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Method of loci - Wikipedia
"'the method of loci', an imaginal technique known to the ancient Greeks and Romans and described by Yates (1966) in her book The Art of Memory as well as by Luria (1969). In this technique the subject memorizes the layout of some building, or the arrangement of shops on a street, or any geographical entity which is composed of a number of discrete loci. When desiring to remember a set of items the subject literally 'walks' through these loci and commits an item to each one by forming an image between the item and any distinguishing feature of that locus. Retrieval of items is achieved by 'walking' through the loci, allowing the latter to activate the desired items. The efficacy of this technique has been well established (Ross and Lawrence 1968, Crovitz 1969, 1971, Briggs, Hawkins and Crovitz 1970, Lea 1975), as is the minimal interference seen with its use."
memory  mnemonics  productivity  thinking  neurobiology  psychology  location  spatial  spatialawareness  spatialthinking  methodofloci  memoryplace  spacialrelationships  order  recall  lists  faces  digits  neuroscience  via:lukeneff 
december 2010 by robertogreco
The Neurobiology of Evil | Going Mental | Big Think
"Is a person's propensity toward evil a matter of malfunctioning synapses and neurons?<br />
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Michael Stone, professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University and author of “The Anatomy of Evil,” says it is. Ever-more-detailed brain scans are revealing the biological origins of psychological issues in "evil" people, from those who are mildly antisocial to serial murderers.<br />
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Under each brain’s wrinkly cortex lies the limbic system, an evolutionary heirloom controlling emotion and motivation, among other functions. Within this limbic system is the amygdala, an almond-shaped cluster of nuclei that processes our feelings of fear and pleasure.<br />
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Murderers and other violent criminals have been shown to have amygdalae that are smaller or that don’t function properly, explains Stone."
biology  neuroscience  crime  ethics  law  neurobiology  science  brain  medicine  neurology  evil  psychiatry  psychopathy 
september 2010 by robertogreco

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