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robertogreco : moments   11

Jeff Sharlet en Instagram: “Wednesday night I worked on my father’s obituary. Thursday, in class, I pulled up on the projector this photograph, “Hyeres, France, 1932,”…”
"Wednesday night I worked on my father’s obituary. Thursday, in class, I pulled up on the projector this photograph, “Hyeres, France, 1932,” by Henri Cartier-Bresson. We’d read a book called H is for Hawk, by Helen MacDonald, a memoir of her grief for her late father. He was a photographer. It was he who taught her how to look, to have the patience to see what Cartier-Bresson called a “decisive moment.” “Your eye must see a composition or an expression that life itself offers you,” wrote Cartier-Bresson, “and you must know with intuition when to click the camera. The moment! Once you miss it, it is gone forever.” // Because I was tired, because before I knew my father would die I had assigned this book about grieving a father—because for some reason I had assigned, across two courses, three books about lost fathers—I mentioned my own writing assignment of the previous evening. An obituary. I told my students the book we had just read was an obituary. An obituary, I said, should not be a recitation of facts; rather, a remembrance of decisive moments. Click. // He’s 18, in a campus movie theater with his football teammates. On screen: subtitles. The movie is French, Cocteau’s Orpheus. Bob Sharlet has never “read” a movie before. He has never, he thinks, really read at all. Now he’ll never stop reading again. // Christmas, 1991, Cairo, at a vegetable stand, seeing on a little tv at the back of the stand the Soviet flag being lowered, the end of the U.S.S.R., to which he had devoted his scholarly life—his life—and realizing, suddenly, that now he could read about anything. // A month ago Saturday.We’ve told him his prognosis—terminal, soon. He’d said he’d sleep an hour. Now he lifts his sleeping mask. He opens his eyes. “Okay,” he says. // Today, sifting through his boxes of photographs, I found this postcard. Blank. He kept it for the picture. The picture I taught Thursday. // I imagine—as I think my father imagined—Cartier-Bresson descending the stairs, noticing the rail, the steps, the curve. Stopping, stepping back. He thinks he’s waiting for a walker. Then comes the bicycle, circles and triangles and spokes. Click. And then it’s gone, forever."
jeffsharlet  writing  reading  howwewrite  life  living  howweread  2019  bobshartlet  photography  bricolage  moments  death  henricartier-bresson  teaching  howweteach  intution  memory  memories  change  decisivemoments 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Very Slow Movie Player – Bryan Boyer – Medium
"Walking around Brasília some years ago I had the distinct feeling that I was doing it “wrong” because, of course, I was. The center of Brasilía is organized along the Exio Monumental, featuring an array of government and other important buildings that form a long spine. This is a place designed to be “read” at the speed of a vehicle, so taking in Brasília by foot is like watching a movie in slow motion. It turns out, both can be rewarding in unexpected ways.

With a little bit of patience, the details of both reveal unexpected and delightful moments. In Brasília, pedestrians are rewarded with an opportunity to discover the subtle variations between what look to be mega-scaled buildings. Rhythmic reflections and shadows bring surfaces to life under the tropical sunlight in beautiful and nuanced ways. Just don’t forget to put on sunscreen, because the distances are intended to be enjoyed from the comfort of a motor vehicle.

On the other hand, watching movies in slow-mo is not something that I’ve had experience with outside of seeing the occasional Bill Viola installation. Until, that is, I started to tinker with ePaper components and Javascript in the depth of Michigan winter, looking for a way to celebrate slowness.

Can a film be consumed at the speed of reading a book? Yes, just as a car city can be enjoyed on foot. Slowing things down to an extreme measure creates room for appreciation of the object, as in Brasília, but the prolonged duration also starts to shift the relationship between object, viewer, and context. A film watched at 1/3,600th of the original speed is not a very slow movie, it’s a hazy timepiece. A Very Slow Movie Player (VSMP) doesn’t tell you the time; it helps you see yourself against the smear of time.

I’ve described VSMP in more detail below, but watch this video [https://vimeo.com/307806967 ] explains it more readily."
bryanboyer  slow  film  brasília  brasilia  modernism  urban  urbanism  raspberrypi  class  diy  movies  billviola  vsmp  cars  travel  movement  time  moments 
december 2018 by robertogreco
The Male Muse, Depicted by Women - The New York Times
"Toyin Ojih Odutola: ‘I’m attracted to androgyny, so I don’t see male and female qualities as distinctive or different. I like to mix them together. I like to mess them up. I came across a quote recently, from Gabriel Orozco, proclaiming: "I don’t use the word beauty anymore… The word beautiful is not an absolute, it’s a moment." So true!’"
2015  beauty  art  androgyny  gender  moments  experience  toyinojihodutola 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Kennedy: Capture the Now on the App Store on iTunes
[Main site: http://kennedyapp.com/]

"Capture the now with Kennedy – a new way to mark moments in time complete with surrounding context of the things happening around you.

With a single tap Kennedy will capture your location, the date and time, the current weather conditions, the latest world news headlines together with what music you're listening to at the time. Add a note or a photo and then save it to the archive of captured moments.

Use the archive to relive past moments. Remember where you were when that big news event happened, or show all those moments when it was raining or when you were listening to that much loved song.

All the data that Kennedy captures can be easily exported as an industry standard JSON or CSV file so if you love to code you can create your own data visualisations or import them into online data viz tools.

Other features include:
Edit your photos (stored in the app) to add effects and make adjustments.

Choose from different headlines that were happening at the time and view the actual news article.

View a map of where you were stood when you captured the now.

Filter the archive to find locations, weather conditions and more."
ios7  ios  applications  iphone  moments  brendandawes  kennedy  metadata  location  time  date  weather  context  news  visualization  photography  filtering 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Tupperwolf - A garden in Chelyabinsk and walking
"The small acts – where do they go? This garden, at this moment, found its way into a famous and stable repository of knowledge. Its neighbors in space and time did not, as far as I know. And even this moment of this garden has lost context. Are those blueberries or cranberries? Why? Who is the man in the white shirt? We could get some answers if we looked hard enough, but not all of them.

Most of life disappears. The small acts barely happen even once. They are unnamed, like gusts of wind. They are transient, like waves. They are mortal, like us.

Walking, because it happens in the ordinary human scale, puts you in these things. You pass gardens like this one, and friends chatting drowsily in the park, and alleys with kickstood children’s bikes, knowing that most of what you notice will never be felt again, by you or anyone. Your pace and your pulse go a little faster than a second hand, sliding the world into the past at comprehensible speed.

And it’s continuous. I can forget, after a plane flight or a car ride, that the place I come to is connected, physically, by a chain of real places, with the place I came from. It’s the realness of the between that I lose. Walking does not make me the perfect seer. It cannot balance me between identifying with the things I see and respecting their otherness. But it lets me try. I can’t look at this garden without imagining that I walked up to it."
walking  charlieloyd  life  moments  transience  ephemeral  slow  scale  huamnscale  2013  gardens  living  otherness  space  time  memory  memories  actions  acts  speed  travel  passage  place  human  humans  ephemerality 
may 2013 by robertogreco
a t l i n - who goes there
"take photos with cam I have at the time. write words with thoughts I got now. no saying what’s right or wrong. photos are what they are. got lots of words, but I try to keep those short too.

because since you began reading this, two colonies of ants in the suburb of montreuil in paris fought over a piece of a leaf. a little girl in mexico city let go of her blue balloon. a young man in the village of zitong in western china ate a pomegranate for the first time (it was delicious). a woman in lisbon lost her keys while at home. a plastic bag caught its handle on a fence post in kotzebue. an old man in northern India awoke from a deep sleep. these were remarkable and ordinary moments all at once. pretty nice, right? wouldn’t want to take you any farther away from it.

it’s worth noting that what may seem remarkable to an ant may not be remarkable to a balloon. so we must remember to respect relativity."  

-Atlin

“How are we suppouse to walk in that fogg?”
whatmatters  surroundings  local  attention  time  life  relativity  moments  remarkablemoments  ordinariness  ordinary  small  perspective  experience  photography  atlin 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Writing Live Fieldnotes: Towards a More Open Ethnography | Ethnography Matters
"I just returned from fieldwork in China. I’m excited to share a new way I’ve been writing ethnographic fieldnotes, called live fieldnoting…

At one point in time, all ethnographers wrote their notes down with a physical pen and paper. But with mobiles, laptops, iPads, and digital pens, not all ethnographers write their fieldnotes. Some type their fieldnotes. Or some do both. With all these options, I have struggled to come up with the perfect fieldnote system…

…the problem with a digital pen, notebook, and laptop is that they are all extra things that have to be carried with you or they add extra steps to the process…

I still haven’t found the perfect fieldnote system, but I wanted to experiment with a new process that I call, “live fieldnoting.” …

…updates everyday from the field. … compilation on Instagram, flickr, facebook, tumblr, and foursquare. I made my research transparent and accessible with daily fieldnotes. Anyone who wanted to follow along in my adventure could see…"
mobile  signs  research  flashbacks  moments  rituals  customs  location  travel  participatoryfieldnoting  socialfieldnoting  johnvanmaanen  ethnographymatters  rachelleannenchino  jennaburrell  heatherford  jorisluyendijk  gabriellacoleman  janchipchase  lindashaw  rachelfretz  robertemerson  photography  iphone  china  noticing  observation  transparency  2012  foursquare  tumblr  facebook  flickr  instagram  triciawang  howwework  process  wcydwt  notetaking  designresearch  fieldnoting  fieldnotes  ethnography  ritual 
august 2012 by robertogreco
aesthetics of joy » Blog Archive » Writing retreat
"When you consider something like death, after which (there being no news flash to the contrary) we may well go out like a candle flame, then it probably doesn’t matter if we try too hard, are awkward sometimes, care for one another too deeply, are excessively curious about nature, are too open to experience, enjoy a nonstop expense of the senses in an effort to know life intimately and lovingly. It probably doesn’t matter if, while trying to be modest and eager watchers of life’s many spectacles, we sometimes look clumsy or get dirty or ask stupid questions or reveal our ignorance or say the wrong thing or light up with wonder like the children we are. It probably doesn’t matter if a passerby sees us dipping a finger into the moist pouches of dozens of lady’s slippers to find out what bugs tend to fall into them, and thinks us a bit eccentric…"

[Quote from "Diane Ackerman’s breathtaking A Natural History of the Senses": http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0679735666/ ]
moments  observation  nature  via:tealtan  life  watching  curiosity  living  noticing  children  wonder  howwewrite  writing  senses  dianeackerman 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Picles from Around the World | Made by Many
"Watching and listening people's lives through their sights and sounds is quite a powerful experience, it's like stepping into a completely new storytelling ecosystem. One minute you will be watching a family birthday in Israel, the next you will be at an NBA playoff game. To give you an idea of what that is like and to share with you all what we have been experiencing I put together this montage of Picles from around the world. 

It's a great feeling to see people from all over the world use something that you have made.

Anyway, check out the video and let us know what you think of it, enjoy :)"

[See also: http://picleapp.com/ ]
iphone  camera  ios  applications  longphotos  experience  moments  2012  photography  audio  picle 
august 2012 by robertogreco
South Sudan: The Newest Nation in the World - Alan Taylor - In Focus - The Atlantic
"Last Saturday, the Republic of South Sudan declared its independence, creating the newest nation in the world -- the 193rd nation to join the United Nations. The new country has been in the making since a referendum last January, when nearly 4 million southern Sudanese voted to secede from Sudan by a margin of more than 98 percent. The region has been involved in civil wars for at least the past 50 years, and the days-old nation is already battling several armed groups within its new borders. Many issues still remain unresolved -- the oil-rich region continues to rely on pipelines that run through Sudan, and a revenue-sharing agreement has not been reached. The new nation, which is comprised of more than 200 ethnic groups, has a largely rural economy, and poverty, civil warfare, and political instability will be the biggest of many challenges for the new administration. Gathered here are scenes from South Sudan as it made its debut on the world stage this weekend. [35 photos]"
southsudan  sudan  independence  2011  infocus  photography  classideas  moments 
july 2011 by robertogreco

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