recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : momoamsterdam   5

haque design + research - on reality, augmented reality, and that talk by kevin
“the only “augmented” reality, is the one that’s constantly being built up through our interactions through the world — whether that’s through a mobile phone, through our sunglasses, or even just through closed eyelids. the process of understanding, it seems to me, is a process of constructing an understanding. the problem with AR, then, is that it assumes that the reality “out there” is fixed, and that we’re merely passive observers that need some kind of markup on it to help understand it “better”. it’s like the terminator analogy you cited: AR is set up so that “we” are sitting inside, simply waiting for info to come in (like arnie “seeing” inside his own head with its own reductio ad absurdam) and all the concomitant repercussions on what this means for our own agency (or lack thereof) in the world. it also assumes that we all see the same thing, which we manifestly do not — and this isn’t because of some distortion in our perceptors…"
visualization  kevinslavin  usmanhaque  augmentedreality  ar  2011  momoamsterdam  via:preoccupations  theory 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Reality *is* Plenty | Serial Consign
"My reading of the talk is that Slavin is extremely curious about augmenting reality—as praxis—and suggesting we (startups, developers and consumers) need to be considerably more thoughtful in our application/exploration of the emerging medium and consider how it might activate other senses – AR should not distill down to "an overlay for all seasons". I think the key takeaway point is in Slavin's suggestion that "reality is augmented when it feels different, not looks different" – which basically echoes Marcel Duchamp's (almost) century-old contempt for the 'retinal bias' of the art market. If AR development (thus far) is lacking imagination, perhaps the problem is that we're very much tethering the medium to our antiquated VR pipe dreams and the web browser metaphor."

[Link rot, so Wayback: http://web.archive.org/web/20110701191941/http://serialconsign.com/2011/06/reality-plenty ]
augmentedreality  kevinslavin  2011  momoamsterdam  virtualreality  ar  marcelduchamp  gregsmith  mapping  praxis  via:preoccupations  vr 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Kevin Slavin – Reality Is Plenty, Thanks. « Mobile Monday Amsterdam
"Kevin Slavin closes the final Mobile Monday Amsterdam with an improvised talk about why reality is plenty. And closing the row of bare feet speakers at the event."

[YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o03wWtWASW4 ]
culture  history  games  psychology  mobile  kevinslavin  ar  augmentedreality  reality  2011  momoamsterdam  tv  television  jeanpiaget  extramission  immersion  mimesis  replication  uncannyvalley  information  tamagotchi  perception  senses  piaget  vision 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Week 22: Undoing AR | Urbanscale
"What [Kevin Slavin] had to offer was nothing less than a diamond bullet through heart of AR as currently constructed…you could feel things in the world shift around his words as he uttered them."<br />
<br />
"…AR is a profoundly anti-urban(e) technology, & this is the real crux of my beef with its advocates."<br />
<br />
"Certainly as delivered through mobile devices, contemporary AR imposes significant limits on your ability to derive information from the flow of streetlife. It’s not just the “I must look like a dork” implications of walking down street w/ a mobile held visor-like before you…It’s that the city is already trying to tell you things, most of which are likely to be highly, even existentially salient to your experience of place. I can’t help but think that what you’re being offered through the tunnel vision of AR is starkly impoverished by comparison…even before we entertain the very high likelihood of that info being inaccurate, outdated, or commercial or otherwise exploitative…"
ar  alternatereality  adamgreenfield  momoamsterdam  2011  ubicomp  urbancomputing  urbanism  urban  reality  augmentedreality 
june 2011 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read