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The Minecraft Generation - The New York Times
"Seth Frey, a postdoctoral fellow in computational social science at Dartmouth College, has studied the behavior of thousands of youths on Minecraft servers, and he argues that their interactions are, essentially, teaching civic literacy. “You’ve got these kids, and they’re creating these worlds, and they think they’re just playing a game, but they have to solve some of the hardest problems facing humanity,” Frey says. “They have to solve the tragedy of the commons.” What’s more, they’re often anonymous teenagers who, studies suggest, are almost 90 percent male (online play attracts far fewer girls and women than single-­player mode). That makes them “what I like to think of as possibly the worst human beings around,” Frey adds, only half-­jokingly. “So this shouldn’t work. And the fact that this works is astonishing.”

Frey is an admirer of Elinor Ostrom, the Nobel Prize-­winning political economist who analyzed the often-­unexpected ways that everyday people govern themselves and manage resources. He sees a reflection of her work in Minecraft: Running a server becomes a crash course in how to compromise, balance one another’s demands and resolve conflict.

Three years ago, the public library in Darien, Conn., decided to host its own Minecraft server. To play, kids must acquire a library card. More than 900 kids have signed up, according to John Blyberg, the library’s assistant director for innovation and user experience. “The kids are really a community,” he told me. To prevent conflict, the library installed plug-ins that give players a chunk of land in the game that only they can access, unless they explicitly allow someone else to do so. Even so, conflict arises. “I’ll get a call saying, ‘This is Dasher80, and someone has come in and destroyed my house,’ ” Blyberg says. Sometimes library administrators will step in to adjudicate the dispute. But this is increasingly rare, Blyberg says. “Generally, the self-­governing takes over. I’ll log in, and there’ll be 10 or 15 messages, and it’ll start with, ‘So-and-so stole this,’ and each message is more of this,” he says. “And at the end, it’ll be: ‘It’s O.K., we worked it out! Disregard this message!’ ”

Several parents and academics I interviewed think Minecraft servers offer children a crucial “third place” to mature, where they can gather together outside the scrutiny and authority at home and school. Kids have been using social networks like Instagram or Snapchat as a digital third place for some time, but Minecraft imposes different social demands, because kids have to figure out how to respect one another’s virtual space and how to collaborate on real projects.

“We’re increasingly constraining youth’s ability to move through the world around them,” says Barry Joseph, the associate director for digital learning at the American Museum of Natural History. Joseph is in his 40s. When he was young, he and his friends roamed the neighborhood unattended, where they learned to manage themselves socially. Today’s fearful parents often restrict their children’s wanderings, Joseph notes (himself included, he adds). Minecraft serves as a new free-­ranging realm.

Joseph’s son, Akiva, is 9, and before and after school he and his school friend Eliana will meet on a Minecraft server to talk and play. His son, Joseph says, is “at home but still getting to be with a friend using technology, going to a place where they get to use pickaxes and they get to use shovels and they get to do that kind of building. I wonder how much Minecraft is meeting that need — that need that all children have.” In some respects, Minecraft can be as much social network as game.

Just as Minecraft propels kids to master Photoshop or video-­editing, server life often requires kids to acquire complex technical skills. One 13-year-old girl I interviewed, Lea, was a regular on a server called Total Freedom but became annoyed that its administrators weren’t clamping down on griefing. So she asked if she could become an administrator, and the owners said yes.

For a few months, Lea worked as a kind of cop on that beat. A software tool called “command spy” let her observe records of what players had done in the game; she teleported miscreants to a sort of virtual “time out” zone. She was eventually promoted to the next rank — “telnet admin,” which allowed her to log directly into the server via telnet, a command-­line tool often used by professionals to manage servers. Being deeply involved in the social world of Minecraft turned Lea into something rather like a professional systems administrator. “I’m supposed to take charge of anybody who’s breaking the rules,” she told me at the time.

Not everyone has found the online world of Minecraft so hospitable. One afternoon while visiting the offices of Mouse, a nonprofit organization in Manhattan that runs high-tech programs for kids, I spoke with Tori. She’s a quiet, dry-­witted 17-year-old who has been playing Minecraft for two years, mostly in single-­player mode; a recent castle-­building competition with her younger sister prompted some bickering after Tori won. But when she decided to try an online server one day, other players — after discovering she was a girl — spelled out “BITCH” in blocks.

She hasn’t gone back. A group of friends sitting with her in the Mouse offices, all boys, shook their heads in sympathy; they’ve seen this behavior “everywhere,” one said. I have been unable to find solid statistics on how frequently harassment happens in Minecraft. In the broader world of online games, though, there is more evidence: An academic study of online players of Halo, a shoot-’em-up game, found that women were harassed twice as often as men, and in an unscientific poll of 874 self-­described online gamers, 63 percent of women reported “sex-­based taunting, harassment or threats.” Parents are sometimes more fretful than the players; a few told me they didn’t let their daughters play online. Not all girls experience harassment in Minecraft, of course — Lea, for one, told me it has never happened to her — and it is easy to play online without disclosing your gender, age or name. In-game avatars can even be animals.

How long will Minecraft’s popularity endure? It depends very much on Microsoft’s stewardship of the game. Company executives have thus far kept a reasonably light hand on the game; they have left major decisions about the game’s development to Mojang and let the team remain in Sweden. But you can imagine how the game’s rich grass-roots culture might fray. Microsoft could, for example, try to broaden the game’s appeal by making it more user-­friendly — which might attenuate its rich tradition of information-­sharing among fans, who enjoy the opacity and mystery. Or a future update could tilt the game in a direction kids don’t like. (The introduction of a new style of combat this spring led to lively debate on forums — some enjoyed the new layer of strategy; others thought it made Minecraft too much like a typical hack-and-slash game.) Or an altogether new game could emerge, out-­Minecrafting Minecraft.

But for now, its grip is strong. And some are trying to strengthen it further by making it more accessible to lower-­income children. Mimi Ito has found that the kids who acquire real-world skills from the game — learning logic, administering servers, making YouTube channels — tend to be upper middle class. Their parents and after-­school programs help them shift from playing with virtual blocks to, say, writing code. So educators have begun trying to do something similar, bringing Minecraft into the classroom to create lessons on everything from math to history. Many libraries are installing Minecraft on their computers."
2016  clivethompson  education  videogames  games  minecraft  digitalculture  gaming  mimiito  robinsloan  coding  computationalthinking  stem  programming  commandline  ianbogost  walterbenjamin  children  learning  resilience  colinfanning  toys  lego  wood  friedrichfroebel  johnlocke  rebeccamir  mariamontessori  montessori  carltheodorsorensen  guilds  mentoring  mentorship  sloyd  denmark  construction  building  woodcrafting  woodcraft  adventureplaygrounds  material  logic  basic  mojang  microsoft  markuspersson  notch  modding  photoshop  texturepacks  elinorostrom  collaboration  sethfrey  civics  youtube  networkedlearning  digitalliteracy  hacking  computers  screentime  creativity  howwelearn  computing  froebel 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Networked Learning as Experiential Learning | EDUCAUSE
"No one believes that knowing the alphabet and sounding out words mean that a person possesses the deep literacy needed for college-level learning. Yet our ideas about digital literacy are steadily becoming more impoverished, to the point that many of my current students, immersed in a "walled garden" world of apps and social media, know almost nothing about the web or the Internet. For the first time since the emergence of the web, this past year I discovered that the majority of my sophomore-level students did not understand the concept of a URL and thus struggled with the effective use and formation of hyperlinks in the networked writing class that VCU's University College affectionately calls "Thought Vectors in Concept Space"—a phrase attributed by Kay to Engelbart and one that describes the fundamentally experiential aspect of networked learning.5 My students appeared not to be able to parse the domains in which they published their work, which meant that they could not consistently imagine how to locate or link to each other's work by simply examining the structure of the URLs involved. If one cannot understand the organizing principles of a built environment, one cannot contribute to the building. And if one cannot contribute to the building, certain vital modes of knowing will be forever out of reach.

Yet educators seeking to provide what Carl Rogers called the "freedom to learn" continue to work on those digital high-impact practices.6 It is a paradoxical task, to be sure, but it is one worth attempting—particularly now, when "for the first time in the still-short span of human history, the experience of creating media for a potentially large public is available to a multitude."7 Students' experience of what Henry Jenkins has articulated as the networked mediation of "participatory culture" must extend their experience to school as well.8 School as a site of the high-impact practice of learner-built, instructor-facilitated, digitally networked learning can transform the experience of education even as it preserves, and scales, our commitment to the education of the whole person.

The web was designed for just this kind of collaboration. One does not need permission to make a hyperlink. Yet one does need "the confident insight, the authority of media-making" to create meaning out of those links. Such confidence and authority should be among the highest learning outcomes available to our students within what Mimi Ito and others have described as "connected learning."9 Learner-initiated connections that identify both the nodes and the lines between them, instead of merely connecting the dots that teachers have already established (valuable as that might be), co-create what Lawrence Stenhouse argues is "the nature of knowledge . . . as distinct from information"—"a structure to sustain creative thought and provide frameworks for judgment." Such structures can encourage an enormously beneficial flowering of human diversity, one that lies beyond the reach of prefabricated outcomes: "Education as induction into knowledge is successful to the extent that it makes the behavioural outcomes of the students unpredictable."10

Offering students the possibility of experiential learning in personal, interactive, networked computing—in all its gloriously messy varieties—provides the richest opportunity yet for integrative thinking within and beyond "schooling." If higher education can embrace the complexity of networked learning and can value the condition of emergence that networked learning empowers, there may still be time to encourage networked learning as a structure and a disposition, a design and a habit of being."
networkedlearning  2016  gardnercampbell  jeromebruner  georgekuh  experientialleaerning  experience  learning  howwelearn  education  carlrogers  hypertext  web  online  internet  literacy  alankay  dougengelbart  adelegoldberg  tednelson  vannevarbush  jcrlicklider  georgedyson  alanturing  johnvonneumann  self-actualization  unschooling  deschooling  progressive  networks  social 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Learning Networks, Not Teaching Machines
"But what can we say about the Villemard vision of “a learning network”? Does it meet our standards today, our belief in the ways in which networks can transform teaching and learning? I’d imagine it does not because this particular learning network is centralized. In that way, it is more akin to Edison’s vision of the future of education – where the knowledge is delivered by (and this power resides in) whatever replaces the teacher and the textbook. For both Edison and Villemard here, the students are receptors, not transmitters of knowledge.

When we talk about the potential for “networked learning” today, I think (I hope) we mean something different. The promise: the Internet – and the Web in particular – enable a readable and a writable platform, where a multitude of voices can express themselves as creators not just consumers and not just through text but through a multitude of media – audio, video, still images, code. These new wires have powerful implications for self-organized learning, some argue – a new participatory culture of learning that need not be managed or monitored by formal educational institutions or by traditional sources of information. The new networks, like the Web itself, ostensibly act as this very postmodern sort of technical infrastructure whereby power is decentralized, distributed.

But it’s not decentralized entirely. It’s certainly not distributed evenly. It never has been. Yet there’s that tendency once again to recast the history of technology as equitable if not equalizing – a nostalgia for a “web we lost” – such as when last year Sir Tim Berners-Lee said it was time to “re-decentralize” his invention, the World Wide Web. Berners-Lee noted – rightly so, I’d say – that “for-profit internet monopolies such as search engines and social networks,” along with government surveillance, threaten the Web’s original, open infrastructure.

Ostensibly open.

I’ve been thinking about this faith we’ve put in online networks – this trust that they are open, for example, or that they flatten hierarchies. I’ve been thinking too, as I’ve researched the history of education technology and teaching machines, about other, older networks. Indeed, many of these networks have not gone away. The telephone company or the television cable company is likely now – in the United States at least – your Internet provider as well. We are building our learning networks on these older technologies. We are building them on and with pre-existing and emerging monopolies.



Despite the promise of the Internet and the Web to “democratize education” – we hear the MOOC proponents talk about this a lot – or to offer this new and radically meritocratic form of “networked learning,” we must remember that our technical infrastructure is controlled by a small number of powerful corporations, alongside – in terms of support, censure, and surveillance, the world’s governments. To repeat David Golumbia, “The network map is not the political territory.”



The Internet and the Web do not exist at the end of history. Technology will change. But the geopolitics, the economic forces will change the Internet and the Web as well. Networks change – canals are replaced by railroads; radio stations are replaced by television and now the Internet. The Internet will be likely replaced by something else. And no doubt, we can see already its consolidation and centralization. We can see the battles for who owns the signal. (The FCC plans soon to license off more wireless spectrum for the “Internet of Things” via auction – that is, to the highest bidder.) We can see the battles for who owns, who controls the network.

Education has not historically fared well when it comes to competing with commercial providers – not on the radio, not on the television, nor I’d argue on new computer-based technologies. These networks have triumphed commercially, politically. In turn, they frame what we mean by network – what we expect them to do, who gets to participate in them and how.

There is no inevitability here. And resistance and alternatives are certainly possible. But we must act to shape the future – to shape the technology and the politics that we want to have. We must act to shape the learning networks we want to have – starting, as I originally intended this talk to address – that we do not want the centralized control, the automation, the teaching machines that Villemard envisioned for us a century ago. If, as some argue, learning networks are powerful new ways for us to organize and share as learners, then we must consider how we can build and wield them (or at least, how they are built and wielded). Networks – not just as analogies, but as what is becoming the very real architecture of how we learn and live.

“The network map is not the political territory.” What territory do we maintain for the future of education? Whose network map are we using to find our way?"
audreywatters  2015  networks  networkedlearning  learning  education  schools  pedagogy  monopolies  power  decentralization  television  tv  content  davidgolumbia  maps  mapping  history  villemard  edtech  centralization  control 
june 2015 by robertogreco
A MOOC is not a Thing: Emergence, Disruption, and Higher Education - Hybrid Pedagogy
[Note: this is a link-rich post, none of which are noted here.]

"A MOOC is not a thing. A MOOC is a strategy. What we say about MOOCs cannot possibly contain their drama, banality, incessance, and proliferation. The MOOC is a variant beast — placental, emergent, alienating, enveloping, sometimes thriving, sometimes dead, sometimes reborn.

There is nothing about a MOOC that can be contained. Try as they might, MOOC-makers like Coursera, EdX, and Udacity cannot keep their MOOCs to themselves, because when we join a MOOC, it is not to learn new content, new skills, new knowledge, it is to learn new learning. Entering a MOOC is entering Wonderland — where modes of learning are turned sideways and on their heads — and we walk away MOOCified.

“There is a relational aspect to learning.” There’s an invisible network (or potential network) underneath every learning community. The best MOOCs make the networks patent. The worst MOOCs are neutered, lost objects that float unabsolved in the ether as capital “L” Learning, abstract and decontextualized.

MOOCification: to harness (in an instant) the power of a nodal network for learning. Rather than creating a course to structure a network, MOOCification relies on nodes to power a learning activity (or assignment). MOOCification also refers to a pedagogical approach inspired by MOOCs that is unleashed in an otherwise closed or small-format course.

Chris Friend writes, in “Learning as Performance: MOOC Pedagogy and On-ground Classes”, “The promise of MOOCs lies not in what the format lets us do, but in what the format lets us question: Where does learning happen? What are the requirements of effective collaboration? How can assessment become more authentic? How much structure and direction are best in a classroom?” These questions stir and circle back upon themselves in endless repetition as we and everyone grapples with what the MOOC is and what it does. These are important questions, exactly the right ones at exactly the right time; but there’s a deeper one that underlies our conversation. The question that needs tending to now, as the furor around MOOCs builds to a roar.

Are organized attempts to harness learning always and necessarily frustrated? Does learning happen modally at all? Is learning the demesne of any institution, organization, or formal community; or does it happen regardless of these, unmonitored, unfettered, uncontrolled, and does the rise of the MOOC point to this? Have we created MOOCs, or have we just discovered them, emerging from their cave, where they’ve always lived? Is it, as Roger Whitson writes, that “there is nothing outside the MOOC”? Without threatening to spin into intellectual nihilism (or relativism), we need to worry for the entire enterprise of education, to be unnerved in order to uncover what’s going on now. And not now this year. But now exactly this moment. Because just this second something is awry.
True stability results when presumed order and presumed disorder are balanced. A truly stable system expects the unexpected, is prepared to be disrupted, waits to be transformed. ~ Tom Robbins

Pete Rorabaugh writes, “The analysis, remixing, and socially engaged construction of personally relevant knowledge — often happens when the institutional framework is disrupted, diverted, or left in the dust.” Many hackles are rightly raised by the ubiquity of this word “disruption”, and its implications for the business of higher education; but the best MOOCs do not deal in the bourgeois concept of disruption, they deal in a very real rupture that is confusing to us all. Something convulsive. A monstrous birth.

The MOOC is a dialectic. It invites us in with a curled finger, as sinister as it is salient.

Learning isn’t (and has never really been) in the hands of academics, administrators, institutions, corporations, Forbes magazine, the Chronicle of Higher Education. It’s in the hands of Rosemary Sewart, and people like her. The ones who come fully alive to learning without being told when and where it’s going to happen, without being placed obediently on a board like a pawn. The ones who throw wide the classroom doors, who hack schooling, or learn by reflecting on the flurry of input in their everyday lives; as Rosemary says, “learning … where life happens.”
We are all schoolmasters, and our schoolhouse is the universe. To attend chiefly to the desk or schoolhouse while we neglect the scenery in which it is placed is absurd. If we do not look out we shall find our fine schoolhouse standing in a cow-yard at last. ~ Henry David Thoreau

While we’ve all focused our consternation on how MOOCs may take down the walls of the university, or how they may represent the MOOCDonalds of higher ed., we are missing the most important, and most frightening, potential of MOOCs. They force us to reconsider the very fabric of how we think about learning — its occurrence, emergence, habitat, and administration.

From August 12th to August 18th, 2012, Hybrid Pedagogy ran MOOC MOOC, a now infamous mini-MOOC, meta-MOOC, MOOC about MOOCs that garnered not only a good bit of attention for its efforts, but also built a lasting community that remains curious about emerging ideas of MOOCification, the place of mini- and micro-MOOCs, and the implementation of open learning environments in traditional higher ed. classrooms. As well, MOOC MOOC set a precedent for MOOCish conversations about MOOCs, and spurred us to think deeply about where online education is headed.

It would be easy to contend, at this early stage in their evolution, that every MOOC has been a MOOC about MOOCs — that every MOOC is a meta-MOOC, a MOOC MOOC. The early connectivist MOOCs pioneered by folks like George Siemens and Stephen Downes were, whether explicitly or implicitly, exploring the form, the pedagogy, and the process of MOOCs.

At the same time, we were unaware of anyone who had done a MOOC unflinchingly trained on the MOOC phenomenon. A MOOC that explored unhesitatingly — even a bit recklessly — the potential, pitfalls, drawbacks, and advantages of this approach to teaching and learning. MOOC MOOC aimed to expose all of us to the grand experiment of MOOCs by having us participate directly in that grand experiment, albeit in a concentrated, one-week format. (And there was mighty participation. Andrew Staroscik created this interactive graph of tweet volume on the #moocmooc hashtag.) Rather than a knee-jerk critical reaction to the march of the MOOCs, we encouraged participants to inhabit the MOOC, exploring its pedagogical potential as an exercise in discernment but not judgment.

For one week beginning January 6, 2013, MOOC MOOC will return for a continued examination of the MOOC phenomenon, now grown well beyond a rising surge into a more perfect storm. This new iteration, which we’re fondly (and absurdly) calling MOOC MOOC [squared], will inspect not only the broadened landscape of MOOCs (including Coursera’s swelling presence and for-credit bid, Udacity’s flash mob-style on-ground gatherings, and the rise of LMS-based MOOCs like Instructure’s Canvas.net), but also will turn the lens on itself, repurposing and remixing the original course and the conversations and artifacts that arose from within the course. MOOC MOOC will be housed once more within the Canvas LMS, fueled by the ongoing discussions of the MOOC MOOC community.

There is no good or evil inherent in a MOOC, only in what it will or will not unleash. We must stop thinking of education as requiring stringent modes and constructs, and embrace it as invention, metamorphosis, deformation, and reinvention. This is the territory of the inventor always, the territory of the pugnacious and irreverent. Learning in MOOCs should be cohesive, not divided, and it must happen multi-nodally. The parsing of learning that formal education has always relied on will give way to something, if not holistic, then simultaneous, distributed, alive in more than one place at a time. If the best MOOCs show us that learning is networked, and that it has always been, then learning is more rampant than we’ve accounted for."
mooc  moocs  seanmichaelmorris  jessestommel  2012  education  highered  pedagogy  highereducation  dialectics  learning  howwelearn  teaching  howweteach  udacity  coursera  canvas.net  chrisfriend  edx  moocification  networkedlearning  networks  rogerwhitson  tomrobbins  thoreau  rosemarystewart  hybridpedagogy  georgesiemens  stephendownes  connectivism 
march 2015 by robertogreco
- Design school X is the genome. It has the...
"“Design school X is the genome.

It has the design to train any kind of educator, an enzyme, to fill a particular need, to be well matched to any particular learner.

When you plug in X for a specific city, a specific set of contexts, that is the equivalent to picking a cell type. The genome swings into action, by activating certain genes, choosing which catalysts to bring into the mix, hiring and training certain educators, and suppressing other genes that are not needed. The right mix of catalysts will make for a healthy, loving cell.

To keep it healthy and loving, the genome is flexible, and can choose which genes to activate or suppress as time passes, even though the genome itself doesn’t change.

The genome can be used to create a distributed system as well, of small storefronts throughout a city, activating genes that encode for catalysts that facilitate communication across the living system. These genes might encode for signaling molecules or hormones, that pass between storefronts, and keep the whole system healthy, as well as antibodies that can be on the lookout for what might be disrupting the health of the whole community.”

— Dr. Anton Krukowski, Scientist, teacher, musian, DSX Catalyst"
designschoolx  schools  schooldesign  2015  davidclifford  antonkrukowski  adaptability  education  lcproject  openstudioproject  teaching  learning  local  networkedlearning  networks  modeling  prototyping  systemsthinking  systems  community  communities  flexibility  enzymes 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Request for Comments | Gardner Writes
"As Naughton tells the story, the young graduate students who were at the center of the Network Working Group found themselves with the future of the Internet in their hands. The big corporate brains knew about the machines that made up the network, but they didn’t know much about the network itself–it was too new, and it was an emergent phenomenon, not a thing they had built. The grad students in the NWG felt they were at great risk of offending the honchos, of overstepping their bounds as “vulnerable, insecure apprentices,” to use Naughton’s words. Crocker was especially worried they “would offend whomever the official protocol designers were….” But the work had to go forward. So Crocker invented the “Request for Comments,” what he called “humble words for our notes” that would document the discussions that would build the network.

Here’s how Crocker himself put it in this excerpt from RFC-3, “Documentation Conventions”:
Documentation of the NWG’s effort is through notes such as this. Notes may be produced at any site by anybody and included in this series…. [Content] may be any thought, suggestion, etc. related to the HOST software or other aspect of the network. Notes are encouraged to be timely rather than polished. Philosophical positions without examples or other specifics, specific suggestions or implementation techniques without introductory or background explication, and explicit questions without any attempted answers are all acceptable. The minimum length for a NWG note is one sentence.

These standards (or lack of them) are stated explicitly for two reasons. First, there is a tendency to view a written statement as ipso facto authoritative, and we hope to promote the exchange and discussion of considerably less than authoritative ideas. Second, there is a natural hesitancy to publish something unpolished, and we hope to ease this inhibition.

You can see the similarity to blogging right away. At least two primary Network Working Groups are involved: that of all the other people in the world (let’s call that civilization), and that of the network that constitutes one’s own cognition and the resulting “strange loop,” to use Douglas Hofstadter’s language. We are all of us in this macrocosm and this microcosm. Most of us will have multiple networks within these mirroring extremes, but the same principles will of course apply there as well. What is the ethos of the Network Working Group we call civilization? And for those of us engaged in the specific cognitive interventions we call education, what is the ethos of the Network Working Group we help out students to build and grow within themselves as learners? We discussed Ivan Illich in the Virginia Tech New Media Faculty-Staff Development Seminar today, and I was forcibly reminded that the NWG within sets the boundaries (and hopes) we have with which to craft our NWG without. School conditions what we expect in and from civilization.

I hope it’s also clear that these RFC-3 documentation conventions specify a praxis of intellectual discourse–indeed, I’d even say scholarly communication–that is sadly absent from most academic work today.

Would such communciation be rigorous? Academic? Worthy of tenure and promotion? What did these RFCs accomplish, and how do they figure in the human record? Naughton observes that this “Request for Comments” idea–and the title itself, now with many numerals following–has persisted as “the way the Internet discusses technical issues.” Naughton goes on to write that “it wasn’t just the title that endured … but the intelligent, friendly, co-operative, consensual attitude implied by it. With his modest, placatory style, Steve Crocker set the tone for the way the Net developed.” Naughton then quotes Katie Hafner’s and Matthew Lyon’s judgment that “the language of the RFC … was warm and welcoming. The idea was to promote cooperation, not ego.”

Naughton concludes,
The RFC archives contain an extraordinary record of thought in action, a riveting chronicle of the application of high intelligence to hard problems….

Why would we not want to produce such a record within the academy and share it with the public? Or are we content with the ordinary, forgotten, and non-riveting so long as the business model holds up?

Or have we been schooled so thoroughly that the very ambition makes no sense?

More Naughton:
The fundamental ethos of the Net was laid down in the deliberations of the Network Working Group. It was an ethos which assumed that nothing was secret, that problems existed to be solved collaboratively, that solutions emerged iteratively, and that everything which was produced should be in the public domain.

I think of the many faculty and department meetings I have been to. Some of them I have myself convened. The ethos of those Network Working Groups has varied considerably. I am disappointed to say that none of them has lived up to the fundamental ethos Naughton identifies above. I yearn for documentation conventions that will produce an extraordinary record of thought in action, with the production shared by all who work within a community of learning. And I wonder if I’m capable of Crocker’s humility or wisdom, and answerable to his invitation. I want to be."
gardnercampbell  internet  web  online  commenting  johnnaughton  2011  arpanet  stevecrocker  via:steelemaley  networks  networkworkinggroups  ivanillich  standards  content  shiftytext  networkedculture  networkedlearning  blogs  blogging  inhibition  unfinished  incomplete  cicilization  douglashofstadter  praxis  cooperation  tcsnmy  sharing  schooling  unschooling  academia  highered  highereducation  authority  humility  wisdom  collegiality  katiehafner  matthewlyon  rfc-3  rfc 
september 2014 by robertogreco
More Educator Luddites Please
"The educator luddites I have in mind are people who have always understood school to be more than test prep and who see themselves as far more than the agents of a standardized testing industry. I see them leading the way to create inquiry driven schools where students and teachers are not too busy to think. Schools where the technology serves the learning rather than drives the teaching and where the demand for original work is a collaborate effort to solve compelling problems to which no one present knows the answer. In such a school, the curriculum is not driven by the textbook, the flow of information is not unidirectional, learning is networked and students and teachers work together across the boundaries of age and experience as active seekers, users and creators of knowledge. In this rosy picture, individual schools form a kind of globally aware and networked cottage industry of creative learning.

In order to start that journey we need a collective effort to figure out how to negotiate the changing world and make sense of it. Here, in a small collection of nutshells, are some observations about the context for the work:

1. The web is changing (us). For the most part we are oblivious to the bigger picture as we take each new gadget, or shift, or industry upheaval for granted. For the cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch, the machine is us and the machine is using us. In his prescient and chilling short story written in 1906 “The Machine Stops”, E. M, Forster imagined a world dependent on an all-powerful, all-knowing machine where humans became shrunken, feeble underground creatures alienated from nature and the natural landscape. In Forster’s story, the machine falters and fails. In our world, it does not look as if the machine is going to stop anytime soon. And that, according to Professor Wesch, means we are going to need to rethink a few things, including: copyright, authorship, identity, ethics, aesthetics, rhetoric, governance, privacy, commerce, love, family and ourselves.

2. In the networked world of ubiquitous and mobile access, boundaries are fluid and hierarchies broken. The ownership of knowledge is changed and the flow multidirectional. Students come to school wired and ready to join the knowledge stream. Learning needs to be organized around these networks and not contained in the traditional one way flow of teacher to student.

3. We have to think off the world of the web and interactive technology as a new ecosystem – one in which any person, in any place, at any time can participate, contribute, communicate, produce, share, curate and organize. It’s an ecosystem that has the potential to make prosumers of us all. That is, producers and not just consumers of information and media content. Anyone with a connection can generate content and the tools of social media mean it can be Stumbled, tagged in Delicious, uploaded to YouTube, sampled in Moviemaker, voted on at Digg, pushed in an RSS feed, shared on Facebook and Tweeted to the world. And then someone can create an interactive commentary, put it to music and turn it upside down, again. This interactivity blurs boundaries. As the New Yorker cartoon put it: “On the net, no one knows you are a dog”. Expertise and value may be perceived without the limiting filters of age, status, nationality or appearance.

4. We have both an explosion of creativity and an incessant need for problem solving and ethical thinking. Information, misinformation and disinformation are fast moving and in fluid abundance. In Teaching as a Subversive Activity Postman and Weingarten wrote of the need to develop “crap detectors” to filter the disinformation, propaganda and hype. To some www means a world wild web of mayhem, mischief and malice. But with a sense of purpose, and the skills of filtering and information navigation, it also holds great promise and potential.

5. Reading and writing are becoming less of a solitary and silent activity characteristic of the print era and more of a social activity. E-reading enables readers to interact with each other as well as the text and digital text is always on the move.

6. We are headed toward ubiquitous access and ever more speed. As quotidian objects such as umbrellas and shopping carts become digitized we are being linked with products just as we are linked with each other. Building community and creating relationships are what people, and social media, do well.

This then is the sea in which schools can swim, or – if they allow themselves to become irrelevant – sink. Professor Wesch had his list and here is my list of some of the things that schools may need to begin to rethink:

Classroom and school design; the school day and the schedule; segregation of learners by age and rather than by interest, passion and commitment; the segregation of knowledge into subjects; grading and assessment; social relationships, adult learning, the role of teacher, peer-to-peer learning and the isolation of the learner; textbooks, curriculum development and the sources of information; the nature of literacy; the nature of learning, creativity and the place of technology; citizenship and community; teamwork, collaboration, plagiarism and cheating; digital footprints, transparency and privacy; partnership with parents other adult learners; learning in the world and learning in school; what counts and what gets counted and how and by whom; and the dress code. (I added the last item because sometimes it’s useful to have a topic that gets everyone thoroughly engaged and busily distracted from important work.)

Above all it means a definition of education as going beyond the acquisition of knowledge. Critical thinking and digital literacy are essential but they don’t go far enough. We need to educate children for active and ethical participation. They need to be contributors and creators of knowledge and that means engaging in solving real problems from the very start.

Change is always hard. Socrates feared the effects of literacy on memory. He argued against it as harmful to young minds, short circuiting the arduous intellectual work of examining life. The scholar Elizabeth Eisenstein, who has written extensively on the effect on the world of the Gutenberg and the print revolution, has said it may be too soon to assess the full impact of that centuries old shift. If it’s too soon to gauge the effect of printing then we can only dimly imagine the effects of social media and the digital age.

Media has transformed our society before, but never at this dizzying rate. The unforeseen and unintended consequences of this revolution that sweeps all before it loom for many as dark clouds threatening the very roots of civilization. And here we are – smack in the epicenter. Unless we want to take ourselves right off the grid we had better start trying to make sense of it.

Educator luddites will be those who can learn with others, in and out of school, against the grain of narrowing definitions and toward what it means to be an educated citizen in a networked world.
I think it is our collective task to engage in the work of social imagination and envision our schools as we want, and need, them to be.

For schools it means some hard work and we are going to need all the help we can get."

[See also: http://www.hybridpedagogy.com/journal/toward-luddite-pedagogy/
via: https://twitter.com/JosieHolford/status/504761003876179968 ]

[Previously bookmarked here: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:726a0951079b ]
josieholford  2010  technology  luddism  michaelwesch  luddites  education  schools  schooling  change  media  internet  web  online  progressive  knowledge  learning  howwelearn  unschooling  deschooling  civilization  slow  sloweducation  slowpedagogy  criticalthinking  digitalliteracy  curriculum  howweteach  teaching  literacy  literacies  multiliteracies  cheating  plagiarism  creativity  purpose  values  grading  assessment  grades  isaacludlam  maxinegreene  socialimagination  civics  citizenship  writing  reading  networkedlearning  community  relationships  tcsnmy  neilpostman  charlesweingartner  crapdetection  social  socialmedia 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The secret of Minecraft — The Message — Medium
"Imagine yourself acquiring the keys to a mutable world in which you can explore caves, fight spiders, build castles, ride pigs, blow up mountains, construct aqueducts to carry water to your summer palace… anything.

Imagine yourself a child, in possession of the secret knowledge.

This wouldn’t be enough on its own. Obscure techniques have been a part of video games from the beginning; Nintendo Power surely had a dusting of secret knowledge. What’s different here is that Minecraft connects this lure to the objective not of beating the game, but making more of the game.

“Game” doesn’t even do it justice. What we’re really talking about here is a generative, networked system laced throughout with secrets.

Five years in, Minecraft (the system) has bloomed into something bigger and more beautiful than any game studio — whether a tiny one like Markus Persson’s or a huge one like EA — could ever produce on its own. The scale of it is staggering; overwhelming. As you explore the extended Minecraft-verse online, you start to get the same oceanic feeling that huge internet systems like YouTube and Twitter often inspire: the mingling of despair (“I’ll never see it all”) with delight (“People made this”) with dizzying anthropic awe (“So… many… people.”)

Turns out you can do a lot with those blocks.



Imagine yourself acquiring the keys to a mutable world in which you can explore caves, fight spiders, build castles, ride pigs, blow up mountains, construct aqueducts to carry water to your summer palace… anything.

Imagine yourself a child, in possession of the secret knowledge.

***

This wouldn’t be enough on its own. Obscure techniques have been a part of video games from the beginning; Nintendo Power surely had a dusting of secret knowledge. What’s different here is that Minecraft connects this lure to the objective not of beating the game, but making more of the game.

“Game” doesn’t even do it justice. What we’re really talking about here is a generative, networked system laced throughout with secrets.

Five years in, Minecraft (the system) has bloomed into something bigger and more beautiful than any game studio — whether a tiny one like Markus Persson’s or a huge one like EA — could ever produce on its own. The scale of it is staggering; overwhelming. As you explore the extended Minecraft-verse online, you start to get the same oceanic feeling that huge internet systems like YouTube and Twitter often inspire: the mingling of despair (“I’ll never see it all”) with delight (“People made this”) with dizzying anthropic awe (“So… many… people.”)

Turns out you can do a lot with those blocks.

We’re in a new century now, and its hallmark is humans doing things together, mostly on screens, at scales unimaginable in earlier times.

In the 2010s and beyond, it is not the case that every cultural product ought to be a generative, networked system.

It is, I believe, the case that all the really important ones will be.

To ignore the creative power of all these brains—millions and millions of them, young and old—leaves too much on the table.

I’m a writer, and don’t get me wrong: To publish a plain ol’ book that people actually want to read is still a solid achievement. But I think Markus Persson and his studio have staked out a new kind of achievement, a deeper kind: To make the system that calls forth the book, which is not just a story but a real magick manual that grants its reader (who consumes it avidly, endlessly, all day, at school, at night, under the covers, studying, studying) new and exciting powers in a vivid, malleable world.

I’m not a huge Minecraft player myself—my shelter never grew beyond the rough-hewn Robinson Crusoe stage—but I look at those books and, I tell you: I am eight years old again. I feel afresh all the impulses that led me towards books and writing, toward the fantastic and science-fictional… except now, there is this other door.

It’s made of blocks, I suppose.

“A generative, networked system laced throughout with secrets.”

When you write it that way, you realize it doesn’t have to be software. This is a stretch, but you could apply that description to the greater Star Wars universe—not just the movies, but all that followed: the books, the video games, the spit-spraying backyard lightsaber battles. And, based on all the fan fiction and wizard rock they inspired, I’d say the Harry Potter books managed to boot up a generative, networked system of some sort.

But now, in the 2010s, Minecraft improves upon those examples, because it does not merely allow this co-creation but requires it. And so the burning question in my brain right now is this: What happens when we take the secret of Minecraft and apply it elsewhere, in new ways?"
minecraft  gaming  games  culture  robinsloan  2014  networks  learning  howwelearn  worldbuilding  lego  books  secrets  networkedlearning 
july 2014 by robertogreco
#clmooc: I’m a maker; so now what? ← Classroots.org
"While it’s useful to keep the connected learning principles in mind while I teach, staying connected to people, watching what they do, and sharing what I do is really my key to learning. People make the principles work. I struggle with the idea of ever going back to school as a learner, but I learn from people in schools of all sorts all the time whenever they try something new and share what they and their students have done. I don’t care about grade-level, content area, or formal assessment. I look for what is most wild and brave in my feeds, and I try to put that in front of my students to keep them wild – to keep them from learning to fear system or to hold an undue regard for it. Ultimately, school, government, and society should be made of our kids, for them, and by them. By all of them. I can’t run a classroom that depends on me to coerce others and reward those most coercible. Making – as inquiry – has shown me that. Nothing that I suggest gets made quite as well as something a kid suggests for herself. I don’t just mean product. I mean affect, engagement, iteration, planning, and reflection, as well. Giving kids access to the kinds of learning we enjoy in spaces like #clmooc allows kids to enjoy learning as much as we do here and to find peer and expert support outside the “teacher” or “rules.” We should stay connected to one another, but also to our kids as mentors and learners. We should teach one another and learn from one another and teach one another’s classes and learn from one another’s classes. I don’t think I would have felt this way unless I had seen my kids learn this way; I wouldn’t have invited my kids to learn this way if I didn’t experience it myself; I wouldn’t have learned this way without finding, following, and asking help from kind and determined people like you. Be connected; bring what you learn to your kids; invite those who seem interested to take up the same work; go back to your connections and model them to help the kids looking for something else."

[via: http://willrichardson.com/post/58371689006/wild-and-brave-learning ]
chadsansing  #clmooc  2013  connectivism  making  connectedlearning  networkedlearning  collaboration  lcproject  openstudioproject  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  teaching  coercion  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  democracy 
august 2013 by robertogreco
elearnspace › What’s next for educational software?
"I’ll take it a few steps further: in the near future, all learning will be boundary-less. All learning content will be computational, not contrived or prestructured. All learning will be granular, with coherence formed by individual learners. Contrived systems, such as teaching, curriculum, content, accreditation, will be replaced, or at minimum, by models based on complexity and emergence (with a bit of chaos thrown in for good measure). Perhaps it will be something like, and excuse the cheesy name, learnometer. Technical systems will become another node in our overall cognitive systems. Call it embodied cognition. Or distributed cognition. Or appeal to Latour’s emphasis that technical nodes in knowledge system can be non-human and actually be seen as equal to human nodes. I’ve used the term connectivism to describe this. Others have emphasized networked knowledge and combinatorial creativity.

The terminology doesn’t really matter.

The big idea is that learning and knowledge are networked, not sequential and hierarchical. Systems that foster learning, especially in periods of complexity and continual changes to the human knowledge base, must be aligned with this networked model. In the short term, hierarchical and structured models may still succeed. In the long term, and I’m thinking in terms of a decade or so, learning systems must be modelled on the attributes of networked information, reflect end user control, take advantage of connective/collective social activity, treat technical systems as co-sensemaking agents to human cognition, make use of data in automated and guided decision making, and serve the creative and innovation needs of a society (actually, human race) facing big problems."
georgesiemens  2013  connectivism  learning  networkedlearning  education  unschooling  deschooling  decentralization  hierarchy  brunolatour  combinatorialcreativity  meaningmaking  knowledge  cognition 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Hive NYC Learning Network
[From the about page, which also includes a great directory of organizations.]

"Hive NYC Learning Network is a Mozilla project that was founded through The MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning initiative to fuel collaborations between cultural organizations to create new learning pathways and innovative education practices together. Hive NYC is composed of fifty-six non-profit organizations—museums, libraries, after-school clubs and informal learning spaces—that create Connected Learning opportunities for youth. Network members have access to funding to support this work through The Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in The New York Community Trust.

Core Beliefs:
• School is not the sole provider in a community’s educational system
• Youth need to be both sophisticated consumers and active producers of digital media
• Learning should be driven by youth’s interests
• Digital media and technology are the glue and amplifier for connected learning experiences
• Out-of-school time spaces are fertile grounds for learning innovation
• Organizations must collaborate to thrive

Hive NYC operates as a city-based learning lab, where members network with each other, share best practices and pedagogies, learn about and play with new technologies, participate in events, and most importantly, collaborate to create learning opportunities for NYC youth. As part of the network, members have access to the following support and services:

• Strategic guidance in seeking funding through the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in the New York Community Trust
• Brokered connections between member organizations based on shared ideas and potential programs
• Participation in events in and beyond New York City that illustrate the work of network members and promote Connected Learning principles, digital literacy AND webmaking skills
• Access to involvement with the NYC Department of Education and others seeking to build experimental and/or sustainable partnerships with Hive NYC
• Opportunity to promote new, programs and events through Hive NYC communications channels (blog, Facebook, Twitter, etc.), as well as youth and volunteer recruitment
• A knowledge exchange for members to share models, ideas, content, tools and best-practices with each other
• Professional Development sessions that develop staff through network peer mentoring, modeling and sharing
• Monthly, in-person meet-ups and conference calls that allow for members to share program updates, best practices, and learn about new opportunities
• Additional seed funding for technology development, research, etc.

Each year, more than 6,000 tweens and teens across NYC directly engage with Hive NYC. These youth take part in projects funded by the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in The New York Community Trust, private and community events, and programs resulting from network partnerships. Another 330,000 youth are indirectly impacted by these efforts, and through the broad dissemination of innovations and programs developed within the network."

[See also: http://hiveresearchlab.org/ ]
nyc  hivenyclearning  mozilla  informallearning  self-directed  self-directedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  learning  youth  openstudioproject  lcproject  macarthurfoundation  homago  museums  ncmideas  afterschool  clubs  learningspaces  funding  professionaldevelopment  bestpractices  digitalliteracy  networkedlearning  networks  collaboration  digitalmedia  newmedia  technology  interestdriven  amnh  bankstreetcollege  beamcenter  brooklynmuseum  brooklynpubliclibrary  carnegiehall  centerforurbanpedagogy  citylore  children'smuseumofthearts  coderjojo  dreamyard  exposurecamp  eyebeam  facinghistoryandourselves  glovbalkids  grilswritenow  maketheroad  thelamp  nycsalt  parsons  reelworks  wagnercollege  worldup  wnyc  wnycradiorookies  urbanword  toked  thepoint  rubinmuseum  momi  nypl  moma  iridescentlearning  habitatmap  cooper-hewitt  commonsensemedia  brooklyn  bronx  manhattan  groundswell  mouse  downtowncommunitytelevision  globalactionproject  globalkids  instituteofplay  joanganzcooneycenter  people'sproductionhouse  radiorookies  stoked  queens  statenisland 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Hive Research Lab
"Hive Research Lab an applied research partner of the Mozilla Hive NYC Learning Network and a project of Indiana University and New York University. It acts as an embedded research lab investigating and collaborating with network stakeholders including network stewards at Mozilla Foundation, funders associated with the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund at the New York Community Trust and, most importantly, the 56 Hive NYC member organizations throughout New York City.

Our mandate is to investigate and strengthen the Hive NYC Learning Network as a context for innovation in out-of-school learning organizations and as a support for interest-driven learning by young people. In the process, we aim to advance the theory and practice related to creating robust regional learning networks. We will leverage empirical data and insights from the literature in order to assist Hive NYC to achieve its collectively articulated network-level goals. Our central areas of investigation concern the development of youth trajectories and pathways within Hive NYC and the functioning of the network as an infrastructure for learning innovation. Our work is informed by literature in areas such as network theory, youth development and learning sciences. We’re guided by a design-based research methodology, as well as a core set of values in research."

[See also: http://explorecreateshare.org/ ]
mozilla  hiveresearchlab  informalearning  via:steelemaley  rafisanto  dixieching  kyliepeppler  chrishoadley  design-basedmethodology  research  youth  learning  education  self-directedlearning  self-directed  interestdriven  networks  networkedlearning  openstudioproject  unschooling  deschooling  nyc 
july 2013 by robertogreco
HammerOn Press - The Para-Academic Handbook
"There is a name for those under-and precariously employed, but actively working, academics in today's society: the para-academic.

Para-academics mimic academic practices so they are liberated from the confines of the university. Our work, and our lives, reflect how the idea of a university as a place for knowledge production, discussion and learning, has become distorted by neo-liberal market forces. We create alternative, genuinely open access, learning-thinking-making-acting spaces on the internet, in publications, in exhibitions, discussion groups or other mediums that seem appropriate to the situation. We don't sit back and worry about our career developments paths. We write for the love of it, we think because we have to, we do it because we care.

We take the prefix para- to illustrate how we work alongside, beside, next to, and rub up against, the all too proper location of the Academy, making the work of higher education a little more irregular, a little more perverse, a little more improper. Our work takes up the potential of the multiple and contradictory resonances of para- as decisive location for change, within the university as much as beyond it.

Specialists in all manner of things, from the humanities to the social and biological sciences, the para-academic works alongside the traditional university, sometimes by necessity, sometimes by choice, usually a mixture of both. Frustrated by the lack of opportunities to research, create learning experiences or make a basic living within the university on our own terms, para-academics don't seek out alternative careers in the face of an evaporated future, we just continue to do what we've always done: write, research, learn, think, and facilitate that process for others.

We do this without prior legitimisation from any one institution. Para-academics do not need to churn out endless 'outputs' because of the pressures of a heavily assessed research environment. We work towards making ideas because learning, sharing, thinking and creating matter beyond easily quantifiable 'products'. And we know that this is possible, that we are possible, without the constraints of an increasingly hierarchical academy.

As the para-academic community grows there is a real need to build supportive networks, share knowledge, ideas and strategies that can allow these types of interventions to become sustainable and flourish. There is a very real need to create spaces of solace, action and creativity.

The Para-Academic Handbook: A Toolkit for making-learning-creating-acting, edited by Alex Wardrop and Deborah Withers, calls for articles (between 1,000-6,000 words), cartoons, photographs, illustrations, inspirations and other forms of text/graphic communication exploring para-academic practice, and its place within active intellectual cultures of the early 21st century."
academics  books  para-academics  alexwardrop  deborahwithers  specialists  research  learning  thinking  making  acting  internet  web  online  markets  economics  knowledgeproduction  networks  networkedlearning  2014 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Make Summer
"MAKE. WRITE. REMIX.

Events and Projects All Summer Long Linked by a Powerful Shared Interest:

Making learning more relevant – connecting learning to people's interests, to real life, real work, real communities, and to the demands and opportunities of the digital age."

[From the about page:]

"This summer, major advocates for the potential of the Internet – including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Mozilla, the National Writing Project, and others – are putting Connected Learning into practice. The Summer of Making and Connecting organizes hundreds of events, projects and programs in communities across the nation, around the world, and online to help youth connect learning to their interests and to enable teachers to learn from and network with their innovative peers.

The campaign will engage hundreds of thousands of people in creating things on the web, with hardware, and on paper—working in schools and community spaces and at kitchen tables. The campaign brings together organizations from the worlds of DIY, making, writing, and learning to build the Connected Learning movement.

Our partners believe Connected Learning is an essential learning approach if we are to engage more students and better prepare today’s youth for real life and real work in a world of constant change. Just as previous generations harnessed the advancements of their times, schools and community spaces such as museums and libraries should leverage new technologies to deepen the connections between student interests, academic rigor and real world paths to success. Schools need to build on the basics so students graduate with the higher-order skills such as critical thinking, creativity, collaboration and communication they need to succeed. Because for education to be relevant and useful today, it must recognize that retreating from these realities means leaving a generation of children behind.

Learning Principles
1. Interest-powered
2. Peer-supported
3. Academically oriented

Design Principles
1. Production-centered
2. Openly networked
3. Shared purpose"
mozilla  making  makers  learning  summer  2013  networkedlearning  connectedlearning  change  interestdriven  doing  purpose  sharedpurpose  community  communities  peersupport  connectivism  constructivism  nationalwritingproject  nwp  macarthurfoundation  events  relevance 
may 2013 by robertogreco
School of Global Art
"School of Global Art is on a journey to the cusp of a new era in learning, and we'd like to take you with us. We've speant that last several months hand picking the best in advanced course material and education technology, and now we're ready to share it with everyone.

School of Global Art provides a unique mix of online always-on resources with a real-world network of experts and professional, connecting you to the knowlege and skills that will empower you to learn, and to learn to learn.

We call this approach NetworkThetic Learning, a totalising concept of Education-as-Art-as-Education. At School of Global Art we see learning as a process of new connections, between people, ideas and art. The more connections we make, the stronger we are, nomatter the distance between us.

So come with us, as we discover how far, how long, and how hard we can go."
humor  education  arteducation  powerpoint  highereducation  businessspeak  learning  networkedlearning 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Twitter for Teachers: an Experiment in Openness | theory.cribchronicles.com
"Academia tends to be one of those (literally) old-school closed structures. Education is about and has always been about systems of power. It’s also about learning and transformation and all those things, but the traditional classroom system privileges the teacher as authority.

Because if I’d walked away, by the time I came back, the requests would have built to a clamour. And by the time there’s a clamour, people have dug in.

That’s the thing about working in the open. You can’t simply dim the lights and hush everyone. You’re part of something, and you may be guiding something, but you don’t control that thing. You’re in it with the network you’ve built. If that network includes your students, then they have public voices within it. If they mutiny, the mutiny will be active and loud and confusing unless you understand what’s going on. They’re not being insubordinate (usually). Networks are not hierarchies. And the medium encourages overt performance of discontent or questioning in a way that the classroom simply doesn’t, unless you’re in Dead Poets’ Society."
modeling  babysteps  collaboration  sharing  networks  learningnetworks  cv  deschooling  unschooling  education  learning  howweteach  tcsnmy  open  participatorylearning  authority  hierarchy  microblogging  networkedlearning  teaching  via:tealtan  2012  twitter  bonniestewart  openness 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Open university: Joi Ito plans a radical reinvention of MIT's Media Lab (Wired UK)
"Welcome to Ito's vision for opening up the 27-year-old Media Lab, one in which — for example — urban agriculture might be researched in Detroit; the arts in Chicago; coding in London; and in which any bright talent anywhere, academically qualified or not, can be part of the world's leading "antidisciplinary" research lab. "Opening up the lab is more about expanding our reach and creating our network," explains Ito…

"Openness is a survival trait." …

By opening up the Media Lab, Ito hopes to move closer towards his goal of "a world with seven billion teachers", where smart crowds, adopting a resilient approach and a rebellious spirit, solve some of the world's great problems. His is a world of networks and ecosystems, in which unconstrained creativity can tackle everything from infant mortality to climate change. …"
christopherbevans  networks  hughherr  nerioxman  edboydens  syntheticbiology  academictenure  academia  tenure  highered  highereducation  poverty  small  ayahbdeir  littlebits  dropouts  walterbender  frankmoss  nicholasnegroponte  communitydevelopment  macarthurfoundation  grey-lock  petergabriel  caafoundation  michellekyddlee  knightfoundation  albertoibargüen  sethgodin  reidhoffman  junecohen  constructivism  connectivism  focus  polymaths  self-directedlearning  networkedlearning  periphery  openstudioproject  deschooling  unschooling  adaptability  disobedience  education  learning  practice  compliance  rebellion  globalvoices  creativecommons  mozilla  innovation  sustainability  consumerism  resilience  london  chicago  detroit  medialab  mit  antidisciplinary  lcproject  openness  open  joiito  mitmedialab 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Two great quotes from Richard Elmore | Scott McLeod | Big Think [More within]
"When students step out the door of…school today, they step into a learning environment…organized in ways radically different from how it once was. It’s a world in which access to knowledge is relatively easy & seamless; in which one is free to follow a line of inquiry wherever it takes one, without the direction & control of someone called a teacher; &, in which…most people can quickly build a network of learners around just about any body of knowledge & interests, unconstrained by the limits of geography, institutions, & time zones. If you were a healthy, self-actualizing young person, in which of these environments would you choose to spend most of your time?

…The more accessible learning becomes through unmediated relationships and broad-based social networks, the less clear it is why schools, and the people who work in them, should have such a large claim on the lives of children and young adults, and the more the noneducational functions of schooling come to the fore."

[Don't miss the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AfQzo5e4iSU ]
scottmcleod  technology  schooling  self-directedlearning  inquiry-basedlearning  change  lcproject  cv  openstudioproject  schools  learning  deschooling  unschooling  networkedlearning  education  2011  richardelmore 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Richard Elmore: Futures of School Reform - C-SPAN Video Library
"general drift here is from left to more radical... I do not believe that the institutional structure of public schooling anymore. I view the work that I continue to do with schools, and I take it seriously, as palliative care for a dying institution.""

"The central organizing principle for society and for learning...is going to be network relationships."

"It will not accommodate well, in fact the longer we stay with the hierarchy model, the worse the disassociation between learning and schooling will be."

"The mobile classroom in the mobile public schools in this country is designed point for point to be exactly the opposite of what we are learning about humans, how human beings develop cognitively."

"how do we handle issues of access when learning starts to migrate away from schooling?… what is the mechanism by which neuroscience becomes part of the way we think about learning and what consequences does that have for the way we design learning environments? I refuse to call them schools."

[Alt link: http://www.c-span.org/video/?308871-1/EducationReform28 ]
networkrelationships  relationships  adhoc  informal  informallearning  schooling  thisishuge  edreform  reform  neuroscience  change  networks  networkedlearning  institutionalization  institutions  self-servinginstitutions  flattening  policy  scale  sugatamitra  hierarchies  nestedhierarchies  bureaucracy  hierarchy  cv  lcproject  learning  teaching  2012  radicalism  radicals  deschooling  unschooling  richardelmore  via:lukeneff  education  radicalization  canon  horizontality 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Max Tabackman Fenton
[The delightful copy from May 15, 2012.]

"Hello, I'm Max Fenton.

Knowingly or not, I've enlisted friends, peers, and strangers to unpack a puzzle that involves reading and writing on networks and screens.

You can follow along or participate by reading, clipping, grokking, assembling, questioning, and sharing—while making a path. You'll need electrons, a wish to explore, and an eye for how these pieces might fit together in novel shapes and forms.

My trails are charted through twitter, tumblr, pinboard, readmill, reading, and 2nd hand [flavors.me]."

[As shared on Twitter:

"Made my site a little more accurate [http://maxfenton.com] then read @pieratt's "Transparency" http://pieratt.tumblr.com/post/23108094947/transparency-in-the-evolution-of-technology — Yes."

http://twitter.com/maxfenton/status/202477843534454784 ]

[See also: http://twitter.com/rogre/status/202481485633159168 ]
stockandflow  flow  commonplacebooks  friends  peers  talktostrangers  strangers  networkedlearning  benpieratt  transparency  comments  peoplelikeme  howwethink  howwecreate  socialmedia  participation  pinboard  readmill  flavors.me  reading.am  tumblr  twitter  2012  sensemaking  meaningmaking  clipping  assembling  sharing  questioning  crumbtrails  conversation  howwelearn  howwework  cv  online  web  trails  wayfinding  pathfinding  maxfenton 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Reading the dictionary - Joi Ito's Web [See also the comments.]
"My sister calls me an "interest driven learner."…code for "short attention span" or "not a good long term planner" or something like that. I can't imagine being able to read the dictionary from cover to cover…don't think most people could…

Although reading the dictionary & the encyclopedia from cover to cover may seem a bit extreme, it often feels like that's what we're asking kids to do who go through formal education…

I love videos of professors, amateurs & instructors putting their courseware online…great resource for interest driven learners like me. However, I wonder whether we should be structuring the future of learning as online universities where you are asked to do the equivalent of reading the encyclopedia from cover to cover online. Shouldn't we be looking at the Internet as an amazing network enabling "The Power of Pull" & be empowering kids to learn through building things together rather than assessing their ability to complete courses & produce the right "answers"?"
networkedlearning  motivation  2012  lcrpoject  interestdriven  dictionaries  encyclopedias  teaching  web  online  education  deschooling  unschooling  learning  joiito  dictionary 
april 2012 by robertogreco
/mentoring
"What is it, exactly?

Anyone can be a part of /mentoring. All it takes is a few lines of text on the internet, expressing your openness to mentoring and offering a specific invitation to get in touch. You might create a dedicated page at 'yourdomain.com/mentoring', write an individual blog post, or even just mention it in a sidebar. Beginning, not formatting, is what matters."

[See also: http://revolution.is/diana-kimball/ AND https://github.com/dianakimball/mentoring AND http://www.twitter.com/mentoring ]
github  gamechanging  distributed  distributedmentoring  templates  learning  education  learningwebs  learningnetworks  networkedlearning  deschooling  unschooling  dianakimball  mentoring 
february 2012 by robertogreco
PARALLEL SCHOOL: Students as Designers (Norman Potter)
[Wayback: https://web.archive.org/web/20100419063957/http://www.parallel-school.com:80/2010/02/students-as-designers-norman-potter.html ]

"Parallel school of art is a virtual and international school where those who want to self-educate themselves can share what they are doing and thinking about, as well as their interests and projects.

Parallel school wants to generate and spread work emulation through the development of self-initiated projects such as publications, meetings, lectures, workshops, etc.

Parallel school would like to bring together the knowledge, experiences and energy from students all over the world.

Parallel School is an umbrella that is free to use by anyone interested in doing so."
workshops  networkedlearning  sharing  lcproject  projectbasedlearning  via:litherland  parallelschool  design  learning  autodidacts  autodidactism  self-education  education  autodidacticism  pbl 
january 2012 by robertogreco
TEDxLondon - Dougald Hine - YouTube
"Dougald is a writer, speaker and creator of organisations, projects and events. His work is driven by a desire to understand how we change things, and how things change, with or without us. This has taken him cross country through a range of fields, from social theory to the tech industry, literary criticism, the future of institutions and the skills of improvisation. He seeks to make connections between people, between ideas and between worlds. His projects include the web startup School of Everything, the urban innovation agency Space Makers, and most recently The University Project, which is seeking new ways to fulfil the promise of higher education."
teaching  autodidacts  self-directedlearning  purpose  highereducation  highered  networkedlearning  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  sharing  lcproject  adaptivereuse  spacemakers  commoditization  schoolofeverything  learning  deschooling  unschooling  2011  via:steelemaley  universities  colleges  education  theuniversityproject  dougaldhine 
january 2012 by robertogreco
dianakimball/mentoring - GitHub
"the opportunity to offer guidance from experience is a gift…"We don't describe ourselves as 'bursting with pride' over our own success, but we do for others…" … reward requires commitment: "to generate the emotional reward of naches, we have to throw ourselves into the act of mentoring."

As we live and work on this electric frontier, it's important to build and renew our own traditions. My goal with /mentoring is to encourage people to believe in one another, and to make it the easiest, most natural thing in the world to express and welcome that belief."

Examples:
http://blog.dianakimball.com/mentoring
http://revolution.is/diana-kimball/
http://geemus.com/mentoring
http://nickd.org/mentoring/
http://www.michaelgalpert.com/mentoring
http://kvans.squarespace.com/mentoring/
http://adambrault.com/mentoring
http://trash.davidcole.me/mentoring
http://patrickewing.info/mentoring

[Twitter @mentoring and Wiki at: https://github.com/dianakimball/mentoring/wiki ]
mentoring  dianakimball  networkedlearning  networks  education  unschooling  deschooling  learning  pride  naches  gratification  gamechanging  generosity  growth  mentorship 
september 2011 by robertogreco
P2PU (beta) | Learning for everyone, by everyone, about almost anything
"LEARN ANYTHING WITH YOUR PEERS. IT'S ONLINE AND TOTALLY FREE.

At P2PU, people work together to learn a particular topic by completing tasks, assessing individual and group work, and providing constructive feedback."

"The Peer 2 Peer University is a grassroots open education project that organizes learning outside of institutional walls and gives learners recognition for their achievements. P2PU creates a model for lifelong learning alongside traditional formal higher education. Leveraging the internet and educational materials openly available online, P2PU enables high-quality low-cost education opportunities. P2PU - learning for everyone, by everyone about almost anything."
education  learning  p2p  p2pu  hourschool  teachstreet  schoolofeverything  universities  highereducation  highered  peertopeer  teaching  unschooling  learningnetworks  networkedlearning  networks  lcproject  online  constructivecriticism 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Education Week: The Classroom Is Obsolete: It's Time for Something New
"The following is a fairly universal list of education design principles for tomorrow’s schools, though it would be tailored to the needs of particular communities: (1) personalized; (2) safe & secure; (3) inquiry-based; (4) student-directed; (5) collaborative; (6) interdisciplinary; (7) rigorous & hands-on; (8) embodying a culture of excellence & high expectations; (9) environmentally conscious; (10) offering strong connections to the local community & business; (11) globally networked; & (12) setting the stage for lifelong learning.

In designing a school for tomorrow, such underlying principles should drive the discussion…would allow us to address questions around how students should learn, where they should learn, & w/ whom should they learn. We may discover that we need teachers to work in teams…We may conclude that it makes no sense to break down the school day into fixed “periods,” & that state standards can be better met via interdisciplinary & real-world projects."
schooldesign  lcproject  tcsnmy  unschooling  deschooling  inquiry-basedlearning  studentdirected  personalization  handson  handsonlearning  environment  networkedlearning  community  communities  classrooms  porous  permeability  interdisciplinary  collaboration  collaborative  2011  prakashnair  classroom 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Skillshare — Classes to learn anything from anyone
"Skillshare is a community marketplace to learn anything from anyone. We believe that everyone has valuable skills and knowledge to teach and the curiosity to keep learning new things. This means our neighborhoods, communities and cities are really the world's greatest universities. Our platform helps make the exchange of knowledge easy, enriching, collaborative, and fun.

All of the classes happen in the real world (that means offline, despite what we nerds may consider to be “real”). We believe that learning should happen in groups around shared interests and passions. When you bring together a variety of voices and hands-on instruction, something truly spectacular happens. This magic just can't be replicated over a webcam and chatroom. We're here to spread this magic and increase the gross happiness index around the world!"
education  learning  teaching  design  skillshare  internet  networkedlearning  hourschool  deschooling  unschooling  schoolofeverything  teachstreet  learningnetworks  classes  community 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Modern Learning Exchange « Adventures in Free Schooling
"Eventually, the Learning Exchange got too large and some fees were instituted if member’s wanted faster access (which introduced hierarchy amongst participants). During the seventies, most of the Learning Exchange’s structure, contacting, and networking was done via phone – and an individual who worked for the Learning Exchange would have to sort through files and individually pair people up. This became a very large task for a small number of people who were trying to offer a free service for universal access to human knowledge, and thus the need to institute fees (in order for people to be able to work full time, get supplies, etc.). However, in modern times, with the advent of the computer and the internet, a lot of these problems that the learning exchange faced – that caused it to institute fees – could be easily organized on a website and a computer database."
deschooling  johnholt  learning  learningexchange  thelearningexchange  learningechanges  networks  networkedlearning  education  1970s  craigslist  freecycle  ivanillich  sharing  communities  brianvanslyke 
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Learning Generalist: Social Media in Learning and Social Learning are just not the same thing
"…true social learning has a few important characteristics…this is where the 'new' social learning is different from old…non-negotiable criteria to dub any learning as social:

1. Democratic: To me the classic example of social interaction is gossip at a watercooler. Gossip emerges from the ground up…doesn't need someone to lead…crowd decides the agenda…the conversation…Learning is truly social when individuals can decide what they want to learn & how they wish to collaborate on it.

2. Autonomous: …it moves by itself & is not controlled by a facilitator…facilitator can help make the flow of the interaction smoother, but in no way does the facilitator become responsible for the direction of these interactions…

3. Embedded: …it's about life in general…not a separate exercise…'just in time' learning.

4. Emergent: …structure emerges from the natural interactions of a participating group. A big problem w/ enterprise social learning is the desire to structure before you start…"
education  sociallearning  networkedlearning  tcsnmy  lcproject  cv  learning  learningnetworks  deschooling  unschooling  emergent  emergentcurriculum  autonomy  hierarchy  wirearchy  social  democratic  democraticschools  grassroots  embedded  reallife  meaningmaking  engagement  justintime  justinintimelearning  2011  sumeetmoghe  structure 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Unschooling Media: Participatory Practices among Progressive Homeschoolers [.pdf]
Just reencountered Vanessa Bertozzi's 2006 thesis through a post by Sandra Dodd, commented by David Friedman: http://unschooling.blogspot.com/2011/06/unschooling-media-participatory.html

"On the flipside of the technology debate, I experienced a moment of great academic pleasure when I received an email from Rob, an unschooling dad in California. He explained that he’d come across my links tagged “unschooling” in del.icio.us and he was curious about my research. We then went on to have a very fruitful interview."
vanessabertozzi  unschooling  homeschool  networking  del.icio.us  bookmarks  bookmarking  2006  lizettegreco  glvo  education  learning  networkedlearning  participatory  participatoryculture  grassroots  ego  cv  filetype:pdf  media:document 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Advances in research on networked ... - Google Books
"Networked learning is learning in which information and communications technology (ICT) is used to promote connections: between one learner and other learners; between learners and tutors; between a learning community and its learning resources. Networked learning is an area which has great practical and theoretical importance. It is a rapidly growing area of educational practice, particularly in higher education and the corporate sector. This volume brings together some of the best research in the field, and uses it to signpost some directions for future work. The papers in this collection represent a major contribution to our collective sense of recent progress in research on networked learning. In addition, they serve to highlight some of the largest or most important gaps in our understanding of studentsa? perspectives on networked learning, patterns of interaction and online discourse, and the role of contextual factors…"
books  networkedlearning  education  learning  via:leighblackall  2004 
june 2011 by robertogreco
The Future Of College: Forget Lectures And Let The Students Lead | Co.Design
"The technological power of the "cloud" as an aggregator of global knowledge & social network capital combines w/ natural tendency to learn through sharing & playing to create a multidimensional, interconnected network that solves complex problems. Simply put: Purpose & play drive learning.

These students help us discern what is valuable about higher-ed learning & what needs to be shed to save it from complete ossification. The insular nature of academia could lead to its demise, but these students also see tremendous value in its ability to incubate. Unis become testing grounds where students can find mentors, receive funding, & iterate initiatives with real-world consequences. The design community can debate where innovation comes from, but we can no longer look to authoritarian, top-down dictation to drive societal change. If the blossoming of this pattern doesn’t point to a new trend in education, then it at least represents what these higher-ed institutions must become."
unschooling  deschooling  hierarchy  trungle  highereducation  highered  colleges  universities  organizations  education  learning  mentoring  mentorship  apprenticeships  problemsolving  criticalthinking  realworld  entrepreneurship  lcproject  johndewey  life  sugatamitra  peterthiel  via:lukeneff  play  purpose  academia  networkedlearning  networks  cloud  socialnetworks  authority  authoritarianism 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Where the F**k Was I? (A Book) | booktwo.org
"Where Selvadurai is interested in the space between two human cultural identities, I suppose I am interested in the space where human and artificial cultures overlap. (“Artificial” is wrong; feels—what? Prejudiced? Colonial? Anthropocentric? Carboncentric?)

There are no digital natives but the devices themselves; no digital immigrants but the devices too. They are a diaspora, tentatively reaching out into the world to understand it and themselves, and across the network to find and touch one another. This mapping is a byproduct, part of the process by which any of us, separate and indistinct so long, find a place in the world."
books  iphone  maps  mobile  data  jamesbridle  shyamselvaduri  kevinslavin  digitalnatives  digital  devices  internet  web  singularity  mapping  place  meaning  meaningmaking  digitalimmigrants  understanding  learning  exploration  networkedlearning  networks  ai  2011 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Toolbox for Education & Social Action « Learn Together • Work Together • Struggle Together
"The Toolbox for Education and Social Action (TESA) is a worker-owned, next-generation publisher of participatory resources for social and economic change. TESA also provides services to support individuals and organizations developing and implementing their own educational materials, programs, and digital resources."
publishing  participatory  socialaction  change  gamechanging  economics  brianvanslyke  activism  networkedlearning  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Model and Method [Xskool]
"The Xskool model is expected to be based on some kind of self-directed action learning that enables participants to study locally, at work or on a project, and in their own language – but supported by a distributed network of learning providers, tutors and mentors.

To be determined: Accreditation/certification

Xskool is envisaged, at the moment, as a part-time programme of intensive workshops, each of a three to five days’ duration. Some workshops on this learning journey will be at a residential site; others will involve participation in live projects."
xskool  actionlearning  unschooling  deschooling  workshops  2011  self-directedlearning  self-directed  altgdp  distributed  networkedlearning  networks  lcproject  local  projectbasedlearning  projects  tcsnmy  classideas  accreditation  certification  pbl 
june 2011 by robertogreco
cloudhead - hypercity
"the web is hypercity - virtualizing and extending every process and relationship that grew out of the urban environment. With the remediation of the city comes a new understanding of citizenship.

hypercity is quite literally the rebirth of the citizen … a reawakening of the city’s exhausted civic potential."
web  internet  online  cities  thecityishereforyoutouse  urban  urbanism  situationist  hypercities  hypercity  civics  citizenship  potential  anarchism  anarchy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  networkedlearning  networks  relationships  learning  meaningmaking  meaning  sensemaking  shiftctrlesc  headmine 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Education Studio (HDL) - Helsinki Design Lab
"HDL developed Studio on Education to think about future of education…

1. From equal access to edu to equal opportunity to develop ones’ talents & aspirations 2. From inherited Social Contract to a Social contract that includes voices of all stakeholders to create shared meaning 3. From current, institutional social welfare system to Social welfare system v 2.0 integrated w/ personal agency & empowerment 4. From administrative structures that are hierarchical & vertical to…inclusive, open & flexible 5. From schools as institutions for acquisition for academic skills to schools as agents of change that inspire & produce civic innovation, creativity, & holistic growth 6. From a strong focus on the normative to the inclusion of all members of society with different abilities and strengths 7. From learning for academic achievement to learning expertise for life 8. Open public discourse 9. Strengthen international networks and collaboration 10. New Suomi School for 21st Century"

[See also: http://helsinkidesignlab.org/dossiers/education/the-challenge AND http://helsinkidesignlab.org/blog/week-113 ]

[See also the Oivallus bookmarks: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/t:oivallus ]
finland  sitra  helsinki  helsinkidesignlab  education  deschooling  unschooling  casestudies  collaboration  networks  vocational  designthinking  lcproject  tcsnmy  holistic  holisticapproach  socialwelfare  hierarchy  access  equality  institutions  empowerment  agency  personalagency  change  gamechanging  civics  innovation  life  lifeskills  discourse  transparency  open  openschools  networkedlearning  relevance  oivallus 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Leigh Blackall: Our epistemology, and entrepreneurial learning
"The sway that the subject of technology has over discussions about education and learning, is giving me increasing cause for concern. Absent from the explanations of new understandings of knowledge and learning, and their arguments for change, is some balance to the largely utopian ideals. The sub headings in the 'entrepreneurial learning' article for example, read like evangelical slogans, without a single word for caution or circumspect (that I could see by scanning). What would one include to strike a balance? Most obvious would be Postman, in particular his warnings in Technonopoly, but their could and should be many others. Surely we agree that technology gives potential to all traits of humanity, not just the bits we'd like to pick out."
leighblackall  comments  technology  howardrheingold  johnseelybrown  maxsengles  technolopoly  google  goldmansachs  allwathedoverbymachinesoflovinggrace  adamcurtis  florianschneider  gatekeepers  mihalycsikszentmihalyi  darkmatter  gregorysholette  institutions  education  learning  power  neo-colonialism  networkedlearning  networkculture  internet  connectivism  society  socialmedia  2011  2008  informallearning  informal  mentoring  mentorship  pedagogy  self-organization  self-directedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  fachidioten  humanism 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Valence Theory of Organization / FrontPage
"In a nutshell, my research finds that [Bureaucratic, Administratively controlled, & Hierarchical] organizations…replace the complexity of human dynamics in social systems with the complication of machine-analogous procedures that enable individual independence, responsibility, and accountability. In contrast, [Ubiquitously Connected & Pervasively Proximate] organizations encourage and enable processes of continual emergence by valuing and promoting complex interactions even though doing so necessitates ceding legitimated control in an environment of individual autonomy and agency, collective responsibility, and mutual accountability. The consequential differences in how each type of organization operates day-to-day are like comparing the societies of Ancient Greece, the medieval Church, the Industrial Age, and today's contemporary reality of Ubiquitous Connectivity and Pervasive Proximity."

[via: https://twitter.com/bopuc/status/71130524705492992 ]
complexity  hierarchy  bureaucracy  organizations  tcsnmy  leadership  management  administration  lcproject  learning  networkedlearning  networkculture  autonomy  agency  howwework  howwelearn  organization  accountability  innovation  valencetheory  toread  markfederman  emergentcurriculum  emergent  society  industrial  ubiquitousconnectivity  ubiquitouslearning  relationships  responsibility  independence  freedom 
may 2011 by robertogreco
A razor’s edge
"Listen closely to the “lesson I want to get across” at 6:31…”There is no opting out of new media…it changes a society as a whole…media mediates relationships…whole structure of society can change…we are on a razor’s edge between hopeful possibilities & more ominous futures….”

At min 8:14 Wesch describes what we need people to “be” to make our networked mediated culture work, and the barriers we are facing in schools. Wesch is right on. Corporate curriculum, schedules, bells, borders, & “teaching/classroom management” are easily assisted by technology. Yet to open learning & deschool our ed system represents the hopeful possibilities Wesch imagines & has acted on. What we accept from industrial schooling, how we proceed in our educational endeavors, & what we do, facilitate, witness, & promote in our actions in education mean so much to learners of today & the interconnected & interdependent systems we are all a part of."

[Love…"anthropologists want…to be children again"]

[Video is also here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwyCAtyNYHw ]
michaelwesch  anthropology  children  perspective  perception  deschooling  unlearning  media  newmedia  papuanewguinea  thomassteele-maley  relationships  networkedlearning  networks  possibility  hope  education  unschooling  healing  justice  culture  unmediated  mediatedculture  ivanillich  criticaleducation  global  names  naming  learning  tcsnmy  lcproject  interconnectivity  interconnectedness  interdependence  society  changing  gamechanging  influence  mediation  hopefulness  future  openness  freedom  control  surveillance  power  transparency  deception  participatory  distraction  interconnected 
may 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - George Siemens on Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)
"George Siemens, at the Technology Enhanced Knowledge Research Institute at Athabasca Universityhas been running "Massive Open Online Courses" (MOOCs). I talk to him about what a MOOC is, how it works, and the educational philosophy behind it."
mooc  socialnetworking  opensource  connectivism  social  georgesiemens  howardrheingold  via:steelemaley  online  internet  networkedlearning  teaching  learning  education  moodle  elluminate  distributed  connectedlearners  connectedlearning  connectedness  grasshopper  stephendownes  sensemaking  messiness  self-directedlearning  self-directed  moocs 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Collectivate.net
"Trebor Scholz is a writer, conference organizer, Assistant Professor in Media & Culture, & Director of conference series The Politics of Digital Culture at The New School in NYC. He also founded Institute for Distributed Creativity that is known for online discussions of critical Internet culture, specifically ruthless casualization of digital labor, ludocapitalism, distributed politics, digital media & learning, radical media activism, & micro-histories of media art. Trebor is co-editor The Art of Free Cooperation, a book about online collaboration, & editor of “The Internet as Playground and Factory,” forthcoming from Routledge…PhD in Media Theory & grant from John D & Catherine T MacArthur Foundation. Forthcoming edited collections by Trebor include “The Digital Media Pedagogy Reader” & “The Future University”…book chapters, written in 2010, zoom in on history of digital media activism, politics of Facebook, limits to accessing knowledge in US, & mobile digital labor…"
treborscholz  education  learning  art  culture  creativity  unschooling  deschooling  social  labor  activism  mediart  institutefordistributedcreativity  networks  networkculture  networkedlearning  nyc  mediaactivism  ludocapitalism  distributedpolitics  micro-histories  pedagogy  teaching  mobility 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Institute for Distributed Creativity
"The research of the Institute for Distributed Creativity (iDC) focuses on collaboration in media art, technology, and theory with an emphasis on social contexts.

The iDC is an international network with a participatory and flexible institutional structure that combines advanced creative production, research, events, and documentation.

While the iDC makes appropriate use of emerging low-cost and free social software (ie. peer-to-peer technologies, blogs and mailing lists) it balances these activities with regular face-to-face meetings."

[See also: http://twitter.com/idctweets AND http://twitter.com/trebors AND http://www.collectivate.net/ AND http://mobilityshifts.org/ AND http://digitallabor.org/ ]

[Subscribe here: https://lists.thing.net/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/idc ]
treborscholz  education  design  technology  art  culture  social  mediaart  theory  socialcontext  participatory  creativeproduction  unschooling  deschooling  networkedlearning  networkculture  networks  learning  ncm  participatoryart 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Moving beyond self-directed learning: Network-directed learning « Connectivism
"To address the information and social complexity of open courses, learners need to be network-directed, not self-directed learners. Social networks serve to filter and amplify important concepts and increase the diversity of views on controversial topics. This transition is far broader than only what we’ve experienced in open courses – the need for netwok-centric learning and knowledge building is foundational in many careers today…

Most importantly network-directed learning is not a “crowd sourcing” concept. Crowd sourcing involves people creating things together. Networks involve connected specialization – namely we are intelligent on our own and we amplify that intelligence when we connect to others. Connectedness – in this light – consists of increasing, not diminishing, the value of the individual."
learning  connectivism  networkedlearning  cck11  via:steelemaley  georgesiemens  self-directedlearning  self-directed  learningnetworks  deschooling  ivanillich  chaos  messiness  cv  amplifiers  specialization  mooc  cck  specialists  moocs 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The future is podular « Dachis Group Collaboratory
"Pods don’t answer every business problem. Like any other strategic decision, choice to go podular involves inherent risks & tradeoffs. A podular system is certainly not the most efficient or consistent way to conduct business. There is more redundancy in this kind of system, which usually means greater cost. When units are autonomous, activity will also be more variable, which means it will be less consistent.

The bet you are making with a podular strategy is that the increase in value to customers, paired w/ increased resiliency in your operations, will more than offset the increases in costs. It’s a fundamental tradeoff & thus a design decision: the more flexible and adaptive you are, the less consistent your behavior will be. The benefit, though, is that you unleash people to bring more of their intelligence, passion, creative energy & expertise to their work. If you’re in an industry where these things matter (& who isn’t), then you should take a look at podular design."
management  socialbusiness  hierarchy  mesh  meshnetworks  autonomy  redundancy  motivation  flexibility  tcsnmy  administration  leadership  organization  organizations  passion  creativity  nodes  networks  networkedlearning  networkculture  decisionmaking  connectivism  connections  efficiency  chains  empowerment  democracy  business  dachisgroup  podular  2011 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The City As School - Gilberto Dimenstein - Revitalizing Cities - Harvard Business Review
"I then realized that the educational process happens not just inside the school walls, but in three different places: school, family and community.

When I came back to São Paulo - a chaotic metropolitan area with 20 million people - I decided to do an experiment using this knowledge. The city was going through its worst period of violence and degradation. In my neighborhood, Vila Madalena, we developed the learning-neighborhood project in cooperation with a group of communicators, psychologists and educators. The core idea was to map the community's resources: theater, schools, cultural centers, companies, parks, etc. We created a network and trained the community to take advantage of all these assets, turning them into social capital. With this model, the school is trained to function as a hub, connecting itself to the neighborhood, and then, to the city."
cities  schools  explodingschool  urban  infrastructure  colinward  education  lcproject  informallearning  informal  thecityishereforyoutouse  socialcapital  gilbertodinmenstein  sãopaulo  cityasclassroom  experience  experientiallearning  realworld  schoolwithoutwalls  bolsa-escola  via:cervus  opencities  opencitylabs  networkedlearning  ivanillich  deschooling  unschooling  catracalivre  neighborhoods  community  communities  communitycenters  learning  families 
april 2011 by robertogreco
From Industrial/Information Age to Connected Age : peterme.com
"bureaucracy supports values of efficiency, calculability, consistency, & predictability…it also dehumanizes the people who work within them…reduced to job titles & set of responsibilities.…figurative cogs in the machine…

People now crave authenticity in their interactions w/ business, which…some companies do well, and others… not so much. These relationships also benefit from mutual trust, which some companies are learning can reap interesting new benefits.

The Connected Age also means that businesses must grapple with the messiness of humanity, because when people are freer to interact, unpredictability occurs. And, the decentralized networks that form the substrate of the Connected Age lead to emergent properties that, byt their very nature, are also unpredictable.

The bureaucratic model that served us in the Industrial and Information Age needs to be set aside for one that is responsive to how business (and society) actually operates today."
cluetrainmanifesto  2011  petermerholz  industrialage  lcproject  organizations  management  collaboration  messiness  human  complexity  people  society  unpredictability  connectedage  networkedlearning  networkedage  business  leadership  administration  tcsnmy  learning  education  relationships  measurement  standardizedtesting  standardization  accountability  deschooling  unschooling 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Learning Through Digital Media » Using Twitter—But Not in the Classroom: Twitter as a Tool to Expand Classroom Conversation
"What is important from a pedagogical standpoint is not to let these conversations happen only on Twitter. That is, whenever there is a particularly interesting or popular conversation on Twitter, incorporating it into the classroom discussion makes Twitter part of the extended learning process instead of a distinct sphere. When done well, with a group of students who are invested in the class material, this can create an atmosphere whereby students start to understand that the issues being discussed are not limited to the confines of the semester, but rather have importance beyond the classroom."
davidparry  microblogging  teaching  education  pedagogy  digitalmedia  conversation  socialsoftware  socialmedia  cv  learning  twitter  edtech  pln  networkedlearning  2011  davidsilver  tcsnmy 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Week 304 – Blog – BERG
"I’m looking forward to travel pausing for a bit, and having everyone back in the same room. There have been lots of changes recently, and the Room – which in my head I’ve started capitalising, Room not room – is nothing if not a culture – a particular stance to design and the world, and shared values – a way to work which is beautiful, popular and inventive – and a network of people in which ideas transmit, roll round and mutate, and come back in new forms and hit you in the back of the head. The Room is what it’s all about. It’s a broth that requires more investment than we’ve been giving it recently. So, yeah, that."
mattwebb  theroom  openstudio  work  howwework  networkedlearning  networks  berg  berglondon  sharedspace  space  place  learningplaces  learningspaces  2011  schooldesign  lcproject  tcsnmy  culture  sharedvalues  invention  creativity  cv  socialemotionallearning  shaedspace  sharedtime  community  communities  howwelearn  socialemotional 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Dream School | Powerful Learning Practice
"I know part of the answer to re-envisioning education comes in the learning communities we are creating – deep, sustained, communities that have hard, messy conversations and become safe places where we ask controversial questions that push for positive change. But part of the problem is getting participants to buy in and make time and truly commit to spending time in community, building trust and learning together. It takes time and energy and folks have to understand it is developmental. The shift will come if they will invest themselves, the very best part of themselves."

"When we let learning rule the school structure, teachers will have to evolve into much more than the delivery vehicle – the person who simply deconstructs knowledge into small, bite sized pieces that can be memorized and regurgitated on tests. Rather, teachers will become connected coaches who understand how to use appreciative inquiry to help students construct and validate their own learning."
schools  projectdreamschool  sherylnussbaum-beach  willrichardson  education  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  learning  connectedlearning  connectedlearners  networkedlearning  networks  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  student-centered  studentdirected  self-directed  openstudio  learner-centered  learner-ledcommunities  theindependentproject  teaching  pedagogy  modeling  via:steelemaley  schoolstart-ups  change  future  schooldesign  tcsnmy  community 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Network | better taste than sorry.
"One of my most favorite quotes is by George Bernard Shaw. It displays my motivation why I contribute to the web.

“If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange these apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas.”

And just imagine what could happen if we all share our ideas with each other…Exchange and sharing are two of the most important aspects within blogs. And there are several people who are constantly giving me inspiration. Basically better taste than sorry would not be the same without these people. And I want to take the chance to feature them right here. (the listening doesn’t follow any rule or special order, just like it came into my mind)"
georgebernardshaw  learning  networks  networkedlearning  design  community  twitter  howwelearn  sharing  ideas  markusreuter  manyminds  inspiration  web  online  attribution  listening  conversation  blogs  blogging  exchange 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Practical Tips for Surviving Academic Life (Part One: The Early Years) - Brainstorm - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"2. Write down every idea you have, even if you suspect it might never be useful. Most won’t be, but some? Some will be more valuable than you might dream.

3. Contact people whose work you admire. Do this not to impress them, but instead to let them know them why you find their work important. Why not tell someone who you’re reading at the moment—someone whose work engages you on a serious level—that you’re enjoying (or at least provoked by) their research and perspective?…

4. Keep in touch with smart people and funny people. You’ll need them in your life no matter what they—or you—end up doing. Smart and funny people make even the worst day better. They are the best reward for survival.

5. Keep good notes. Keep track of the titles, authors, and dates of those books, articles, movies (or “films” if you’re that sort), songs, poems, art pieces, reviews—of anything that engages you—because otherwise you’ll spend ridiculous amounts of time trying to track them down."
learning  networkedlearning  networking  notetaking  cv  academia  via:lukeneff  admiration  remembering  memory  recordkeeping  people  howto  advice  work  sharing  etiquette 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Ubiquitous Learning - a critique - Wikiversity
"Ubiquitous learning as in situated learning, across platforms, devices, locations and jurisdictions, and including neglected historical references[1], ignored present initiatives[2], and acknowledging the risks of a darker future of corporate power over information, communication and medium[3].

So this is a critique of "Ubiquitous Learning", rejecting the notion as central content repository, or devices and software that favour such. Looking instead to that which supports and enhances peer to peer connection, contextualisation, localisation, device independence, and lowering barriers of cost, distraction, or central control."
leighblackall  ubiquitouslearning  conviviality  situatedlearning  contentrepositories  peertopeer  networks  networkedlearning  contextualization  distraction  centralization  localization  local  independence  unschooling  deschooling  critique  decentralization  software  communication  crossplatform  corporatism  information  control 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Unschool House Rock | bavatuesdays
"Unschooling for us need not be understood as some repudiation of the public trust, or public schools. Nor need it be understood in the stark, divisive terms of institutions need to be gutted, rather it is an attempt to create some critical distance from one institution in particular we both care deeply about: public education. Fact is, on a daily basis we depend upon all kinds of public institutions to carry out this process: the local libraries (which are amazing), the U of Mary Washington (for both flexibility & my paycheck), as well as innumerable people at innumerable institutions who share things w/ us all the time. For too long the annoying “but you’re at an institution” shot lodged at me & many others (w/ some justification) has failed to take into account just how vital many of these institutions are to the public trust & the future of our culture. I want to think this through, while at the same time moving away from empty rhetoric & stepping into the light of praxis."
deschooling  unschooling  networkedlearning  criticaleducation  via:steelemaley  jimgroom  cv  learning  parenting  publicschools  publicinstitutions  libraries  culture  values 
march 2011 by robertogreco
The Routledge International Handbook of the Sociology of Education (Hardback) - Routledge
"brings together many of the world’s leading sociologists of education to explore and address key issues and concerns within the discipline. The 37 newly commissioned chapters draw upon theory & research to provide new accounts of contemporary educational processes, global trends, & changing & enduring forms of social conflict & social inequality.

The research, conducted by leading international scholars in the field, indicates that 2 complexly interrelated agendas are discernible in the heat & noise of educational change over the past 25 years. 1st rests on a clear articulation by the state of its requirements of education. 2nd promotes at least the appearance of greater autonomy on the part of educational institutions in the delivery of those requirements…examines the ways in which sociology of education has responded to these 2 political agendas, addressing a range of issues which cover:

perspectives & theories
social processes & practices
inequalities & resistances."
via:steelemaley  education  unschooling  deschooling  sociology  networkedlearning  michaelapple  stephenball  luisarmando  inequality  autonomy  change  policy  politics  trends  conflict  social  reform  routledgeinternational  books  toread 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Announcing my Next Project: The Edupunk’s Guide to a DIY Credential » DIY U
"The Edupunk’s Guide to a DIY Credential will be an e-book distributed free on the web in summer 2011.* The primary goal is to reach low-income students and potential students to help them find alternative paths to a credential using online and open resources.  The secondary goal is to reach educators and administrators interested in incorporating the latest technology, social media, and collaborative learning into their approaches in order to cut costs while improving learning, socialization, and accreditation both inside and outside the classroom…

Here’s what I’d love to learn more about:

-Alternative higher ed programs, particularly for credentialing prior learning,  experiential learning, self-learning. I know about Excelsior. What else?

-Really smart HR people who are thinking about recruitment given the world of open learning.

-Really smart people I haven’t interviewed yet, who you think I should."
networkedlearning  freelearning  openphd  anyakamenetz  diyu  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  openlearning  2011  alternative 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Apple (2010) Global crisis, social justice, and education
"Apple et al. use four regional case studies, the US, Japan, the Israel|Palestinian state , and Latin America to prove that critical educators (teachers, researchers, learners) and social movements are needed to countervail the neo-liberal, and neo-conservative designs (against social justice and progressive education) surfacing as reform movements around the world as entrenched facets of globalization."
deschooling  networkedlearning  freelearning  democracy  michaelapple  justice  neoliberalism  neo-conservative  reform  teaching  democratic  schools  education  learning  society  lcproject  activism  thomassteele-maley  criticaleducation  criticalthinking  leighblackall  florianschneider  stephendownes  georgesiemens  jamesbeane  curriculum  tcsnmy  progressive  humanism  humanity  unschooling 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Florian Schneider, (Extended) Footnotes On Education / Journal / e-flux
"Networked environments or what could be called “ekstitutions” are based on exactly the opposite principle: they promise to provide instant access to knowledge. Ek-stitutions exist: their main purpose is to come into being. They exist outside the institutional framework, & instead of infinite progress, they are based on a certain temporality."

"The challenge that ekstitutions permanently face is the question of organizing, while in institutional contexts the challenge is, on the contrary, the question of unorganizing. How can they become ever more flexible, lean, dynamic, efficient, & innovative? In contrast, ekstitutions struggle w/ task of bare survival. What rules may be necessary in order to render possible the mere existence of an ekstitution?"

"It is crucial to acknowledge that institutions and ekstitutions cannot mix—there is no option of hybridity or of simultaneously being both, although this may very often be demanded by rather naïve third parties."
education  universities  crisis  labor  critique  agitpropproject  florianschneider  ekstitutions  institutions  learning  unschooling  deschooling  situationist  gillesdeleuze  deleuze  collaboration  lcproject  autodidacts  autonomy  connectivism  connectedness  networkedlearning  networkculture  virtualstudio  highereducation  highered  organization  organizing  unorganizing  capitalism  latecapitalism  commercialism  commoditization  marxism  anarchism  money  management  the2837university 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Weblogg-ed » Finns Looking Forward
"At any rate, from Robert Greco’s most excellent Delicious feed I snagged this link to “Oivallus-A Project on Future Education.” Here we have some Finns, already basking in all of their educational excellence glory, trying to figure out what teaching and learning are going to look like in a “networked economy.” (What a concept.) Not that there is anything earth shattering here, but the idea that Finnish Industries, the European Union, and The Finnish National Board of Education are seeking to “explore and outline progressive operating and learning environments” shows they’re not just resting on their laurels. And the outlines they’re sketching also show that they’re not just thinking about doing what they currently do better. They get that things are changing."

"Why aren’t more of us here in the States not seeing these trends and their impact on education more clearly?…Somehow, we have to get this party started…more on that in a couple of days."
finland  change  gamechanging  oivallus  willrichardson  ego  cv  del.icio.us  education  policy  future  lcproject  networkedeconomy  networkculture  networkedlearning  learning  progress 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Web: Original Trailer on Vimeo
"character-based, documentary feature enamored with the possibilities for global unification offered by the Internet. The film follows the work of OLPC... Shot entirely on location in Peru, the film will be an intimate portrayal of the lives of students living in the remoteness of the Amazon Jungle, the Andes Mountains and the nation’s inner cities. Using OLPC as a tangible example, the film will consider the Internet as the culmination of a technological evolution that has pushed the human species toward deeper and more meaningful cross-cultural collaboration. As children in the third world become entangled in a global web of information, communication, and collaboration, the Internet will be seen as a tool of unparalleled unification and connectivity. At its heart, the film seeks to uncover the sometimes hidden truth that we are all fundamentally the same; that there is much we can learn from a global conversation and that such interdependence is our mutual destiny."
documentary  film  olpc  networkedlearning  global  globalbrain  web  wikipedia  learning  communication  perú 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Personal Learning Ecologies - 2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning
"Families look outside the traditional “system” to create ecologies of learning experiences. Families will leverage the emerging learning economy to cultivate their own ecologies of learning resources. School will be part of this ecology, but it will play different roles for different families, and it won’t be the only player in the wider learning ecosystem.
education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  homeschool  future  schools  networkedlearning  networking  lcproject  tcsnmy 
april 2010 by robertogreco
The Unfinished Project: Exploration, Learning and Networks | the human network
"There is no authority anywhere. Either we do this ourselves, or it will not happen. We have to look to ourselves, build the networks between ourselves, reach out and connect from ourselves, if we expect to be able to resist a culture which wants to turn the entire human world into candy. This is not going to be easy; if it were, it would have happened by itself. Nor is it instantaneous. Nothing like this happens overnight. Furthermore, it requires great persistence. In the ideal situation, it begins at birth and continues on seamlessly until death. In that sense, this connected educational field mirrors and is a reflection of our human social networks, the ones we form from our first moments of awareness. But unlike that more ad-hoc network, this one has a specific intent: to bring the child into knowledge."

[mentioned: http://weblogg-ed.com/2010/opportunity-not-threat/ ]
markpesce  curriculum  education  teaching  technology  authority  learning  schools  networks  networkedlearning  socialnetworks  informallearning  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  constructivism  tcsnmy  pedagogy 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Networked Study at bavatuesdays
Great discussion in the comments including this: "It’s hard to change the culture of education without getting the kids before their thinking processes begin to ossify, but in order to do that, you have to contend with their parents who, however well-intended, didn’t have the benefit of the kind education you’re trying to provide their kids and often see it as more of a threat than an opportunity."

[via: http://weblogg-ed.com/2010/opportunity-not-threat/ ]
education  edupunk  diy  future  highered  learning  lms  networkedlearning  students  parenting  teaching  tcsnmy  lcproject  change  reform  gamechanging  unschooling  deschooling 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Weblogg-ed » The New National Ed Tech Plan…Pinch Me
"I’m trying not to get overly optimistic here, but suffice to say, if the rhetoric is any indication of the direction, we may have actually turned a corner.
schools  schooling  willrichardson  edtech  gamechanging  reform  change  optimism  tcsnmy  education  rttt  policy  technology  cloud  broadband  learning  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  networkedlearning  collaboration  personallearning 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Formal vs informal education - Joi Ito's Web
"[My sister an I] were discussing formal learning vs informal learning & how I probably survived because I had the privilege of having access to smart people & mentors, support of an understanding mother, an interest driven obsessive personality & access to the Internet. I completely agree that improving formal education & lowering dropout rates is extremely important, but I wonder how many people have personalities or interests that aren't really that suited for formal education, at least in its current form.

I wonder how many people there are like me who can't engage well w/ formal education, but don't have mentors or access to Internet & end up dropping out despite having a good formal education available to them. Is there a way to support & acknowledge importance of informal learning & allow those of us who work better in interest & self-motivated learning to do so w/out the social stigma & lack of support that is currently associated w/ dropping out of formal education?"
joiito  mimiito  formal  informal  informallearning  informaleducation  networkedlearning  formaleducation  tcsnmy  support  lcproject  learning  unschooling  deschooling  mentorship  apprenticeships  learningstyles  learningnetworks 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Teaching in Social and Technological Networks « Connectivism
"social & technological networks subvert the classroom-based role of the teacher. Networks thin classroom walls. Experts are no longer “out there” or “over there”. Skype brings anyone, from anywhere, into a classroom. Students are not confined to interacting with only the ideas of a researcher or theorist...The largely unitary voice of the traditional teacher is fragmented by the limitless conversation opportunities available in networks. When learners have control of the tools of conversation, they also control the conversations in which they choose to engage. Course content is similarly fragmented. The textbook is now augmented with YouTube videos, online articles, simulations, Second Life builds, virtual museums, Diigo content trails, StumpleUpon reflections, and so on...The following are roles teacher play in networked learning environments: 1. Amplifying 2. Curating 3. Wayfinding and socially-driven sensemaking 4. Aggregating 5. Filtering 6. Modelling 7. Persistent presence"
connectivism  teaching  learning  technology  education  networking  socialmedia  georgesiemens  wayfinding  unschooling  deschooling  networkedlearning  tcsnmy  lcproject  curation  filtering  modeling  sensemaking  cv  amplifying  content  textbooks  pedagogy  21stcenturylearning  openeducation  highereducation  networks  e-learning  elearning  apprenticeships  teacherasmasterlearner 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The Edurati Review: 10 Principles for the Future of Learning [via: http://www.downes.ca/cgi-bin/page.cgi?post=49506]
"1. Self Learning 2. Horizontal Structures 3. From Presumed Authority to Collective Credibility 4. A De-Centered Pedagogy 5. Networked Learning 6. Open Source Education 7. Learning as Connectivity and Interactivity 8. Lifelong Learning 9. Learning Institutions as Mobilizing Networks 10. Flexible Scalability and Simulation"
education  learning  tcsnmy  instruction  leadership  pedagogy  connectivity  technology  highereducation  elearning  networkedlearning  opensource  change  lcproject 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Teaching How to Learn | blog of proximal development
"Instead of separating our students from the world they’re getting ready for, instead of cocooning them in protected classrooms, we need to give them opportunities to learn from & w/ people who share their passions ... “the pursuit of real & relevant questions” is too complex for our rubrics, checklists & multiple choice quizzes. ... we [need to] get involved as co-investigators who assist students w/ their independent research & who also, through personal engagement as online learners & collaborators, model what it means to be successful as a learner. We have to become “co-conspirators” or, to use Vygotsky’s famous term, “more capable peers,” whose job is not to measure & evaluate but, primarily, to promote & support reflection & analysis in our students. As educators, we need to work on our role in the classroom as “passionate hobbyists and creators,” we need to engage in learning in our classrooms & in doing so we need to move towards a different model of assessment & evaluation."
education  learning  teaching  networkedlearning  tcsnmy  self-directed  self-directedlearning  newmedia  empowerment  pedagogy  change  reform  lcproject  michaelwesch  unschooling  deschooling  modeling  assessment  konradglogowski  curriculum  netgen  internet  elearning  media  vygotsky 
january 2009 by robertogreco
ed4wb » Insulat-Ed
Applying Clay Shirky: "A scribe [school], someone [an institution] who has given his life over [whose mission is] to literacy [education] as a cardinal virtue, would be conflicted about the meaning of movable type [free-forming educational networks]. After all, if books [information/teachers/experts] are good, then surely more books [information/teachers/experts] are better. But at the same time the very scarcity of literacy [information/teachers/experts] was what gave scribal [school/institutional] effort its primacy, and the scribal [school/institutional] way of life was based on this scarcity. Now the scribe’s [institution’s/school’s] skills [information/teachers/expertise] were [are] eminently replaceable, and his [its] function–making copies of books [educating]–was [is] better accomplished by ignoring tradition than by embracing it.” (p. 67)
education  learning  tcsnmy  networks  constraints  filtering  insulation  rules  regulation  clayshirky  control  change  reform  school  schooling  policy  networkedlearning  administration  leadership  management  connectivism  21stcenturyskills  networking  learning2.0  future 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Fluid Learning | the human network
"What’s most interesting about the computer is how it puts paid to all of our cherished fantasies of control. The computer – or, most specifically, the global Internet connected to it – is ultimately disruptive, not just to the classroom learning experience, but to the entire rationale of the classroom, the school, the institution of learning. And if you believe this to be hyperbolic, this story will help to convince you." ... "In this near future world, students are the administrators. All of the administrative functions have been “pushed down” into a substrate of software. Education has evolved into something like a marketplace, where instructors “bid” to work with students."
education  learning  future  socialnetworking  curriculum  crowdsourcing  networkedlearning  connectivism  laptops  pedagogy  networks  control  administration  leadership  management  open  sharing  gamechanging  flattening  e-learning  web2.0  community  freelanceteaching  organization  lcproject  universities  colleges  markpesce 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Tarina - Teemu Arina’s blog on networked learning, knowlege and collaboration in organizations » Blog Archive » Subliminal pattern recognition and RSS readers
"This is exactly why those people who use RSS readers to scan through thousands of feeds, read blog posts from various decentrally connected sources and who engage themselves into assembling multiple unrelated sources of information into one (probing connections between them) have much greater ability to sense and respond to changing conditions in increasingly complex environments than those who read only the major newspapers, watch only the major news networks and don’t put themselves into a difficult situation of being hammered with a lot of stuff at once. Linear, intentional learning was how you learned in the past. Enter nonlinear, visually active way of learning of the future."
rss  overload  knowledge  networkedlearning  information  flow  generalists  filtering  stress  insight  teemuarina  learning  connections  gamechanging 
november 2008 by robertogreco
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