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Why NASA wants you to point your smartphone at trees - The Verge
"This NASA app gives nature walks new purpose"



"NASA would like you to take a picture of a tree, please. The space agency’s ICESat-2 satellite estimates the height of trees from space, and NASA has created a new tool for citizen scientists that can help check those measurements from the ground. All it takes is a smartphone, the app, an optional tape measure, and a tree. So to help, the Verge Science video team went on a mission to measure some massive trees in California as accurately as they can.

Launched in September 2018, the ICESat-2 satellite carries an instrument called ATLAS that shoots 60,000 pulses of light at the Earth’s surface every second it orbits the planet. “It’s basically a laser in space,” says Tom Neumann, the project scientist for ICESat-2 at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. By measuring the satellite’s position, the angle, and how long it takes for those laser beams to bounce back from the surface, scientists can measure the elevation of sea ice, land ice, the ocean, inland water, and trees. Knowing how tall trees are can help researchers estimate the health of the world’s forests and the amount of carbon dioxide they can soak up.

But Neumann says that a big open question is how good those measurements from space actually are. That’s where the citizen scientist comes in — to help verify them. Some are more challenging than others. “You can’t really ask a bunch of school kids in Pennsylvania to go to Antarctica to measure the ice sheet height for you for a calibration,” he says. But you can ask them to take their smartphones outside, which is exactly what NASA is doing with its GLOBE Observer app. “You’ve got all sorts of great terrain and features right in your backyard that you could go out and do these measurements that would be useful for us,” Neumann says."
nasa  maps  mapping  measurement  2019  trees  citizenscience  crowdsourcing  classideas  math  mathematics  trigonometry 
may 2019 by robertogreco
NASA’s new nighttime map of the entire Earth
"For the first time since 2012, NASA has released a new map of the entire Earth at night. Of course, you don’t see the Earth so much as the activity of humans in well-lit cities.
Today they are releasing a new global composite map of night lights as observed in 2016, as well as a revised version of the 2012 map. The NASA group has examined the different ways that light is radiated, scattered and reflected by land, atmospheric and ocean surfaces. The principal challenge in nighttime satellite imaging is accounting for the phases of the moon, which constantly varies the amount of light shining on Earth, though in predictable ways. Likewise, seasonal vegetation, clouds, aerosols, snow and ice cover, and even faint atmospheric emissions (such as airglow and auroras) change the way light is observed in different parts of the world. The new maps were produced with data from all months of each year. The team wrote code that picked the clearest night views each month, ultimately combining moonlight-free and moonlight-corrected data.

Scientists are planning on providing “daily, high-definition views of Earth at night” starting later this year. It’s worth clicking through to play with the interactive India map…it’s astounding to see how much light the country has added in the past 5 years. And see if you can spot North Korea at night:

[image]

Barely…just a tiny dot for Pyongyang. You can play around with a fully zoomable version of the entire map here."
maps  mapping  2017  night  earth  nasa  satelliteimagery  classideas  light  lightpollution  urbanization  urban  urbanism  cities 
january 2018 by robertogreco
The font that escaped the Nazis and landed on the moon - YouTube
"Futura is familiar. But its journey from avant-garde German type to hipster favorite is unusual — and it includes Nazis and the moon."
futura  history  typography  via:lukeneff  nazigermany  design  graphicdesign  fonts  nasa  paulrenner 
march 2017 by robertogreco
Mars Rover Game
"Mars Rover drivers wanted! Search for water as your game rover climbs up and down hills to explore Mars. Drive carefully! One crater crash, and it's "game over" for your rover! Get the free app to play Mars Rover, and find out below how the game rover compares to real Mars rovers."
nasa  games  gaming  videogames  marsrover 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Trump to scrap Nasa climate research in crackdown on ‘politicized science’ | Environment | The Guardian
"Nasa’s Earth science division is set to be stripped of funding as the president-elect seeks to shift focus away from home in favor of deep space exploration"
2016  climatechange  donaldtrump  nasa  earthscience  science  policy  priorities  funding  space  spaceexploration  politics 
november 2016 by robertogreco
This Expandable Structure Could Become the Future of Living in Space | Science | Smithsonian
"Even NASA refers to the kind of spacecraft Bigelow is developing as “soft-sided” or as “soft goods.” In fact, nothing could be more misleading. The spacecraft Bigelow Aerospace is engineering are pillowy the way a fully inflated football is pillowy. They are soft the way the tires on a 450-ton 747 gliding onto a runway at 180 miles an hour are soft. Says Glenn Miller, the principal investigator for Bigelow’s technology at NASA, “It’s ‘inflatable,’ but it’s not like a kid’s bouncy castle.”

“If you were to float into one of these modules in orbit and rap on the interior with your knuckles, it would feel like you were rapping on the inside of a fiberglass boat hull,” says George Zamka, a former Marine combat pilot who flew space shuttle Discovery in 2007 and commanded space shuttle Endeavor in 2010. He worked for Bigelow for 14 months, developing training and procedures for the people who might ultimately staff Bigelow space modules. If the Bigelow space modules don’t look like what we think of as “space-age” habitats and vehicles, says Zamka, “it’s just because it’s not what we’re used to seeing.”"

[via: https://twitter.com/pomeranian99/status/752545111737704449 ]
inflatables  nasa  space  soft  inflatable 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Windows on Earth
"Windows on Earth is an educational project that features photographs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station. Astronauts take hundreds of photos each day, for science research, education and public outreach. The photos are often dramatic, and help us all appreciate home planet Earth.

This web site provides free public access to virtually all of these photos, updated at least weekly. The site is operated by TERC, an educational non-profit, in collaboration with the Association of Space Explorers (the professional association of flown astronauts and cosmonauts).

CASIS (Center for Advancement of Science in Space) provided funds to develop and operate the site.

Windows on Earth also operates software on the International Space Station, as a window-side aide to help astronauts identify priority targets for photography.

All images are in the public domain, credit NASA."
satelliteimagery  earth  photography  astronauts  space  via:tealtan  night  imagery  nasa 
march 2016 by robertogreco
A Flag for No Nations | booktwo.org
"This is the moment at which our ideas of technology as a series of waymarks on the universal march of human progress falter and fall apart. A single technology – the vacuum-deposition of metal vapour onto a thin film substrate – makes its consecutive and multiple appearances at times of stress and trial: at the dawn of the space age, in orbit and on other planets, at the scene of athletic feats of endurance, in defence and offence in the mountains of the Hindu Kush, on the beaches of the European archipelago. These are moments of hope as well as failure; moments when, properly utilised, technological progress enables us to achieve something which was beyond our capabilities before. And yet: we are still pulling bodies from the water wrapped in material which was meant to send us into space."



"Technologies are stories we tell ourselves – often unconsciously – about who we are and what we are capable of. By analysing their traces we may divine the progress they are capable of assisting, but they are not in and of themselves future-producing, magical, or separate from human agency. They are a guide and a hope. The reality of these technologies and the place of their deployment shows us plainly that another world is not only possible, but coming into being, should we choose to recognise and participate in it. Technology alone will not achieve such change, merely reflect back our failure to capitalise upon it. Its proper use is not as a bandage for the present, but as a banner for the future."
jamesbridle  techology  humanism  humanity  nasa  space  skylab  refugees  skylab2  1973  jackkinzler  josephkerwin  nationalmetallizing  jerryross  1988  hubbletelescope  spaceblankets  heatsheets  afghanistan  rubenpeter  2011  2013  2005  pakistan  lesbos  greece  lampedusa  2014  2015  2016  mediterranean  migration  chios  hope  flags  kimstanleyrobinson  technology 
january 2016 by robertogreco
BEAUTIFUL MARS
"Images and posts from HiRISE, the high resolution camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO, NASA). Enhanced color pictures are 1 km across; black and white are less than 5 km. "
mars  nasa  photography  tumblrs  via:tealtan  hirise 
november 2015 by robertogreco
Queering Outer Space — Space + Anthropology — Medium
"It’s time to queer outer space.

Since the Space Shuttle program was retired in 2011, the U.S. space agency NASA has turned over much of the work on space transportation to private corporations and the “commercial crew” program. As venture capitalist space entrepreneurs and aerospace contractors compete to profit from space exploration, we’re running up against increasingly conflicting visions for human futures in outer space. Narratives of military tactical dominance alongside “NewSpace” ventures like asteroid mining projects call for the defense, privatization, and commodification of space and other worlds, framing space as a resource-rich “frontier” to be “settled” in what amounts to a new era of colonization (Anker 2005; Redfield 2000; Valentine 2012).

However, from at least the 1970s, some space scientists have challenged this trajectory of resource extraction, neo-colonialism, and reproduction of earthly political economies with alternative visions of the future (McCray 2012). Today’s “visionary” space scientists imagine space exploration as a source of transformative solutions to earthly problems such as climate change, economic inequality, conflict, and food insecurity (Grinspoon 2003; Hadfield 2013; Sagan 1994; Shostak 2013; Tyson 2012; Vakoch 2013).

Elsewhere I’m doing research on all of this as a PhD student in anthropology, but here I want to argue that we must go even further than academically interrogating the military and corporate narratives of space “exploration” and “colonization.” We must water, fertilize,and tend the seeds of alternative visions of possible futures in space, not only seeking solutions to earthly problems which are trendy at the moment, but actively queering outer space and challenging the future to be even more queer.

I’m queering the word queer here — I want to use it to call for more people of color, more indigenous voices, more women, more LGBTQetc., more alternative voices to the dominant narratives of space programs and space exploration. I want to use queer to stand in for a kind of intersectionality that I can speak from without appropriating or speaking on behalf of others, as a queer person. So by saying queer, I’m not trying to subsume other identities and struggles into the queer ones, but calling out to them and expressing solidarity and respect for difference in joint struggle, I’m inviting you all. I also don’t want to write “intersectionalize” outer space but it’s basically what I mean. So, when I use it here queer is not marriage equality and the HRC and heteronormativity mapped onto cis, white, gay, male characters ready for a television show. It’s also not me with my own limited corner of queer, minority, and disability experience. Queer is deeply and fully queer. As Charlie, an awesome person I follow on twitter calls it: “queer as heck.”

So in this way queer is also, if you’ll permit it, a call-out to mad pride, Black power, sex workers, disability pride, Native pride, polyamory, abolitionist veganism, the elderly, imprisoned people, indigenous revolutionaries, impoverished people, anarchism, linguistic minorities, people living under occupation, and much more. It’s all those ways that we are given no choice but to move in the between spaces of social, economic, and environmental life because the highways and sidewalks are full of other people whose identity, behavior, politics, and sensitivities aren’t questioned all the time, and they won’t budge.

In a sense, it’s the old definition of queer as odd — because when they tell you that you don’t belong, you don’t fit it, you’re unusual, then you’re queer. It’s that feeling that you’re walking behind those five people walking side-by-side who won’t let you pass becuase you’re not one of them. Queer is radical, marginal, partial, torn, assembled, defiant, emergent selves — queer is also non-human — from stones and mountains to plants and ‘invasive’ species. I know, you’re thinking: then what isn’t queer? But, if you’re asking that — the answer might be you.

***

I. Queer Lives in Orbit…

II. De-colonizing Mars and Beyond…

III. Extraterrestrial Allies

IV. Generations of Queer Futures"
michaeloman-reagan  2015  socialscience  space  outerspace  anthropology  colonization  race  gender  sexuality  multispecies  sciencefiction  scifi  science  spaceexploration  decolonization  donnaharaway  chrishadfield  davidgrinspoon  carlsagan  sethshostak  peterredfield  nasa  colinmilburn  patrickmccray  walidahimarisha  adriennemareebrown  frederikceyssens  maartendriesen  kristofwouters  marleenbarr  pederanker  100yss  racism  sexism  xenophobia  naisargidave  queerness  queer  DNLee  lisamesseri  elonmusk  mars  occupy  sensitivity  inclusinvity  inclusion  identity  inlcusivity  inclusivity 
september 2015 by robertogreco
How Big is the Solar System?
"This is a classic exercise for visualizing just how BIG our Solar System really is. Both the relative size and spacing of the planets are demonstrated in this outdoor exercise, using a mere peppercorn to represent the size of the Earth. Guy Ottewell has kindly given permission for this electronic presentation of The Thousand-Yard Model; his exercise is presented in its original form, indexed with a few anchors to help you find you way around the large file. We also include a catalog describing several Ottewell publications. Image of the planets courtesy of NASA."
via:timmaly  scale  space  outerspace  solarsystem  science  nasa  size 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Watch: Satellite time lapse reveals humanity's global footprint - Vox
"[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNQ9z_Eb-Jc ]

In the 1970s, some forward-thinking NASA scientists put an Earth-observing satellite into orbit. At an altitude of 570 miles, it photographed the entire planet every 18 days, circling Earth 14 times a day and sending the data back to ground stations.

Forty years later, this satellite and its successors have created the longest continuous record of our planet's surface. By stringing the images together, NASA and the US Geological Survey have shown how rapidly and how profoundly humans are changing the face of Earth.

[gif]

In this time lapse showing the massive growth of Las Vegas, vegetation appears red because the images were partially gathered through infrared sensors. Golf courses and lawns jump out, foretelling the city's water scarcity problems. Off of Lake Mead an artificial lake appears in the 1990s, and developments form alongside it. This is Lake Las Vegas, where Celine Dion lives.

Check out the video above to see what 40 years of satellite imagery reveal about humanity's global footprint.

Read more: 15 before-and-after images that show how we're transforming the planet"
satelliteimagery  via:vruba  anthropocene  nasa  geology  geography  2015  energy  defoestation  envionment  earth  urbansprawl  wateruse  aralsea  lasvegas  brazil  brasil  climatechange  wyoming 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Slow Factory
"Slow Factory™ is a design boutique that creates limited edition silk scarves by merging high-resolution digital prints of scientific images from NASA with the highest quality, centuries-old artisanal textile finishing in Como, Italy. Each collection weaves a strong partnership with an internationally-recognized NGO working in the Environmental or Human Rights sectors."
via:bopuc  textiles  silk  clothing  design  fashion  celinesemaanvernon  glvo  satelliteimagery  earth  nasa  scarves 
april 2015 by robertogreco
The Nonhuman Autonomous Space Agency
"The Nonhuman Autonomous Space Agency is a network of robotic and biological systems, tied together by exchanges in the material and attention economies. One set of probes searches the asteroid belt for resources drifting in the solar wind like giant flowers. Another set, made from modified classic spacecraft, uses its manufacturing and fabrication capacity to shape those resources. Together they build and nurture the habitats for animals and robots, while the whole process can be followed on social media from Earth, all mediated by servers on the Moon."



"The Nonhuman Autonomous Space Agency is a research project from the Working-Group on Adaptive Systems.

Selected prints and three dimensional artifacts from this series are available for exhibition, for more information, please contact sevensixfive ~at~ gmail ~dot~ com.

Keyboard shortcuts
j or right arrow — next image
k or left arrow — previous image
i or up arrow — index
r — random image
Stretch and re-size the browser window to see more detail on the images

Further Reading
When Species Meet, Donna Haraway
The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan
Space Settlements: a Design Study, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Modernity Unbound, Detlef Mertins
Lesabéndio, an Asteroid Novel, Paul Scheerbart
Enduring Innocence, Keller Easterling

Special Thanks
Bryan Boyer, Keller Easterling, Anne Galloway, Marian Glebes, Adam Greenfield, and John Powers"



[http://cargocollective.com/nonhumanagency/How-to-Get-Involved ]

"The Nonhuman Autonomous Space Agency is an open world project. If you have an idea for an image, story, comic book, toy, scenario, or any other media, narrative or not that explores the interaction between nonhuman Earthlings in space exploration and colonization, please get in touch and share it at sevensixfive ~at~ gmail ~dot~ com"
fredscharmen  multispeciesdesign  donnaharaway  space  nonhumanautonomousspaceagency  johnpowers  adamgreenfield  marianglebes  annegalloway  kellereasterling  bryanboyer  michaelpollan  nasa  datlefmertins  paulscheerbart  adaptivesystems  posthumanism 
january 2015 by robertogreco
6, 4: Block quotes
"So! In some of NASA’s actions you can detect a flavor of institutional hypervigilance against controversy. For example, most of what I’m in contact with is EO (Earth Observation, under what to my great pleasure was once called MTPE, Mission to Planet Earth), and for them climate change is a big, big deal. But they have to bend over backwards not to say anything that could be interpreted as even a little partisan, which is a tough move when simple, contextualized facts are very partisan. Likewise, two different people have politely reminded me that their communications are subject to FOIA, giving me the impression that they feel they have to avoid volunteering opinions outside narrow technical topics, even when they’re squeaky clean of any bias that could possibly affect the quality and independence of their work.

The impression that one sometimes gets is of a sticky note on the monitor frame reading “Don’t say anything you wouldn’t want to hear read out in Congress by someone who intends to defund your program”.

It’s a shame. You add friction to people’s work when you make them second-guess themselves and not express even well-supported, carefully framed, intellectually honest, professionally relevant opinions.

I wish the squint-inducing sunlight were felt in agencies whose failures cause secret murders, foolish wars, and the creation of surveillance states more than in an agency whose most salient failures so far – seventeen suited astronaut deaths – were caused by institutional lock-up more than by anything else. It should scare us how much Columbia was a repeat of Challenger: in both cases, a good understanding of the problem and solution was diffused within NASA, but it never converged on the point where it was needed. Too little jidoka. It’s not that transparency causes Crew Module Catastrophic Events, but there’s a chain from “we need to make sure the taxpayers are getting their money’s worth” through “let’s make sure we have solid procedures for everything” to “no, don’t just say ‘STOP! I see a problem that could kill the crew.’ to your boss; write up a nice report in rock-solid formal language” that has to be broken somewhere.

Astronaut deaths are the most salient failure, but to my mind the much bigger one is the failure to go further, which is the fault of the Executive and Legislative branches. One illustration of the problem is the Landsat program. As a series of satellites, you might assume it would be NASA’s responsibility to manage the space side of things. Nope. Obama reached over with scissors and glue to move Landsat to its own authority within the Geological Survey, because we was rightly counseled that Congress (and the presidency) cannot be trusted to fund NASA consistently enough to let it run Landsat. The consequence is very good: USGS’s Landsat operation is one of my stock examples when folks ask about doing open data right. But it bodes bogus of our handling of our primary space program when we have to take satellites away from it because we can’t trust ourselves to let it run them.

And so I see the hypervigilance as another face of the imposed institutional conservatism that has made NASA an anxious genius of an agency, never sure whether it will have the funding to do anything ambitious even after it’s been promised, tired of being scolded for not finishing what it doesn’t have the mandate to start, trying to get through a few short-sighted decades while doing justice to its domain. It’s amazing it’s as sure-handed as it is.

This, then, I think, is why we don’t see even more radical innovation from NASA: because Congress hates funding costly failures, even ones that are small and necessary parts of hugely worthwhile successes. And that’s why I doubt we’re anywhere close to the fail-hard/win-big r strategy program that Maly envisions. NSF grants are one good back door. Universal healthcare and a better social net in general is another: read Bill Gates’s “half” story and go ask a single mother who can’t afford daycare how she thinks the US economy is doing at letting her best ideas compete. I bet we’ll get there, but what happens between now and then still counts. America is waiting.

One of many causes for hope is that, even as its funding for outreach is cut, it’s NASA’s figured out how to put on a show on the web."
charlieloyd  2014  nasa  bureaucracy  universalhealthcare  healthcare  research  government  failure  science  hypervigilance  observation  imagery  congress  funding  landsat  usgs  remotesensing  earth  satellites  satelliteimagery 
march 2014 by robertogreco
GSAXcess®
"NASA is offering Space Program 'Artifacts' and 'Special Items' for use or display in your science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) themed program. Learn more about each of these two programs below and click on the respective icon to see what is available and make a request."
via:vruba  science  nasa  schools  classideas  schoolideas  free  space  artifacts 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Neil Armstrong’s Spacesuit Was Made by a Bra Manufacturer | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine
"In reality, once helmet, gloves and an oxygen-supplying backpack were added, it was a wearable spacecraft."
spacesuits  space  neilarmstrong  nasa  2013  apollo 
november 2013 by robertogreco
BBC - Future - Science & Environment - Inside Nasa’s hurricane drone lab
"Take a behind the scenes tour of the US space agency's unmanned aerial vehicle programme."
drones  droneproject  nasa  2013 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Tobias Revell on the future of art and design at 'A New Dawn' by ArtEZ studium generale, 24 May 2013 on Vimeo
"Tobias Revell outlines how the willing acceptance and grasping of uncertainty has led to a new way of thinking in the present and a resurgence of romantic futurism. He gives specific examples of solutions outside of a 'grand plan', new production methods that liberalise and free design and art from larger systems. He shows how science-fiction imagery and fantasy have penetrated the arts.
Opening lecture at 'A New Dawn' by ArtEZ studium generale on 24 May 2013, Enschede, the Netherlands."
tobiasrevell  2013  art  design  designfiction  futurism  systems  towatch  artez  uncertainty  video  debate  reflection  critique  change  futures  kickstarter  bitcoins  makerbot  3dprinting  reprap  globalvillageonstructionset  opensource  opensourceecology  cohenvanbalen  thomasthwaites  manufacturing  control  consumption  economics  systemsthinking  bigdog  robots  technology  normalization  marsone  uncannyvalley  spacetravel  space  film  nasa  hierarchy  music  vincentfournier  prosthetics  evil  googleglass  internetofthings  superflux  dance  computing  data  anabjain  iot 
june 2013 by robertogreco
How NASA scientists are turning LA into one big climate change lab | California Watch
"Today, Mount Wilson is the site of a more terrestrial but no less ambitious endeavor. Scientists from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena and elsewhere are turning the entire Los Angeles metro region into a state-of-the-art climate laboratory. From the ridgeline, they deploy a mechanical lung that senses airborne chemicals and a unique sunbeam analyzer that scans the skies over the Los Angeles Basin. At a sister site at the California Institute of Technology, researchers slice the clouds with a shimmering green laser, trap air samples in glass flasks and stare at the sun with a massive mirrored contraption that looks like God’s own microscope."
losangeles  climate  science  jpl  nasa  via:javierarbona  emissions  air  airquality  cities  climatechange  research  megacities 
march 2013 by robertogreco
GRIN [Great Images in NASA]
"GRIN is a collection of over a thousand images of significant historical interest scanned at high-resolution in several sizes. This collection is intended for the media, publishers, and the general public looking for high-quality photographs. Please note that downloading these image files may take some time, although searching and browsing should be relatively quick."
space  photography  nasa 
december 2012 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Spacesuit: An Interview with Nicholas de Monchaux
"I was looking for a way to discuss the essential lessons of complexity and emergence—which, even in 2003, were pretty unfamiliar words in the context of design—and I hit upon this research on the spacesuit as the one thing I’d done that could encapsulate the potential lessons of those ideas, both for scientists and for designers. The book really was a melding of these two things."

"But then the actual spacesuit—this 21-layered messy assemblage made by a bra company, using hand-stitched couture techniques—is kind of an anti-hero. It’s much more embarrassing, of course—it’s made by people who make women’s underwear—but, then, it’s also much more urbane. It’s a complex, multilayered assemblage that actually recapitulates the messy logic of our own bodies, rather than present us with the singular ideal of a cyborg or the hard, one-piece, military-industrial suits against which the Playtex suit was always competing.

The spacesuit, in the end, is an object that crystallizes a lot of ideas about who we are and what the nature of the human body may be—but, then, crucially, it’s also an object in which many centuries of ideas about the relationship of our bodies to technology are reflected."

"The same individuals and organizations who were presuming to engineer the internal climate of the body and create the figure of the cyborg were the same institutions who, in the same context of the 1960s, were proposing major efforts in climate-modification.

Embedded in both of those ideas is the notion that we can reduce a complex, emergent system—whether it’s the body or the planet or something closer to the scale of the city—to a series of cybernetically inflected inputs, outputs, and controls. As Edward Teller remarked in the context of his own climate-engineering proposals, “to give the earth a thermostat.”"

"most attempts to cybernetically optimize urban systems were spectacular failures, from which very few lessons seem to have been learned"

"architecture can be informed by technology and, at the same time, avoid what I view as the dead-end of an algorithmically inflected formalism from which many of the, to my mind, less convincing examples of contemporary practice have emerged"

"connections…between the early writing of Jane Jacobs…and the early research done in the 1950s and 60s on complexity and emergence under the aegis of the Rockefeller Foundation"

"Geoffrey West and Luis Bettencourt—who have gone a long way in showing that, not only should cities be viewed through the analogical lens of complex natural systems, but, in fact, some of the mathematics—in particular, to do with scaling laws, the consumption of resources, and the production of innovation by cities—proves itself far more susceptible to analyses that have come out of biology than, say, conventional economics."
militaryindustrialcomplex  tools  cad  gis  luisbettencourt  janejacobs  meatropolis  manhattan  meat  property  fakestates  alancolquhoun  lizdiller  cyberneticurbanism  glenswanson  parametricarchitecture  parametricurbanism  interstitialspaces  urbanism  urban  bernardshriever  simonramo  neilsheehan  jayforrester  housing  hud  huberthumphrey  vitruvius  naca  smartcities  nyc  joeflood  husseinchalayan  cushicle  michaelwebb  spacerace  buildings  scuba  diving  1960s  fantasticvoyage  adromedastrain  quarantine  systemsthinking  matta-clark  edwardteller  climatecontrol  earth  exploration  spacetravel  terraforming  humanbody  bodies  cyborgs  travel  mongolfier  wileypost  management  planning  robertmoses  cybernetics  materials  fabric  2003  stewartbrand  jamescrick  apollo  complexitytheory  complexity  studioone  geoffreywest  cities  research  clothing  glvo  wearables  christiandior  playtex  interviews  technology  history  design  science  fashion  nasa  books  spacesuits  architecture  space  bldgblog  geoffmanaugh  2012  nicholasdemonchaux  wearable  elizabethdiller  interstitial  bod 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Luke Johnson: Mysteries and Curiosities Map of JPL: How can design influence an established culture?
"It was during this walk that I first realized JPL was a lot like the television show Lost."

"The map functions as a tool to orient new employees, encourage Lab explorationg for current employees, and to put a human face on JPL for the outside public."

"Armed with a GPS tracknig device, camera, and a trusty pair of shoes, I walked to every buidling on Lab in numerical order. What I thought would take a Saturday afternoon took 22 hours over the span of four days at a walking distance of 52.2 miles."

"The map itself is divided into two sections. The front is an Insider's Guide containing information I wish someone had explained to me when I began working at the Lab. The back provides several Walking Tours. A Welcome Pack and Website/Smartphone App were recently funded."

"The creation of a new design practice requires a certain entrepreneurial spirit and chutzpah"

[via: https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/267163844512714752 ]
wayfinding  nasa  california  exploration  cartography  mapping  maps  buildings  numbering  numbers  lost  alexandersmith  davidmikula  juliatsao  christianeholzheid  erinellis  pasadena  jpl  lukejohnson 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Warren Ellis » How To See The Future [What? Not yet bookmarked?] [Purposely tagged 'boredome'.]
"Can you even consider being part of a culture that could go to space and then stopped?

If the future is dead, then today we must summon it and learn how to see it properly.

[more examples]

We live in the future. We live in the Science Fiction Condition, where we can see under atoms and across the world and across the methane lakes of Titan. …

Understand that our present time is the furthest thing from banality. Reality as we know it is exploding with novelty every day.

To be a futurist, in pursuit of improving reality, is not to have your face continually turned upstream, waiting for the future to come. To improve reality is to clearly see where you are, and then wonder how to make that better.

Act like you live in the Science Fiction Condition. Act like you can do magic and hold séances for the future and build a brightness control for the sky.

Act like you live in a place where you could walk into space if you wanted. Think big. And then make it better."

[Video now here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLTs4RXM3vE ]
boredom  boredome  spacetravel  jgballard  philipkdick  takealookaroundyou  appreciation  science  sciencefictioncondition  rearviewmirror  space  nasa  voyager  voyager1  vintage  vintagespace  magic  weliveinamazingtimes  perspective  atemporality  iphone  googlegloves  googleglass  manufacturednormalcy  venkateshrao  reality  marshallmcluhan  noticing  hereandnow  now  lookaround  futurism  sciencefiction  2012  scifi  technology  future  warrenellis 
september 2012 by robertogreco
NASA - Rover Leaves Tracks in Morse Code
"NASA's Curiosity rover took its first test stroll Wednesday Aug. 22, 2012, and beamed back pictures of its accomplishment in the form of track marks in the Martian soil. Careful inspection of the tracks reveals a unique, repeating pattern, which the rover can use as a visual reference to drive more accurately in barren terrain. The pattern is Morse code for JPL, the abbreviation for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., where the rover was designed and built, and the mission is managed.

"The purpose of the pattern is to create features in the terrain that can be used to visually measure the precise distance between drives," said Matt Heverly, the lead rover driver for Curiosity at JPL."
tracks  morsecode  2012  marsrover  jpl  nasa 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Crazy Smart: When A Rocker Designs A Mars Lander : NPR
"Steltzner's path to becoming team leader for this new Mars lander was hardly direct. Unlike many successful engineers, he struggled at school. An elementary school principal told him he wasn't very bright. His high school experience seemed to confirm that.

"I passed my geometry class the second time with an F plus, because the teacher just didn't want to see me again," he says.

His father told him he'd never amount to anything but a ditch digger, a remark he still carries with him years later.

Maybe that's because school wasn't a priority, particularly with the distractions of the flower-power era in the Bay Area.

"I was sort of studying sex, drugs and rock and roll in high school," says Steltzner. It wasn't just the long hair. "I liked to wear this strange Air Force jump suit. And my first car was a '69 Cadillac hearse. I put a bed in the back."

After high school, the plan was to be a rock star. … played bass guitar in Bay Area bands… But then something happened."
unschooling  deschooling  engineering  marslander  nasa  2012  learning  physics  curiosity  marsrover  science  education  jpl  adamsteltzner 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Station: The UnFacebook World
"Dark = Facebook
Yellow = No Facebook

This is a mashup of two world maps: NASA's earth at night and Facebook's friendship map. By subtracting one from the other, we get an image the shows only cities that don't use Facebook."
facebook  visualization  earth  nasa  maps  mapping  unfacebook  2011 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Astronaut Suicides [photo series]
"I understand that some believe that we should return to the surface of the moon but I have to say this bluntly, we have been there before.<br />
<br />
President Barack Obama<br />
April 15th 2010"
suicide  nasa  humor  2011  astronauts 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Video: A Two-Minute Visual History of the Spacewalk - Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg - Technology - The Atlantic
"If there is a defining activity for NASA's Space Shuttle program, it is the spacewalk, or extra-vehicular activity. 160 spacewalks were made in the assembly of the ISS alone. There's something about the image, too, of a human high above the Earth, clambering around on a piece of machinery whizzing through space. In this video, we take a two-minute tour of the history of the EVA from the first during the Gemini program to the last spacewalk, which occurred Wednesday in low-earth orbit.<br />
<br />
All footage is courtesy of NASA and the Internet Archive. Some of it has been sped up."
kasiacieplak-mayrvonbaldegg  space  spacewalks  2011  video  spaceshuttle  nasa  history  iss  internationalspacestation  weightlessness 
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Spirit of the Spacesuit - NYTimes.com ["The success of this “soft” approach — ad hoc, individualistic, pragmatic — should be a lesson to us."]
"Props and costumes mattered in this theater of war. That NASA’s equipment should be painted white, and feature no military shields or corporate brands but only “USA,” “NASA” and the flag, was a deliberate decision by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Yet American rockets were nevertheless cobbled together from instruments of war, their craftsmen drawn from the same network of systems engineers that was devised to manage the arms race and its doomsday scenarios. Our first astronauts went to space hunched into an improvised capsule atop ICBM’s, squatting in place of warheads. The brilliance with which the resulting achievements shone was — like a diamond’s — the result of terrible pressure. We should be glad that this era is past.

But if the dazzling image of midcentury spaceflight obscures its dark origins, close scrutiny of the Apollo spacesuit reveals a different and more robust approach to innovation — one that should inspire us at this uncertain moment in space exploration."
space  spacerace  history  war  2011  ingenuity  nicholasdemonchaux  via:javierarbona  spaceexploration  spacesuits  spaceflight  coldwar  adhoc  innovation  nasa  us  bureaucracy  militaryindustrialcomplex  possibility  optimism  dwightdeisenhower 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Moon Zoo
"Welcome to Moon Zoo — with your help, we hope to study the lunar surface in unprecedented detail. Thanks to the help of the Moon Zoo community we have already visually classified 1,236,747 images from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)."
astronomy  collaboration  crowdsourcing  moon  maps  mapping  nasa  moonzoo  space  science  spacetravel  spaceexploration 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Welcome NASA to the Commons « Flickr Blog
"NASA joins the Commons on Flickr today with three iconic sets spanning the US space agency’s 50+ year history. Their Commons account will feature photos from across the agency’s many locations and centers, chronicling the history of space and lunar missions, and the people and places of the organization."
commons  flickr  history  nasa  photography  space  spacetravel  spaceexploration 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Nasa called in to help trapped Chilean miners stay healthy | World news | The Guardian
"Chilean health officials are seeking advice from Nasa on how the 33 miners trapped underground can remain sane and healthy while rescue efforts continue.

The men appear to be healthy and optimistic but are likely to be confined in a tiny shelter 688 metres underground for up to four months while relief crews bore an extraction shaft.

According to officials at the Chilean health ministry, conditions in the chamber are similar to those faced by submarine crews or astronauts on the international space station.

Rescue workers have now started delivering food, water and oxygen to the trapped men, and a communications system has been installed. The first package contained rehydration tablets and a high-energy glucose gel to help the miners' digestive systems.

Meanwhile, doctors and psychologists are trying to safeguard the miners' mental wellbeing by keeping them informed and busy."
chile  2010  miners  rescue  survival  nasa 
august 2010 by robertogreco
But First We Must Send Robots | Quiet Babylon
"Want to inspire the kids of tomorrow? Forget the heroic myths. That kind of inspiration is over. “Anyone can be the President.” No they can’t. We all know it.
timmaly  quietbabylon  space  nasa  economics  mars  exploration  robots  mannedspaceflights  engagement  cost  money  resources  internationalspacestation 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Wikipedia trumps Britannica
"At start of writing book I bought subscription to Britannica...worried that Wikipedia might be inaccurate...discovered that Wikipedia trumps Britanncia all the time...articles are in more depth & provide better references...site design...is easily navigable & focuses on content, whereas Britannica’s site assaults eyes w/ distractions. Initially, I’d find myself double-checking facts on Wikipedia by looking in Britannica...After weeks...realized that Britannica wasn’t helping. Any errors found on Wikipedia were because I was reading original source material...more often than not [found] via Wikipedia...policy of linking to reliable sources turned out to be wonderful starting point for research. Britannica, on other hand, appears to view role as being reliable source. Because it is edited & managed, part of brand is reliability...leads to a sort of self-sufficiency which contrasts with Wikipedia’s need to prove reliability constantly...[resulting in] wealth of 3rd-party links"
wikipedia  reliability  britannica  enyclopedias  research  tcsnmy  online  web  learning  via:preoccupations  collaboration  nasa  nytimes  history  jpl  nobelfoundation 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Open the Future: Countdown
"But beyond that was the recognition that the massive rockets and space-stations programs are the apotheosis of 20th century engineering. These are artifacts of yesterday's version of tomorrow, the mechanistic urge on an unthinkable scale. And such remarkable, complex systems are ultimately tied to a worldview and process that celebrates the centralized and the controlled in an era that is increasingly neither.
jamaiscascio  nasa  space  future  futurism  2010 
march 2010 by robertogreco
NASA Brings the Dark Side of the Sun to Your iPhone | Wired Science | Wired.com
"With the free 3D Sun app, you can set your phone to alert you when a new solar flare erupts, watch video of a solar prominence or a comet heading into the sun. You can manipulate an image of the sun in three-dimensions with your finger.

The data is streamed to Earth by NASA’s twin STEREO spacecraft which monitor the sun from two different spots, one ahead of Earth in its orbit and one behind, giving stereoscopic images to give a sort of three-dimensional view, similar to the way our two eyes do."
iphone  applications  nasa  sun  science  astronomy  ios 
february 2010 by robertogreco
NASA - NASA Ames Scientist Develops Cell Phone Chemical Sensor
"Jing Li, a physical scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., along with other researchers working under the Cell-All program in the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate, developed a proof of concept of new technology that would bring compact, low-cost, low-power, high-speed nanosensor-based chemical sensing capabilities to cell phones.

The device Li developed is about the size of a postage stamp and is designed to be plugged in to an iPhone to collect, process and transmit sensor data. The new device is able to detect and identify low concentrations of airborne ammonia, chlorine gas and methane. The device senses chemicals in the air using a "sample jet" and a multiple-channel silicon-based sensing chip, which consists of 16 nanosensors, and sends detection data to another phone or a computer via telephone communication network or Wi-Fi."
iphone  2009  nasa  sensors  chemistry  air  via:preoccupations 
november 2009 by robertogreco
The 10 best educational websites - Times Online
"If you bought a computer a few years ago, it would invariably come with a free CD-Rom encyclopedia. At the time it seemed like a life-changer, but after an hour or two spent looking at ancient wildlife clips and a timeline about the Romans, the excitement wore off. Today’s internet equivalents are bigger, faster and more interactive, whether you’re helping youngsters with their homework or cramming for the pub quiz."
teaching  online  history  education  learning  technology  e-learning  science  glvo  edg  srg  tcsnmy  nasa  nationalgeographic  howstuffworks  smithsonian  bbc  pbs 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Resources to help you commemorate Apollo 11 | Webware - CNET
"Forty years ago this Thursday, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins lifted off on their historic mission to the moon. It was the first manned spaceflight to reach the lunar surface, and on July 20, 1969, first Armstrong then Aldrin became the first people to step onto the moon. (Collins stayed in orbit around the moon for the 21 or so hours that the other two were on the surface.)
apollo11  resources  history  space  nasa 
july 2009 by robertogreco
We choose the moon ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"You know, I hear those objections, to our wind-power program, to Obama's health care plan, to open education and free learning, and the rest, and I just want to look at these people and say we choose to go to the Moon and make the arguments about ROI and effectiveness and data-supported decision-making just go away."
stephendownes  nobelprojects  progress  nasa  apollo11  roi  healthcare  climatechange  energy 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Texture maps of Earth and Planets
"Here are some of my planetary texture maps that I've collected over the years. It has taken me lots of time to find and make these maps, but I'm providing them here for your modelling pleasure. They are available in a usable size compared to other places on the web. In fact, with the size of
via:reas  maps  mapping  photography  geography  space  earth  planets  nasa  images  textures  modeling  graphics  moon  mars  science  elevation 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Space Eulogies: Shuttle-Riding Bat Dies The Most Glorious Death Imaginable
"Bereft of his ability to fly and with nowhere to go, a courageous bat climbed aboard our Discovery with stars in his weak little eyes. The launch commenced, and Spacebat trembled as his frail mammalian body was gently pushed skyward. For the last time, he felt the primal joy of flight; for the first, the indescribable feeling of ascending toward his dream—a place far away from piercing screeches and crowded caves, stretching forever into fathomless blackness.
space  animals  wildlife  bats  nasa  nature  death  humor 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Spacehack
"a directory of ways to participate in space exploration. interact + connect with the space community."
space  spaceexploration  exploration  community  socialnetworking  collaboration  engineering  astrophysics  tcsnmy  spacehack  socialmedia  opensource  astronomy  science  technology  nasa  stars  participatory  education  learning  collaborative 
december 2008 by robertogreco
climateTimeMachine - Tracking Changes in Global Conditions over Time
"This series of visualizations show how some of the key indicators of climate change, such as temperature, sea ice extent and carbon dioxide concentrations, have changed in Earth's recent history."
climate  nasa  science  environment  globalwarming  visualization  climatechange  arctic  datavisualization  simulations 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Wired Science Scores Exclusive Twitter Interview with the Phoenix Mars Lander | Wired Science from Wired.com
"to catch up with the personal life of this robotic lander carrying out a heroic mission millions of miles from home...we reveal the real identity of the Phoenix Mars Lander's Tweets. Don't read on if knowing the truth will spoil your fun."
mars  nasa  twitter  humor  science  space  wired 
june 2008 by robertogreco
greg.org: the making of: The Moon Museum
"Moon Museum, w/ drawings by Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, David Novros, Forrest "Frosty" Myers, Claes Oldenburg, John Chamberlain...supposedly installed on moon in 1969 as part of Apollo 12 mission"
art  history  moon  space  museums  nasa  drawing  warhol  rauschenberg  oldenburg  culture  curation  nazca 
march 2008 by robertogreco
NASA's Gen Y Speaks Out | Wired Science from Wired.com
"At NASA Next Generation Exploration Conference two young employees gave a powerful presentation called "The Gen Y Perspective"-- set of charts they had delivered to center management week before that made way up to Administrator's desk."
nasa  geny  millennials  generations  attention  engagement  science  space 
february 2008 by robertogreco
the nonist - Long Duration Love Affair
[Wayback: http://web.archive.org/web/20130216141615/http://thenonist.com/index.php/thenonist/permalink/long_distance_love_affair/ ]

"That cylindrical object you see pictured above is a roughly school-bus sized structure which was deployed into space in 1984. It orbited the Earth for five and a half years with nothing expected of it other than to float there, getting battered about by whatever the great black yonder saw fit to throw at it. You see, every inch of its outside surface was covered with Science. 57 separate experiments, mounted in 86 trays, involving the participation of “more than 200 principal investigators from 33 private companies, 21 universities, seven NASA centers, nine Department of Defense laboratories and eight foreign countries.” Its purpose was to study the effects of space on a multitude of materials. Its name is the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and I am deeply in love with it."

[Permalink: http://thenonist.com/index.php/thenonist/permalink/long_distance_love_affair/ ]
science  space  nasa  nostalgia  exposure  engineering  design  art  time  wear  research  materials  beausage  patina  nonist 
january 2008 by robertogreco
The Most Beautiful Planetary Maps Ever | Wired Science from Wired.com
"I didn't know that the United States Geological Survey even mapped planets in the first place. But indeed they do. The map above -- of the moon's dark side, with colors correlating to geological materials and phenomena -- is one of a series produced in p
geography  maps  moon  nasa  planets  science  scifi  art  mapping  usgs  space  images  information  beautiful 
november 2007 by robertogreco
greg.org: the making of: The Satelloons Of Project Echo: Must. Find. Satelloons.
"From about 1956 until 1964, US aeronautics engineers and rocket scientists at the Langley Research Center developed a series of spherical satellite balloons called, awesomely enough, satelloons."
space  nasa  retro  history  satellites  balloons  satelloons 
october 2007 by robertogreco

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