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robertogreco : ncaa   5

HEWN, No. 232
"The University of Wyoming 1969 Football Team. The "Black 14" wore black armbands in a game versus BYU to protest the racial policies of the school and the Mormon church. The players had their scholarships revoked and were kicked off the team.

For my high school gym teacher Mel Hamilton, one of the "Black 14": someone who taught us early that athletes have long been activists

I’ve been a Denver Broncos fan my whole life. I often joke that I learned to cuss watching my dad watch the team. My dad faulted quarterback Craig Morton for the team’s failures, and I remember the first game of the QB who replaced him – the string of profanities that my dad shouted at the television when that quarterback, John Elway, lined up behind a guard and not the center to take the snap. I’ve cheered for the Orange Crush and the Three Amigos, and I’ve remained a loyal fan through decades of humiliating losses when there wasn’t much to craft a good PR campaign or nickname around. (I never cheered for Tebow, to be clear.) Every time Shannon Sharpe leans in with his commentary on the politics of sports, I want to point out to everyone that he was a Bronco (and one of the greatest tight ends in the history of the game).

But I’ll never watch football again.

I decided to boycott the NFL this year because of the organization’s treatment of Colin Kaepernick. It’s so apparent that he’s been blackballed for his activism and his protest of police brutality. (Yes, I realize there’s an argument that he’s just not that good of a QB. I don’t buy it.) I’ve thought about ordering a Broncos jersey with a number 7 on it – a 7 with the name Kaepernick, not Elway on the back. But I’m not giving the NFL another dime.

The President of the United States spoke at a campaign rally in Alabama last night and said that NFL owners should fire players who take a knee, as Kaepernick famously did last season, during the national anthem. “Get that son of a bitch off the field right now, out. He’s fired. He’s fired!” Trump role-played to roars of approval from the audience. These protests, Trump contended, are “a total disrespect of our heritage” – “our heritage,” of course, is quite the racist dog-whistle when speaking about the actions of Black football players to a crowd of white supporters in Alabama.

Trump also blasted the NFL for changes to the game that have meant “big hits” are penalized. “Today, if you hit too hard, 15 yards, throw him out of the game,” Trump said as he mimicked a referee throwing a flag.

Trump’s complaints about football came less than a day after The New York Times reported that former Patriots player and convicted murderer Aaron Hernandez had severe CTE when he killed himself in his jail cell earlier this year. Hernandez was 27. He’d last played football at age 23.

I haven’t been able to stop thinking about Hernandez’s story.

Like I said, I’m a Broncos fan, and there’s one team I hate more than any team in any sport. But I’ll tell you this: it’s a New England Patriot who’s finally convinced me: I will never watch football again. Kap could get re-hired. Every player tomorrow could take a knee. Doesn’t matter. I just can’t support this game any longer.

Wait a minute Audrey, I can hear you mutter. This is an ed-tech newsletter. What does any of this have to do with education? Everything. Football is a huge deal – culturally, financially – for schools, from middle school on. As we think about the future of education, we must not only address the labor of the professoriate, adjunct teachers or otherwise; we must address the labor of students, and particularly the labor of student-athletes. Pay them for starters, sure. But we’ve got to do more than that. I’ve previously argued that, until futurists address the NCAA in their predictions about the end of higher ed, their prattle about the coming techno-disruption means very little. Now more than ever it’s time to talk about the end of football. Two college football players died last weekend. Three died during the off-season.

This isn’t simply about exploitation of professional athletes. This isn’t simply about the politics of the NFL. The practices of K–12 education and college education are implicated here as well – how we treat and and how we create vulnerable bodies and minds. And how powerful white owners laugh all the way to the bank.

Yours in struggle,
~Audrey"
2017  americanfootball  football  us  sports  politics  ncaa  education  highered  edtech  protest  history 
september 2017 by robertogreco
How It Ends: The last gasp of amateurism in an Oakland courthouse
"“When I first started bitching was in 1998,” Sonny said, “when they started showing on classic sports the old movies of the games. Then you had them selling the jerseys, with Chris Webber and those guys at Michigan. EA Sports wasn’t even in my thought process.”

And then, something remarkable happened. Serious people outside of sports began to notice how absurd the whole thing had become. Joe Nocera of the New York Times made a crusade out of it, and Taylor Branch, one of the towering figures among American historians, went after the NCAA like the genuine Jeremiah in the pages of The Atlantic, hanging the label of “cartel” on the organization so firmly that the NCAA lawyers are tearing up the English language trying to keep it out of this trial. All these people came to Sonny Vaccaro, because he had been there all along, whereupon the players themselves became involved."
ncaa  sports  labor  highereducation  highered  capitalism  2014  sonnyvaccaro  exploitation  money  charlespierce 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Chuck Klosterman on Amherst, Maine Maritime Academy, and innovation in college football - Grantland
"Watch a major college game, and the action gets weird. You immediately see plays that simply can't happen1 in a pro game. At the subdivision and Division II tiers, things get stranger still. And by the time you hit Division III, you begin to see football games that are more philosophical than technical. With no athletic scholarships and extremely limited resources, football becomes a game in which the system matters more than the play calling or the personnel. The polarities become acute. This is where you find the most extreme versions of contemporary football: This is where you find teams that still live in the 1950s and teams trying to play basketball on grass. This is the level where football changes — and also where it doesn't change at all."<br />
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[Relates, from 2010: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/05/magazine/05Football-t.html?pagewanted=all ]
sports  football  collegefootball  via:lukeneff  2011  mainemaritimeacademy  cv  chuckklosterman  tactics  strategy  amherst  oregon  ncaa 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Oregon’s Speed-Freak Football - NYTimes.com [This reminds me of the system I used when coaching six-man flag football.]
"Kelly has transformed football into aerobic sport…style is particularly of moment because it is apparent football, at least in short term, will become less violent. Kelly's teams have found new way to intimidate, one that does not involve high-speed collisions & head injuries. "Some people call it a no-huddle offense, but I call it a no-breathing offense," Mark Asper, an Oregon offensive lineman "It's still football. We hit people. But after a while, the guys on the other side of the line are so gassed that you don't have to hit them very hard to make them fall over."...point of a play sometimes seems to be just to get it over w/, line up & run another. The play that preceded last touchdown was a 1-yard loss—setback in traditional offensive schemes…But "3rd & long" is not as difficult a proposition for offense when opposing defense can barely stand. "Obviously, all of our plays are designed to gain yards. But our guys understand cumulative effect of running them really fast."
college  football  ncaa  oregon  cv  sports  collegefootball  via:kottke  soccer  americanfootball  futbol 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Usual Suspects: 6 Characters Who Ruin Every NCAA Office Pool | Cracked.com
"It's time for the NCAA tournament: the one week out of the year that your office turns into a Vegas sports book. Here are the six people you're going to want to choke out by the time the Final Four roles around."
humor  marchmadness  sports  work  officepools  basketball  ncaa 
march 2008 by robertogreco

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