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robertogreco : monsters   30

wikipedia brown, unstable genius on Twitter: "someone please write an essay about Cookie Monster and minstrelsy please https://t.co/Ms5gbNahVr"
"someone please write an essay about Cookie Monster and minstrelsy please

Cookie Monster is an expression of the unruly black body viewed through the 19th century white gaze, a reflection of a Cartwright-esque vision of unfettered, almost beastlike corporeal desire

😂😂😂😂😂

“gimme dat cookie,” says Cookie Monster, a reflection at once of his presentist thinking and his black vernacular linguistic practice. he is unable to see past the cookie. He is at once “monstrous” and a site of American fetishization.

my flight is delayed. I got time

Feel free to quote me in your next media studies term paper kids

During the height of 90s era globalism-and-multiculturalism neoliberal fantasia, Cookie Monster was briefly reimagined as a vegetable connoisseur, a new configuration through a lens that at once called upon a commodified hip-hop aesthetic and a respectability politic.

The fact that C is for Cookie is, simply put, *good enough* for Cookie Monster, whose literacy practices and ideological concerns are limited to this unidimensional question. It’s a hyper-reduced identity politic, one unconcerned with the nuances of modernity.

I crack myself up"
cookiemonster  sesamestreet  2018  eveewing  monsters  minstrels  aav  africanamericanvernacular  language  linguistics  fetishes  fetishization  cookies  respectabilitypolitics  hiphop  1990s  identitypolitics 
january 2018 by robertogreco
William Kentridge: "The Magic Flute" | ART21 "Exclusive" - YouTube
"Episode #134: In his 2005 production of Mozart's "The Magic Flute" (1791), artist William Kentridge reframes the opera's original themes of Enlightenment philosophy through the bitter legacy of colonialism. "The most toxic combination in the world is...the certainty of being right and a monopoly of power," says the artist, who casts the character of Sarastro in the role of a colonial overlord, "a benevolent figure that hides a monster."

Having witnessed first-hand one of the twentieth century's most contentious struggles—the dissolution of apartheid—William Kentridge brings the ambiguity and subtlety of personal experience to public subjects most often framed in narrowly defined terms. Using film, drawing, sculpture, animation, and performance, he transmutes sobering political events into powerful poetic allegories. Aware of myriad ways in which we construct the world by looking, Kentridge often uses optical illusions to extend his drawings-in-time into three dimensions.

Learn more about William Kentridge at: http://www.art21.org/artists/william-kentridge "
themagicflute  williamkentridge  art  monsters  sarastro  mozart  2005  apartheid  colonialism  certainty  poer 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Teju Cole: FABLE
"FABLE

It was true that the Adversary had brought other monsters into being. Each had been wicked in its own way, each had been an embodiment of one or other of the seven vices, and each had been strong and difficult to vanquish. Some of those monsters still roamed the land. But what made this new monster remarkable, indeed uniquely devious, was that it wasn’t strong at all. In fact, it was weak. The weaknesses through which the other monsters had been vanquished, this monster had tenfold. The new monster was not moral, but it is not in the nature of monsters to be moral. But the monster was also not beautiful, or intelligent, or brave, or well-dressed, or charming, or gifted in oratory, though usually monsters had at least some of those qualities. The Adversary had sent this new monster out, designing it to derive its strength from one source and one source alone, as in olden days was said of Samson and his locks, so that if that source were cut off, the monster would wilt like a severed flower stalk in the noonday heat. The source of the new monster’s strength was noise. If it heard a bit of noise pertaining to it, it grew stronger. If it heard a lot of noise, whether the noise was adulation or imprecation, it was full of joy, and grew even stronger. Only collective quietness could vanquish it, quietness and the actions that came from contemplation.

Having thus designed it, the Adversary sent the monster out to Noiseville. “A new monster!” the cry went up, and the monster grew a little stronger. “It grows stronger!” went the chorus, and the monster grew stronger still. And thus it was in Noiseville that the new monster, weaker than all the other monsters ever sent by the Adversary, was the only thing the people of Noiseville spoke about. The sound had reached a deafening roar. In every newspaper across Noiseville, the most read articles were about the monster. On television, the reporters spent most of their time making noise about the monster. On little devices the people carried around with them, it was all monster all the time. If the monster smiled, there was noise in reaction. If the monster scowled, there was noise. If it coughed, there was an uproar of coughing and commentary on the manner of the monster's coughing. The Adversary was astonished by how well his little stratagem had worked. The monster smiled and scowled and coughed, and learned to say the things that generated more noise. And on and on it grew.

“But it is so weak!” the people shouted. “It is not beautiful, or intelligent, or brave, or well-dressed, or charming, or gifted in oratory. How can it grow in strength and influence so?” And if the noise went down even one decibel, the monster did something again, anything at all, and the noise went up. And the people talked of nothing but the monster when they were awake, and dreamed of nothing but the monster when they were asleep. And from time to time, they turned on each other, and were distraught if they saw their fellows failing to join in the noise, for any quiet form of contemplation was thought of as acquiescence to the monster. Other monsters in the past had been drowned out by sufficient loudness. Besides, this was Noiseville, and there was no question of not making noise, there in the home of the loudest and best noise in the world, the most beautiful noise, it was often said, the greatest noise in the history of the world. And so the noise swelled to the very limits of Noiseville, and the new monster grew to gargantuan size as had Gulliver in the land of the Lilliputians, and their ropes were powerless against it, and there seemed no limit to its growth, though it was but the eighth month of that year."
tejucole  2016  monsters  fiction  donaldtrump  fables  electronics  attention  noise  media  power 
august 2016 by robertogreco
▶ On The History of Ugliness - VideoLectures.NET
"In “History of Beauty,” Umberto Eco explored the ways in which notions of attractiveness shift from culture to culture and era to era. With ON UGLINESS, a collection of images and written excerpts from ancient times to the present, he asks: Is repulsiveness, too, in the eye of the beholder? And what do we learn about that beholder when we delve into his aversions? Selecting stark visual images of gore, deformity, moral turpitude and malice, and quotations from sources ranging from Plato to radical feminists, Eco unfurls a taxonomy of ugliness. As gross-out contests go, it’s both absorbing and highbrow."
aesthetics  art  beauty  culture  umbertoeco  2007  ugliness  zombies  history  monsters  arthistory  socrates  aesop  donnaharaway  suffering  christ  unicorns  dragons  physiognomy  anthropology  jean-paulsartre  monalisa  pieromanzoni  richardgere  marilynmanson  piercings  cyborgs  et  disgust  cyranodebergerac  hunchbacks  jews  gender  sirens  kitsch  uglification  monarchs  naomicampbell  picasso  sartre 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Ed-Tech's Monsters #ALTC
[video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kiotl4G6fMw ]

"No doubt, we have witnessed in the last few years an explosion in the ed-tech industry and a growing, a renewed interest in ed-tech. Those here at ALT-C know that ed-tech is not new by any means; but there is this sense from many of its newest proponents (particularly in the States) that ed-tech has no history; there is only now and the future.

Ed-tech now, particularly that which is intertwined with venture capital, is boosted by a powerful forms of storytelling: a disruptive innovation mythology, entrepreneurs' hagiography, design fiction, fantasy.

A fantasy that wants to extend its reach into the material world.

Society has been handed a map, if you will, by the technology industry in which we are shown how these brave ed-tech explorers have and will conquer and carve up virtual and physical space.

Fantasy.

We are warned of the dragons in dangerous places, the unexplored places, the over explored places, the stagnant, the lands of outmoded ideas — all the places where we should no longer venture. 

Hic Sunt Dracones. There be dragons.

Instead, I’d argue, we need to face our dragons. We need to face our monsters. We need to face the giants. They aren’t simply on the margins; they are, in many ways, central to the narrative."



"I’m in the middle of writing a book called Teaching Machines, a cultural history of the science and politics of ed-tech. An anthropology of ed-tech even, a book that looks at knowledge and power and practices, learning and politics and pedagogy. My book explores the push for efficiency and automation in education: “intelligent tutoring systems,” “artificially intelligent textbooks,” “robo-graders,” and “robo-readers.”

This involves, of course, a nod to “the father of computer science” Alan Turing, who worked at Bletchley Park of course, and his profoundly significant question “Can a machine think?”

I want to ask in turn, “Can a machine teach?”

Then too: What will happen to humans when (if) machines do “think"? What will happen to humans when (if) machines “teach”? What will happen to labor and what happens to learning?

And, what exactly do we mean by those verbs, “think” and “teach”? When we see signs of thinking or teaching in machines, what does that really signal? Is it that our machines are becoming more “intelligent,” more human? Or is it that humans are becoming more mechanical?

Rather than speculate about the future, I want to talk a bit about the past."



"To oppose technology or to fear automation, some like The Economist or venture capitalist Marc Andreessen argue, is to misunderstand how the economy works. (I’d suggest perhaps Luddites understand how the economy works quite well, thank you very much, particularly when it comes to questions of “who owns the machinery” we now must work on. And yes, the economy works well for Marc Andreessen, that’s for sure.)"



"But even without machines, Frankenstein is still read as a cautionary tale about science and about technology; and Shelley’s story has left an indelible impression on us. Its references are scattered throughout popular culture and popular discourse. We frequently use part of the title — “Franken” — to invoke a frightening image of scientific experimentation gone wrong. Frankenfood. Frankenfish. The monster, a monstrosity — a technological crime against nature.

It is telling, very telling, that we often confuse the scientist, Victor Frankenstein, with his creation. We often call the monster Frankenstein.

As the sociologist Bruno Latour has argued, we don’t merely mistake the identity of Frankenstein; we also mistake his crime. It "was not that he invented a creature through some combination of hubris and high technology,” writes Latour, "but rather that he abandoned the creature to itself.”

The creature — again, a giant — insists in the novel that he was not born a monster, but he became monstrous after Frankenstein fled the laboratory in horror when the creature opened his “dull yellow eye,” breathed hard, and convulsed to life.

"Remember that I am thy creature,” he says when he confronts Frankenstein, "I ought to be thy Adam; but I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed. Everywhere I see bliss, from which I alone am irrevocably excluded. I was benevolent and good— misery made me a fiend.”

As Latour observes, "Written at the dawn of the great technological revolutions that would define the 19th and 20th centuries, Frankenstein foresees that the gigantic sins that were to be committed would hide a much greater sin. It is not the case that we have failed to care for Creation, but that we have failed to care for our technological creations. We confuse the monster for its creator and blame our sins against Nature upon our creations. But our sin is not that we created technologies but that we failed to love and care for them. It is as if we decided that we were unable to follow through with the education of our children.”

Our “gigantic sin”: we failed to love and care for our technological creations. We must love and educate our children. We must love and care for our machines, lest they become monsters.

Indeed, Frankenstein is also a novel about education. The novel is structured as a series of narratives — Captain Watson’s story — a letter he sends to his sister as he explores the Arctic— which then tells Victor Frankenstein’s story through which we hear the creature tell his own story, along with that of the De Lacey family and the arrival of Safie, “the lovely Arabian." All of these are stories about education: some self-directed learning, some through formal schooling.

While typically Frankenstein is interpreted as a condemnation of science gone awry, the novel can also be read as a condemnation of education gone awry. The novel highlights the dangerous consequences of scientific knowledge, sure, but it also explores how knowledge — gained inadvertently, perhaps, gained surreptitiously, gained without guidance — might be disastrous. Victor Frankenstein, stumbling across the alchemists and then having their work dismissed outright by his father, stoking his curiosity. The creature, learning to speak by watching the De Lacey family, learning to read by watching Safie do the same, his finding and reading Volney's Ruins of Empires and Milton’s Paradise Lost."



"To be clear, my nod to the Luddites or to Frankenstein isn’t about rejecting technology; but it is about rejecting exploitation. It is about rejecting an uncritical and unexamined belief in progress. The problem isn’t that science gives us monsters, it's that we have pretended like it is truth and divorced from responsibility, from love, from politics, from care. The problem isn’t that science gives us monsters, it’s that it does not, despite its insistence, give us “the answer."

And that is problem with ed-tech’s monsters. That is the problem with teaching machines.

In order to automate education, must we see knowledge in a certain way, as certain: atomistic, programmable, deliverable, hierarchical, fixed, measurable, non-negotiable? In order to automate that knowledge, what happens to care?"



"I’ll leave you with one final quotation, from Hannah Arendt who wrote,
"Education is the point at which we decide whether we love the world enough to assume responsibility for it and by the same token save it from that ruin which, except for renewal, except for the coming of the new and young, would be inevitable. And education, too, is where we decide whether we love our children enough not to expel them from our world and leave them to their own devices, nor to strike from their hands their chance of undertaking something new, something unforeseen by us, but to prepare them in advance for the task of renewing a common world.”

Our task, I believe, is to tell the stories and build the society that would place education technology in that same light: “renewing a common world.”

We in ed-tech must face the monsters we have created, I think. These are the monsters in the technologies of war and surveillance a la Bletchley Park. These are the monsters in the technologies of mass production and standardization. These are the monsters in the technologies of behavior modification a la BF Skinner.

These are the monsters ed-tech must face. And we must all consider what we need to do so that we do not create more of them."
audreywatters  edtech  technology  education  schools  data  monsters  dragons  frankenstein  luddites  luddism  neoluddism  alanturing  thomaspynchon  society  bfskinner  standardization  surveillance  massproduction  labor  hannaharendt  brunolatour  work  kevinkelly  technosolutionism  erikbrynjolfsson  lordbyron  maryshelley  ethics  hierarchy  children  responsibility  love  howwelearn  howweteach  teaching  learning  politics  policy  democracy  exploitation  hierarchies  progress  science  scientism  markets  aynrand  liberarianism  projectpigeon  teachingmachines  personalization  individualization  behavior  behaviorism  economics  capitalism  siliconvalley 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Skrímslasetrið Bíldudal
"Tales of sea monsters have played a colorful role in Icelandic folk culture for centuries and thousands of written accounts can be found all around the country. Today, these elusive creatures that still appear in Arnafjordur have been given a worthy home at the Icelandic Monster Museum, located in the north-west cost village of Bildudalur on the shores of Arnarfjordur fjord, proclaimed to be one of the most prolific centers of monster activity in Iceland.

Visitors to the Sea Monster Museum watch these remarkable creatures brought to life through a lively mix of words, images and videos, an action-packed multimedia display that culminates in a spectacular interactive plinth, the first of its kind in Iceland. First-hand accounts from eye-witnesses are joined on-screen by academic theories on the nature of sea monsters, while a variety of relics and artifacts relating to this mysterious branch of zoology appear throughout the museum as tangible evidence for their existence.

Comments from visitors: Multimedia screens and quirky, dark lit rooms create a unique atmosphere where the history of sea monsters in Iceland and Arnarfjördur is conveyed in an eerie manner. The museum is truly a well worth a visit when you travel to these parts because afterwards you will look differently at what you see in the fjord. It will add a new dimension to your imagination—one which points towards the shore and the sea. Picture this tale of horror. A foreign trawler is fishing illegally in Arnarfjördur fjord in the West Fjords in the early 20th century. In comes the trawl net with something big and squirmingly alive. When the fishermen try to open the trawl the creature viciously fights back and sprays something slimy over them. When they finally manage to cut the net and drive the creature overboard a few of the crew are seriously burned and have to be treated. No one aboard knows what this terrifying beast was. There is something supernatural about Arnarfjördur fjord. It looks prehistoric on the map, resembling an eagle claw. In fact it is named after an eagle, Arnar means eagle’s, fjördur fjord. In reality the fjord is deep and wide with an abundance of shellfish, shrimp and reportedly other murkier life organisms. And after a long day you build up a mysteries appetite, the museum restaurant offers the most tasty monster catch of the day and a range of light refreshments and snacks.

The Icelandic Sea Monster Museum is open daily from 10.00-18.00, June 1 – September 10.

Guests aged 10 years and younger must be accompanied by an adult."
iceland  museums  creatures  monsters  seamonsters  bíldudalur 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Mythical Icelandic Creatures: Skoffín | Iceland, Defrosted
"Over the next few weeks, I wanted to feature a series of mythical (or are they?) Icelandic creatures. I was inspired by a visit to the Sea-Monster Museum in Bíldudalur a couple of years ago. Since then, I’ve kept an eye open for anything on the folklore and legends of Iceland’s strangest beasts. If you have any further information on them, or I’ve made an error with your favourite oddball animal, please just let me know!

Are we ready? Then I shall begin. With the Skoffín. The Skoffín is the fierce, dreaded offspring of an Arctic Fox mating with a female cat. The other option (male cat, and vixen) would produce a Skuggabaldur; a different beast altogether.

Skoffín are partially hairless, with formidable teeth and claws.

Skoffín are supposedly able to kill humans simply by looking directly into their eyes. I have met girls able to do something similar. Anyway, avert your gaze if you come across a Skoffín.
A newborn Skoffín is likely to disappear quickly, and may not return to their place of birth for up to three years, when they will feast on any nearby animal.

Most Skoffín are killed before they get to maturity, but if they do reach adulthood, killing them is not so easy. You’ll need some silver bullets, or the potentially risky strategy of using another Skoffín against the one you are trying to dispose of, in a kind of fatal staring competition. Steer clear of the Skoffín, I say."

[See also: http://www.allbordercollies.com/forums/index.php?page=Thread&threadID=4193 ]

[More creatures: http://griffinworldgeo.edublogs.org/2013/12/08/icelandic-mythical-creatures/
http://forteanzoology.blogspot.com/2009/04/g.html
http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/35092550/view/Iceland.2010.Creatures.SS.jpg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irRk4mKYH08
http://icelandreview.com/news/2008/07/18/meet-icelands-monstershttp://books.google.com/books/about/Meeting_with_Monsters.html?id=P65WcgAACAAJ http://www.fauna.is/pagee.asp?lysing=publications

http://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2008/09/26/more-monsters-and-mythical-beings-thorgeirsboli/
http://grapevine.is/mag/column-opinion/2008/10/10/more-monsters-and-mythical-beings-miklabaejar-solveig/http://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2008/09/03/more-monsters-and-mythical-beings-skoffin/
http://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2008/09/12/more-monsters-and-mythical-beings-utburdur/
http://grapevine.is/mag/feature/2009/02/13/monsters-and-mythical-beings-tilberi/
http://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2008/07/29/hugleikurandmonsters/
http://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2009/04/03/monsters-and-mythical-beings-nabuxur/
http://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2009/05/08/monsters-and-mythical-beings-gryla/
http://grapevine.is/mag/column-opinion/2008/11/06/monsters-and-mythical-beings-the-worm-of-lagarfljot/
http://grapevine.is/culture/art/2008/12/10/the-christmas-cat/http://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2009/01/12/monsters-and-mythical-beings-x-the-hidden-people-as-depicted-by-hugleikur-dagsson/
http://grapevine.is/travel/traveling-on-your-own/2008/05/09/chasing-monsters-in-east-iceland/

http://grapevine.is/travel/traveling-on-your-own/2011/06/24/you-will-believe-in-bildudalur-visiting-the-sea-monster-museum/
http://www.skrimsli.is/

http://galdrasyning.is/ ]

[from http://stamps.postur.is/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-387/523_read-2648/522_view-590/

"Icelandic legends abound with tales of strange creatures on land, in air and sea. There is an entire genre of legends involving “beings in lochs and sea”. Skoffin is said to be the offspring of a cat and a fox. Beachwalker, a creature of the sea, posed danger to sheep in the mating season. Shellmonster was a multilegged creature, rusty brown and hairy, which made a rattling sound when it moves. There was the poisonous Reverse-Fin Trout with all fins turning forward instead of backward. Iceland Post has issued a sheet with ten stamps featuring an artist’s conception of some of these creatures. Among them are the Horse-Whale, the Ghoul Cat, Sea Cattle, Seal Mother, Mouse-Whale and Red-Crest. A recently published book, “Meeting with Monsters” covers the best known of these legendary creatures. The book is available in Icelandic and English and can be ordered from Postphil Iceland." ]
iceland  myths  mythology  animals  monsters  skoffín  skuggabaldur 
july 2014 by robertogreco
skuggabaldur - Wiktionary
"skuggabaldur m (genitive singular skuggabaldurs, nominative plural skuggabaldrar)

1. (mythological creature, mythology) a creature from Icelandic folk belief who is the offspring of a tomcat (a male cat) and a vixen (female fox) or a bitch (female dog)

2. an evil spirit

3. an evildoer who anonymously commits outrages or evil deeds; a sneak"
myths  iceland  animals  mythology  monsters  skuggabaldur  skoffín 
july 2014 by robertogreco
No Old Maps Actually Say 'Here Be Dragons' - Robinson Meyer - The Atlantic
"Here be dragons. The words supposedly contain every difference between ancient maps and our own. Where old maps were illustrated and incomplete, ours are accurate and photographed from the sky. Old maps were pricey and precious; ours are nearly free and ubiquitous.

Most importantly: Old maps—early modern European maps—contain uncharted territory, across which beasts rumble and serpents writhe. They have dragons.

Our technology might be indistinguishable from magic, but it does not contain magical creatures. Google Maps does not have dragons.

Or that’s the story, anyway. But I’d always wondered: Do any old, original maps actually say those words, “Here be dragons?” 

The answer, it seems, is … No.

Not a single old paper map presents those exact words—“Here be dragons”— in the margins or otherwise. Nor does any paper map include “Hic sunt dracones,” the words’ Latin equivalent. 

But a globe does."



"But if Here be dragons is only on one map, why do we think of it as “typical?” Erin C. Blake, now a curator of special collections at the Folger Shakespeare Library, muses:
It must at least pre-date the publication of Dorothy L. Sayers' short story "The Learned Adventure of the Dragon's Head" in Lord Peter Views the Body (London: Gollancz, 1928), in which a character refers to having seen "hic dracones" on an old map [spotted by both Andrew S. Cook and Benjamin Darius Weiss]. Does it pre-date the publication of the text of the LenoxGlobe in 1879? Why dragons, and not one of the other terrifying creatures depicted on old maps?


The final answer, Blake writes, may be just this: “We don’t know.”

Maybe it’s this: Those famous words served as a warning to the map’s original users and a kind of flourish from the map’s artisan makers. To us, they seem to comment both on the travails of the terrain (“We don’t know what’s here!”) and about the dangers of ignorance (“There might as well be dragons in this unknown spot!”).

Now, we use here be dragons to name our novels full of knights and kings, our treatises on fantastic maps, and even our investigations into extraterrestrial life. The words remind us how different our modern-day map-making is: Shot from cameras in the sky, and available on every smart phone, maps are ubiquitous and photographic, and, the creatures they catalog are too small to see."
robinsonmeyer  maps  mapping  history  2013  cartography  monsters  herebedragons  globes  erinblake  fantasy 
december 2013 by robertogreco
brian dick = brothergeek
"No Rules Except…YARD
In 2008 I was invited by the New Children's Museum, San Diego and the Allan Kaprow estate to "Reinvent" one of two Kaprow Environments for the Museum's premier exhibition Childsplay. Initially I planned to reinvent one or the other, but then it occurred to me to combine them. Kaprow's 1960 seminal tire environment Yard and the 2000 pillow environment No Rules Except… created with Kaprow's son Bram Crane- Kaprow for LACMA Lab's Made in California: NOW exhibition, was reinvented as No Rules Except…YARD.

The installation includes 150 full sized canvas covered foam tires; over 30 mattresses, a climbing wall, sound element (designed by Bram Crane-Kaprow); two heavy bags, a climbing wall with rope (inspired by the work of Simone Forte ); flashing lights and mirrors.

To date the installation has had over 50,000 visitors."

[See also (Museum Mascot Project): http://www.kcet.org/arts/artbound/counties/los-angeles/nation-wide-museum-mascot-project.html ]
briandick  artists  sandiego  via:crisscorza  mascots  beds  bedmaking  ncm  monsters  art  lacmalab  allankaprow  mcasd  openstudioproject  lcproject 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Dear Nick Cave, I was at St. Brigid’s in Ottawa... - what what
"I’ve never drank beer in a church before, deconsecrated or not…never heard someone read about “cunt crunches” & “bullet-proof pussy” in the presence of the Virgin Mary. To say the least, it made an impact…

…you explained that Bunny doesn’t get redeemed. While that’s probably consistent for a story inspired by the Gospel of Mark & the SCUM Manifesto, it was your claim that redemption isn’t necessary that stuck with me. I’ve always had a hard time trusting a God who wanted to forgive me for being human, save me from being human… some people simply don’t deserve redemption. But I really liked Bunny Junior. His father was a monster and he loved him anyway. Found the bits that could be loved… monsters are like that. You can love them, can’t help but love them, but it doesn’t save them. And that’s just fine.

…thanks for saying that the life of an artist is more privileged than painful. It was the only time the security guy security guy behind you smiled so big I saw his teeth."
sincerity  humor  monsters  thedeathofbunnymonroe  bunnymunro  charlesbukowski  johnberryman  franko'hara  god  christianity  nickcave  2009  annegalloway 
december 2012 by robertogreco
snollygoster - Wiktionary
"19th century American English. Possibly from snallygaster, a mythical beast that preys on poultry and children < possibly from Pennsylvania Dutch schnelle geeschter < German snēl, quick + geist, spirit."

[More at: http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-sno1.htm ]
[Follow-up to: http://www.waywordradio.org/spendthrift-snollygosters/ ]
words  monsters  children  poultry  myth  myths  pennsylvaniadutch 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Mutant fish develops a taste for human flesh in India - Telegraph
"The enormous goonch, a type of catfish, is said to have developed a taste for human flesh after feeding on corpses thrown into the river after funeral ceremonies. Locals rumours have held for years that a mysterious monster lurks in the water. But they think it has moved on from scavenging to targeting live bathers who swim in the Great Kali, which flows along the India-Nepal borde"
fish  animals  india  monsters  food  oddities  via:regine 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Mythical 16th-century disease critters ::: Pink Tentacle
"Long ago in Japan, human illness commonly believed to be work of tiny malevolent creatures inside body. Harikikigaki, book of medical knowledge written in 1568 by now-unknown resident of Osaka, introduces 63 of creepy-crawlies, describes how to fight the
medicine  history  japan  illustration  myth  mythology  folklore  glvo  disease  monsters  drawings 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Kage no Sekai | imgl
"We all have childhood experience of feeling there is "something" hiding in dark. This device expresses this perspective not by using existing media but in real world itself. The mechanism is concealed, giving device appearance of ordinary piece of furnit
children  childhood  newmedia  electronics  gadgets  fear  monsters  dark  shadows 
march 2008 by robertogreco
A huge head and a short stumpy body - What monsters are still scary? When described with words only? | Ask MetaFilter
"When I read books, the monsters all seem pretty mild. A man with fangs is not scary, and we've seen slimy slugs on TV hundreds of times. These written descriptions of monsters no longer scare because we've actually seen depictions of them on TV and no lo
monsters  television  books  reading  fear  glvo 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Click opera - Alpine rite aesthetics
"This stuff is to do with people who live in the mountains, their relationship with the animals which live in the mountains too (goats, bears, creatures with horns and fur, things you trap in the snow), and ancient and sinister rituals based on these rela
myth  monsters  ritual  glvo  rituals 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Fogonazos: La verdad sobre los monstruos imaginarios
"Perdidos en la noche de los tiempos, los primeros hombres debieron de encontrarse con restos de criaturas cuya forma y tamaño no fueron capaces de interpretar."
history  science  myth  monsters  dragons  imagination  stories 
june 2007 by robertogreco
PingMag - The Tokyo-based magazine about "Design and Making Things" » Archive » MUSTONE: underground painting and Edo monsters
"MUSTONE is one of the hottest painters in Japan right now - mysteriously hiding underground. Starting his career as a graffiti writer, he worked on cartoon expression, live paintings and held various exhibitions at galleries… At his newly opened joint
design  art  japan  monsters  pingmag 
may 2006 by robertogreco

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