recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : nationalstandards   5

Everything you need to know about Common Core — Ravitch
"These two federal programs, which both rely heavily on standardized testing, has produced a massive demoralization of educators; an unprecedented exodus of experienced educators, who were replaced in many districts by young, inexperienced, low-wage teachers; the closure of many public schools, especially in poor and minority districts; the opening of thousands of privately managed charters; an increase in low-quality for-profit charter schools and low-quality online charter schools; a widespread attack on teachers' due process rights and collective bargaining rights; the near-collapse of public education in urban districts like Detroit and Philadelphia, as public schools are replaced by privately managed charter schools; a burgeoning educational-industrial complex of testing corporations, charter chains, and technology companies that view public education as an emerging market. Hedge funds, entrepreneurs, and real estate investment corporations invest enthusiastically in this emerging market, encouraged by federal tax credits, lavish fees, and the prospect of huge profits from taxpayer dollars. Celebrities, tennis stars, basketball stars, and football stars are opening their own name-brand schools with public dollars, even though they know nothing about education.

No other nation in the world has inflicted so many changes or imposed so many mandates on its teachers and public schools as we have in the past dozen years. No other nation tests every student every year as we do. Our students are the most over-tested in the world. No other nation—at least no high-performing nation—judges the quality of teachers by the test scores of their students. Most researchers agree that this methodology is fundamentally flawed, that it is inaccurate, unreliable, and unstable, that the highest ratings will go to teachers with the most affluent students and the lowest ratings will go to teachers of English learners, teachers of students with disabilities, and teachers in high-poverty schools. Nonetheless, the U.S. Department of Education wants every state and every district to do it. Because of these federal programs, our schools have become obsessed with standardized testing, and have turned over to the testing corporations the responsibility for rating, ranking, and labeling our students, our teachers, and our schools.

The Pearson Corporation has become the ultimate arbiter of the fate of students, teachers, and schools.

This is the policy context in which the Common Core standards were developed. "



"Early childhood educators are nearly unanimous in saying that no one who wrote the standards had any expertise in the education of very young children. More than 500 early childhood educators signed a join statement complaining that the standards were developmentally inappropriate for children in the early grades. The standards, they said, emphasized academic skills and leave inadequate time for imaginative play. They also objected to the likelihood that young children would be subjected to standardized testing. And yet the proponents of the Common Core insist that children as young as 5 or 6 or 7 should be on track to be college-and-carer ready, even though children this age are not likely to think about college, and most think of careers as cowboys, astronauts, or firefighters."



"I fear that the Common Core plan of standards and testing will establish a test-based meritocracy that will harm our democracy by parceling out opportunity, by ranking and rating every student in relation to their test scores.

We cannot have a decent democracy unless we begin with the supposition that every human life is of equal value. Our society already has far too much inequality of wealth and income. We should do nothing to stigmatize those who already get the least of society's advantages. We should bend our efforts to change our society so that each and every one of us has the opportunity to learn, the resources needed to learn, and the chance to have a good and decent life, regardless of one's test scores."

[See also: http://teachertomsblog.blogspot.com/2014/02/everything-you-need-to-know-about.html ]
dianeravitch  commoncore  2014  government  policy  education  democracy  us  standards  nationalstandards  meritocracy  testing  standardizedtesting  society  arneduncan  rttt  nclb  schools  publicschools  pearson  michellerhee  joelklein  billgates  jebbush 
february 2014 by robertogreco
The Finland Phenomenon – a film about schools « Cooperative Catalyst [Great detail in the post, some valuable comments too]
"key takeaways…

1. Finland does not have high stakes tests

2. …worked to develop national consensus about public schools

3. Having made a commitment to public schools…few private schools.

4. …RE accountability, Finns point out they…don't have tests nor an inspectorate…find trusting people leads to them being accountable…

5. …don't have incredibly thick collections of national standards…have small collections of broadly defined standards, & allow local implementation.

6. Qualifying to become teacher is difficult

7. Teachers are well trained, supported, & given time to reflect…including during school day.

8. Finns start school later in life than we do

9. …little homework.

10. …meaningful technical education in Finnish Schools

[Also]…All students in primary & secondary schools get free meals…grow up learning Swedish & English as well as Finnish…health care in the schools…teaching force is 100% unionized. Administrators function in support of teachers, not in opposition."
education  schools  teaching  film  finland  2011  politics  policy  us  learning  standardizedtesting  testing  accountability  control  publicschools  standards  nationalstandards  trust  unions  professionalism  professionaldevelopment  reflection  poverty  healthcare  homework  training  support  technicalschools  vocational 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: The Common Core Will make High School English More Like This
"They have to change the structure of high school English to make in more amenable to "data-driven instruction." If you don't believe me, read the article, then look at the difference between the high school standards you use now and the Common Core."

[At minimum, see the long quote that Tom provides.]
tomhoffman  commoncore  standards  nationalstandards  education  policy  english  teaching  schools  us  scary 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Hechinger Report | Interactive: Academic standards are all over the map [See aslo: http://www.tuttlesvc.org/2010/06/im-tired-of-this-crap.html]
"Academic standards range widely across the country for even the simplest set of facts. Such disparities are one reason why 48 states jointly developed a set of common standards, which seek to provide a single, clear definition of what should be taught in English & math in America’s public schools from K-12. The common standards, released on June 2nd, are also intended to better prepare U.S. children for college & workplace.
education  interactive  maps  mapping  standards  tomhoffman  policy  nationalstandards  us  schools  arbitrary 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Debunking the Case for National Standards
"Are all kids entitled to a great education? Of course. But that doesn’t mean all kids should get the same education. High standards don’t require common standards. Uniformity is not the same thing as excellence – or equity. (In fact, one-size-fits-all demands may offer the illusion of fairness, setting back the cause of genuine equity.) To acknowledge these simple truths is to watch the rationale for national standards – or uniform state standards -- collapse into a heap of intellectual rubble. ... The goal clearly isn’t to nourish children’s curiosity, to help them fall in love with reading and thinking, to promote both the ability and the disposition to think critically, or to support a democratic society. Rather, a prescription for uniform, specific, rigorous standards is made to order for those whose chief concern is to pump up the American economy and make sure that we triumph over people who live in other countries."
assessment  education  alfiekohn  pedagogy  curriculum  change  reform  teaching  standards  poverty  politics  learning  criticism  nationalstandards  rttt  nclb  trends 
january 2010 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read