recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : mojavedesert   7

Hello World: Explore the Tech World Outside Silicon Valley With Ashlee Vance
"Hello World invites the viewer to come on a journey. It's a journey that stretches across the globe to find the inventors, scientists and technologists shaping our future. Each episode explores a different country and uncovers the ways in which the local culture and surroundings have influenced their approach to technology. Join journalist and best-selling author Ashlee Vance on a quest to find the freshest, weirdest tech creations and the beautiful freaks behind them.

Episode 1: New Zealand
New Zealand’s freaky AI babies, robot exoskeletons, and a virtual you.

Episode 2: Sweden
We explore Sweden's magical treehouses, faceswapping robots, and enjoy fika with Spotify’s Daniel Ek.

Episode 3: Israel
Learn how the constant threat of war has shaped Israel's tech industry.

Episode 4: Iceland
Iceland's punishing terrain inspires cutting-edge tech.

Episode 5: Mojave Desert
America's most passionate and daring inventors have built an engineering paradise in the middle of nowhere.

Episode 6: Australia
Bio-hackers, Internet playboys, and underwater drones have ignited Australia’s long-dormant tech industry.

Episode 7: England
Once a computing pioneer, England has struggled to remain relevant in tech. Now, a revival appears to be on the way.

Episode 8: Japan
Japan's obsessive robot inventors are creating the future.

Episode 9: Russia
Grab yourself a vodka and witness the bizarre spectacle that is Russian technology.

Episode 10: Chile
Searching for the origins of the universe in the Earth’s driest desert."
technology  video  chile  russia  japan  england  australia  mojavedesert  iceland  israel  sweden  newzealand  ashleevance 
july 2017 by robertogreco
The Ghost Grid of California City — Medium
"What happens when you go to places and there’s nothing there, no surge of the response — awe, enjoyment, whatever — that you expect to have (or feel you are expected to have) in a certain locale? This had been the concern gnawing at me just a week before Brad suggested this trip, back home in London, looking at my air miles and holiday allowance yet feeling deeply unenthused at the prospect of a week trawling around Istanbul or Budapest on my own. What’d I do? Look at noted landmarks, feel uncomfortable sitting in cafes with no purpose, and watch the 15 hours to bedtime stretch tirelessly ahead. I’d tried travelling like this before. One time in Venice I blacked out on a bridge over the Grand Canal rather than deal with the day ahead, and got rushed to hospital on a speedboat. I didn’t much want to repeat that, and had been grateful when this California invitation came.

Wayne said that, well, when you go to a place there’s always something that happens. It might not be what you expect or want, you might not really like it, but one way or another you will respond. So you might as well work with that.

The story of California City I’d been sold was one of nostalgia for California optimism and the Space Age, for a 1950s modernism that believed cities could be planned and rationalised and perfected. We know that they can’t, now, but there’s supposed to be a kind of poignancy at the generations before us who believed in the future. I didn’t feel that twang. But for all that (and the hangover) I’m glad I was there. This road trip was driven by many things, but Brad and Wayne’s generosity and enthusiasm in showing me their California mythos was a big part of it. The hope that that mythos might be there, might be tangible for a moment — that’s a dream worth having dreamt.

California City was supposed to be the “the map that precedes the territory […] that engenders the territory” — Nat Mendelsohn’s dream of a hyperreal Los Angeles. For Baudrillard, simulation reveals the “desert of the real”, its absence — but what’s left when the simulation isn’t there and never got built? Just desert dust."
jayowens  2015  californiacity  mojavedesert  california  waynechambliss  bradleygarrett 
august 2016 by robertogreco
America Deserta | Artbound | Shows | KCET
""Artbound" travels to Southern California's desert regions in this episode featuring the landscape painting and video art of visual artist Diane Best, whose work personifies the creative spirit found throughout the Joshua Tree region; the Coachella artists the Date Farmers who infuse abstract expressionism with a politically charged, pop culture update; a draw-in with Hillary Mushkin's Incendiary Traces at the 29 Palms Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center that challenges participants to become conscious of militarized landscapes.

We also examine the superadobe construction techniques of Cal-Earth, whose experimental designs are challenging the ubiquitous cookie-cutter suburban communities in the urbanized southwestern Mojave Desert; Jackrabbit Homesteads and the cultural legacy of the Small Tract Act in Southern California's Morongo Basin; the eclectic practice of Joshua Tree's "Art Queen Shari Elf"; and a performance by Rodrigo Amarante."
deserts  art  california  socal  coachella  joshuatree  2015  datefarmers  hillarymushkin  cal-earth  rodrigoamarante  jackrabbithomesteads  artbound  mojavedesert  dianebest  29palms  military  militarization 
may 2015 by robertogreco
The Academy of Modern Ruins » The Philosopher’s Library
"In our age of increasing distractions, the need for perspective and reflection is essential. Candy Chang and James A. Reeves will transform an abandoned gas station on Route 66 into a library dedicated to pilgrimages and personal transformation. Located in the Mojave desert, The Philosopher’s Library will be a remote sanctuary filled with books about leading an examined life, as well as a card catalogue where travelers can share their philosophies for personal well-being.

* * *

Initial preparations for the library are underway. Share the books that changed your life below and we’ll include them in our catalogue. Your description will be printed on a handsome book plate inside the book you’ve recommended."
travelers  libraries  route66  mojave  mojavedesert  books  well-being  candychang  jamesreeves  sharing  philosophy 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Assembly Required: The Transformative Art of Noah Purifoy | San Bernardino | Artbound | KCET
"On a ten-acre parcel near the perimeter of the Marine Corps Air and Ground Combat Center (half a million acres of chocolate mountains and sand dunes that serve as a simulacrum of the Middle East), Purifoy, one of the founders of the Watts Towers Art Center that rose from the ashes of the 1965 riots, spent the final years of his life creating the monumental "Outdoor Desert Art Museum of Assemblage Sculpture" made from tons of discarded materials. The "Environment" (the nickname a few critics and Purifoy himself sometimes used) is an astonishing feat of the imagination as much as it is a physical one."
desert  california  joshuatree  noahpurifoy  art  artists  2013  mojavedesert  deserts  segregation  environment  rubénmartínez 
may 2013 by robertogreco
airplane graveyard - a set on Flickr
"between 1997 and 1999, i made several visits to an aircraft scrapyard in the mojave desert. it's an incredible thing to walk right up to these giant machines and see their intricate workings laid bare.

the black and white images were shot on a blistering august day, the temperature well over 110˚. kodak tri-x pan with a red #25 filter.

color was shot on fuji velvia with a circular pola filter."
flickr  graveyard  mojave  desert  mojavedesert  aircraft  tovisit  togo 
december 2010 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read