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robertogreco : muni   17

Muni Poetry - Nine Haikus | Arts and Culture | thebaycitybeacon.com
"Muni Haikus

This nineteen bus
Went out of service again
Stop barfing in there

Market Street Railway
Dreamy cream green streamliner
Embarcadero

Ocean Beach in June
Waiting for the twenty three
My ass is frozen

Mission red carpet
Fourteen is so much faster
Fuck your parking spot

Unhoused family
Sharing the back bench all night
Their baby is safe

Streetcars have a bell:
“Ding ding, ding ding!” And a horn:
“Move, Motherfucker!”

Escalator broke
in Civic Center and every
elevator reeks

J Lurch, K Lied
L Terri-ble and N Judas
M Motion-less, T turd."
muni  poems  poetry  haiku  mcallen  2019  publictransit  transportation  sanfrancisco 
may 2019 by robertogreco
Muni Poetry - Hooray for the Buses (36 Teresita) | Arts and Culture | thebaycitybeacon.com
"Hooray for the Buses (36 Teresita)

“Hooray for the Buses” was the title of a flyer the Miraloma Park Improvement Club distributed in advance of the opening of a new bus line in the neighborhood.

Your first inbound stop
is the same first stop
for inbound babies
at St Luke's Maternity ward.
Same terminal transfer point to under hill
as folks outbound at Laguna Honda too.

Your first operator was the Mayor
and your inauguration followed
in the wake of a marching
Drum Corps, Bugle Corps,
Parkside Post Legion plus the Municipal Band
and a bicycle parade.

A panoramic drive,
sometimes Sutro fills your windscreen,
a city view, a sea view, a sky view,
cross over Portola, snake
along your namesake street
or in daylight climb a prominent spur.

Teresita you keep secrets too,
an old name and an old number,
a secret stop you almost always skip.
In eighty years what whispers
have you heard but buried
under a blanket of fog?

Ply the highest prominences of the City,
Twin Peaks and Mount Davidson and Mount Sutro.
Serve spectacular scenes but also
connect neighborhoods and
humbly serve daily passengers,
commuters still need to get to work.

A young boy might be riding to school,
An elder may need to get to the doctor,
A pilgrim may need to get to the cross,
A wedding party is going to the conservatory,
be right on time for their transfers!
This is not your last stop."

[See also:

"Muni Poetry: Spectacle of the Turn (33 Stanyan)"
https://www.thebaycitybeacon.com/culture/muni-poetry-spectacle-of-the-turn-stanyan/article_193daebe-4f43-11e9-bcff-13b286542f0f.html

"Muni Poetry - Sky Line (25 Treasure Island)"
https://www.thebaycitybeacon.com/culture/muni-poetry---sky-line-treasure-island/article_8f1a21bc-4999-11e9-9cc0-2b8a1c3a9246.html

"Muni Poems - 37 Corbett"
https://www.thebaycitybeacon.com/culture/muni-poems---corbett/article_fa98f746-443b-11e9-9d03-e7ed732b8a57.html

"This is Just to Say (38 Geary)"
https://twitter.com/BayCity_Beacon/status/1105838429739208704

"Muni Poetry - M. Mole"
https://www.thebaycitybeacon.com/culture/muni-poetry---m-mole/article_551e6f18-5a24-11e9-879b-4389bcc5a039.html

"Muni Poetry - Nine Haikus"
https://www.thebaycitybeacon.com/culture/muni-poetry---nine-haikus/article_640f9302-5fa2-11e9-89d6-93e38d0e7659.html

"Muni Poetry - Twenty-Eight Nineteenth Ave"
https://www.thebaycitybeacon.com/culture/muni-poetry---twenty-eight-nineteenth-ave/article_cb5b8ac6-6528-11e9-b0d3-1b208b50119a.html

"Muni Poetry: Rondeau for the 14"
https://www.thebaycitybeacon.com/culture/muni-poetry-rondeau-for-the/article_bfec3260-6b06-11e9-b6cb-3b52d678de26.html

"Muni Poetry - Surf Boarding (23 Monterey)"
https://www.thebaycitybeacon.com/culture/muni-poetry---surf-boarding-monterey/article_f2cfa6e2-706c-11e9-80ea-0ff2b2c8797d.html

"Muni Poetry - New Splice (55 16th)"
https://www.thebaycitybeacon.com/culture/muni-poetry---new-splice-th/article_8c2e334a-7580-11e9-950b-8f1b79bd324e.html ]
muni  36teresita  buses  sanfrancisco  publictransit  2019  poetry  38geary  37corbett  33stanyan  25treasureisland  classideas  poety  poems  mcallen  haiku 
april 2019 by robertogreco
Viewtiful Muni – Mc Allen – Medium
"As the Chronicle gears up for a mysterious Total Muni Sequel, Peter reached out to subscribers for input on ranking the best–and worst–of San Francisco’s Muni lines. I threw my hat enthusiastically into the ring by proposing an entire route of Muni lines which offer stunning views of the city. I haven’t actually tried to complete this route, which involves ten transfers and nearly eight miles of walking. I think it’s possible as a whole day trip beginning at dawn and finishing after dark. I tweeted step by step directions, but twitter doesn’t make it exactly read-able, so I thought I’d make it more accessible as a post here. And I made a map!"

[See also:
https://www.sfchronicle.com/news/article/The-5-best-Muni-lines-in-San-Francisco-your-13559760.php ]
sanfrancisco  classideas  muni  2019  mcallen  buses  tains  publictransit  views  lcproject  openstudioproject  parenting  children  cv  transportation  adventuredays  tcsnmy  sfsh 
january 2019 by robertogreco
76X Marin Headlands Express | SFMTA
[via: "Onboard the 76X! @peterhartlaub and @hknightsf weren’t able to include this route for #TotalMuni2018 because it’s weekends only. Marin Headlands, here we come!"
https://twitter.com/that_mc/status/1023622994067828736

We met a fan on the 76X, and now I get to feel like Beyoncé, @peterhartlaub! Was a beautiful if chilly afternoon at Rodeo Beach, where we visited @TMMC and @HeadlandsArts, not to mention a run in with @apthornley! #totalmunisummer
https://twitter.com/that_mc/status/1023684500591525889 ]
togo  sanfrancisco  muni  marin  todo  buses  sfmta  marinemammalcenter  marinheadlands  headlandscenterforthearts  art  arts  science  classideas 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Mc Allen Profile and Activity - Curbed
[Also collected here: https://sf.curbed.com/summer-of-muni ]

[So far at the time of this bookmarking, updated [18 July 2018]:

"Summer of Muni: Riding each line from start to end
A San Francisco dad and his two kids will attempt to ride every Muni line—from terminus to terminus—this summer"
https://sf.curbed.com/2018/6/27/17506718/ride-muni-every-line-diary-summer

"Summer of Muni: From the 56-Rutland to the 25-Treasure Island"
https://sf.curbed.com/2018/7/3/17527494/summer-of-muni-bus-folsom-treasure-island-transportation

"Summer of Muni: Blaring F-Market horns and a trip to Lands End"
https://sf.curbed.com/2018/7/10/17550268/summer-of-muni-transit-dad-kids-challenge-sf

"Summer of Muni: What’s in a name, 44-O’Shaughnessy?"
https://sf.curbed.com/2018/7/18/17578600/muni-challenge-ride-bus-oshaughnessy-eureka ]
sanfrancisco  muni  parenting  children  cv  sfsh  libraries  publictransit  transportation  adventuredays  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject  mcallen 
july 2018 by robertogreco
West Portal - FoundSF
"The West Portal shopping and residential district takes its name from the Twin Peaks Tunnel, which ushered in streetcar service to the southeast corner of San Francisco in 1918. MUNI streetcar service opened San Francisco's last great wilderness to residential development. Formerly sand dunes and vegetable farms, today West Portal is the area bounded by Portola, Kensington, Taraval, and 15th Avenue. High quality homes on detached lots lead to rapid growth in the 1920s and set the stage for West Portal to become the commercial and transportation hub for the West of Twin Peaks area.

In Spanish times, West Portal was part of the land holdings of Mission de Dolores. After the break up of the Missions, Jose de Jesus Noe was granted a 4,443 acre ranch in 1846, called Rancho San Miguel. The ranch ran from present day UCSF in Parnassus Heights to San Jose Avenue, south to Daly City and north to Juniper Serra Boulevard and Forest Hill, including the area of present day West Portal. Parts of the ranch east of Twin Peals were subdivided in the late 1800s and became Noe Valley, Eureka Valley, Fairmont Heights, and Sunnyside.

But West Portal remained a ranch until well after the 20th Century. Adolph Sutro bought the remnant of the original rancho in 1880 -- a 1,200-acre parcel that ran from present day UCSF, south along Stanyan Street, up over Twin Peaks due south roughly along present-day Ridgewood Avenue, continuing south to the Ocean View district, then north along Junipero Serra Boulevard to the Laguna Honda reservoir.

While most of the ranch was hilly, the area that later became West Portal was relatively flat, and Sutro rented it to Italian vegetable farmers. For the next 35 years, the rest of Rancho San Miguel remained a nature preserve. Sutro's passion for tree planting eventually covered the slopes of Mt. Sutro and Mt. Davidson as far south as Ocean Avenue with eucalyptus.

When the rancho was put up for sale in 1909 after a contentious battle over Sutro's will, the City was desperate to recover from the 1906 earthquake and fire. City boosters badly wanted to compete with new subdivisions being built on the Peninsula and in the East Bay. The Burnham plan of 1905 and the City Beautiful Movement called for respecting the contours of the land and incorporating landscaping into residential developments. It was no longer acceptable to pack houses tightly together on rectangular street grids that ignored the terrain.

The first neighborhoods to be developed, St Francis Wood and Forest Hill in 1912, were faithful to these new ideas and were carefully designed and built as "residential parks." Both developments prohibited commercial activities and were made up exclusively of large homes from the Craftsman movement, the Chicago school, the prairie style of Frank Lloyd right, the Beaux-Arts, and other styles. In contrast, West Portal became a commercial and transportation hub with homes in a wide variety of architectural styles."
sanfrancisco  westportal  history  classideas  2003  richardbrandi  tunnels  construction  muni  transportation 
december 2017 by robertogreco
How to make the Bay Area's tangle of public transit options less chaotic - San Francisco Business Times
"Have you ever tried to transfer from BART to Muni downtown, entering and exiting separate gates after you walk up and down two sets of stairs? Or made the same maneuver transferring from Caltrain to BART in Millbrae? The transfer takes minutes when it should take seconds — and that’s just one way the Bay Area’s transit system can bewilder riders.

SPUR, the region’s urban policy think-tank, just released a hulking 51-page report on how to make the Bay Area’s transit systems less chaotic. Much of the conversation surrounding public transit woes centers on funding shortfalls and overcrowding.

But there's another issue: when there are 27 different Bay Area transit systems, it's difficult for people to use them. The sheer number of intersecting systems makes the Bay Area arguably the most complex public transit network in the country, the report notes. “The Big 7” agencies — Muni, BART, AC Transit, Caltrain, VTA, SamTrans and Golden Gate Transit — each have more than 9 million riders a year.

“I ran into these problems when my family visits. They learned how to use BART but nothing else,” Ratna Amin, SPUR’s transit policy director, said at a panel discussion on Tuesday announcing the report. “While we like transit, we don’t use it because it’s too uncertain.”

It’s not just her family, of course.

There’s been a 14 percent drop in public transit usage per capita in the Bay Area since 1991. Aside from Dallas, Houston and Atlanta, that's biggest decrease among large metro areas. That’s bad company to be in if you care about transit-oriented development, traffic, the environment and making life better for 29 percent of Bay Area commuters who pass a county boundary to get to work every day.

The report notes that the region’s “divergent maps, schedules and fares to uncoordinated capital planning and investment” plays a big role. Part of that decline is because “having so many different transit systems makes it harder for riders to understand and use the services available to them,” SPUR notes.

How can policymakers ease the tension?

The report doesn’t just call for all-out consolidation among agencies because that could be onerous. It does call on state legislators to think of ways to provide financial incentives for just that. SPUR’s interviews found “some apathy among stakeholders about” solving the problem because “state and federal transit funding programs have not emphasized integration.”

SPUR mostly lays out a mixture of small and ambitious steps. They include designing new signage and a region-wide map to be more like New York and London’s signature looks; improving revenue-sharing between agencies; standardizing fares; and using bus fleets more efficiently by letting them provide more service across counties.

The shining example of Bay Area transit agencies working together was the creation of the Clipper Card in 2010. The service allows riders to use one re-loadable card across bus and rail systems. But that system has a major flaw: it includes several different fare structures, penalizing people who switch transit operators. Fixing this would require improved revenue sharing, the report notes.

The group also calls out the Metropolitan Transit Commission, the state-authorized transit coordinator in the region, for stopping short of requiring transit operators to change routes and business rules. For example, there are still no timed transfers from BART to feeder buses, the report said.

SPUR found in interviews that MTC also has strained relationships with its operators.

Planning easier transfers for riders is also important because major transit hubs will soon come online. Those hubs include the Valley Transit Authority’s BART-Silicon Valley Extension to San Jose, Caltrain’s Downtown Extension in San Francisco and the Municipal Transportation Agency’s Central Subway.

“We have shortcomings to identify — interagency disputes, transit lines that stop at one boundary,” State Senator Jim Beall said Tuesday morning at the panel. “if we were starting from scratch, no one would invent the transit system we have in the Bay Area.”"
bayarea  transportation  transit  publictransit  sanfrancisco  bart  muni  trains  2017  sanjose  marin  vta  smart  oakland  caltrain  publictransportation  marincounty 
november 2017 by robertogreco
SFTRU - San Francisco Transit Riders
"SF Transit Riders is a rider-based grassroots advocate for world-class transit in San Francisco"
muni  sanfrancisco  publictransit  transit  grassroots 
november 2017 by robertogreco
New Muni Train Tracker
"LRV4 Tracker
Siemens S200
Muni has begun adding the new LRV4 trains into the fleet alongside the existing Breda LRVs.

Want to find out whether they're in service and where? The map on the right shows the locations of the new trains and the lines that they're operating on.

This map auto-updates,
no need to refresh!"
sanfrancisco  muni  trains  maps  mapping  classideas 
november 2017 by robertogreco
SF Beautiful
"Our mission

Since 1947, San Francisco Beautiful, a non-profit 501c3 organization, has been instrumental in creating and delivering community-centered artistic public benefit and preserve neighborhood character. San Francisco Beautiful is a trusted partner to the city’s diverse neighborhood communities and the only organization in San Francisco that brings community based organizations together with regional government, philanthropic, and business sectors to improve and artistically beautify the public realm. We count on and efficiently leverage public, private, and philanthropic funds, volunteers and gratefully accept in-kind contributions that enable us to continue to keep San Francisco Beautiful.

Accomplishments
We are proud of our history and our impact. Some of our successes include:

• Saving San Francisco's cable car system.
• Launching the first citywide tree planting program.
• Capping the number of billboards in the city.
• Legalizing sidewalk seating.
• Creating developer and business tax set asides to fund public art & greening.
• Bringing art to our Muni buses."
sanfrancisco  green  art  classideas  sfsh  muni  trees  nonprofit  nonprofits 
april 2017 by robertogreco
Bay Area 2050: the BART Metro Map
"Introduction
The BART Metro Map consolidates the Bay Area’s existing transit — currently spread over two dozen different transit agencies — and aggregates proposed, planned, and under-construction projects. The map envisions a “best-case scenario,” in which every proposal currently under consideration around the Bay has been funded and constructed (wishful thinking, of course). As we trudge down Geary on the 38, jam ourselves into rush hour BART, or as CalTrain experiences yet another delay, this map imagines an integrated, reliable, and truly regional transit future.

Purpose
The Bay Area has over two dozen different transit agencies. The lack of coordination and the competition for funds costs our region economically both in terms of inefficient government spending on poorly planned routes, and lost productivity due to poor service for commuters. In addition, as the population in nearly every city around the Bay grows, it is clear that our current infrastructure is inadequate to handle future growth, much less the recent tech boom. Although proposals and plans have sprung up left and right to augment transit capacity and service in the 9 counties, in isolation it can be difficult to visualize how these different projects would improve transportation in the Bay.

I’ve created this map to help people understand what is being considered and what our transit future could look like with more funding and more commitment from local governments. You can also take a look at SPUR’s hypothetical unified Bay Area rail map and CalUrbanist’s map of current regional rail.

Jump below for a comprehensive list of the projects referenced in this map, as well as an explanation of the style."

[See also: http://sf.curbed.com/2016/6/23/12017204/bart-metro-map-bay-area-future-plans

Another project: http://www.jakecoolidgecartography.com/regional-rapid-transit-bay-area.html

And more: http://www.jakecoolidgecartography.com/regional-rapid-transit-bay-area.html
]
maps  mapping  bart  muni  sanfrancisco  bayarea  trains  transit  publictransit  2050  future  adamsusaneck  spur  caltrain  classideas 
march 2017 by robertogreco
Week 27: Scattered, and rolling. | Urbanscale
"the course also included some reading…we decided that compiling and designing a newspaper with all the reading for the course would be a better route to success. We had a 20-page newspaper printed by…Newspaper Club…The very fact of having a physical artefact, laying around on the desks in the studio, is a constant reminder that there is related reading to be done, and it invites browsing in a way a list of links or open tabs does not. It also has the advantage of being print — there’s much greater control (albeit with commensurately more effort) over presentation, of curating a selection, of removing distractions, no links, of considering what sits next to what. Texts from blogs can sit next to more historical texts, forcing the ideas to bounce and spark off each other. Not to mention, it ends up being a rather nice object to keep around, to glance at or refer to later.

Find below a list of the content in the newspaper we handed out as a form of shortened reading list."
urban  urbanism  urbanscale  adamgreenfield  toread  readinglist  tomarmitage  jackschulze  timoarnall  greglindsay  janejacobs  italocalvino  copenhagen  denmark  big  bjarkeingels  georgeaye  mayonissen  rongabriel  muni  williamhwhyte  danhill  2011  networkedurbanism  networkedcities  urbancomputing  immaterials  urbanexperience  systems  layers 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Transporter: A New Kind of Public Transit App for San Francisco
"Transporter is an award-winning public transit app designed specifically for San Francisco riders.

It supports SF MUNI and BART. AC Transit is coming soon. (We would love to support more transit agencies in the Bay Area, but unfortunately only MUNI, BART, and AC Transit have real-time arrivals information.)

Transporter supports many features you might find in other apps, like finding out real-time arrivals of the buses and trains you ride. But, once you're on board Transporter lets you find out when you'll arrive at your destination!"

[iTunes page: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/transporter-real-time-public/id373726282?mt=8 ]
transportation  sanfrancisco  bayarea  muni  bart  iphone  applications  tcsnmy  ios 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Real-time Muni and BART predictions for iPhone - Routesy Bay Area
"Have another coffee. The train is still 15 minutes away.

Real-time predictions for San Francisco Muni and BART
Bookmarks for quick access to your favorite stops
GPS-enabled to help you find the nearest stop
Fully compatible with iOS 4.0"
applications  bayarea  sanfrancisco  transit  transportation  bart  muni  buses  trains  iphone  tcsnmy  ios 
august 2010 by robertogreco

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