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robertogreco : narratives   6

Sha Hwang - Keynote [Forms of Protest] - UX Burlington on Vimeo
"Let’s close the day by talking about our responsibilities and opportunities as designers. Let’s talk about the pace of fashion and the promise of infrastructure. Let’s talk about systematic failure — failure without malice. Let’s talk about the ways to engage in this messy and complex world. Let’s throw shade on fame and shine light on the hard quiet work we call design."
shahwang  2015  design  infrastructure  fashion  systemsthinking  complexity  messiness  protest  careers  technology  systems  storytelling  scale  stewartbrand  change  thehero'sjourney  founder'sstory  politics  narrative  narratives  systemsdesign  blame  control  algorithms  systemfailure  healthcare.gov  mythmaking  teams  purpose  scalability  bias  microaggressions  dignity  abuse  malice  goodwill  fear  inattention  donellameadows  leveragepoints  making  building  constraints  coding  code  programming  consistency  communication  sharing  conversation  government  ux  law  uxdesign  simplicity  kindness  individuals  responsibility  webdev  web  internet  nava  codeforamerica  18f  webdesign 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Finding Ways for All Kids to Flourish: Do Report Card Narratives Lead to Positive Change?
"IT'S THAT WONDERFUL (AKA EXHAUSTING) TIME OF YEAR!

Trimester report card narratives were due to my administrator on Tuesday. My very quiet disclaimer: Self Science, the class I teach for all students in 5th -8th grade, does not have its own space on the report card, so I don't actually have to/get to write them. In fact, I am very fortunate that I don't deal with grades in my classes. I spend a lot of time inviting students in reflective conversations on shared google docs where we share thoughts and observations. How could I even begin to "grade" social and emotional skills anyway?

ASKING QUESTIONS ABOUT WHY AND HOW WE DO IT:

Before I begin, let me emphasize that I am questioning the "system", not criticizing the work of hard working teachers.

My awesome, and exhausted after writing way too many narratives colleagues ask for input, so I have the opportunity to edit, and sometimes reframe comments that need a bit of clarity. Despite the fact that I work in a school where teachers are strengths-oriented and skilled at observation, I still wonder if narratives could be more productive and useful. Does the incredible investment of time pay off? Do parents actually find the paragraphs and paragraphs written about their middle schoolers helpful? Do the narratives lead to positive change?

Here's another main concern: So much of what we write seems so subjective, more about "who" we think a kid is, instead of "what" they have done during the trimester.

What would happen if we made a more concerted attempt to avoid judgment oriented phrases such as: Nicole is a conscientious and generous student.. and tried something more "action" specific: Nicole works diligently in class and often goes out of her way to help peers when they are struggling to understand.

PERHAPS THE KEY IS IN STUDENT VOICE:

What if we ask students for their reflections on their performance before writing their narratives, so we can compare their view of their effort and improvement with our own perception? What if a student's reflection actually landed on the report card? Wouldn't it be a rich discussion for parents to compare and contrast the student's impression with the teacher's report? What if report cards included goals and action items co-created by students and teachers?

I'd love to hear from you..
How do you ensure that your narratives lead to positive change?"
teaching  education  narratives  2015  joanyoung  howweteach  reflection  reportcards 
november 2015 by robertogreco
Twitter / ablerism: a workshop for designers: they ...
"a workshop for designers: they do nothing but develop and write 3 versions of a bio/about page, and 1 sample project narrative"

[thread that followed]

"‏@annegalloway
"@ablerism Yes please. Assessed on intelligibility."

@ablerism
"@annegalloway I recently sent someone to your lab site, and they remarked particularly about how well you articulated the questions/work."

‏@annegalloway
"@ablerism thanks - and that’s nice to hear :) it’s something i believe in strongly and really push my students to do well."

‏@ablerism
"@annegalloway Do you have a basic formula? I relied this past year on the following: Tell us 1) What is your question(s)? +"

‏@ablerism
"@annegalloway 2) What did you make? 3) Walk us through your material choices. 4) Why does it matter? Big > smaller > smaller > very big. +"

‏@ablerism
"@annegalloway I had good exchanges with students using that generally. But I think it could be much better, more nuanced than that."

‏@annegalloway
"@ablerism v similar: 1) what did you want to know? 2) why did you want to know? (can include but must go beyond curiosity/personal interest)

‏@annegalloway
"@ablerism 3) how did you answer it (methods & materials) and why those choices? 4) what did you learn? 5) what would u do differently/next?"

‏@ablerism
"@annegalloway I like your grouping of question + why right up front. And reassured to see the overlaps!"

@annegalloway
"@ablerism I find it helps get away from design as *either* problem-solving *or* self-expression :)"

@ablerism
"@annegalloway Yep. Have you written formally or informally about that both/and wish explicitly?"

‏@annegalloway
"@ablerism Nah - I rant about it so much in class that I try not to think about it otherwise ;)"

@annegalloway
"@ablerism and since I wasn't trained as a designer, I've only recently started to get validation from (some) designers"

‏@ablerism
"@annegalloway I was suddenly wondering whether purselipsquarejaw contained these ideas."
sarahendren  2014  workshopideas  classideas  profiles  biographies  narratives  writing  design  art  communication  teaching  howweteach  projectideas  reflection  presentation 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Level 2 Gallery: Alejandro Cesarco. Present Memory | Tate
"Uruguayan artist Alejandro Cesarco pays special attention to the construction of narratives and the practices of reading and translating. ‘I am interested in cataloguing, classifying, appropriating and reinterpreting texts’, he has said. Through different conceptual strategies and a range of media, including prints, books, videos and installations, he explores the various meanings of words and images in relation to context, experience and subjectivity.

Present Memory, a newly commissioned video, features an intimate portrait of the artist’s father, a doctor recently diagnosed with cancer. Using a 16mm camera, Cesarco filmed him in his medical practice in Montevideo with a series of close-ups and medium shots. He later projected this footage onto the same room and recorded the film screening with a video camera. The resulting video is now being shown at three different sites across the museum. Conceived as a projection of a projection, its repetition creates a visual echo and activates a sense of déjà vu every time the viewer re-encounters it.

The work documents both a constructed and anticipated memory of the father, through which the artist also explores the writing of his personal narrative amidst the museum’s writing of its own history and memory."

[Interview: http://bombsite.com/issues/1000/articles/5057 ]

[Program: http://felipsiswoof.tumblr.com/post/29389136081 ]

[See also: http://www.cesarco.info/ ]
2010  alejandrocesarco  memory  reading  translating  uruguay  artists  nostalgia  narrative  narratives  translation  meaning  words  context  experience  subjectivity  pauldeman  classification  reinterpretation  belatedness  meaningmaking  assemblage  appropriation  art 
december 2013 by robertogreco
OK Do | Dreaming objects – A meeting with Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby
"AD: The question of art and design is problematic. A lot of people want to see us as artists, but we definitely see ourselves as designers trying to push the discipline forward, asking questions about design and through it. In fact, we launched the term critical design ten years ago in order to describe our work. Sometimes people think it simply means criticism; that we are negative about everything, anti-consumerist and against design. Some people relate it to critical theory; to Frankfurt school and anti-capitalist thinking. We are definitely aware of it, but then again not in that category either. Critical design is about critical thinking – about not taking things at face value. It’s about questioning things, and trying to understand what’s behind them. In essence, our objective is to use design as a means for applying skepticism to society at large."
art  design  dunne&raby  fionaraby  anthonydunne  learning  unschooling  deschooling  criticalthinking  questioning  unproduct  undesign  science  research  parallelworlds  paralleluniverses  social  society  democracy  education  thinking  philosophy  glvo  lcproject  openstudio  anti-consumption  functionalfictions  okdo  interviews  potential  herenow  presentations  narratives  change  sustainability  slow 
may 2011 by robertogreco
VUE 24: Darling Hammond Article: Steady Work: How Finland Is Building a Strong Teaching and Learning System
"Indeed, there are no external standardized tests used to rank students or schools in Finland, and most teacher feedback to students is in narrative form, emphasizing descriptions of their learning progress and areas for growth (Sahlberg 2007). As is the case with the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) exams in the United States, samples of students are evaluated on open-ended assessments at the end of the second and ninth grades to inform curriculum and school investments. The focus is on using information to drive learning and problem solving, rather than punishments." [One quote does not give sense of the article. This is just one component of the Finnish edcation system as discussed by Darling-Hammond.]
education  finland  policy  politics  change  development  reform  learning  assessment  narratives  tcsnmy  evaluations  standardizedtesting  lindadarling-hammond 
july 2010 by robertogreco

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