can tackle everything from infant mortality to climate change. …"
christopherbevans  networks  hughherr  nerioxman  edboydens  syntheticbiology  academictenure  academia  tenure  highered  highereducation  poverty  small  ayahbdeir  littlebits  dropouts  walterbender  frankmoss  nicholasnegroponte  communitydevelopment  macarthurfoundation  grey-lock  petergabriel  caafoundation  michellekyddlee  knightfoundation  albertoibargüen  sethgodin  reidhoffman  junecohen  constructivism  connectivism  focus  polymaths  self-directedlearning  networkedlearning  periphery  openstudioproject  deschooling  unschooling  adaptability  disobedience  education  learning  practice  compliance  rebellion  globalvoices  creativecommons  mozilla  innovation  sustainability  consumerism  resilience  london  chicago  detroit  medialab  mit  antidisciplinary  lcproject  openness  open  joiito  mitmedialab 
november 2012 by robertogreco
A Slower Speed of Light | MIT Game Lab
"…a first-person game prototype in which players navigate a 3D space while picking up orbs that reduce the speed of light in increments. Custom-built, open-source relativistic graphics code allows the speed of light in the game to approach the player's own maximum walking speed. Visual effects of special relativity gradually become apparent to the player, increasing the challenge of gameplay. These effects, rendered in realtime to vertex accuracy, include the Doppler effect (red- and blue-shifting of visible light, and the shifting of infrared and ultraviolet light into the visible spectrum); the searchlight effect (increased brightness in the direction of travel); time dilation (differences in the perceived passage of time from the player and the outside world); Lorentz transformation (warping of space at near-light speeds); and the runtime effect (the ability to see objects as they were in the past, due to the travel time of light). Players can choose to…"
mitgamelab  mit  gamedesign  speedoflight  videogames  gamelab  gaming  science  physics  games 
november 2012 by robertogreco
sprout & co.
"sprout is a community education and research organization devoted to creating and supporting the community-driven learning, teaching, and investigation of science. We're united by a passion to reclaim science as a richly personal and creative craft. Through our PROGRAMS & STUDIOS, we're working to make our vision real in Somerville.

You might say we're working to create a community college that lives up to its name—not a college in a community or a school in a building, but a community of people who work together as colleagues to explore questions they care about."

[From the Studios page]

"Our studios are a bit unusual. Here you can find out WHERE they are, how you can use them as a COWORKING space, a community VENUE, a WORKSHOP AND LABSPACE for independent investigation, or WHATEVER ELSE you have in mind. And if you're interested, you can read about WHY we run our studios the way we do."
deschooling  unschooling  schooldesign  venues  workshops  labspace  coworking  glvo  shaunalynnduffy  alecresnick  michaelnagle  lcproject  openstudioproject  mit  massachusetts  somerville  learning  community  diy  sprout  makerspaces  hackerspaces  education  science  design  boston  sprout&co 
september 2012 by robertogreco
NewsDiffs | Tracking Online News Articles Over Time
"NewsDiffs archives changes in articles after publication.
Currently, we track nytimes.com, cnn.com, politico.com and the bbc.co.uk.

NewsDiffs, which was born out of the Knight Mozilla MIT hackathon in June 2012, is trying to solve the problem of archiving news in the constantly evolving world of online journalism.

The New York Times recently highlighted NewsDiffs in the public editors column (which had previously discussed the difficulties of revisions in the digital age).

You can browse our repository of articles. Or you can take a look at some of the examples of articles that have changed.

If you are a developer, you can check out the Github repository.

If you want updates, you can subscribe to our newsletter, or you can follow NewsDiffs on Twitter."

[via: http://contentsmagazine.com/articles/the-update/ ]
bbc  politico  cnn  nytimes  changes  updates  mit  journalism  news  tracking  newsdiffs 
august 2012 by robertogreco
MaKey MaKey: An Invention Kit for Everyone (Official Site)
"MaKey MaKey is an invention kit for the 21st century. Turn everyday objects into touchpads and combine them with the internet. It's a simple Invention Kit for Beginners and Experts doing art, engineering, and everything inbetween:

The kit will include everything you see above: MaKey MaKey, Alligator Clips, USB Cable."
interface  mit  invention  programming  children  interaction  hardware  diy  arduino  makeymakey  coding 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Joi Ito's Near-Perfect Explanation of the Next 100 Years - Technology Review
"One hundred years from now, the role of science and technology will be about becoming part of nature rather than trying to control it.

So much of science and technology has been about pursuing efficiency, scale and “exponential growth” at the expense of our environment and our resources. We have rewarded those who invent technologies that control our triumph over nature in some way. This is clearly not sustainable.

We must understand that we live in a complex system where everything is interrelated and interdependent and that everything we design impacts a larger system.

My dream is that 100 years from now, we will be learning from nature, integrating with nature and using science and technology to bring nature into our lives to make human beings and our artifacts not only zero impact but a positive impact to the natural system that we live in."
systemsthinking  systems  complexsystems  complexity  environment  growth  scale  sustainability  2012  technology  science  nature  future  biology  singularity  mit  joiito 
may 2012 by robertogreco
The Speculist » Blog Archive » In the Future Everything Will Be A Coffee Shop
"Eventually you could have local campuses becoming places where MITx students seek tutoring, network, & socialize—reclaiming some of the college experience they’d otherwise have lost.

Phil thought this sounded like college as a giant coffee shop. I agree. Every education would be ad hoc. It would be student-directed toward the job market she’s aiming for.

This trend toward…coffeeshopification…is changing more than just colleges:

Book Stores Will Shrink to Coffee Shops…

The Coffee Shop Will Displace Most Retail Shops…

Offices Become Coffee Shops…Again…

What Doesn’t Become a Coffee Shop?…

…houses of worship…

What will remain other than coffee shops? Upscale retail will remain…[for] experience…Restaurants remain. Grocery stores remain.

Brick and mortar retail stores will be converted to public spaces. Multi-use space will be in increasing demand as connectivity tools allow easy coordination of impromptu events…"
restaurants  multipurpose  multi-usespace  impromptuevents  events  coffeeshopification  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  howwelearn  howwework  work  enlightenment  stevenjohnson  amazonprime  amazon  shopping  espressobookmachine  coffeehouses  coffeeshops  coffee  on-demandprinting  highereducation  higheredbubble  highered  information  reading  ebooks  stephengordon  future  retail  deschooling  unschooling  sociallearning  self-directedlearning  mitx  mit  learning  srg  glvo  2011  universities  colleges  education  opencoffeeclubdresden  3dprinting  ondemand  ondemandprinting  bookfuturism  books  cafes  openstudioproject 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Innovation in Open Networks
"Moore's Law and the Internet have dramatically lowered the cost of the creation and distribution of information, fundamentally changing the way we collaborate. We no longer live in a world of central control but rather in ecosystem of "small pieces loosely joined" with innovation on the edges. Open source software and open standards thrive in this environment and push the networks to be even more open, making it possible that the agility we see in software and consumer Internet services may spread to hardware. Joichi Ito will show what startups, the MIT Media Lab and citizen geiger counters in Japan have in common."
joiito  opennetworks  open  2011  towatch  mitmedialab  medialab  mit  japan  smallpieceslooselyjoined  control  ecosystems  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  innovation  networks  startups 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Building 20 - Wikipedia
"Building 20 was a temporary wooden structure hastily erected during World War II on the central campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Since it was always regarded as "temporary", it never received a formal name throughout its 55-year existence. The three-floor structure housed the Radiation Laboratory (or "Rad Lab"), where fundamental advances in physical electronics, electromagnetic properties of matter, microwave physics, and microwave communication principles were made. After the Rad Lab shut down after the end of World War II, Building 20 served as a "magical incubator" for many small MIT programs, research, and student activities for a half-century before it was demolished in 1998."

[See also: http://www.eecs.mit.edu/building/20/ ]
building20  mit  history  temporary  extendedtemporary  persistence  incubator  radlab  magicalincubartor  place  lcproject  pop-ups  popup 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Mitchel Resnick 2011 Prize Winner - YouTube
"Mitchel Resnick, Professor of Learning Research at the MIT Media Lab, develops new technologies and activities to engage people (especially children) in creative learning experiences, helping them learn to think creatively, reason systematically, and work collaboratively. His Lifelong Kindergarten research group developed ideas and technologies underlying the LEGO Mindstorms robotics kits and the Scratch programming environment and online community, used by millions of young people around the world. He also co-founded the Computer Clubhouse project, an international network of more than 100 after-school learning centers where youth from low-income communities learn to express themselves creatively with new technologies."
mit  mitmedialab  mitchresnick  2011  lifelongkindergarten  scratch  education  learning  constructivism  projectbasedlearning  tcsnmy  schools  design  mindstorms  lego  legonxt  wedo  electronics  coding  programming  children  lcproject  teaching  pbl  medialab 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Mitch Resnick: The Role of Making, Tinkering, Remixing in Next-Generation Learning | DMLcentral
"…best learning experiences come when people are actively engaged in designing things, creating things, & inventing things—expressing themselves.

…if we want people to really be fluent w/ new technologies & learn through their activities, it requires people to get involved as makers—to create things.

…best experiences come when…making use of the materials in the world around you, tinkering w/ things…coming up w/ a prototype, getting feedback…iteratively changing it…making new ideas, over & over…adapting to the current situation & the new situations that arise.

In our after school programs, we see many kids who have been unsuccessful in traditional educational settings become incredibly successful when they are given the opportunity to make, tinker, & remix.

…there are lessons for schools from the ways that kids learn outside of schools…

Over time, I do think we need to rethink educational institutions as a place that embraces playful experimentation."
tcsnmy  mitchresnick  mit  mitmedialab  medialab  scratch  mindstorms  lego  informallearning  learning  unschooling  deschooling  schools  play  prototyping  making  doing  remix  remixing  remixculture  self-expression  technology  lcproject  howardrheingold  makers  creators  iteration  iterative  wedo  lifelongkindergarten  education  experimentation  invention  feedback  2011  toshare 
september 2011 by robertogreco
This Week in Ed-Tech: App Inventor Finds a New Home | Hack Education
"Fans of Google‘s Android App Inventor can breathe a sigh of relief. Following on last week’s news that Google planned to shut App Inventor down, the company announced that it was open sourcing the project and handing it over to MIT Media Lab. The Media Lab in turn, and with seed funding from Google, announced it would launch a new Center for Mobile Learning, focusing on how new mobile technologies can help enhance learning and utilizing App Inventor as its first project."

"Skillshare announced this week that it has raised $3.1 million from Union Square Ventures and Spark Capital to help extend its offerings. Skillshare allows anyone to offer a class — on or offline. A sign, perhaps of great and committed investors: USV’s Alfred Wenger has taught a Skillshare class on Bayesian probability."
google  android  appinventor  mit  medialab  applications  coding  programming  opensource  centerformobilelearning  skillshare  hourschool  education  learning  2011  mitmedialab 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The difference between Google and Aaron Swartz | MediaFile
"Aaron’s arrest should be a wake up call to universities–evidence of how fundamentally broken this core piece of their architecture remains despite d ecades of progress in advancing communication and collaboration.

The MIT staff who called the FBI would have been served better by calling the chancellor to ask, “How have we created a system that forces 25 year-olds to sneak around in the basement, hiding hard-drives in closets in order ask basic and important questions about our work? Can’t we do better?”"
academia  publishing  openaccess  aaronswartz  datascraping  law  legal  mit  jstor  technology  2011 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Specs that see right through you - tech - 05 July 2011 - New Scientist ["Boring conversation? Accessories that decipher emotional cues could save your social life – or reveal that you're a jerk"]
"Picard handed me a pair of special glasses. The instant I put them on I discovered that I had got it all terribly wrong. That look of admiration, I realised, was actually confusion and disagreement. Worse, she was bored out of her mind. I became privy to this knowledge because a little voice was whispering in my ear through a headphone attached to the glasses. It told me that Picard was "confused" or "disagreeing". All the while, a red light built into the specs was blinking above my right eye to warn me to stop talking. It was as though I had developed an extra sense.

The glasses can send me this information thanks to a built-in camera linked to software that analyses Picard's facial expressions. They're just one example of a number of "social X-ray specs" that are set to transform how we interact with each other. …Our emotional intelligence is about to be boosted, but are we ready to broadcast feelings we might rather keep private?"
technology  culture  psychology  nonverbalcommunication  nonverbal  communication  listening  rosalindpicard  paulekman  ranaelkaliouby  simonbaron-cohen  affectiva  autism  social  faces  mit 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Don’t show, don’t tell? - MIT News Office
"Cognitive scientists find that when teaching young children, there is a trade-off between direct instruction and independent exploration."
education  learning  teaching  psychology  pedagogy  instruction  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  play  cognition  cognitivesciences  children  humility  patience  howwelearn  howweteach  tcsnmy  toshare  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  schools  schooliness  2011  mit 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Errol Morris: Did My Brother Invent E-Mail With Tom Van Vleck? - Interactive Feature - NYTimes.com
"MIT’s Compatible Time Sharing System, or CTSS, was one of the first operating systems to utilize “time-sharing,” which allowed many people to use a single mainframe computer simultaneously. Users accessed the computer at remote terminals — modified electric typewriters — that sent input to the computer and printed output on paper as the user typed code. In early 1965, two programmers, Tom Van Vleck and Noel Morris, wanted to send each other electronic messages, and created the e-mail program MAIL. To get a sense of what it felt like to use this early version of e-mail, try the programming game below. Your terminal will type lines of the actual CTSS MAIL code, with missing segments indicated by a blank. Use the clues to fill in the blanks and complete the lines of code. Then, using the MAIL program you just wrote, send a message to yourself or to a friend."
mit  email  history  ctss  compatibletimesharingsystem  errolmorris  noelmorris  tomvanvleck  2011  communication 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Architecture needs to interact - Op-Ed - Domus
"Instead of bringing together users through machines, what if interaction design were reconceived to foster positive friction between different design disciplines? What would interaction design look like if it wasn't only (or even necessarily) digital, but if it genuinely melded architecture, industrial and product design, graphic design, art, video narrative, tiny technology, large scale networks, and so on? What would debates between the disciplines be like? What might win, and more importantly, what would they unearth about interaction design in general? What other disciplines might emerge and what new visions of the world might appear? The recognition that many other fields have dealt with these issues and continue to do so, may open up a larger conversation that reveals new relationships, isomorphisms, productive frictions—even interactions."
architecture  design  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  mollywrightsteenson  fredscharmen  mit  medialab  nicholasnegroponte  janejacobs  christopheralexander  cedricprice  archigram  reynerbanham  urbancomputing  interactiondesign  networkarchitecture  billmoggridge  billverplank  ideo  philtabor  2011  mitmedialab 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Joining the MIT Media Lab - Joi Ito's Web
"In the press release announcing my appointment, Nicholas Negroponte, Media Lab co-founder and chairman emeritus says, "In the past 25 years, the Lab helped to create a digital revolution -- a revolution that is now over. We are a digital culture. Today, the 'media' in Media Lab include the widest range of innovations, from brain sciences to the arts. Their impact will be global, social, economic and political -- Joi's world."

I really felt at home for the first time in many ways. It felt like a place where I could focus - focus on everything - but still have a tremendous ability to work with the team as well as my network and broader extended network to execute and impact the world in a substantial and positive way."
mit  education  joiito  2011  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  medialab  nicholasnegroponte  digitalrevolution  digitalculture  change  innovation  brain  science  art  crosspollination  crossdisciplinary  networks  teamwork  mitmedialab 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Joichi Ito Named Head of M.I.T. Media Lab - NYTimes.com
"For centuries diplomas have been synonymous w/ the nation’s universities.

That makes MIT’s decision to name a 44-year old Japanese venture capitalist who attended, but did not graduate, from 2 American colleges as director of one of the world’s top computing science laboratories an unusual choice…

Mr. Ito first attended Tufts where he briefly studied computer science but wrote that he found it drudge work. Later he attended the U of Chicago where he studied physics, but once again found it stultifying…later wrote of his experience: “I once asked a professor to explain the solution to a problem so I could understand it more intuitively. He said, ‘You can’t understand it intuitively. Just learn the formula so you’ll get the right answer.’ That was it for me.”

Mr. Ito’s colleagues minimize the fact that he is w/out academic credentials. “He has credibility in an academic context,” said Lawrence Lessig…"
mit  medialab  joiito  larrylessig  innovation  dropouts  postcredentials  credentials  alternative  alternativeeducation  learningbydoing  2011  creativecommons  unschooling  deschooling  connectivism  connections  mozilla  venturecapital  mitmedialab 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The Really Smart Phone - WSJ.com
"Researchers are harvesting a wealth of intimate detail from our cellphone data, uncovering the hidden patterns of our social lives, travels, risk of disease—even our political views."
mobile  phones  cellphones  data  statistics  predictablity  health  predictions  research  2011  politics  policy  movement  travel  behavior  society  psychology  socialcontagion  robertleehotz  mit  alexpentland  humandynamiclaboratory  sms  texting  twitter  communication  happiness  smartphones  socialnetworks 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Vanished
"An environmental disaster has taken place on Planet Earth and we need your help.<br />
Smithsonian Institution & MIT Education Arcade invite all scientists-in-training ages 10½-14 to log onto VANISHED & help decipher clues that unravel one of the world’s biggest mysteries. An online/offline interactive event, VANISHED is an 8-week episodic quest that will transform you into principal scientific investigators who must collaborate to find the answers. You will race against time as you solve games, puzzles, & other online challenges; visit real museums; collect samples from in & around your homes; and even partner w/ some of the Smithsonian’s world renowned scientists & investigators, to help unlock the true secrets of this catastrophe—before it’s too late."
games  learning  vanished  smithsonian  mit  miteducationarcade  simulations  arg  museums  puzzles  mysteries  collaboration  tcsnmy  classideas  interactive 
april 2011 by robertogreco
electronic computation is invisible: maeda at RISD (tecznotes) {best to read the whole thing, and also the Natalia Ilyin post]
"…post about Maeda’s difficulties at RISD is interesting, but I was particularly struck by broader resonance of this:

"The Medialab is much more random than that. This may help to illuminate why John’s approach is so alien to traditional art students. Paul Rand seems to think it’s John’s engineering background which interferes with his leadership ability at RISD, but I think it’s actually scarier. John’s approach is hands off & experimental. Anything goes. Confusing & startling people is valorized…

…NONE of these artists have managed to broach the basic limitation that electronic computation is invisible. All techno artwork thus far relies on impenetrable microchips which require observer/participants to form abstractions in order to appreciate them. Look how hard it is to teach art students to program…

…once you go back in time & look at a Maeda or PLW project & realize you can’t run their code anymore, the collapsing of reality can be devastating."
johnmaeda  michalmigurski  risd  2011  handsoff  leadership  management  disconnect  medialab  mit  engineering  confusion  experimentation  paulrand  computers  computation  art  electroniccomputation  invisibility  reality  collapsingofreality  administration  learning  change  abstraction  inpenetrability  technology  mitmedialab 
april 2011 by robertogreco
MIT Media Lab's Brilliant New Logo Has 40,000 Permutations [Video] | Co.Design
"An algorithm can create 40,000 logo shapes in 12 different color combinations, providing the Media Lab an estimated 25 years' worth of personalized business cards."
mit  design  logos  medialab  evolvinglogos  mitmedialab 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Junkyard Jumbotron
"The Junkyard Jumbotron lets you take a bunch of random displays and instantly stitch them together into a large, virtual display, simply by taking a photograph of them. It works with laptops, smartphones, tablets --- anything that runs a web browser. It also highlights a new way of connecting a large number of heterogenous devices to each other in the field, on an ad-hoc basis."
display  media  video  diy  junkyardjumbotron  olpc  hacks  mit  make  classideas  edg  srg  glvo  installations 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Deb Roy: The birth of a word | Video on TED.com
"MIT researcher Deb Roy wanted to understand how his infant son learned language -- so he wired up his house with videocameras to catch every moment (with exceptions) of his son's life, then parsed 90,000 hours of home video to watch "gaaaa" slowly turn into "water." Astonishing, data-rich research with deep implications for how we learn."
debroy  language  science  ted  languageacquisition  learning  infants  children  childhood  environment  visualization  video  mit  neuroscience  social  spacetimeworms  naturenurture  speech  words  memorymachines  memory  lifelogging  tracking  audio  recording  classideas  patternrecognition  patterns  vocabulary  media  television  tv  socialmedia  eventstucture  conversation  semanticanalysis  wordscapes  communication  communicationdynamics  engagement  data  socialgraph  contentgraph  coviewing  behavior  socialstructures 
march 2011 by robertogreco
The Billion Prices Project @ MIT
"The Billion Prices Project is an academic initiative that collects prices from hundreds of online retailers around the world on a daily basis to conduct economic research. We currently monitor daily price fluctuations of ~5 million items sold by ~300 online retailers in more than 70 countries.

This webpage showcases examples of average inflation indexes that we created to illustrate the type of statistical work that can be done with this type of data. Our team is currently working on developing econometric models that leverage the data to forecast future trends and conduct economic research."
economics  visualization  inflation  finance  mit 
december 2010 by robertogreco
:: NuVu studio
"Students register for a specific studio such as “Balloon Mapping”, “Music and the City”, or “Future of Global Warming” of which there will be approximately 10 students, one Coach and an Assistant Coach. The Coach begins by providing a general overview of a problem to the students, an ambiguous real-world problem with potentially millions of answers. With the Coach’s help each student frames the problem from his/her perspective and enters into an iterative development process supported by the studio team of students & advisors.

Students are provided with access to outside resources – leading thinkers and experts – to whom they present their framework and receive feedback. Students document their process and progress, continually reviewing it with the Coach. They set parameters, synthesize, and continue refining, refining, refining. NuVu trains students to apply multiple perspectives to challenge and refine ideas over and over again until it becomes a natural way of learning."

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5ZlJVHfiYg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmY2_Xlhpng and
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4f4vb7GBIg&list=PL4D54C52BBC9A68D8 ]
education  engineering  highschool  lcproject  openstudio  mit  pedagogy  stem  design  make  innovation  technology  problemsolving  learning  boston  process  unschooling  deschooling  studioclassroom  designthinking  nuvu  nuvustudio 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Gray Area Foundation – Culture Debate’s Review of City Centered
"The City Centered Festival of Locative Media & Urban Community brought together a broad range of practices from artists, researchers, urban planners, community organisers, educators & computer programmers...
gaffta  stamen  bencerveny  sanfrancisco  preemptivemedia  brookesinger  senseablecities  cities  mit  urbancomputing  ubicomp  planning  urban  urbanism  mobile  phones  data  rfid  gps  locativemedia  location  maps  mapping  emmawhittakercitycenteredfestival 
august 2010 by robertogreco
designfiction :: NuVu studio
"In “Design Fiction Studio,” we will focus on experimental ways to combine science fiction story telling w/ new forms of media production. The students will be asked to write a short science-fiction story & expected to illustrate it in an experimental book. We will explore ways to combine alternative materials–such as very basic electronic elements, conductive inks, phase-&color-changing materials– w/ new kinds of fabrication & production techniques to learn both about materials & way they can be used in different kinds of fictional products.

Topics to be covered:

—Basic scifi writing skills to develop a short story or concept that will address a problem we may have in the near future.

—Experiment w/ new kinds of smart materials, design & interaction techniques to build an interactive book to illustrate the story.

—Discuss how writing fiction & building fictional objects can contribute to our thinking & allow us to bring into attention problems before they may even emerge."

[via: http://www.nearfuturelaboratory.com/2010/07/30/design-fiction-studio-for-young-minds/ ]
designfiction  education  future  learning  design  julianbleecker  mit  writing  classideas  nearfuture  brucesterling  scifi  sciencefiction  science  newmedia  multimedia  objects  fiction  designfictionstudio  nuvustudio  nuvu 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Redesigning Education: Why Can't We Be in Kindergarten for Life? | Fast Company
"The learner-centered paradigm should extend beyond the kindergarten classroom. Unfortunately, most educational institutions follow a model that creates an impersonal environment where adults, teaching, and authority are at the center. The studio-like environment of the kindergarten classroom succumbs to a rigid structure of disconnected subject-based classrooms and curricula. Naturally, the physical environment parallels this transition, moving from an open, multi-zone learning environment to a prototypical, teacher-centric mode of direct instruction. The collaborative student-teacher team and its dynamic atmosphere are replaced with the "sage-on-the-stage," front-teaching wall model."
tcsnmy  learning  schools  schooling  lcproject  classroomasstudio  teaching  kindergarten  lifelongkindergarten  creativity  collaboration  classrooms  mit  education  design  student-centered  sageonthestage  thirdteacher  unschooling  deschooling  reggioemilia  classroom 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Our Report Card
"We had children & became unschoolers. We teach [them] how to find information. We teach them that info & skills are choices as much as talents. You choose info, you choose tools, & you often choose your skill. Skill generally being a matter of practice. Not completely, but generally.
capitalism  information  learning  unschooling  deschooling  education  homeschool  tcsnmy  mit  informationage  freedom  sharing  scarcity  society  narcissism  sklls  tools  lcproject  parenting  glvo 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Eide Neurolearning Blog: Why MIT Students Can't Write and Harvard Students Can't Count
"Like the old MIT-Harvard rivalry, there's often a cortical battle for resources between spatial and verbal / visual "picture" thinking. In studies of spatial experts, high levels of spatial expertise were correlated with lower levels of verbal fluency, auditory verbal memory, and visual memory"
math  neuroscience  mathematics  mit  verbal  writing  reading  harvard 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Personas: How does the internet see you? | Metropath(ologies) | An installation by Aaron Zinman
"What is Personas? Personas is a component of the Metropath(ologies) exhibit, currently on display at the MIT Museum by the Sociable Media Group from the MIT Media Lab. It uses sophisticated natural language processing and the Internet to create a data portrait of one's aggregated online identity. In short, Personas shows you how the Internet sees you.
visualization  identity  internet  web  mit  art  exhibits  media  data  search 
august 2009 by robertogreco
MIT's Independent Activities Period: IAP 2010
"For close to four decades, IAP has provided members of the MIT community (students, faculty, staff, and alums) with a unique opportunity to organize, sponsor and participate in a wide variety of activities, including how-to sessions, forums, athletic endeavors, lecture series, films, tours, recitals and contests.
plp  mit  iap  education  learning  lcproject  tcsnmy 
august 2009 by robertogreco
MIT Hopes to Exorcise ‘Phantom’ Traffic Jams | Autopia | Wired.com
"Phantom jams are born of a lot of cars using the road. No surprise there. But when traffic gets too heavy, it takes the smallest disturbance in the flow - a driver laying on the brakes, someone tailgating too closely or some moron picking pickles off his burger - to ripple through traffic and create a self-sustaining traffic jam.
traffic  math  patterns  transportation  mit  mathematics  research  congestions  flow 
june 2009 by robertogreco
A New Map for Design: "As the focus of design shifts from the production of finite goods to a practice of experimentation, ideas take precedence over products." § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM
"The best contemporary design schools are the most important centers for the production of ideas, having earned preeminence over the R&D departments of corporations & other think tanks by progressively shedding the focus on the immediate production of finite artifacts to privilege experimentation. As a result, they usually flourish where students & teachers can find interdisciplinarity & pluralism, in areas with a strong cultural identity—be it the arts, engineering, architecture, technology, craft, or in any other discipline from which designers draw on a daily basis—that have connections & access to other cultural poles, such as departments of universities, museums, galleries...The dismantling of a static geography of design is not over yet, however...the system of schools & other educational institutions is becoming wider & more open. It will hopefully foster the development of identity & personality, the ultimate pointillistic & open-source destination of the design trajectory. "
paolaantonelli  design  education  future  technology  consumerism  postconsumerism  mit  futurism  disruption  experimentation  gamechanging  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  innovation  crisis  furniture  research  change  criticism  designthinking  art 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Is MIT Obsolete? § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM
"A few hundred top universities with a few thousand students each can hope to host only millions out of the billions of people on the planet, but insight and invention do not stop there. The MITs of the world are far from obsolete, but instead of draining brains away from where they are most needed, these institutions can now share not just their knowledge but also their tools, by providing the means to create them. Rather than advanced technological development and education being elite activities bounded by scarce space in classrooms and labs, they can become much more widely accessible and locally integrated, limited only by the most renewable of raw materials: ideas."
mit  invention  innovation  collaboration  prototyping  engineering  education  colleges  universities  media  community  technology  manufacturing  fabrication  funding  obsolescence  learning  autodidacts  deschooling  unschooling 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Scratch Lowers Resistance to Programming | Gadget Lab from Wired.com
""Our design philosophy is, don't design something for kids that you don't also find engaging and interesting," says Jay Silver, one of the researchers who created Scratch. Silver works in the Media Lab's "Lifelong Kindergarten" group. So it's not surprising that the environment is fun for adults, too. At the Emerging Technology conference here Monday, a roomful of grownups were playing with the program, creating bouncing kitties and a simple golf game."
scratch  mit  lifelongkindergarten  olpc  programming  learning  edg  education  picoboard  etech 
march 2009 by robertogreco
David Merrill demos Siftables, the smart blocks | Video on TED.com
"MIT grad student David Merrill demos Siftables -- cookie-sized, computerized tiles you can stack and shuffle in your hands. These future-toys can do math, play music, and talk to their friends, too. Is this the next thing in hands-on learning?"
davidmerrill  design  education  learning  technology  medialab  mit  newmedia  siftables  interface  media  mitmedialab 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Global Guerrillas: INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION?
"Since nearly all of the value of an education has been extracted by the producer, to the detriment of the customer, this situation has all the earmarks of a bubble. A bubble that will soon burst as median incomes are adjusted downwards to global norms over the next decade". lectures + application + collaboration. "When will the floodgates open? The shift towards online education as the norm and in-person as the exception will arrive, however, the path is unclear. It is currently blocked by guilds/unions, inertia, credentialism, and romantic notions."
change  reform  education  learning  online  elearning  colleges  universities  futurism  future  business  trends  economics  opensource  mit  johnrobb  crisis  unschooling  deschooling  homeschool  lcproject  gamechanging  money  tuition  inflation  price  cost  bubbles  2009  credentials  teaching  students 
january 2009 by robertogreco
MIT Developing “Smart Bikes” and a Facebook App For Bikers : Gas 2.0
"In addition to the social networking and tracking software, MIT is developing a “Smart Bike” that uses regenerative braking to charge a battery for a motor that supplements peddling power. The battery, motor and regenerative braking system are all integrated into a rear wheel and could be retrofitted to existing bicycles.
bikes  copenhagen  concepts  mit  research  transportation  urban  green  mapping  social  location  technology 
november 2008 by robertogreco
MIT Mobile Experience Laboratory
"The MIT Mobile Experience Lab focuses on radically reinventing and creatively designing connections between people, information and physical places using cutting-edge information technology to improve peopleʻs lives through meaningful experiences. With a multidisciplinary team, we research and design new technologies along with their impact in societies, spaces and communities."
mit  mobile  ict  information  technology  usability  mobility  phones  interaction  location  design  education  future 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Why Microsoft and Intel tried to kill the XO $100 laptop - Times Online
"Nicholas Negroponte had a vision: to build a $100 laptop and give away millions to educate the world’s poorest children. And then the fat-cat multinationals got scared and broke it... "
olpc  microsoft  intel  capitalism  competition  negroponte  linux  laptops  education  technology  economics  business  opensource  mit 
august 2008 by robertogreco
In search of a beautiful mind - The Boston Globe
"He was long a jewel of the MIT faculty. Now, after a devastating brain injury, mathematician Seymour Papert is struggling bravely to learn again how to think like, speak like, be like the man of genius he was."
genius  learning  neuroscience  mit  seymourpapert  biography  brain  health  science  autodidacts  autodidactism  lego  olpc  education  children  mind  mindstorms  constructivism  unschooling  deschooling  recovery  rehabilitation  autodidacticism 
august 2008 by robertogreco
'Major discovery' from MIT primed to unleash solar revolution - MIT News Office
"Until now, solar power has been a daytime-only energy source, because storing extra solar energy for later use is prohibitively expensive and grossly inefficient. With today's announcement, MIT researchers have hit upon a simple, inexpensive, highly efficient process for storing solar energy.
via:preoccupations  photosynthesis  science  energy  power  storage  solar  solarpower  sustainability  innovation  green  mit  economics  environment  future  technology  plants  cleanenergy  biomimicry  fuelcell  electricity  biomimetics 
august 2008 by robertogreco
GameSetWatch - GameSetInterview: Henry Jenkins On The Responsibility Of Games
ARG=informational scavenger hunts which disperse info across broad range of media channels; encourage players to create new media tools to process & communicate info; only solved by people working together as teams & tapping power of social networks to so
games  gamedesign  arg  gaming  henryjenkins  technology  mit  reality  learning  education  convergence  videogames  play  media  information  collectiveintelligence 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Games by GAMBIT: AudiOdyssey
"experimental computer game designed to be accessible to both the visually impaired community & mainstream gamers...user stars as Vinyl Scorcher, an up-and-coming DJ, on his quest to get club patrons dancing. Swinging the Nintendo Wii controller to the be
games  accessibility  wiimote  mit  experimental  gamedesign  audio  music 
june 2008 by robertogreco
SENSEable City
"increasing deployment of sensors & hand-held electronics...allowing new approach to study of built environment...way we describe & understand cities is being radically transformed - alongside the tools we use to design them & impact on physical structure
mit  architecture  urban  design  technology  visualization  research  megacities  ubicomp  ubiquitous  programming  sensing  semanticweb  urbancomputing  surveillance  simulations  psychogeography  globalization  location-aware  location  locative  mapping  maps  geography  geolocation  datavisualization  data  culture  space  environment  interaction  interactive  interface  landscape  mobile  demographics 
april 2008 by robertogreco
MIT Media Lab: Reality Mining
"Reality Mining defines the collection of machine-sensed environmental data pertaining to human social behavior. This new paradigm of data mining makes possible the modeling of conversation context, proximity sensing, and temporospatial location throughou

[see also: http://www.technologyreview.com/read_article.aspx?ch=specialsections&sc=emerging08&id=20247]
attention  culture  technology  phones  realitymining  reality  memory  location-based  privacy  future  data  context  research  social  mobile  datamining  networks  MIT  modeling  networking  psychogeography  pervasive  context-aware  crowds  behavior  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  mobilecomputing  mobility  location  locative  compsci  psychology  socialgraph  surveillance  statistics  visualization  visual  spatial  medialab  mapping  ai  mitmedialab 
april 2008 by robertogreco
NYTE: New York Talk Exchange
"New York Talk Exchange illustrates the global exchange of information in real time by visualizing volumes of long distance telephone and IP (Internet Protocol) data flowing between New York and cities around the world."
internet  ip  mit  traffic  nyc  visualization  communication  global  international  telecommunications 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Patrick Winston - How to Speak | overstated
"Professor Patrick Winston gives a wonderfully reflexive and recursive talk about giving talks titled How to Speak. This lecture provides some useful speaking heuristics, especially if you’re in the business of helping people learn."
communication  education  howto  learning  presentation  presentations  public  publicspeaking  speaking  tips  MIT  teaching  tutorial  lectures  pedagogy 
february 2008 by robertogreco
The OLPC Design Critics --- From Texas and Serbia | Beyond the Beyond from Wired.com
"I hope I'm proven wrong about the glum political assessments that I make here -- but that groovy little doodad is very Washington Consensus, and this is just not a Washington Consensus world. Not any more."
brucesterling  olpc  djspooky  video  mobile  phones  jasminatesanovic  criticism  politics  policy  government  education  children  mit  serbia  china  hardware  design  opinion  software 
february 2008 by robertogreco
At 71, Physics Professor Is a Web Star - New York Times
"Walter H. G. Lewin, 71, a physics professor, has long had a cult following at M.I.T. And he has now emerged as an international Internet guru, thanks to the global classroom the institute created to spread knowledge through cyberspace."
mit  physics  open  opencourseware  education  colleges  universities  science  lectures  teaching  learning  instruction 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Technology Review: Searching Video Lectures
"A tool from MIT finds keywords so that students can efficiently review lectures."
search  video  mit  opencourseware  reference  lectures  education  e-learning  technology  semantic 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Meraki Wireless Network | Affordable Internet Solution | Free WiFi
"Meraki’s mission is to bring affordable Internet access to the next billion people. Meraki’s new approach to wireless networking empowers individuals and groups to bring access to local communities, anywhere in the world."
access  wireless  wifi  mit  mobile  networking  p2p  gamechanging  future  free  collaboration  community  internet  technology  broadband  hardware  mesh 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Smart Cities - City Car
"stackable electric 2-passenger city vehicle...one-way sharable user model...to be used in dense urban areas. Vehicle Stacks...placed throughout the city...urban transportation network...takes advantage of existing infrastructure such as subway and bus li
design  electric  cars  environment  mit  sustainability  technology  mobility  transportation 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: The Inefficiency of the StarLogo TNG License
"this project is funded by an National Science Foundation grant. I don't understand why the NSF allows grantees to limit the distribution of software written with public funds in this way. It is a waste of my tax dollars."
mit  starlogo  programming  scratch  languages  opensource  kids  children  comments  free  licensing  coding  teaching 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Creating from Scratch - MIT News Office
"New software from the MIT Media Lab unleashes kids' creativity online"
children  computers  scratch  learning  creativity  software  mit  media  web  online  internet  education  programming  coding  teaching 
may 2007 by robertogreco
http://web.media.mit.edu/~nvawter/thesis/index.html
"Ambient Addition is a Walkman with binaural microphones. A tiny Digital Signal Processing (DSP) chip analyzes the microphone's sound and superimposes a layer of harmony and rhythm on top of the listener's world. In the new context, some surprising behavi
ambient  audio  cities  electronics  music  sound  space  interaction  place  play  architecture  psychogeography  soundscapes  sounds  mit  art  walking  wearable  installation  headphones  medialab  ipod  future  interface  noise  processing  portable  multimedia  monitoring  mobile  environment  dynamic  newmedia  wearables  mitmedialab 
december 2006 by robertogreco
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read