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robertogreco : mixedmedia   4

Tokyo Totem | トーキョー・トーテム
"This publication is the result of a collaboration between international and Japanese authors and makers from various disciplines, ranging from art to social science and from urban studies to design. What they have in common is their interest and fascination with cities, and in particular Tokyo’s urban culture.

This eclectic group grew from an international urban research and exploration workshop on Tokyo organised by Amsterdam-based studio Monnik and hosted by Tokyo’s SHIBAURA HOUSE exactly 3 years ago, on 30 October 2012. Everybody’s efforts resulted in the essay’s, maps, photo essay’s, collage’s, poem’s, manga’s, illustrations and observation’s that have been collected in this book that is hard to categorize. It is called a guide, not because it helps you to find places to see, or places to eat or drink, but because it helps you to read and see the city differently. Each contribution let’s you experience a different city. You may look at the city through the eyes of a bathhouse connoisseur, a host, an architect, a topographer, a flaneur, a konbini anthropologist, a foreigner, an artist or a child. In a way each author is a guide, and thus this guide book is reality 46 guidebooks. Amongst your ‘guides’ are social design researcher Atsushi Miura, Tokyo Urban Basin Society president Norihisa Minagawa, architect Julian Worrall, architect Julian Worrall, artist Arne Hendriks, editor Kohei Fukazawa, architect Yasutaka Yoshimura, visual artist Jan Rothuizen, urbanism professor Christian Dimmer, anthropologist Gavin H. Whitelaw, bathhouse connoisseur Greg Dvorak and many others.

Learn more about this book, and check out the general information, table of contents, introduction and some selected sample material from the book. And come to the book launch and the opening of the Tokyo Totem on October 30th."

[See also:

"Tokyo Totem, the ultimate guide for the befuddled Tokyoite, has finally come to the rescue"
https://www.timeout.com/tokyo/blog/tokyo-totem-the-ultimate-guide-for-the-befuddled-tokyoite-has-finally-come-to-the-rescue-040416

https://www.ideabooks.nl/9784904894286-tokyo-totem-a-guide-to-tokyo

"Among cities, Tokyo in particular seems to baffle foreigners. This subjective guidebook to the spectacular Japanese metropolis intends to help you navigate and read the city in a way that evokes both a sense of adventure and a feeling of belonging. A whole spectrum of seasoned urban explorers invites you to look, read, and experience Tokyo differently, offering insights and imaginative perspectives to understand the city, its facets, and wealth of features. From a tour of Roppongi’s uneven topography, konbini food offerings, and exploring bathhouses, to following the rhythm of temporal urban totems, this densely packed book guarantees an alternative take on Tokyo."

https://www.amazon.com/Tokyo-Totem-Guide-English-Japanese/dp/4904894286

"This publication is the result of a collaboration between international and Japanese authors and makers from various disciplines. What they have in common is their interest and fascination with cities, and in particular Tokyos urban culture. Everybodys efforts resulted in the essays, maps, photo essays, collages, poems, mangas, and observations that have been collected in this book that is hard to categorize. It is called a guide, not because it helps you to find places to see, eat or drink, but because it helps you to read and see the city differently. Each contribution lets you experience a different city. You may look at the city through the eyes of a bathhouse connoisseur, a host, an architect, a topographer, an artist, or a child."]
tokyo  japan  books  exploration  multimedia  mixedmedia  citie  urban  urbanism 
april 2019 by robertogreco
Muriel Cooper: Turning Time into Space — The Gradient — Walker Art Center
[see also: http://messagesandmeans.com/ ]

"Who was Muriel Cooper?

RW: Muriel Cooper (1925–1994) was a graphic designer who spent the bulk of her career working at MIT. In the mid-50s, she started as a designer in the Office of Publications. By the mid-60s she was the first Design Director at the MIT Press, where she rationalized their production system and designed classic books like The Bauhaus (1969) and Learning from Las Vegas (1972), along with about 500 others. In the mid-70s she founded the Visible Language Workshop in MIT’s Department of Architecture, where she taught experimental printing and hands-on production. And by the mid-80s, she was a founding member of the MIT Media Lab, designing early computer interfaces."



"The GSAPP exhibitions team did a smart job creating a custom steel structure that suspends three long walls in the gallery, two of them angled. The works are sandwiched between sheets of clear plexi, and appear to float. We tried to mix media, as Muriel would, and treat all media in the same way. We also wanted to mix visual and verbal material, reveal process and show some of Cooper’s teaching materials. Work by students and colleagues runs through the show — traditional notions of authorship weren’t terribly important, and it was an extremely collaborative environment. In many cases, Muriel is the author of the process or system, or created the environment in which it was produced, whether or not she designed the graphic you’re looking at."



DR: Central to our approach is Muriel’s idea of responsive graphic systems and design processes that embed an explicit feedback loop. Describing Messages and Means, the course she taught at MIT and which gives our exhibition its name, she said:

“Messages and Means was design and communication for print that integrated the reproduction tools as part of the thinking process and reduced the gap between process and product.”



What was the MIT’s relationship to design at the time she began working there?

"RW: MIT was doing serviceable design work when Muriel began there. Gyorgy Kepes, a former colleague of Moholy-Nagy’s, and since 1947 a teacher at MIT, thought MIT’s design presence could be much stronger and suggested that they hire a dedicated designer for their Office of Publications. Both there and at the MIT Press Muriel created systems to standardize formats and production and give a consistent look to publications. And her earliest work at MIT — which we debated whether or not to include — is in fact quite “pretty” in a mid-century way that Paul Rand would be proud of (and indeed was proud of; Cooper met Rand during a brief stint at ad agencies in New York, and he later recommended her to work for the MIT Press). It’s not really representative of her later work, which is rougher, and more about process and dynamism, but does suggest her formation, and a point of departure."



"… make more intelligible the highly complex language of science… and articulate in symbolic, graphic form the order and beauty inherent in the scientist’s abstract vision." —Muriel Cooper



"Experiment and play as a part of professional discipline is difficult at best. This is not only true of an offset press but of all activities where machines are between the concept and the product." —Muriel Cooper



"What do you think was her interest in transitioning between spaces, from print to digital, or from flat to dimensional?

DR: Muriel was frustrated with the limitations of the printed page, and always interested in quicker feedback, non-linear experiences and the layering of information. She used an offset printing press, as she said, as “an interactive medium.” So when she first encountered computers, it was clear that these would present even greater possibilities.

RW: Integrating word and image on screen (“Typographics”), in a way that filtered and communicated information based on the reader/user’s interest, was her goal. The computer screen offered more depth, and information environments — real or simulated — offered more possibilities for orientation within this space. It was crucial to her that information be usable. She saw the designer’s job as creating dynamic environments through which information would stream, rather than designing unique and static objects.

Do you think she was aware of how deep our contemporary relationship would be with technology and interfaces?

RW: Muriel seems to have always had the newest gizmo, whether it was a special digital watch or the highest-resolution computer displays available outside NASA — and whether or not she always knew exactly how to use them (she was a bit of a klutz). It also seems that she predicted so much of our connection to interfaces and the need for them to be intuitive and anticipatory. Yet even she may have been surprised at the extent of it. And very likely frustrated. Not so much at their usability — so many products are pretty and intuitive — but at their inflexibility, their resistance to being hacked, or to using them to make new things. I think she would also be deeply troubled by their intrusiveness, and current questions of privacy and mass surveillance. As she noted in an essay for the Walker’s Design Quarterly in 1989 (one of the few that she would publish), artificial intelligence in computers presents important ethical questions for the designer of these systems. Coupled with her awareness of the corporate and defense sponsorship model for the MIT Media Lab, which was indispensable for her research, the question of the ends to which her research might be put was not far from her mind. In addition to being a technologist, she was, I think, always also a humanist."

"Some people believe that the computer will eventually think for itself. If so, it is crucial that designers and others with humane intentions involved in the way it develops." —Muriel Cooper"
murielcooper  design  graphidesign  srg  time  space  davidreinfurt  robertwiesenberger  theservinglibrary  dextersinister  exhibitions  print  digital  interfacedesign  graphics  mixedmedia  gyorgykepes 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Becoming Animal- Race, Terror and the American Roots Dick Hebdige [Saw a version of this performance at the Hammer. Awesome!]
"An early version of the text reproduced below was first given as a mixed-media presentation at an interdisciplinary conference on ‘‘Noise’’ held at the University of California, Santa Barbara in June 2002. The conference brought together a group of musicians, composers, visual artists, ethnomusiciologists and film, TV and media scholars drawn from a range of institutions sited in the States and abroad. What follows should be regarded more as the inchoate mapping or approximate documentation of a performance than as a conventional piece of written scholarship or criticism. Inevitably much is lost or at least significantly refigured in the translation from a ‘live’ real-time context complete with audio, slide and video inserts to the stereophonic silence of words upon a page but it is my hope that some of those readers who persevere beyond this preamble and who follow what follows will recognize or, failing that, will follow up/track down some at least of the audio citations."
dickhebdige  2007  history  mixedmedia  performance  performanceart  presentations  art  media  culture  music  race  terror  roots  audio 
july 2011 by robertogreco
SAMPLE REALITY · What’s Wrong With Writing Essays
"The student essay is a twitch in a void. A compressed outpouring of energy (if we’re lucky) that means nothing to no one. My friend and occasional collaborator Randy Bass has said that nowhere but school would we ask somebody to write something that nobody will ever read.

This is the primary reason I’ve integrated more and more public writing into my classes. I strive to instill in my students the sense that what they think and what they say and what they write matters — to me, to them, to their classmates, and through open access blogs and wikis, to the world.

In addition to making student writing public, I’ve also begun taking the words out of writing. Why must writing, especially writing that captures critical thinking, be composed of words? Why not images? Why not sound? Why not objects? The word text, after all, derives from the Latin textus, meaning that which is woven, strands of different material intertwined together. Let the warp be words and the weft be something else entirely.

With this in mind, I am moving away from asking students to write toward asking them to weave. To build, to fabricate, to design. I don’t want my students to become miniature scholars. I want them to be aspiring Rauschenbergs, assembling mixed media combines, all the while through their engagement with seemingly incongruous materials, developing a critical thinking practice about the process and the product."

[via: http://snarkmarket.com/blog/snarkives/books_writing_such/teaching_as_antiteaching_writing_as_antiwriting/ ]
teaching  learning  multimedia  tcsnmy  classideas  expression  criticalthinking  robertrauschenberg  process  mixedmedia  blogs  wikis  publicwriting  writing  education  marksample  2009  workinginpublic  teachingwriting  canon  cv  uncreativewriting 
march 2009 by robertogreco

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