recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : networking   304

« earlier  
u n t h i n k i n g . p h o t o g r a p h y
"Unthinking Photography is an online resource that explores photography's increasingly automated, networked life."
photography  publishing  automation  networking  networks  online  web 
11 weeks ago by robertogreco
Paolo Pedercini 🌹 on Twitter: "An anti-battle royale / walking simulator in which you start with a group of friends in a small area and, as the circle expands, you gradually lose touch with them, too busy accumulating stuff and piecing together fragmen
"An anti-battle royale / walking simulator in which you start with a group of friends in a small area and, as the circle expands, you gradually lose touch with them, too busy accumulating stuff and piecing together fragments of a story that doesn't make any sense"
paolopedercini  scale  small  walking  understanding  2018  accumulation  socialmedia  networks  networking 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Are You Being Served? → Summit_afterlife.md
"A few months after “Are You Being Served?“ some of us met up in the Feminist Server Summit at Art Meets Radical Openness (AMRO <http://radical-openness.org>), ESC in Graz. The theme of this edition, Autonomy (im)possible sparked discussions on relationality, dependency and what that would mean for an (imaginary) Feminist Server. The following embryonic manifesto was written in response to these discussions.
A feminist server…

* Is a situated technology. She has a sense of context and considers herself to be part of an ecology of practices
* Is run for and by a community that cares enough for her in order to make her exist
* Builds on the materiality of software, hardware and the bodies gathered around it
* Opens herself to expose processes, tools, sources, habits, patterns
* Does not strive for seamlessness. Talk of transparency too often signals that something is being made invisible
* Avoids efficiency, ease-of-use, scalability and immediacy because they can be traps
* Knows that networking is actually an awkward, promiscuous and parasitic practice
* Is autonomous in the sense that she decides for her own dependencies
* Radically questions the conditions for serving and service; experiments with changing client-server relations where she can
* Treats network technology as part of a social reality
* Wants networks to be mutable and read-write accessible
* Does not confuse safety with security
* Takes the risk of exposing her insecurity
* Tries hard not to apologize when she is sometimes not available


Another version will be developed and presented at The Ministry of Hacking (ESC, Graz) <http://esc.mur.at/de/projekt/ministry-hacking>. You are welcome to contribute to this text through comments, rewriting, additions or erasure: <http://note.pad.constantvzw.org/public_pad/feministserver>."
via:caseygollan  feminism  servers  technology  ecology  community  software  hardware  materiality  efficiency  scalability  slow  small  immediacy  networking  autonomy  security  safety  readwrite  service  manifestos  context  sfsh  care  caring  transparency  open  openness 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Understanding Hillary: The Clinton America sees isn’t the Clinton colleagues know. Why are they so different?
"I don’t buy it. Other politicians find themselves under continuous assault, but their poll numbers strengthen amid campaigns. Barack Obama’s approval rating rose in the year of his reelection. So too did George W. Bush’s. And Bill Clinton’s. All three sustained attacks. All three endured opponents lobbing a mix of true and false accusations. But all three seemed boosted by running for the job — if anything, people preferred watching them campaign to watching them govern.

Hillary Clinton is just the opposite. There is something about her persona that seems uniquely vulnerable to campaigning; something is getting lost in the Gap. So as I interviewed Clinton's staffers, colleagues, friends, and foes, I began every discussion with some form of the same question: What is true about the Hillary Clinton you’ve worked with that doesn’t come through on the campaign trail?

The answers startled me in their consistency. Every single person brought up, in some way or another, the exact same quality they feel leads Clinton to excel in governance and struggle in campaigns. On the one hand, that makes my job as a reporter easy. There actually is an answer to the question. On the other hand, it makes my job as a writer harder: It isn’t a very satisfying answer to the question, at least not when you first hear it.

Hillary Clinton, they said over and over again, listens.

How a listener campaigns

“I love Bill Clinton,” says Tom Harkin, who served as senator from Iowa from 1985 to 2015. “But every time you talk to Bill, you’re just trying to get a word in edgewise. With Hillary, you’re in a meeting with her, and she really listens to you.”

The first few times I heard someone praise Clinton’s listening, I discounted it. After hearing it five, six, seven times, I got annoyed by it. What a gendered compliment: “She listens.” It sounds like a caricature of what we would say about a female politician.

But after hearing it 11, 12, 15 times, I began to take it seriously, ask more questions about it. And as I did, the Gap began to make more sense.

Modern presidential campaigns are built to reward people who are really, really good at talking. So imagine what a campaign feels like if you’re not entirely natural in front of big crowds. Imagine that you are constantly compared to your husband, one of the greatest campaign orators of all time; that you’ve been burned again and again after saying the wrong thing in public; that you’ve been told, for decades, that you come across as calculated and inauthentic on the stump. What would you do?"



"Laurie Rubiner, who served as Clinton’s legislative director from 2005 to 2008, recalls being asked to block out two hours on the calendar for “card-table time.” Rubiner had just started in Clinton’s office six weeks before, and she had no idea what card-table time was, but when the boss wants something put on the calendar, you do it.

When the appointed day arrived, Clinton had laid out two card tables alongside two huge suitcases. She opened the suitcases, and they were stuffed with newspaper clippings, position papers, random scraps of paper. Seeing the befuddled look on Rubiner’s face, Clinton asked, “Did anyone tell you what we’re doing here?”

It turned out that Clinton, in her travels, stuffed notes from her conversations and her reading into suitcases, and every few months she dumped the stray paper on the floor of her Senate office and picked through it with her staff. The card tables were for categorization: scraps of paper related to the environment went here, crumpled clippings related to military families there. These notes, Rubiner recalls, really did lead to legislation. Clinton took seriously the things she was told, the things she read, the things she saw. She made her team follow up.

Her process works the same way today. Multiple Clinton aides told me that the campaign’s plan to fight opiate addiction, the first and most comprehensive offered by any of the major candidates, was the direct result of Clinton hearing about the issue on her tour. “Her way of dealing with the stories she hears is not just to repeat the story but to do something about the story,” says John Podesta, the chair of Clinton’s campaign."



"One way of reading the Democratic primary is that it pitted an unusually pure male leadership style against an unusually pure female leadership style. Sanders is a great talker and a poor relationship builder. Clinton is a great relationship builder and a poor talker. In this case — the first time at the presidential level — the female leadership style won.

But that wasn’t how the primary was understood. Clinton’s endorsements left her excoriated as a tool of the establishment while Sanders's speeches left people marveling at his political skills. Thus was her core political strength reframed as a weakness.

I want to be very clear here. I’m not saying that anyone who opposed Clinton was sexist. Nor am I saying Clinton should have won. What I’m saying is that presidential campaigns are built to showcase the stereotypically male trait of standing in front of a room speaking confidently — and in ways that are pretty deep, that’s what we expect out of our presidential candidates. Campaigns built on charismatic oration feel legitimate in a way that campaigns built on deep relationships do not.

But here’s the thing about the particular skills Clinton used to capture the Democratic nomination: They are very, very relevant to the work of governing. And they are particularly relevant to the way Clinton governs.

In her book Why Presidents Fail, Brookings scholar Elaine Kamarck argues that "successful presidential leadership occurs when the president is able to put together and balance three sets of skills: policy, communication, and implementation."

The problem, Kamarck says, is that campaigns are built to test only one of those skills. “The obsession with communication — presidential talking and messaging — is a dangerous mirage of the media age, a delusion that inevitably comes crashing down in the face of government failure.”

Part of Kamarck’s argument is that presidential primaries used to be decided in the proverbial smoke-filled room — a room filled with political elites who knew the candidates personally, who had worked with them professionally, who had some sense of how they governed. It tested “the ability of one politician to form a coalition of equals in power.”

Hillary Clinton won the Democratic nomination by forming a coalition. And part of how she forms coalitions is by listening to her potential partners — both to figure out what they need and to build her relationships with them. This is not a skill all politicians possess.

As I began to press the people I talked to about why they brought up Clinton’s listening skills, a torrent of complaints about other politicians emerged. “The reason so many people comment on this is most of us have experienced working with people who are awful listeners,” says Sara Rosenbaum, who worked with Clinton on the 1994 health reform bill and is now at George Washington University. “Because they don’t listen, they can’t ask good questions. They can’t absorb the information you’ve given them.”"



"The danger of leading by listening

There is a downside to listening to everyone, to seeking rapport, to being inclusive, to obsessing over common ground. Clinton’s effort to find broad consensus can turn her speeches and policies into mush. Her interest in hearing diverse voices can end with her chasing down the leads of cranks and hacks. Her belief that the highest good in politics is getting something — at times, anything — done means she takes few lonely stands and occasionally cuts deals many of her supporters regret.

Clinton spent much of the primary defending herself against criticisms of deals her husband made and she supported — welfare reform and the crime bill, specifically. Her great failure, the 1994 health reform effort, unwound in part because she created a sprawling, unruly process in which hundreds of experts came together to write a bill no one understood and no one could explain."



"This is, in general, one of the frustrations you hear from Clintonites: Her network is massive, and particularly when her poll numbers flag, or she feels under attack, she reaches out into that vast, strange ecosystem. The stories of Clinton receiving a midnight email from an old friend and throwing her campaign into chaos are legion, and it was all the worse because she often wouldn’t admit that’s what was happening, and so her staff ended up arguing against a ghost.

In an exhaustive review of private communications from her 2008 campaign, Joshua Green wrote that “her advisers couldn’t execute strategy; they routinely attacked and undermined each other, and Clinton never forced a resolution.” Under duress, Clinton’s process broke down, and her management proved cumbersome, ineffective, and conducive to staff infighting.

“What is clear from the internal documents is that Clinton’s loss derived not from any specific decision she made but rather from the preponderance of the many she did not make,” Green concluded. “Her hesitancy and habit of avoiding hard choices exacted a price that eventually sank her chances at the presidency.”"



"Clinton laments how polarizing she is, but the fault lies at least partly with her. Asked at a Democratic debate to name the enemies she’s most proud of making, she replied, “The Republicans.” For all her talk of finding common ground, of reaching out, of respecting each other, she stood up, on national television, and said she’s proud of the enmity she inspires in roughly half the country.

I asked her if she regretted that statement, whether she thinks she’s feeding the negativity, becoming part of the problem. “Not very much,” she said. “I mean, you can go back and look at how I’ve worked with Republicans, and I … [more]
2016  hillaryclinton  politics  elections  listening  consensus  policy  billclinton  barackobama  governance  berniesanders  gender  coalitions  media  journalism  press  communication  networking  decisionmaking  relationships  implementation 
july 2016 by robertogreco
The Privatization of Childhood Play — Pacific Standard
"With playdates replacing free childhood play, it’s upper-class families who set the social norms — and working-class families who pay the price.

Kids used to play outside more. They would hopscotch through the streets, assembling games of stickball and breaking glass soda bottles for fun. Parents would tell their children to be home for dinner and then forget about them until dark.

That golden age of unstructured play was real — scholars place it in the second quarter of the 20th century — but the children who lived it are now senior citizens. If you’re currently alive, you probably played less than your parents did. Between 1981 and 1997, for example, six- to eight-year-olds lost 25 percent of their play time. We aren’t romanticizing some fictional American idyll — kids really are playing less today, even if you include video games. And for some kids, even play is now a regimented and supervised activity.

We live in an era of the playdate, when aspirational parenting means being your child’s agent and chauffeur. The idea of kids so busy they need adult secretaries to pencil in time with their friends is both silly and real. Take New York mom Tamara Mose: Her son and daughter’s weekly schedule includes piano, Kumon (a chic approach to private tutoring), taekwondo, regular tutoring, dance, and soccer. She’s lucky if she has time for a playdate.

Mose is a professor of sociology at Brooklyn College, and when one playdate connection turned into an invitation to deliver a talk about her first book, she became more interested in the repercussions of the phenomenon. Were other parents using playdates for professional networking? “I started noticing that I was gaining some kind of benefit through the playdate experience,” Mose tells me, “and I thought, ‘I wonder if this is a thing.’” The result is The Playdate: Parents, Children and the New Expectations of Play, a book-length study of playdate dynamics in New York City.

According to Mose, the biggest difference between simple play and an official playdate is that playdates are work. Playdates aren’t just scheduled, they’re prepared. They have expenses, and they can succeed or fail. A parent who serves the wrong kind of crunchy cheese snack could be jeopardizing their family’s place in the social hierarchy. Kids play, adults — or, more accurately, moms — make playdates.

The question at the heart of The Playdate is why do moms bother? The dates that Mose describes are labor-intensive and anxiety-ridden. A Pew analysis of time-use surveys found that average weekly hours of work for mothers increased slightly between 1965 and 2011 as a significant decrease in unpaid housework was offset by increases in waged work and childcare. Weekly maternal childcare hours increased from 10.2 to 13.5.

So what purposes, exactly, do playdates serve?

One explanation for the emergence of supervised play is that American parents got more serious about protecting their kids from harm. An evolutionary psychologist might point to declining birth rates and a historic shortage of back-up children. Death by unintentional injury for kids under 15 has fallen by more than half since the early 1970s; maybe the golden age of play was really a plague of parental negligence. Maybe playdates save little lives.

There might be some truth to the safety justification for playdates, but not much. Sociologist Annette Lareau coined the term “concerted cultivation” for the kind of parenting that involves a full schedule and constant oversight. Lareau contrasted concerted cultivation with the “natural growth” style, and found that both were class-linked, with upper- and upper-middle-class moms practicing the former, and working-class and poor moms the latter. It’s a pattern that Mose found in her research as well, with rich white moms setting the playdate standard. If concerted cultivation and playdate parenting were responsible for the drop in child-killing accidents, we would see a class division in the data.

In fact, childhood injury mortality has declined (in absolute terms) more in high-poverty counties than in low ones. Kid safety has more to do with general crime rates (child victimization is down across the board, from homicides to kidnappings to sexual assault) and with seatbelt-buckling than with helicopter parenting. “There’s never been a safer time to be a kid in America,” the Washington Post’s stats-based Wonkblog declared, and as automated cars replace human drivers things will only get safer.

Playdates, like other elements of the concerted-cultivation mode of parenting, are about a different kind of security. “Given the precarity of work in general — people are not working for companies for 20 or 30 years the way they used to — there’s this threat that the economy could crumble at any moment,” Mose says. “So what you find is there’s this learned fear that parents have for their children, because we don’t know what the economic situation is going to look like down the road.” Managing a child’s play schedule ensures they don’t pick up any bad influences that will steer them from the path to college and success on the job market.

Like royal marriages, concerted parents set up playdates that are socially advantageous, for the parents themselves and for their children’s imagined futures. “Parents are unsure of what is happening in terms of their children’s future, and we want [children] to be prepared, so we over-prepare them,” Mose says. “What we do in the playdate is create a play that is mediated at every level. And when it’s mediated at every level, parents think that they can determine which direction they’re leading their child, and maybe that offers them some type of security.”

As a social phenomenon, playdates are something like private schools. Wealthier parents remove their kids from public and sequester them somewhere with a guest list and a cover charge. Mose uses the term “enclosure” — when a public or common resource is fenced and privatized. Brooklyn developers brag about the borough’s diversity, but the parents Mose interviewed were using playdates to shield their kids from people who weren’t like them. The app MomCo even lets moms (a selfie is required for “gender verification”) search for suitable matches from their smartphones.

When wealthier people don’t use a public resource, it tends to degrade. Not because the rich hold things together, but because the government cares less about people who aren’t rich. This goes for the literal paving on streets, but also the symbolic space for unstructured childhood play. In 2014, South Carolina mother Debra Harrell was jailed for leaving her nine-year-old daughter in a park while she worked at a nearby McDonald’s. A Reason poll commissioned afterward found that average Americans don’t think kids should be allowed to do anything more independent than play in the front yard until they’re 12 years old. Natural growth parenting has been stigmatized and even criminalized.

Upper-class parenting practices that require a surplus of time, money, and private space set the standard for comparison. As a black mother routinely engaged in interracial playdates, Mose describes the pressure to make sure her children play the right way: “I always wanted to present as a decent black family because I know of the stereotypes out there about black families and black children,” she says. “So I always wanted to make sure my home was clean, I always wanted to make sure that appropriate food was being offered, and appropriate meaning organic or fruits and vegetables, not junky food or anything like that.” With professional connections and social prestige up for grabs, a playdate is not a game.

But, as Mose reminds me, there are also higher stakes. “We are reproducing inequality today through the enclosure of a playdate,” she says. “Through the privatization of play, we are reproducing inequality in our children.”"
children  play  society  playdates  parenting  malcolmharris  2016  inequality  history  tamaramose  race  class  us  networking  diversity  publicgood  publicresources 
may 2016 by robertogreco
WhatsApp Is How Facebook Will Dominate the World | WIRED
"HERE IN NORTH America, mobile Internet traffic is dominated by YouTube and Facebook. So says Sandvine, a company with an unusually good view of the world’s Internet activity. YouTube accounts for nearly 20 percent of all mobile traffic, and Facebook tops 16 percent.

This is what you’d expect. Streaming video from a service like YouTube eats up more network bandwidth than any other type of online application, and in recent years, our smartphones and wireless networks have matured to the point where watching video from a handheld device is a common thing. Facebook is a social networking service, and video is now a primary part of the way people use it.

But the situation elsewhere in the world may surprise you. Take Africa, for instance. In terms of mobile traffic, the continent’s most dominant service is a tool that many in the US haven’t even heard of: WhatsApp.

WhatsApp is the smartphone messaging app Facebook bought for about $22 billion last year, and according to Sandvine—which helps big ISPs monitor and manage all the bits moving across their networks—it accounts for nearly 11 percent of all traffic to and from mobile devices in Africa.

This shows just how popular WhatsApp is across the continent, in large part because it lets people exchange texts without paying big fees to carriers. And it shows that people are using the service for more than just texting. Like other messaging services, it’s a way of trading photos and videos, too. And this year, the company expanded the service so it can make Internet phone calls, echoing services like Skype. According to Dan Deeth—the author of a new report from Sandvine on Internet traffic trends—those high traffic numbers reflect a shift towards voice calling as well as photo and video sharing.

“It’s a mix,” he says. “The texting is the smallest part. Once you get into photos and sending videos to each other and voice calling, that’s when traffic really starts to creep up.”

[image]

Differences in Evolution

In a larger sense, this shows that the Internet is evolving differently in the developing world than it has here in the US. Because network and phone technologies aren’t as mature—and because people have less money to spend on tech—low-bandwidth messaging apps like WhatsApp have become a primary gateway onto the Internet as whole. In Africa, web browsing accounts for 22 percent of mobile traffic, about twice as much as WhatsApp. But no other individual service is even close to WhatsApp’s numbers. Not YouTube. Not BitTorrent. Not Facebook."

[via: "On what makes WhatsApp popular in low-income countries. But the piece overlooks stability. http://www.wired.com/2015/12/new-stats-show-whatsapp-is-how-facebook-will-dominate-the-world/ "
https://twitter.com/anxiaostudio/status/674604771177717761

"WhatsApp is stable and useable under very low/mixed bandwidth conditions. Unlike WeChat and Line it works well on small screens too."
https://twitter.com/anxiaostudio/status/674605226914000896

"Examples re WhatsApp: message queuing when you're offline; low bandwidth mode for voice calls (audio compression)" "@anxiaostudio Wow how do they optimize for the low bandwidth conditions?" https://twitter.com/judemwenda/status/674605980634783745 ""
https://twitter.com/anxiaostudio/status/674608959026675713

"The message queue in WhatsApp shouldn't be overlooked. Most messaging apps give you a permanent error when your note doesn't go through."
https://twitter.com/anxiaostudio/status/674609623236673536

"The little clock next to your note is an assurance from WhatsApp: we'll send this as soon as we can (i.e., you have a connection again)"
https://twitter.com/anxiaostudio/status/674609934135263233 ]
whatsapp  2015  facebook  messaging  mobile  phones  stability  bandwidth  usability  ux  applications  smartphones  connectivity  networking  communication  offline  voicecalls  compression  audiocompression 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Lagos Wide and Close Online
"An Interactive Journey into an Exploding City"

"Every day, hundreds of people start new lives in Lagos, Nigeria. This megacity is home to an estimated 13 million people who very survival depends on improvisation, networking, and risk-taking.

In 2001, architect Rem Koolhaas and filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak went to Lagos to document one of fastest growing cities in Africa. Based on research by the Harvard Project on the City, this website represents a unique engagement with an exploding city, capturing multiple perspectives of a volatile moment in its evolution.

In this interactive documentary film, the information has been organised according to distance. Loosely based on the trajectory of bus driver Olawole Busayo, it presents intimate encounters with the city and its people on the one hand, and a more removed perspective of Lagos on the other. In the one hour film, viewers join Busayo for his daily journey in the yellow minivan. Switch between a wide and a close view of Lagos and choose between three audio tracks: comments by Rem Koolhaas, conversations with Lagos citizens, or city sounds."



"This interactive documentary is an online adaptation of the DVD Lagos Wide & Close - An Interactive Journey into an Exploding City (2004). As one of the first interactive documentaries ever made, and a rare documentation of Lagos at a volatile moment in its evolution, we decided to make it available on the Internet in 2014.

The interactive film presents a selection of video and audio of Lagos recorded in 2001. It separates the distant – wide — and the intimate – close — views of the city enabling the viewer to switch between these perspectives interactively. Rather than following a dramatic storyline, it aims to bring the viewer close to the reality of what it means to live and work in Lagos, to move alongside bus driver Olawole Busayo and other Lagosians, and to delve into the city’s layered fabric, slowly making sense of the rules, the possibilities, and lifestyles of Lagos.

Increased bandwidth makes it now possible to play the two video channels and three audio channels in parallel online. The Lagos research project by Rem Koolhaas and The Harvard Project on the City, on which this interactive film is based, has not been published yet. With this online adaptation, we hope to provide a permanent and accessible resource for those interested in understanding Lagos and rapid urban growth.

The Explosive Growth of Lagos

Reliable statistics are not available, but based on UN reports and the Lagos city census, it is estimated that every day, hundreds of people start new lives in the African city of Lagos. As the largest port and commercial centre of Nigeria, it is now home to approximately 15 million people. This dangerous, polluted, and in many ways, dysfunctional city, has drainage problems, relentless traffic jams, and shortages of water and electricity, but is somehow working for those who move there to start new lives.

How and why does a city with so many problems continue to grow against all odds? In 2000, architect Rem Koolhaas decided to study Lagos in an attempt to understand the hidden logic that makes a “dysfunctional” city function. His research revealed a population’s unique ability to cope inventively with an urban landscape of disorder and to bring order into it. Lagosians have equipped their expanding metropolis with a finely meshed web of efficient self-organizing networks, challenging the dominant idea that “Lagos doesn’t work.”

Loosely based on the trajectories of bus driver Olawole Busayo, this interactive film provides a wide and a close perspective on an expanding city. In three separate audio tracks, it provides a glimpse of the lives of eight Lagos inhabitants, revealing the creative relationships they develop with their urban environment. In parallel to Busayo’s journey and interviews with Lagosians, Rem Koolhaas voices his reactions, interpretations, and changing attitudes towards Lagos during his five years of research.

Recording in 2001

In 2001, Rem Koolhaas invited filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak to help document his research in Lagos with the Harvard project on the City and photographer Edgar Cleijne. To present Lagos through the eyes of Koolhaas, Van der Haak created the documentary Lagos/Koolhaas that premiered in the International Documentary Festival Amsterdam and the Volksbühne in Berlin in the fall of 2002. As the title suggests, Lagos/Koolhaas is as much a portrait of the architect and his research methods as it is an image of the city of Lagos.

But another, more personal interpretation of the city was embedded in the 55 hours of material she shot with cinematographer Alexander Oey during their three trips to Nigeria — a collection of up-close encounters with the people of Lagos and a tracing of the paths and rhythms of their daily lives. If Koolhaas looked at the patterns of Lagos from afar and then zoomed in on the details, Van der Haak started from within letting personal encounters gradually reveal clues for deciphering the larger picture.

No Event No History

Because filming had long been prohibited in Nigeria, very few images of Lagos existed before 2001. This project involves an extended, chaotic and intimate engagement with a then hardly documented city, capturing multiple perspectives of a unique moment in its evolution, presenting experiences and observations, rather than a linear argument.

As one of the few contemporary records of a city that has been largely ignored by western media – with the exception of ‘news events’ like religious riots and military coups - this project is an invitation to look and listen to Lagos – at a moment in which the energy of change may reveal valuable insights into the uncontrollable forces of urbanization.

Credits

This project has been developed by documentary filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak and designer Silke Wawro in close collaboration with architect Rem Koolhaas, photographer Edgar Cleijne, and the Harvard Project on the City. The concept and scenario for Lagos Wide & Close was developed by Van der Haak and Wawro during a masterclass of the Sandberg Institute and Dutch Cultural Media Fund in 2003 and produced by Submarine. Most of the footage was originally shot in 2001/2002 by Alexander Oey for the linear documentary Lagos/Koolhaas (2002, 55 minutes), directed by Bregtje van der Haak and produced by Pieter van Huystee Film & TV in co-production with VPRO Television. Alexander Oey also edited Lagos Wide & Close. The soundscape was designed by Rik Meier."
lagos  nigeria  via:litheland  cities  interactive  urban  urbanism  storytelling  documentaries  improvisation  risktaking  networking  megacities  remkoolhaas  bregtjevanderhaak  africa  2001  olawolebusayo  soundscapes  2004  2014  edgarcleijne  silkewawro  rikmeier 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Open Garden
"Fixing the mobile Internet. Together.

More than 5 million people use Open Garden today. By joining Open Garden, you are joining forces to make the Internet better, faster and more reliable – for everyone, including yourself. Open Garden allows all devices (including smart phones, tablets, laptops and “wearables”) to work together and find the best connections at any time. The more people use it, the better it gets."
opensource  mesh  networking  internet  wifi  meshnetworks  meshnetworking  opengarden  connectivity 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Social Software Sundays #2 – The Evaporative Cooling Effect « Bumblebee Labs Blog
"The people who most want to meet people are the people who the least number of people want to meet. The people who are the most desperate to date are those who the least number of people want to date. The people who are the most eager to talk are the ones who the least number of people are interested in hearing. It is the ignorance of this fundamental principle that I see at the heart of so many failed social software designs. This is what I call the Evaporative Cooling problem and one I believe must absolutely be tackled head on by the designers of any communal gathering product unless they want to see their product descend into a squalid lump of mediocrity.

The Evaporative Cooling Effect is a term I learned from an excellent essay by Eliezer Yudowsky that describes a particular phenomena of group dynamics. It occurs when the most high value contributors to a community realize that the community is no longer serving their needs any more and so therefore, leave. When that happens, it drops the general quality of the community down such that the next most high value contributors now find the community underwhelming. Each layer of disappearances slowly reduces the average quality of the group until such a point that you reach the people who are so unskilled-and-unaware of it that they’re unable to tell that they’re part of a mediocre group.

Evaporative Cooling is a dynamic that can apply to both real world and online communities but the affordances of the Internet make it particularly susceptible to Evaporative Cooling. By looking at real world social structures, we can get some clues as to both what causes Evaporative Cooling and what are effective ways of preventing it."
community  design  networking  psychology  social  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  via:sha  eliezeryudowsky  communities  scale  size  2010 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Teaching in the Connected Learning Classroom | DML Hub
"This volume highlights compelling firsthand counter-narratives from educators engaged in solving an array of challenges in today’s classrooms. It draws together narratives from an inspiring group of educators within the National Writing Project—a collaborative network of instructors dedicated to enhancing student learning and effecting positive change—that contributes to our understanding of what “Digital Is” (DI). DI is a web community for practitioners with high levels of expertise and a deep commitment to engaging today's youth by fostering connections between their in- and out-of-school digital literacy practices. Furthermore, DI is about sharing experiences that offer visibility into the complexity of the everyday classroom, as well as the intelligence that the teaching profession demands.

The chapters in this volume represent a bold re-envisioning of what education can look like, as well as illustrate what it means to open the doors to youth culture and the promise that this work holds. While there are certainly similarities across these diverse narratives, the key is that they have taken a common set of design principles and applied them to their particular educational context. The examples aren't your typical approaches to the classroom; these educators are talking about integrating design principles into their living practice derived from cutting-edge research. We know from this research that forging learning opportunities between academic pursuits, youth’s digital interests, and peer culture is not only possible, but positions youth to adapt and thrive under the ever-shifting demands of the twenty-first century. We refer to this approach as the theory and practice of “connected learning,” which offers a set of design principles—further articulated by this group of educators—for how to meet the needs of students seeking coherence across the boundaries of school, out-of-school, and today’s workplace. Taken together, these narratives can be considered “working examples” that serve as models for how educators can leverage connected learning principles in making context-dependent decisions to better support their learners."

[From within: ]

“…Typically, publications about or for teachers highlight “best practices.” The buzzword-driven form of highlighting a superior approach, to me, ignores the cultural contexts in which teacher practices are developed. The best practice for my classroom is going to be different both from a classroom anywhere else and from my classroom a year down the road. Context drives practice. As such, this is not a how-to guide for connected learning or a collection of lesson plans. The pages that follow are, instead, meant to spur dialogue about how classroom practice can change and inspire educators to seek new pedagogical pathways forward…”

and

“…I remember distinctly thinking “those students are doing it wrong.” … I didn’t understand that I was naturally ascribing my own rules of use on a cultural practice that was not my own…As such “doing it wrong” is culturally constructed and important to remember when we think about how we will roll out sustained connected learning support for teachers nationally and globally.”

[See also: http://dmlcentral.net/blog/antero-garcia/teaching-connected-learning-classroom-new-report ]

[A Summary (source of those quotes): http://bwatwood.edublogs.org/2014/03/05/connected-learning/ ]

[PDF: http://dmlhub.net/sites/default/files/teaching-in-the-CL-classroom.pdf ]
anterogarcia  mimiito  connectedlearning  2014  bestpractices  teaching  pedagogy  emergentcurriculum  christinacantrill  daniellefilipiak  budhunt  cliffordlee  nicolemirra  cindyodonnell-allen  kyliepeppler  classideas  openstudioproject  tcsnmy  lcproject  interest-drivenlearning  learning  peer-supportedlearning  sharedpurpose  networking  production-centeredclassrooms  interest-basedlearning 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Mind Games Forever – The New Inquiry
"Gamification in social media turns out to be no different from Berne’s head games. Both use quantification to generate incentives that can supplant the receding master motive of intimacy. But Berne, and the generation of readers that bought into him, believed that all the games had to go if we were ever going to face up to ourselves. Today, the social-media game lets us push one another to more and more self-expression, as though info dumps were an approach to truth. Our demands for attention are no longer tactfully oblique; they are explicitly instrumental. On social ­media passive aggressiveness can show itself as open and honest aggression. At last, we can do away with the inconvenient codes of etiquette. Grove Press’s valiant crusade against censorship hasn’t been for naught.

Social media are a broad refinement of the self-help scam, offering not just texts but an entire interactive apparatus that can incite anxiety about the self while pretending to assuage it. Games People Play, like all self-help books, lets us pretend that our problems (which stem from having to relate to others) are generic and thus readily fixable with off-the-shelf solutions, while our virtues (all our own sole responsibility) are totally unique, not imbricated with our vices at all. Social media carry this further: By replacing presence with networking, and spontaneous interaction with preformatted expression, they purport to resolve the generic problems that beset us in social life, leaving us with a space in which we can’t help but elaborate our best self, in as much detail as we can muster. What is supposed to be special about us is precisely that which doesn’t admit the influence of others but that we can impose on others without shame or restraint. In practice, what that means is there is nothing special about us, and we can never shut up about it."
gamification  socialmedia  robhorning  2013  self-help  scams  presence  networking  interaction  spontaneity  influence  attention  etiquette  grovepress  ericberne  society  community  censorship  compulsivity  psychology  poppsychology  socialrecognition  games 
june 2013 by robertogreco
"Networked Norms: How Tech Startups and Teen Practices Challenge Organizational Boundaries"
"Building lifelong learners means instilling curiosity, but it also means helping people recognize how important it is that they continuously surround themselves by people that they can learn from. And what this means is that people need to learn how to connect to new people on a regular basis."
danahboyd  youth  social  networks  networking  learning  lifelonglearning  newness  freshness  curiosity  challenge  2013  cv  connectivism  connectivity 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Manufacturing Serendipity - Rand's Blog
This manufacturing serendipity business breaks down pretty much like this:

1. Go to places that are not your office (conferences, events, meetups, trains, etc)
2. Participate in things, learn things, and be generally game for new experiences
3. Meet interesting people in the process
4. Build relationships
5. Be generally awesome by helping the people you’ve met and doing good deeds with no expectation of a return
6. Repeat 1-5 hundreds of times

Following this process yields a weird and wonderful return on investment. But, like many investments that actually pay off, that return is poorly understood for three big reasons:

Reason #1: The true value of serendipity usually comes years down the line. …

Reason #2: It’s nearly impossible to measure the impact of serendipity. …

Reason #3: Attribution is almost always misplaced."
learning  crosspollination  relationships  randfishkin  2012  luck  networking  serendipity 
september 2012 by robertogreco
MediaShift . The Rise of Ad-Hoc Journalist Support Networks | PBS
"To remake journalism, we need to build new networks of resiliency for the future of news. When we talk about the journalistic resources we have lost in recent years we tend to focus almost exclusively on the number of jobs lost, not on the capacity of the entire field to fight for the First Amendment, protect each other and our reporting, and support experimentation and eventually sustainability. To the best of my knowledge, there has been no comprehensive effort to map the needs of the new journalism ecosystem in these terms. Perhaps now is the time."
press  firstamendment  freepress  solidarity  emergingnetworks  joshstearns  2012  via:robinsonmeyer  adhocjournalism  adhoc  collaboration  networking  networks  journalism 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Spatial Agency
"…a project that presents a new way of looking at how buildings & space can be produced. Moving away from architecture's traditional focus on the look and making of buildings, Spatial Agency proposes a much more expansive field of opportunities in which architects and non-architects can operate. It suggests other ways of doing architecture.

In the spirit of Cedric Price the project started with the belief that a building is not necessarily the best solution to a spatial problem. The project attempts to uncover a second history of architecture, one that moves sharply away from the figure of the architect as individual hero, & replaces it with a much more collaborative approach in which agents act with, & on behalf of, others.

In all the examples on this website, there is a transformative intent to make the status quo better, but the means are very varied, from activism to pedagogy, publications to networking, making stuff to making policy - all done in the name of empowering others…"
centerforurbanpedagogy  mockbee  santiagocirugeda  coophimmelblau  freeuniversity  hackitectura  teamzoo  yalebuildingproject  wuzhiqiao  wholeearthcatalog  colinward  urbanfarming  supertanker  self-organization  selforganization  raumlabor  victorpapanek  eziomazini  jaimelerner  iwb  cohousing  mikedavis  doorsofperception  johnthackara  teddycruz  buckminsterfuller  centerforlanduseinterpretation  atelierbow-wow  elemental  antfarm  ruralstudio  amo  collaborativeproduction  collaboration  networking  policy  holisticapproach  systemsthinking  systemsdesign  activism  spacialagency  jeremytill  tatjanaschneider  nishantawan  matterofconcern  brunolatour  transformativeintent  openstudioproject  lcproject  empowerment  via:cityofsound  cedricprice  resource  designthinking  database  urbanism  space  uk  design  research  architecture 
august 2012 by robertogreco
The FNF – Free Information, Free Culture, Free Society | The Free Network Foundation
"Who We Are

We are an organization committed to the tenets of free information, free culture, and free society.
We hold that advances in information technology provide humanity with the ability to effectively face global challenges.
We contend that our very ability to mobilize, organize, and bring about change depends on our ability to communicate.
We see that our ability to communicate is purchased from a handful of powerful entities.
We know that we cannot depend on these entities to support movement away from a status quo from which they are the beneficiaries.
We believe that access to a free network is a human right, and a necessary tool for environmental and social justice.

What We’re Doing

We envision communications infrastructure that is owned and operated cooperatively, by the whole of humanity, rather than by corporations and states.
We are using the power of peer-to-peer technologies to create a global network which is resistant to censorship and breakdown.
We promote free
innovation  cooperation  communications  socialjustice  humanrights  humanity  democracy  freesociety  freeculture  culure  society  information  opensource  open  free  networks  networking  mesh  freedom  network  pablovaronaborges  tyronegreenfield  charleswyble  isaacwilder 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Will Dropouts Save America? - NYTimes.com
"Classroom skills may put you at an advantage in the formal market, but in the informal market, street-smart skills and real-world networking are infinitely more important.

Yet our children grow up amid an echo chamber of voices telling them to get good grades, do well on their SATs, and spend an average of $45,000 on tuition — after accounting for scholarships — while taking on $23,000 in debt to get a private four-year college education."
entrepreneurship  dropouts  2011  business  education  unschooling  deschooling  startups  psychology  careers  highered  highereducation  michaelellsberg  networking  mentoring  learning  schooliness  schooling  failure  risktaking  jobs  work  grades  grading  standardizedtesting 
november 2011 by robertogreco
DIY Days – a roving conference for those who create
"DIY DAYS is a roving conference for those who create. Past stops have included Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston and Philadelphia. FREE to participants and organized by volunteers – DIY DAYS is about the accessibility of ideas, resources and networking that can enable storytellers to fund, create, distribute and sustain."
diy  conferences  free  losangeles  sanfrancisco  nomadic  creativity  glvo  classideas  sharing  networking  nyc  making  doing  diydays  media  community  roving  collaboration 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Submarine Cable Map
"The Submarine Cable Map is a free resource from TeleGeography. Data contained in this map is drawn from Global Bandwidth Research Service and is updated on a regular basis."
internet  maps  visualization  networking  networks  cables  submarinecables  mapping  2011 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Steve Jobs and the Rewards of Risk-Taking - NYTimes.com
"The academics identify five traits that are common to the disruptive innovators: questioning, experimenting, observing, associating and networking. Their bundle of characteristics echoes the ceaseless curiosity and willingness to take risks noted by other experts. Networking, Mr. Gregersen explains, is less about career-building relationships than a search for new ideas. Associating, he adds, is the ability to make idea-producing connections by linking concepts from different disciplines — intellectual mash-ups."
questioning  experimenting  experimentation  observation  observing  association  associating  networking  curiosity  disruptiveinnovation  stevejobs  2011  risktaking  tcsnmy  ideas  mashups  mashup  interdisciplinary  generalists  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  halgregersen 
september 2011 by robertogreco
United States Artists - Great Art Forms Here - Artist Fundraising & Advocacy
"United States Artists (USA's) mission is to invest in America's finest artists and illuminate the value of artists to society.<br />
Supporting outstanding artistic talent has been realized by the USA Fellows program over the past 5 years. By the end of 2009, 213 artists had been named USA Fellows, each receiving a grant of $50,000, for a total of direct investment in artists equalling $10,000,000. USA's investment funded new dances, poetry, films, theatrical productions, musical compositions, paintings, sculpture, and more. Worldwide audiences of all ages have encountered these stimulating new works in galleries, on stages, in print, and online."<br />
<br />
[via: http://www.unitedstatesartists.org/project/yucca_crater via Regine (wmmna)]
design  art  culture  networking  kickstarter  glvo  fundraising 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Customized Learning - The Slideshow | Education Rethink
Great set of slides from John T Spencer. Notes are forthcoming, but the slides should speak for themselves. These were for his Reform Symposium presentation in 2011. (I missed it, so I'm glad it put them online.)
johnspencer  teaching  learning  tcsnmy  differentiatedlearning  customization  self-directedlearning  student-centered  studentdirected  pedagogy  unschooling  deschooling  standards  mastery  presentations  classideas  networking  hierarchy  freedom  autonomy  projectbasedlearning  science  socialstudies  reading  writing  flexibility  choice  dialogue  relationships  conversation  assessment  metaphor  ownership  empowerment  fear  dialog  pbl 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Mindshare Los Angeles
"Mindshare LA is a monthly event where ~350 Angelenos gather for a night of inspiration and interaction. The cornerstone of the evening is a curated program of short, eclectic presentations. Over the years Mindshare has become a mecca for intellectuals, artists, scientists and other progressive characters to meet, broaden their perspective and expand their networks."

[via: http://boingboing.net/2010/08/17/mindshare-la-a-night.html via ªªhttp://www.diygradschool.com/2010/08/potential-diy-field-trip-mindshare-la.html ºº]
education  design  technology  science  art  losangeles  unschooling  deschooling  networking  lcproject  mindshare  meetups 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Unschooling Media: Participatory Practices among Progressive Homeschoolers [.pdf]
Just reencountered Vanessa Bertozzi's 2006 thesis through a post by Sandra Dodd, commented by David Friedman: http://unschooling.blogspot.com/2011/06/unschooling-media-participatory.html

"On the flipside of the technology debate, I experienced a moment of great academic pleasure when I received an email from Rob, an unschooling dad in California. He explained that he’d come across my links tagged “unschooling” in del.icio.us and he was curious about my research. We then went on to have a very fruitful interview."
vanessabertozzi  unschooling  homeschool  networking  del.icio.us  bookmarks  bookmarking  2006  lizettegreco  glvo  education  learning  networkedlearning  participatory  participatoryculture  grassroots  ego  cv  filetype:pdf  media:document 
june 2011 by robertogreco
What Really Keeps Poor People Poor | JonBischke.com
"Poverty is not deprivation. It is isolation. When the high school senior from the inner city doesn’t get into Harvard or Yale, she’s being isolated from the networks that could allow to reach the highest rungs of society. In all fairness, many people from impoverished communities have been able to access these networks in recent decades and it has lead to some of the greatest success stories of our time. [examples]…<br />
<br />
We live in an age where with a solid Internet connection and someone to guide you through the process of self-education (admittedly something many people don’t have) you can learn just about anything. Certainly enough to qualify for some of society’s highest-paid positions. But unfortunately that’s not enough…<br />
<br />
How do we instill in our less privileged youth an attitude and aptitude for rising up the ranks and meeting the people they need to meet Lois Weisberg-style, regardless of what university they happen to get into?"
education  culture  economics  networks  life  networking  unschooling  deschooling  access  learning  online  internet  web  society  disparity  inequality  lcproject  tcsnmy 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Practical Tips for Surviving Academic Life (Part One: The Early Years) - Brainstorm - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"2. Write down every idea you have, even if you suspect it might never be useful. Most won’t be, but some? Some will be more valuable than you might dream.

3. Contact people whose work you admire. Do this not to impress them, but instead to let them know them why you find their work important. Why not tell someone who you’re reading at the moment—someone whose work engages you on a serious level—that you’re enjoying (or at least provoked by) their research and perspective?…

4. Keep in touch with smart people and funny people. You’ll need them in your life no matter what they—or you—end up doing. Smart and funny people make even the worst day better. They are the best reward for survival.

5. Keep good notes. Keep track of the titles, authors, and dates of those books, articles, movies (or “films” if you’re that sort), songs, poems, art pieces, reviews—of anything that engages you—because otherwise you’ll spend ridiculous amounts of time trying to track them down."
learning  networkedlearning  networking  notetaking  cv  academia  via:lukeneff  admiration  remembering  memory  recordkeeping  people  howto  advice  work  sharing  etiquette 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Critical Technology: Networked and Open also means Collaborative
"This is what the Networked & Open PhD (NOPhD) is all about. It is about working w/ others in an open & collaborative way so everyone deepens their knowledge on a shared subject domain. The great part would be if everyone who is in the collaborative cohort aspired to develop a PhD level of knowing w/in the subject they share a passion. Due to the networked (& collaborative) aspect of NOPhD I believe a number of people in the cohort need to make it to PhD depth of knowing, otherwise it couldn't be considered networked. So I have faith & begin to encourage (& hopefully inspire) people around me (virtually & otherwise) who are interested in this pursuit of developing a deeper knowing of Folk Music & Dance. & those interested in pedagogy, technology & life-long learning; for I will be drawing on these skills & knowledge as I build upon this anchor subject.

So what exactly does this look like?…why don't I describe my week & how certain events fit into the networked & collaborative"
learning  phd  openphd  nophd  education  alternative  highereducation  networked  networking  open  openlearning  collaboration  collaborative 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Technology and the Whole Child - Practical Theory
"For years, in our schools, teachers have told students that school is preparation for real life - a statement that divorced the meaning of school from the lives kids led in that moment. With the research, creation and networking tools at our disposal, we have the ability to help students see that the lives they lead now have meaning and value, and that school can be a vital and vibrant part of that meaning. We can help students to see the powerful humanity that exists both within them and all around them. And technology can be an essential piece of how we teach and learn about that."
technology  education  wholechild  constructivism  chrislehmann  johndewey  humanism  networking  socialnetworking  socialmedia  socialnetworks  teaching  learning  schools  change  reform  edtech  policy  progressive  tcsnmy  unschooling  deschooling  realworld 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Humans Are The Routers
"Free communications is an essential human right. The 21st Century will be defined by the idea that no Government, no power shall ever block or filter the right of all men and women to communicate together again. It is my dream that within my lifetime that dictatorship shall be banished from this planet and unfiltered and true democracy shall flourish everywhere. It is time that our Faustian bargains with brutal dictators for short-term concerns end and a new covenant directly made with citizens everywhere seeking freedom will take its place. OpenMesh is a first step to help create a world where such a covenant can take hold in a world where brave people armed with new electronic tools can never be blocked or silenced ever again."
technology  internet  politics  social  networking  mesh  openmesh  connectivity  humanrights  access  government  communication  web  online  networks  openmeshproject  routers  wireless  wifi 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Conceptual art events, exhibitions, and collaborations - Set & Drift
"Set & Drift curates art and design exhibitions and events. We advocate interdisciplinary exchange and bring together a diverse network of international artists, designers, and craftsmen.

We are modern storytellers. We create scenarios to showcase the ideas and work of creatives through nontraditional formats and venues. Blurring established boundaries, we use the many curious expressions of art and design to introduce something unexpected into the everyday experience. We believe this sparks conversations that inspire cultural innovation.

The name Set & Drift originates from terms for the speed and direction of the current under a sailing ship. We navigate the cultural landscape, inviting the unforeseen to carry us to sought-after uncharted territories."
art  sandiego  design  glvo  networking 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Chile’s Grand Innovation Experiment
"All government-sponsored tech-cluster efforts either have failed or are on life support. That’s because they all used the wrong ingredients. It isn’t real estate, universities, or VCs that make innovation happen; it is entrepreneurs. To create a tech center like SV, you need to first attract smart entrepreneurs…Then you have to create entrepreneurial networks; instill a spirit of risk-taking & openness; & build mentoring systems. You also need to provide seed financing to startups. The money is easy; everything else requires a change in culture that usually takes decades.<br />
<br />
But Chile is trying a radical new experiment that I helped conceive, to short-circuit this process. It is importing entrepreneurs from all over the world, by offering them $40,000 to bootstrap in Chile. They get a visa; free office space; assistance w/ networking, mentoring, fundraising, & connecting to potential customers and partners. All the entrepreneurs have to do, in return, is commit to working hard…"
chile  startup  innovation  technology  internet  start-upchile  techcrunch  incubator  entrepreneurship  funding  networking 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Seb's Open Research: How to Become a Culture Hacker (in 5 min.)
"Culture is a shared pattern among a group of people. It's a set of habits that defines the way we view things and the way that we relate to one another. In an organization, culture is the social infrastructure… Culture is the operating system of society."

"I. Observe.
II. Find the crack.
III. Make art. *Openly.
IV. Find the others. (Make no compromise.)
V. Catalyze.
VI. Exploit language.
VII. Institutionalize.
VIII. Let go.
IX. Go back to I.

All along, keep searching for people you can look up to. ["To keep looking for people who are better than you are…people who will see bullshit and call it for what it is and act accordingly. You want to look for people who make you feel uncomfortable, who challenge you, people who have something to teach you."]"
culture  sebpaquet  art  change  social  innovation  glvo  gamechanging  hacking  hackticism  hackers  hackerculture  culturehacking  networking  networks  catalysis  creativity  evolution  socialnetworks  language  preneuriatdurabiliste  preneuriat  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Edmodo | Secure Social Learning Network for Teachers and Students
"Edmodo is a social learning network for teachers, students, schools and districts.

Edmodo is accessible online or using any mobile device, including DROID and iPhones.

Edmodo provides free classroom communication for teachers, students and administrators on a secure social network.

Edmodo provides teachers and students with a secure and easy way to post classroom materials, share links and videos, and access homework, grades and school notices.

Edmodo stores and shares all forms of digital content – blogs, links, pictures, video, documents, presentations, and more."
via:cburell  education  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  classroom  collaboration  edtech  e-learning  networking  students  teachers  technology  twitter  elearning  communication  ict  microblogging  blogging  classrooms 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The Secret of Successful Entrepreneurs | Wired Science | Wired.com
"Business people with entropic networks were three times more innovative than people with predictable networks. Because they interacted with lots of different folks, they were exposed to a much wider range of ideas and “non-redundant information”. Instead of getting stuck in the rut of conformity—thinking the same tired thoughts as everyone else—they were able to invent startling new concepts... And this returns us to meritocracy. It’s not enough to simply take the smartest kids and make them smarter. What’s just as important is teaching these young people to seek out strangers, to resist the tug of self-similarity and homogenization. Diversity can seem like a such a vague and wishy-washy aspiration, but it comes with measurable benefits. To the extent our meritocratic institutions diminish our social diversity—are your college buddies just like you?—they might actually make us less likely to succeed. Perhaps Bill Gates knew what he was doing when he dropped out of Harvard."
diversity  entrepreneurship  management  success  sociology  startups  psychology  networking  business  creativity  jonahlehrer  interdisciplinary  looseties  homogeneity  crosspollination  networks  scoialnetworks  tcsnmy  toshare  strangers  topost  harvard  meritocracy  martinruef  michaelmorris  paulingram  bias  culture 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Why Dunbar's Number is Irrelevant | Social Media Today
"I recently finished reading Morten Hansen's fantastic book on Collaboration in which he states that the real value of collaboration and of networks doesn't come from strong relationships and networks but from weak one's. In fact one of Morten's network rules is actually “build weak ties, not strong ones.” According to Morten:
dunbar  dunbarnumber  collaboration  socialmedia  sociology  networks  weakties  strongties  relationships  pln  knowledge  sharing  networking  mortenhansen 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Why Dunbar's Number is Irrelevant | Social Media Today
"I recently finished reading Morten Hansen's fantastic book on Collaboration in which he states that the real value of collaboration and of networks doesn't come from strong relationships and networks but from weak one's. In fact one of Morten's network rules is actually “build weak ties, not strong ones.” According to Morten:

“But research shows that weak ties can prove much more helpful in networking, because they form bridges to worlds we do not walk within. Strong ties, on the other hand, tend to be worlds we already know; a good friends often knows many of the same people and things we know. They are not the best when it comes to searching for new jobs, ideas, experts, and knowledge. Weak ties re also good because they take less time. It's less time consuming to talk to someone once a month (weak tie) than twice a week (a strong tie). People can keep up quite a few weak ties without them being a burden.”"
dunbar  dunbarnumber  collaboration  socialmedia  sociology  networks  weakties  strongties  relationships  pln  knowledge  sharing  networking  mortenhansen 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Growing the Movement - Practical Theory
"let's start 1,000 EduCons all over country...network the events...aggregate ideas. And, in the words of Arlo Guthrie, "Friends, they may call it a movement."
change  chrislehmann  database  education  educon  technology  web2.0  unconferences  todo  conferences  networking  teaching  schools  gamechanging  tcsnmy  lcproject 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Personal Learning Ecologies - 2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning
"Families look outside the traditional “system” to create ecologies of learning experiences. Families will leverage the emerging learning economy to cultivate their own ecologies of learning resources. School will be part of this ecology, but it will play different roles for different families, and it won’t be the only player in the wider learning ecosystem.
education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  homeschool  future  schools  networkedlearning  networking  lcproject  tcsnmy 
april 2010 by robertogreco
GAFFTA – Creative Spaces and Innovation
"Reflecting on role of creative spaces for their innovations, they proposed 3 types of spaces: mindset (brain space), location & work environment (physical space), & network (virtual space). They described how each of these played a pivotal role in facilitating their projects: how the lack of privacy had occasionally fueled tensions between residents but also forced everyone to – literally – listen to other ideas; how the lack of boundaries between work & life had surfaced a growing quest for “meaning” in what you do; how “curiosity, risk-taking, & challenging the status quo” had been the key requirements for a fully immersive experience (& how some of the residents weren’t able to cope with these demands). They stressed that scarcity (space & time limits) had propelled intimacy & urgency & thus increased output intensity, & that in the face of the abundance of information & social connections on the web the experience of face-to-face collaboration had changed their concept of work."
palomar5  space  creativity  tcsnmy  schooldesign  lcproject  coworking  sharing  trust  mindset  virtual  networking  networks  immersion  privacy  work  life  gaffta  innovation 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Weblogg-ed » Opportunity, Not Threat
"Most parents think their kids schools are doing just fine based on the assessment systems we currently have in place...see the traditional track from HS to college as success...are ok with “online courses” & can use them to check the technology box since they don’t radically disrupt the status quo...have no clue as to what that change they might be sensing really looks like. They don’t, as Jim Groom writes, see education as “the biggest sham going.”...
willrichardson  unschooling  deschooling  change  parenting  tcsnmy  learning  schools  technology  networking  lcproject  reform  gamechanging 
april 2010 by robertogreco
cnewmark: Trust and reputation systems: redistributing power and influence
"In real life, personal networks are pretty small, maybe in the hundreds. Mass media plays a role in shaping reputation for a small number of people, including celebrities and politicians. A very small number of people have influence in this environment.

* people tend to work with each other
* people are normally trustworthy
* despite their large media footprint, there aren't many bad guys out there
* message spreads quickly
* message is persistent, it's there forever
* connectivity is increasingly pervasive
* people are finding that reputation and recommendation systems can be used to drive a lot of profit.

Okay, so we want to be able to see who we might be able to trust, maybe by seeing some explicit measurement, or maybe something implicit, like seeing their history, and who trusts them."
via:hrheingold  media  network  reputation  networking  networks  trust  twitter  blogging  business  community  craignewmark  craigslist  internet  influence  socialnetworking  socialmedia  behavior  culture  future  identity  communication  making  social 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Trends in Ed, 2.18.10 | EdLab - Math sees a future with web 2.0
"Is it a match made in Heaven? According to Maria Droujkova, developer of Natural Math and Math 2.0, it is! Droujikova saw the need for math to catch up to other subjects with regards to web 2.0 communities. Her response was to create math programs in which learning takes place within communities and networks-- a mashup between traditional math practices and social networking. This has given birth to the concept of social math:"
math  teaching  learning  education  tcsnmy  collaborative  networking  social  authoring  community  psychology  scratch  geogebra  danmeyer  wcydwt  xkcd  youtube  manyeyes  flickr  voicethread  problemsolving  instructables 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Teaching in Social and Technological Networks « Connectivism
"social & technological networks subvert the classroom-based role of the teacher. Networks thin classroom walls. Experts are no longer “out there” or “over there”. Skype brings anyone, from anywhere, into a classroom. Students are not confined to interacting with only the ideas of a researcher or theorist...The largely unitary voice of the traditional teacher is fragmented by the limitless conversation opportunities available in networks. When learners have control of the tools of conversation, they also control the conversations in which they choose to engage. Course content is similarly fragmented. The textbook is now augmented with YouTube videos, online articles, simulations, Second Life builds, virtual museums, Diigo content trails, StumpleUpon reflections, and so on...The following are roles teacher play in networked learning environments: 1. Amplifying 2. Curating 3. Wayfinding and socially-driven sensemaking 4. Aggregating 5. Filtering 6. Modelling 7. Persistent presence"
connectivism  teaching  learning  technology  education  networking  socialmedia  georgesiemens  wayfinding  unschooling  deschooling  networkedlearning  tcsnmy  lcproject  curation  filtering  modeling  sensemaking  cv  amplifying  content  textbooks  pedagogy  21stcenturylearning  openeducation  highereducation  networks  e-learning  elearning  apprenticeships  teacherasmasterlearner 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Some ditch social networks to reclaim time, privacy - USATODAY.com
"As the social networking train gathers momentum, some riders are getting off.

Their reasons run the gamut from being besieged by online "friends" who aren't really friends to lingering concerns over where their messages and photos might materialize. If there's a common theme to their exodus, it's the nagging sense that a time-sucking habit was taking the "real" out of life."
facebook  exodus  twitter  flickr  socialmedia  privacy  fatigue  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  networking  linkedin  overload  technology  social 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Urgent Evoke - A crash course in changing the world.
"EVOKE is an online game designed to teach collaboration, creativity, knowledge networking, entrepreneurship, courage, resourcefulness, sustainability, and vision."
games  gaming  arg  janmcgonigal  collaboration  creativity  knowledge  networking  entrepreneurship  courage  resourcefulness  sustainability  vision  africa  janemcgonigal  argentina 
february 2010 by robertogreco
On the iPad and Networked Books | varnelis.net
"Not only that, I had hoped that iWork might be rewritten as a set of tools that would allow easy construction of media-rich books for the iPad, but that didn’t happen. So much for the Netlab’s next book being on the iPad (a crazy thought I had).
ipad  kazysvarnelis  networking  socialnetworks  closed  open  apple  coursesmart  extbooks  books  newmedia  future  iwork  contentcreation 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Joho the Blog » The iPad is the future of the past of books
"The iPad definitely ups the Kindle’s ante. Unfortunately, it ups the Kindle ante by making an e-book more like a television set. Will it do well? I dunno. Probably. But is it the future of reading? Nope. It’s the high-def, full-color, animated version of the past of reading. The future of reading is social. The future of reading blurs reading and writing. The future of reading is the networking of readers, writers, content, comments, and metadata, all in one continuous-on mash."
via:preoccupations  kindle  ipad  creativity  apple  consumption  ebooks  2010  books  reading  writing  contentcreation  commenting  metadata  readwriteweb  networking 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Harold Jarche » Learning socially and being social
“@BFchirpy “The killer learning management system is the Web – silly” [in case anyone is still wondering]” ... "Are we too professional: has professionalism gone too far?" ... "Great slide presentation by @sachac on how to be a shy connector – Shows that it’s not necessary to behave like arrogant self-aggrandizing jerks"
learning  education  professionalism  haroldjarche  self-promotion  introverts  presentations  networking  socialnetworking  tcsnmy  shyness  ples  lms 
january 2010 by robertogreco
ongoing · After Branding
So much great advice. I'm highlighting this one because I was just warning a friend about the same a few days ago. "8. Do not invest any time or money with anyone whose title, or company name, includes the words “Search Engine” or the abbreviations “SEO” or “SEM”. While one hears that there are a few honest souls out there, lots are just looking for sheep to fleece; don’t be one.
design  culture  homepage  socialnetworking  identity  networking  reputation  presence  business  web  webdev  blogging  marketing  spelling  personal-branding  timbray  internet  branding  seo  sem  flash  glvo  via:cburell  webdesign 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Queen Street Studios
"QSS is a hub for artistic excellence, committed to the growth and success of the creative community in Nova Scotia. It is a place where social and creative minds come together to share ideas, resources and employment opportunities. We provide you with...

A working space, photo studio, meeting place, event venue and a public art space... A network, web presence, professional development, collective learning and a spirit of collaboration..."
novascotia  coworking  thirdplaces  lcproject  tcsnmy  collectivelearning  collaboration  networking  dartmouth  thirdspaces 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Social Networking: Rethinking Productivity [via: http://www.downes.ca/cgi-bin/page.cgi?post=50870]
"[Drawback] 2. Social resistance to change: Active social networking opens you up to being heavily influenced by others. In a way it subjects you to a new form of social conditioning. Once your network knows you a certain way, it may resist some of your attempts to grow and change."
socialnetworking  networking  socialmedia  productivity  life  groupthink  gamechanging  peerpressure  socialconditioning  stagnation 
november 2009 by robertogreco
On Twitter and in the Workplace, It's Power to the Connectors - Rosabeth Moss Kanter - HarvardBusiness.org
"Today, people with power & influence derive their power from their centrality w/in self-organizing networks that might or might not correspond to any plan on the part of designated leaders. Organization structure in vanguard companies involves multi-directional responsibilities, w/ an increasing emphasis on horizontal relationships rather than vertical reporting as the center of action that shapes daily tasks and one's portfolio of projects, in order to focus on serving customers & society. Circles of influence replace chains of command, as in the councils & boards at Cisco which draw from many levels to drive new strategies. Distributed leadership — consisting of many ears to the ground in many places — is more effective than centralized or concentrated leadership. Fewer people act as power-holders monopolizing information or decision-making, and more people serve as integrators using relationships and persuasion to get things done"

[via: http://metacool.typepad.com/metacool/2009/11/circles-of-influence.html ]
business  collaboration  socialmedia  connectors  social  media  networking  socialnetworking  networks  hierarchy  careers  leadership  management  administration  twitter  enterprise2.0  influence  organizations  communications  power 
november 2009 by robertogreco
The Science of Success - The Atlantic (December 2009)
"Most of us have genes that make us as hardy as dandelions: able to take root and survive almost anywhere. A few of us, however, are more like the orchid: fragile and fickle, but capable of blooming spectacularly if given greenhouse care. So holds a provocative new theory of genetics, which asserts that the very genes that give us the most trouble as a species, causing behaviors that are self-destructive and antisocial, also underlie humankind’s phenomenal adaptability and evolutionary success. With a bad environment and poor parenting, orchid children can end up depressed, drug-addicted, or in jail—but with the right environment and good parenting, they can grow up to be society’s most creative, successful, and happy people."
education  psychology  science  research  environment  parenting  behavior  relationships  intelligence  evolution  depression  aspergers  genes  nurture  nature  development  networking  success  genetics 
november 2009 by robertogreco
on battle suits | varnelis.net
"my fear is that some theorists have argued against critique and self-reflection for so long that a new generation doesn't even have an inkling of how to practice it. I don't mean we should head back to the early 1990s, but just as intelligent thinkers like Matt Jones can recapture Archigram as a model, I hope that we can recapture critique as well."
networkculture  archigram  urbanism  postmodernism  architecture  culture  technology  urbancomputing  pompidou  ubicomp  paris  critique  networking  berg  berglondon  mattjones 
october 2009 by robertogreco
RSS never blocks you or goes down: why social networks need to be decentralized - O'Reilly Radar
"Recurring outages on major networking sites such as Twitter and LinkedIn, along with incidents where Twitter members were mysteriously dropped for days at a time, have led many people to challenge the centralized control exerted by companies running social networks. Whether you're a street demonstrator or a business analyst, you may well have come to depend on Twitter. We may have been willing to build our virtual houses on shaky foundations might when they were temporary beach huts; but now we need to examine the ground on which many are proposing to build our virtual shopping malls and even our virtual federal offices."
rss  socialnetworks  collaboration  decentralized  networking  networks  decentralization  socialnetworking  socialmedia  open  feeds  twitter  facebook  internet  distributed  rsscloud  syndication 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Digital Youth Network: Empowering Youth Through Media
"Digital Youth Network gives students tools to be engaged, articulate, critical and collaborative. Facilitate the ability to become creators – designers, builders & innovators – who can envision new possibilities."

[login here: http://rw.iremix.org/login ]
[via: http://www.edutopia.org/digital-generation-youth-network-literacy ]
education  technology  schools  socialnetworking  children  teens  youth  remixworld  literacy  media  edtech  ning  networking  sharing  writing  video  music  social  remix  digitalyouthnetwork  tcsnmy  internet  online  web  chicago  learning  digitalmedia  lcproject 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Kickstarter
"Kickstarter is a funding platform for artists, designers, filmmakers, musicians, journalists, inventors, bloggers, explorers..."
glvo  funding  fundraising  art  creativity  design  entrepreneurship  crowdsourcing  vc  socialsoftware  money  networking  community  music  projects  kickstarter 
june 2009 by robertogreco
BookArmy
"Bookarmy is a social networking website for every sort of reader. Whether you’re a bookaholic or someone who picks up a book only once a year while relaxing on holiday, bookarmy is the place to discuss and review books, build reading lists, get the best book recommendations, and where you and your friends, family or classmates can read books together.
books  socialnetworking  networking  bookarmy  community  recommendations  reading 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Is There a Reverse Network Effect with Scale? - ReadWriteWeb
"Here is the theory:

In a social network, the value for existing users of a new user joining the network plateaus once users have most of their own contacts in that network."
facebook  socialmedia  socialnetworking  networking  behavior  myspace  linkedin  readwriteweb  business  twitter  media  networkeffect 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Two-player Network Pong Guide - Scratch Connections
"This is a guide to help you through setting up your first multiplayer networked Scratch game on Mac OS X computers. This demo utilizes the new remote sensor connection functionality in Scratch to allow two people on two computers to play Pong with two Scratch Boards. We will use a program written in the Python language to pass data through network sockets. The mechanics of the communication system I will describe here is the same as the one used by most Massively Multiplayer Online games today."
edg  scratch  networking  coding  programming  tcsnmy  projectideas 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Scratchtweet - Scratch Connections
"Scratchtweet is a bare-bones program that allows a Scratch project to send tweet updates to Twitter.com via a small Python program that accesses the Twitter API while also communicating with Scratch through its external sensors. This is a simple program that you can build on to do other cool things with twitter."
scratch  twitter  python  networking  edg  via:blackbeltjones 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Thanks for the Add. Now Help Me with My Homework - News Features & Releases
"If teachers are going to successfully build those connections, Greenhow suggests, they must take a page from social networking sites themselves and allow student to take an active part in the discussion. "The more we understand about what motivates and engages youth to use these technologies in their everyday lives," she says, "the more we will be able to build on what they are learning in school, so they are developing the 21st century competencies that we value, and colearning or coconstructing their own educational experience.""
teaching  schools  online  internet  socialnetworking  edtech  socialsoftware  facebook  research  literacy  networking  learning  education  socialmedia 
march 2009 by robertogreco
The size of social networks | Primates on Facebook | The Economist
"average number of “friends” in a Facebook network is 120, consistent with Dr Dunbar’s hypothesis ... But the range is large, and some people have networks numbering more than 500 ... What also struck Dr Marlow, however, was that the number of people on an individual’s friend list with whom he (or she) frequently interacts is remarkably small and stable. The more “active” or intimate the interaction, the smaller and more stable the group. ... What mainly goes up ... is not the core network but the number of casual contacts that people track more passively. This corroborates Dr Marsden’s ideas about core networks, since even those Facebook users with the most friends communicate only with a relatively small number of them"
via:preoccupations  socialnetworks  dunbarnumber  psychology  socialnetworking  facebook  sociology  anthropology  analytics  dunbar  socialmedia  networking  socialsoftware  culture  internet  social  web  community  networks  people 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Refreshing Cities: design, technology, usability, and standards
"Refresh is a community of designers and developers working to refresh the creative, technical, and professional culture of New Media endeavors in their areas. Promoting design, technology, usability, and standards."
design  cities  sandiego  technology  culture  web  development  social  media  webdesign  usability  collaboration  networking  local  accessibility  developers  organization  creative  standards  webstandards  webdev 
february 2009 by robertogreco
WikiDashboard - Providing social transparency to Wikipedia
"The idea is that if we provide social transparency and enable attribution of work to individual workers in Wikipedia, then this will eventually result in increased credibility and trust in the page content, and therefore higher levels of trust in Wikipedia." ... "While tongue-in-cheek, it brings up a valid point. Because the information is out there for anyone to examine and to question, incorrect information can be fixed and two disputed points of view can be listed side-by-side. In fact, this is precisely the academic process for ascertaining the truth. Scholars publish papers so that theories can be put forth and debated, facts can be examined, and ideas challenged. Without publication and without social transparency of attribution of ideas and facts to individual researchers, there would be no scientific progress."
tcsnmy  wikipedia  transparency  collaboration  wikis  complexity  authority  visualization  networking  socialsoftware  analysis  wikidashboard  reference  research  credibility 
february 2009 by robertogreco
M-Lab | Welcome to Measurement Lab
"Measurement Lab (M-Lab) is an open platform for researchers to deploy Internet measurement tools. By enhancing Internet transparency, we aim to help sustain a healthy, innovative Internet."
internet  performance  via:preoccupations  broadband  isp  netneutrality  bandwidth  monitoring  security  analysis  analytics  neutrality  bittorrent  traffic  testing  networking  tools  sysadmin  google 
january 2009 by robertogreco
History of the Internet - Motiongraphics Documentary - lonja – Melih Bilgil – Motion Design
""History of the internet" is an animated documentary explaining the inventions from time-sharing to file-sharing, from arpanet to internet. The history is told with help of the PICOL icons, which are also a part of my diploma. The icons are soon available for free on picol.org" Also on Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/2696386
documentary  visualization  video  motiongraphics  arpanet  history  internet  computing  reference  networking 
january 2009 by robertogreco
The Future of Libraries as Places | The Institute For The Future
"So libraries are more popular than ever. Another unanticipated outcome of the end of cyberspace. But what's most interesting is just how different the activities of these 21st century undergrads are from what I used to do in libraries during the 1990s. Whereas most of my peers looked to libraries as a place of solace and quiet focus, for these students they are intensely collaborative spaces.
libraries  future  change  lcproject  iftf  anthonytownsend  culture  books  learningspaces  community  collaboration  meetingplace  thirdplaces  networking  architecture  via:preoccupations  coworking 
january 2009 by robertogreco
ed4wb » Insulat-Ed
Applying Clay Shirky: "A scribe [school], someone [an institution] who has given his life over [whose mission is] to literacy [education] as a cardinal virtue, would be conflicted about the meaning of movable type [free-forming educational networks]. After all, if books [information/teachers/experts] are good, then surely more books [information/teachers/experts] are better. But at the same time the very scarcity of literacy [information/teachers/experts] was what gave scribal [school/institutional] effort its primacy, and the scribal [school/institutional] way of life was based on this scarcity. Now the scribe’s [institution’s/school’s] skills [information/teachers/expertise] were [are] eminently replaceable, and his [its] function–making copies of books [educating]–was [is] better accomplished by ignoring tradition than by embracing it.” (p. 67)
education  learning  tcsnmy  networks  constraints  filtering  insulation  rules  regulation  clayshirky  control  change  reform  school  schooling  policy  networkedlearning  administration  leadership  management  connectivism  21stcenturyskills  networking  learning2.0  future 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Planning to Share versus Just Sharing at EdTechPost
"Contrast this with these formal initiatives to network “organizations.” In my experience, these start with meetings in which people first agree that sharing is a good idea, and then follow up meetings to decide what they might share, then, somewhere way down the line, some sharing might happen. The whole time, some of the parts of a network are already present and could have just started sharing what they have, heck they could have started before ever meeting, even WITHOUT ever meeting, but this never happens. (I say part, because if it’s a network it will grow to include many others not in any intial group.)"
education  learning  networking  sharing  blogging  knowledge  bestpractice  institutions  organizations  collaboration  community  control  deschooling  lcproject  administration  management  collaborative  meetings  schools  leadership  ples  tcsnmy  open  networks  transparency  bureaucracy  decisionmaking  fear  safety  unintendedconsequences  obsolescence  workplace  gamechanging  self-preservation 
december 2008 by robertogreco
ed4wb » Blog Archive » Institutions as Barriers, Organizations as Enablers
"Schools’ automatic immune response has been to try to control the ELN by creating boundaries & regulations aimed at “protecting” the institution & those within it...need to protect itself from obsolescence, thus bureaucracy in charge of creating rules & regulations...This type of safety net rests on top of the institution’s members–not under them, preventing a free flow of potentially useful information. In an age when the tools for sharing, collaboration, and collective action are ubiquitous and dirt cheap, a controlling paradigm can be quite limiting and counter-productive." ... "PLNs & ELNs function best when they form organically–not due to decree or lengthy planning; when they can tap into the power of disparate voices–often found outside of the institution; are need-driven, amorphous, self-organizing, self-policing, fluid, permeable & control-wary. In other words, when they are given access to everything schools pretty much hate."
education  learning  networking  sharing  blogging  knowledge  bestpractice  institutions  organizations  collaboration  community  control  deschooling  lcproject  administration  management  collaborative  meetings  schools  leadership  ples  tcsnmy  clayshirky  open  networks  transparency  bureaucracy  decisionmaking  fear  safety  unintendedconsequences  obsolescence  workplace  gamechanging  self-preservation 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Cognitive Edge - We just forgot about it for a while
"She quoted Alan Webber of Fast Company who said: What’s new about the new economy is that work is conversation. Partly in order to provide continuity, but also as a part of a general theme I am developing that social computing takes on the form of an older oral tradition, I added my own codicil: It always has been, we just forgot about it for a while. This is important, its not that social computing creating some completely new form of human interaction, what it has done is to enable conversations across barriers and boundaries. We can now be a global tribe (or rather tribes), if we can make the changes that the technology permits. Given some of the conversations that ensued from my brief polemic on IT departments that change may not be easy!"
conversation  networking  socialnetworking  it  work  via:preoccupations 
december 2008 by robertogreco
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read