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About | Capturing Reality | NFB
[project site: https://capturingreality.nfb.ca/ ]

“Filmmakers have been turning their cameras on the real world since the time of the Lumière Brothers — and the documentary genre has sparked impassioned creative debate ever since.

What comes into play when filmmakers set out to represent reality? What ethical concerns arise when portraying real people on screen? How does music condition our emotional response to film?

From cinema-vérité pioneers Albert Maysles, Joan Churchill and Michel Brault to maverick moviemakers like Errol Morris and Nick Broomfield, and socially engaged directors like Kim Longinotto, Patricio Guzmán and the legendary Alanis Obamsawin — some of the doc world’s brightest lights reflect upon the unique power of the genre in in this interactive companion to Pepita Ferrari’s 2008 feature documentary of the same name.

Ferrari interviewed 38 documentarians to make the feature version of Capturing Reality, amassing over 80 hours of footage with master filmmakers from around the world. The interactive documentary showcases 163 interview clips curated from this footage that can be navigated by topic or theme. Viewers can navigate freely through the content or watch all of the interviews with a particular filmmaker or those related to a specific topic.

Originally built in FLASH and released in 2008, this project was rebuilt using Wordpress and re-released for web and mobile in 2018.”
nfb  nbc  documentary  film  filmmaking 
12 weeks ago by robertogreco
Shipbreakers - YouTube
"This feature documentary profiles a bustling Indian shantytown where 40,000 people live and work in the most primitive conditions."
documentary  video  towatch  india  shipbreaking  nfb  nfbc 
12 weeks ago by robertogreco
XINONA
[via: https://twitter.com/flett_julie/status/890000615316742144

"This tale of Indigenous resistance by Kaheró:ton takes place in an alternate universe. Or does it? http://nfb.ca/legacies150/xinona/ #canada150"]

[part of: http://legacies150.nfb.ca/

"A nation is a collection of stories. Where they overlap, they represent a shared experience and an intergenerational legacy. In their uniqueness, they underscore just how varied our individual lives are.

Legacies 150 is a series of interactive photo and illustration essays reflecting on legacy and inheritance a century and a half into Canadian Confederation. These first-person stories explore where we come from, who we are, and what kind of nation we are becoming."]
srg  multimedia  canada  film  newmedia  classideas  storytelling  nfb  nfbc 
august 2017 by robertogreco
The Lady and the Owl - YouTube
"This short documentary introduces us to the McKeevers, who care for injured owls. They live in the country and have built special cages for different purposes and species. There are many ways of being wounded, yet many ways of being cured

Directed by William Canning - 1975"
nfb  1975  documentary  via:tealtan  multispecies  owls  birds  film  wildlife  nature  animals  nfbc  williamcanning 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Do Not Track: revolutionary mashup documentary about Web privacy - Boing Boing
"Brett "Remix Manifesto" Gaylor tells the story of his new project: a revolutionary "mashup documentary" about privacy and the Web."

[This article refers to:
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/1
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/2
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/3
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/4 ]

"I make documentaries about the Internet. My last one, Rip! A Remix Manifesto, was made during the copyright wars of the early 2000s. We followed Girl Talk, Larry Lessig, Gilberto Gil, Cory and others as the Free Culture movement was born. I believed then that copyright was the Internet's defining issue. I was wrong.

In the time since I made Rip, we’ve seen surveillance from both corporate and state actors reach deeper into our lives. Advertising, and the tracking that goes with it, have become the dominant business model of the web. With the Snowden revelations, we've seen that this business model has given the NSA and other state agencies access to the intimate details of our online lives, our location, our reading lists, and our friends.

So with my colleagues at Upian in Paris, the National Film Board of Canada, AJ+, Radio-Canada, RTS, Arte and Bayersicher Rundfunk, I decided to make a documentary series about this. The trouble is, privacy is a difficult issue for most people. They either quickly pull out the "nothing to hide" argument, or they give the shruggie ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. We wanted to find a way to make this personal for people, so we decided to use the viewer's own data to create each episode.

When you open Episode One, the narrator you hear will depend on your location. You'll likely see me if you link from Boing Boing -- I'm the English narrator on desktop. But if you connect on mobile, you'll meet Francesca Fiorentini from AJ+. In Quebec, you'll meet Sandra Rodriguez. In France, it'll be journalist Vincent Glad. The tone is conversational. You'll meet someone who speaks your own language discussing their online sharing addiction.

Once you've met us, we'll say different things to you. If it's raining where you are, we'll know it, because we've plugged into a weather API. This API will communicate with Giphy's API and present different GIFs. It's all edited together like a movie, but a movie that is created on the spot, just for you.

To go further, we ask you to tell us a bit more about you. If you tell us where you go for your news, we've partnered with the service disconnect.me to show you the third party trackers that advertisers and analytics folks place on your computer to follow you around the Web.

In Episode Two, we then take this data to create personalized ads within the program - while we talk to Ethan Zuckerman and Julia Angwin about how advertising came to dominate the Web. We'll ask you how much you would be willing to pay for a version of Facebook or Google that didn't have ads, and compare that with how much they make from you.

In Episode Three, we created a a corporation called Illuminus that practices "future present risk detection". If you log in with your Facebook profile, the corporation uses an API developed at the University of Cambridge, "Apply Magic Sauce," to determine which one of the "Big Five Personality Traits" applies to you. We discover how lenders are dipping their toes into making risk assessments based on your social media activity.

We varied our style in Episode Four and made a privacy cartoon. Journalist Zineb Dryef spent months researching what information she discloses on her mobile phone, and then Darren Pasemko animated what she learned. We meet Kate Crawford, Julia Angwin, as well as Harlo Holmes and Nathan Freitas from the Guardian project. It’s an episode told in four parts, and you can watch the first part in the video below.

If you watch the rest of this episode on donottrack-doc.com, it will be geo-located and interactive.

Our next episode, available May 26th, is produced by the National Film Board of Canada's digital studio, who have a well deserved reputation for creating beautiful interfaces for new types of documentaries. In this episode, we'll explore big data - by making correlations as you watch, you'll determine the outcome, while you meet danah boyd, Cory Doctorow, Alicia Garza and Kate Crawford.

We’re still catching our breath while we produce the final two episodes. One thing we know - we want these to be personal. As we learned in our first episodes, people understand the issues around privacy and surveillance when we let them explore their own data. Depending on how you behaved during the series, we want these final episodes to adapt. We’ll be exploring how the filter bubble shapes your view of the world in our 6th episode, and how our actions can shape the future in our 7th. What these episodes look like is up to you."
brettgaylor  film  interactive  interactivefilm  mashups  documentary  towatch  privacy  web  online  internet  2015  nfbc  nfb  katecrawford  corydoctoow  aliciagarza  danahboyd  location  zinebdryef  darrenpasemko  harloholmes  nathanfreitas  juliaangwin  ethanzuckerman  advertising  tracking  francescafiorentini  sandrarodriguez  giphy  api  trackers  cookies 
may 2015 by robertogreco
WAY TO GO
"Description

Way to Go is an interactive experience for human beings between 5 and 105 years old. Maybe it lasts six minutes; maybe it lasts forever. Way to Go is ready for your web browser and willing to go VR, if you're Rift-y. It is like a grey squirrel balanced on a branch, fearless. Made by Vincent Morisset, Caroline Robert, Édouard Lanctôt-Benoit and the studio AATOAA, visionary creators of BLA BLA and Arcade Fire's award-winning Just A Reflektor. Produced by the National Film Board of Canada, co-produced by France Televisions, with a mesmerizing soundtrack by Philippe Lambert, it is a game and a solace and an alarm, a wake-up call to the hazards of today. At a moment when we have access to so much, and see so little, Way to Go will remind you of all that lies before you, within you, in the luscious, sudden pleasure of discovery.

Shorter Description

Way to Go is a walk in the woods. It is an astonishing interactive experience, a restless panorama, a mixture of hand-made animation, 360˚ video capture, music and dreaming and code; but mostly it is a walk in the woods, c'mon. Created by Vincent Morisset, Philippe Lambert, Édouard Lanctôt-Benoit & Caroline Robert (AATOAA). Produced by the NFB & France TV."



"Preface

YOU ARE ON YOUR WAY.
Yes, you are on your way.
It is not your first journey but Way to Go is the next journey before you. A walk through strange country - strange, familiar, remembered, forgotten. It is a restless panorama, a disappearing path, a game and a feeling. Way to Go is a small experience that gets bigger as you uncover it.
And the trees will change their shape, and the sky will widen.
And you will fly.
We go away every day. We plunge through the city, skate down roads, tunneling toward a destination without remembering the quests we are on. A journey is a collection of moments - we are here, we are here, we are here, and yet we miss these moments. A journey is a collection of choices - turn here, stop here, choose here, and yet we surrender these choices.
What if we quit surrendering? What if we didn't miss?
Here is a world enclosed in a screen. Here is an adventure. A landscape of leaves and wildflowers, teeming with hidden life. A garden and a wilderness, a wistful blink of dream. You are Jean Painlevé, Marco Polo, Maria Merian. You are Alice, Sonic, Osvaldo Cavandoli. You are a visitor, a cartoon of face and limbs, and you are going on a walk.
Using hand-made animation, music, 360° capture technology and webGL sorcery, Way to Go imagines a dream-world of journeys. Walk, run, fly; crouch in the grass and remember what's hidden all around. Slip like a rumour from one place into another; chase your shadow; listen to the slow pulse of the metronome, black-clad, following in your wake.
Are you alone? Are you not alone? Are you dreaming or awake? Can you ever reach the mountains?
Can you see what's here before you?
Set out through woods and fields, sunlight and aurora, grey and colours.
Set out, in deliberate lucid looking
and you'll find,
perhaps,
the present.

(Preface by Sean Michaels)"
games  storytelling  gaming  videogames  art  nfb  forest  aaotaa  javascript  html  html5  webgl  three.js  webaudioapi  vincentmorisset  philippelambert  édouardlanctôt-benoit  carolinerobert  nfbc 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Don't Knock the Ox by Tony Ianzelo - NFB
"The International Ox Pull, highlight of the Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, annual fair, is a holdover from the pioneer past when oxen cleared the land and tilled the soil. These beasts of burden have lost none of their pulling power, as demonstrated when they drag tons of weight loaded on sleds (the winner pulls up to 6 tons!). Competing teams come from various parts of the Maritimes and the Northeastern United States."
1970  film  via:anne  documentary  novascotia  tonyianzelo  oxen  nfb  animals  agriculture  nfbc 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Through These Eyes by Charles Laird - NFB
"An American elementary school program from the 1970s, Man: A Course of Study (MACOS), looked to the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic to help students see their own society in a new way. At its core was The Netsilik Film Series, an acclaimed benchmark of visual anthropology from the National Film Board that captured a year in the life of an Inuit family, reconstructing an ancient culture on the cusp of contact with the outside world. But the graphic images of the Netsilik people created a clash of values that tore rifts in communities across the U.S. and revealed a fragile relationship between politics and education. A fiery national debate ensued between academic and conservative forces.

Through These Eyes looks back at the high stakes of this controversial curriculum. Decades later, as American influence continues to affect cultures worldwide, the story of MACOS resonates strongly."

[See also: http://onf-nfb.gc.ca/en/our-collection/?idfilm=51241 ]

[MACOS: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man:_A_Course_of_Study ]

[via Alan Kay: https://plus.google.com/events/c67c9rk920s1rd3invjtd4assf4 ]
film  towatch  macos  jeromebruner  2004  1970s  charleslaird  anthropology  education  schools  teaching  learning  unschooling  deschooling  curriculum  humanities  peterdow  asenbalikci  documentary  ethnography  nfb  nfbc 
june 2014 by robertogreco
NFB/Interactive - OUT MY WINDOW
"One highrise. Every view, a different city.

This is Out My Window -- one of the world's first interactive 360º documentaries -- about exploring the state of our urban planet told by people who look out on the world from highrise windows.

It's a journey around the globe through the most commonly built form of the last century: the concrete-slab residential tower. Meet remarkable highrise residents who harness the human spirit -- and the power of community -- to resurrect meaning amid the ruins of modernism.

With more than 90 minutes of material to explore, Out of My Window features 49 stories from 13 cities, told in 13 languages, accompanied by a leading-edge music playlist."
global  perspective  outofmywindow  towatch  glvo  international  living  life  highrises  modernism  urbanism  urban  via:sebastienmarion  2012  nationalfilmboardofcanada  nfbc  interactivedocumentary  documentary  interactive  design  nfb 
july 2012 by robertogreco
NFB/Interactive - Bear 71
[an interactive film about grizzly bears from the National Film Board of Canada]

"It's hard to say where the wild world ends and the wild one begins."

"The forest has its own language."

"If you look backward from any single point in time, everything seems to lead up to that moment."

"They'll have to learn *not* to do what comes naturally, and I wonder. Maybe the lesson is too hard."
deschooling  unschooling  parenting  flash  video  film  2012  tracking  visualization  classideas  storytelling  interactivenarratives  nationalfilmboardofcanada  nfb  bear71  bears  nature  animals  documentary  interactive  cyoa  interactivefiction  if  nfbc 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Bear 71: An Interactive, Experimental Documentary
"This interactive documentary blurs the line between wild and wired worlds"

"It’s usually a good thing when technology and creativity intersect, and that’s why it’s so easy to love projects like Bear 71, which surpasses everything I previously believed was possible to do with a documentary.

Produced by the National Film Board of Canada’s digital studio, the documentary is constructed as an interactive online experience that observes and records the intersection of humans, nature and technology.

The story follows a female grizzly bear, named Bear 71 by the park rangers who track her. The bear’s story speaks to how we coexist with wildlife in an age of networks, surveillance and digital information, and blurs the line between the wild and wired worlds."
nfbc  networks  storytelling  via:anterobot  surveillance  bears  animals  technology  nature  towatch  2012  bear71  documentaries  classideas  interactive  srg  edg  cyoa  interactivefiction  if  nfb 
january 2012 by robertogreco

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