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‎textboard2 on the App Store
"textboard2 provides the smartest way to clear your mind. Using tags, you can organize your thoughts, tasks, executions, data, and more.

[ Main Features ]
* the board.
​​The players are your thoughts turned into text. Whatever short or long, one line or multi-lines, you can add. They are all listed in one board. Check with just scrolling.

* tags.
Reminders, snippets, drafts, and more. Your text is neatly organized by adding 'tags' so that you can easily pick up and reuse by coping to pasteboard.

* themes.
​Initially 4 visual themes are available as a start. Easy to change them at any time, and have fun with your mood. More will be added by update soon.

* sync.
Just turn on iCloud and now you will be able to back up your text and use in other iDevices. Mac app is also coming soon.

Upgraded features from the previous version

*refined interface / logics
​From many use cases, more quicker access to the controls and are built and tested. Now much more addictive for daily use.

*upcoming features
- Integrating more input methods (mac, keyboard, etc.)
​- Supporting more viewer devices (watch, etc.)
- Shop - buyable utilities, themes"
applications  ios  yoshitohasaka  notes  notetaking  mac  osx 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Bear - Notes for iPhone, iPad and Mac
"Write beautifully on iPhone, iPad, and Mac
Bear is a beautiful, flexible writing app for crafting notes and prose.

Use it everywhere
Bear works on iPhone, iPad, and Mac, so you can write wherever inspiration strikes. Use todos to stay on task across every device.

Keep control
Link notes to each other to build a body of work. Use hashtags to organize for the way you think. All notes are stored in portable plain text.

Write your way
Bear is perfect for everything from quick notes to in-depth essays. A focus mode helps you concentrate, and advanced markup options are an online writer's best friend. Full in-line image support brings your writing to life.

A beautiful setting
Packed with beautiful themes and typography, and more options on the way, Bear makes your writing look great before and after publishing.

Editing tools and exports
Bear's simple tools take the effort out of writing, whether you need to hit specific word counts and reading times, or you need to convert your writing into PDF and Word docs. With Bear's custom markup shortcuts, you can add style and links with just a tap or keystroke.

Bear features at a glance

• Advanced Markup Editor that supports and highlights over 20 programming languages
• Rich previews while writing so you see prose, not code
• In-line support for images and photos
• Use Cross-Note Links to build a body of work, quickly reference other notes, and more
• Quickly add todos to individual notes to keep yourself on task
• Multiple themes, including dyslexic and color-blind options, to offer a style for everyone
• Multiple export options including HTML, PDF, DOCX, MD, JPG, and more
• Smart Data Recognition of elements like links, emails, addresses, colors, and more to come
• Hashtags to quickly find and organize notes however you like
• One-tap formatting on iPhone and iPad with a custom shortcut bar
• Focus Mode hides notes and other options when it matters
• All your notes are stored in plain text for the ultimate in portability
• Effortless, secure, and private multi-device sync via iCloud
Regular updates to keep you and your writing current

Pricing model

The core version of Bear for iOS and Mac will be free.

Bear Pro will offer advanced features, including themes and exporting, which can be unlocked via a single In-App Purchase that covers all your devices. Unlocking Bear Pro also provide one year of sync between your devices. When the year is over, you'll be able to renew sync for another year. The other unlocked features remain yours forever.

We’ll announce the pricing for Bear Pro at the end of the public beta."
via:lukeneff  applications  notes  notetaking  writing  wordprocessing  web  online  ios  mac  osx 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Journalism + Annotation = ❤️️ - FOLD
"With pen and paper, it's easy to annotate. You can highlight text, circle relevant parts of an image, add comments, and doodle in the margins. Digital annotation is a bit trickier, but these annotations have the potential to be shared with a much wider audience. Because journalism increasingly presents us with a deluge of information in all forms, has an archival nature, and offers us a way to understand the world around us, journalism and annotation are natural BFFs.

Annotation has a long history as part of the original conception of the web. Today, the most common form of annotation we see online is commenting, which has a complex culture. Typically comments are buried at the bottom of the page, hard to sort through, and challenging to moderate. Location-specific annotations, when they exist, are often platform-specific (for now, that's the case here on FOLD, too).

This Wednesday, I attended the Annotation Summit hosted by the Poynter Foundation at the New York Times building to talk about some of these issues. The purpose of this event was to bring together people working on annotation from different angles (academics, makers of publishing platforms, members of standards groups, and media companies) to discuss how annotation can help reimagine journalism and strengthen democracy."

[via: https://twitter.com/mtechman/status/604033875703156736 ]
annotation  2015  digital  alexishope  highlighting  journalism  commenting  moderation  coralproject  johnunsworth  dougschepers  hypothes.is  basseyetim  andycarvin  firstlookmedia  amyhollyfield  livefyre  benjamingoering  sidenotes  footnotes  hypertext  briandonohue  speedreading  notes  notetaking  gregbarber  trolls  andrewlosowsky  rapgenius  chrisglazek  medium  stevenlevy  responses  danwhaley  mirandamulligan  sound  data  gistory  genius.com 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Your Nostalgia Isn’t Helping Me Learn — The Synapse — Medium
[See also: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:fe14a9668c31 ]

"These stories keep popping up, recycling the same studies and confirming someone’s intuition that the “good old-fashioned way” is better.

But contrary to these claims, I would not have made it through my years of university courses without the technology I use every day. And I don’t mean specific “assistive technology” designed with “disabilities” in mind. I’m talking here about the notes I make on my phone when I’m chatting with someone, which serve as an extension of my brain — the course project documents, folders of articles, collected syllabi, images, screenshots, and more that are always available on my laptop or anywhere through my synchronized folders.

I rely on the over 170 notebooks in Evernote where I practically wrote my entire MA thesis and where I track all current projects, personal and academic. I worked a full time job for much of my undergraduate education and part of my MA and was able to do this because of the ability to search through all 70,000+ email messages from the last 15 years, the ability to search inside a journal article, search a PDF of a book and copy/paste the text. This technology is assistive for me as a student very simply because all technology is assistive technology.



“Research Shows”

Surely we can agree then that all technology is assistive. But what about in the classroom? What’s missing from these popular articles when they claim technology is a distraction in the classroom? How do they conclude assistive technology is getting in the way of learning when so many students like myself rely on it? And what are the consequences of banning technology in the classroom?

I’ll start by taking that article from Vox and looking at some of the claims. After that, I’ll look at what’s happening in classrooms where technology is banned.

I. The Vox article defines learning as remembering information. That’s funny, because learning is not memorizing, and I think all educators would agree on that.

At the same time that many educators will tell us testing misses the mark in evaluating students and that learning isn’t about facts and figures but about critical thinking skills, articles like this are shared widely with the opposite message: learning is your “ability to remember information.” But it isn’t, it’s your ability to synthesize information, think critically, and evaluate claims.

II. This article claims the problem with taking notes on laptops is that students “usually just mindlessly type everything a professor says.” But this isn’t actually a claim about taking notes on laptops vs. paper notebooks, this is an issue of note taking skills. I wouldn’t conflate the Vox article with the study it cites here, but on this point what Vox reports matches the abstract of the study quite well. I don’t agree, instead I’d suggest that if you have good note taking skills you can take good notes in any format.

If you are taught to discern what matters in a lecture or discussion or while reading, you can learn to take useful notes about anything in any format. This problem they bring up of students acting as stenographers is an issues of learning to learn, learning to think critically and yes these are skills that students need. The fact that they don’t have them certainly isn’t the fault of laptops, in fact we should be grateful that we can see they don’t have them by how they are (mis)using the laptops. As educators do we really like the idea that students can only decide what matters because “they can’t write fast enough to get everything down”?

III. The article says students who use laptops “have something unrelated to class” on the screen about 40% of the time. So…. they’re actually talking about a failure to “learn” among students who aren’t using the technology to engage in the class at all? These students are chatting with friends, shopping, doing whatever. So, what does this have to do with the technology or taking notes on a laptop? What does this have to do with using a laptop to learn? Nothing. But still, we get this summary “Research shows students who use laptops perform more poorly in classes.”

IV. Of course, the whole argument is all summed up as common sense, validated by science! What could go wrong with that and with popular reporting about it? If science AND common sense are clear on this — well, it must be true for all students, or maybe not? It certainly isn’t true for me or for other students I’ve seen and spoken with.

I’m picking on this Vox article because it is precisely this kind of article that is shared on Facebook and Twitter and through email lists, without being carefully read, without being critically analyzed. And it winds up standing in for well thought out technology policy and pedagogy in classrooms. I think it’s pretty ironic that the same people who get so excited about the article’s title (“Why you should take notes by hand — not on a laptop”) because it validates their pre-existing distrust of “technology” (i.e. everything invented after they were born), these same people then fail to think critically about the argument in the article. Hmmm…. Maybe they’re actually the ones who have trouble thinking critically when using a laptop?"



"Classrooms on the Anti-Tech Bandwagon

I’m now seeing Professors jumping on this bandwagon and proudly banning technology in the classroom. And even those who don’t are giving students lectures in class about how we should ban e-books at the university library, and telling students who use laptops in class they should really be writing in a notebook, that is, if they really want to learn… Faculty are even adding notes to their syllabi …"



"The pressure to use “real books” and write in a notebook (preferably a moleskine, right?) has emerged as part of a growing anti-technology fetish among academics, and popular culture broadly. I get the appeal and I love books! I would love it if I could do that, I want all paper books, a room full of them, with ferns and armchairs and whisky and whatever — but it just isn’t how I learn. And it’s expensive, and you have to move them around. And you can’t search in them in the same way. The more precarious academic lives become the more a book collection is a luxury many can’t afford in terms of cost and other factors.

For students like me, technology use in the classroom comes down to a question of how we learn. I need to be able to search a book, copy and paste passages. I’m a scholar because I have technology that allows me to organize, sort, and synthesize information that I wouldn’t otherwise be able to work with. I didn’t learn to be a scholar with paper and pen, or with a typewriter. And I wouldn’t have been able to make it through my degree programs, and excel at my studies, write a thesis, publish papers — without being able to use this technology. I, and many students out there like me, rely on laptops, tablets, phones, and online software in the classroom because it is all assistive technology."
michaeloman-reagan  notes  notetaking  assistivetechnology  ableism  laptops  education  technology  notebooks  memorization  learning  howwelearn  engagement  thinking  howwethink  howweteach  media  2015  typing  handwriting  copying  summarizing  transcribing  sarahendren  commonsense 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Michael Oman-Reagan on Twitter: "In which I point out some issues w/ a "you learn better without a laptop!" article. #ableism https://t.co/q49L9TfetU http://t.co/3gfwk5Db48"
[Update: This has now been expanded into an article: https://medium.com/synapse/your-nostalgia-isn-t-helping-me-learn-141bd0939153 ]

"In which I point out some issues w/ a "you learn better without a laptop!" article. #ableism https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578393387667206145 "

[In response to “To Remember More, Take Notes by Hand — Not on a Laptop: http://bit.ly/1AHy97v pic.twitter.com/0qewhIKsAU
https://twitter.com/calestous/status/578390475217973249 ” ]

"Or not, depending on how you learn, think, act, what media you're engaging with, etc. @calestous @SallieHanAnthro"
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578393387667206145

"While we're on it - let's look at what's going on in this article about taking notes in writing vs typing: http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578396742758084609

"First: They define learning as remembering information. Huh? Learning =/= memorizing. http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop pic.twitter.com/GSJs0llaN5 "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578397319701348352

"Second: They aren't talking abt laptops vs notebooks, they're talking abt note taking skills. http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop pic.twitter.com/RjrF01IBdF "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578397705476665345

"Third: They're talking abt students who aren't using tech to be engaged in the class at all. http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop pic.twitter.com/1QOfoHORIs "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578398374866628608

"And finally, of course, it's common sense, validated by science. What could go wrong... http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop pic.twitter.com/VbvJHdoKqi "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578398820377186304

"Of course what's wrong is they are ignoring fact that the tech is assistive for students who know how to use it. http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578399129073774592

"So the key is to teach people how to use the tech. Not use those who take useless notes and shop as excuse. http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578399523581620224
michaeloman-reagan  notes  notetaking  assistivetechnology  ableism  laptops  education  technology  notebooks  memorization  learning  howwelearn  engagement  thinking  howwethink  howweteach  media  2015  typing  handwriting  copying  summarizing  transcribing 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Rev Dan Catt: The Pen
"I've been asked about my pen (for reals) a couple of times, so I thought I'd write a blog post about it. It's a Tombow Zoom 707 Ballpoint Pen (amazon UK/US), it cost £28 and I bought it for myself as a Christmas present.

I keep two Field Notes notebooks in my pocket, at night I take them out and put them on the bedside table. My life is dense, not hectic, not crazy busy, just every moment is filled. We have three kids, we home educate, the start-up I'm involved in is blowing up, I try to swim, I try to run, I'm learning the bass, I try and put together a podcast that takes an age, sometimes I even try to write a blog post or two. In all of that there's hardly any time to do other stuff, although that doesn't stop me thinking about other stuff. That other stuff goes down in one of the two notebooks.

When I think of something I often can't get to a laptop or my phone in time, I tried, the thoughts don't stay in my head long enough to survive the gauntlet of children asking me things on the way upstairs. If you've watched the film Memento it's like that scene where he's looking around for a pen to write the thing down before he forgets it. I decided I needed notebooks and a pen with me at all times.

I think it's the most I've ever spent on a pen.

Before this I used the Field Notes pen that came with the notebooks. It's a good pen, feels nice to hold, flows well but the clip doesn't clip it in my pocket properly. I can't slide it into my jeans without having to put a fingernail round the back of the clip to make sure it clips properly. When I sit down the pen didn't stay in the same place.

It was all kinds of wrong.

The Zoom 707 slides into the pocket right next to the seam, and better still it stays there, after all I didn't want to lose a £28 pen. For the next few days I'd reach down and feel for the red ball on the clip, to know it was still there.

Now it's a reflex action, I'll brush my hand past the side seam of my jeans and feel if the pen's clip is still there. When I feel it I know I can't forget anything, life is speeding on but in that one moment I know I haven't left anything behind. If I need to remember something it's in the notebook, if it's in the notebook I don't need to remember it. I can clear my mind and move onto the next thing.

When I stop to take a moment, I can touch the red ball feel it against my fingertips and the memory of the last thing I wrote comes back to me. It's a shortcut to having to open the notebook and read it back.

It's a memory machine, a meditation device and an anchor."
worrybeads  fidgettools  anxiety  anti-anxietydevices  2015  pens  revdancatt  notetaking  memory  notes  notebooks  outboardboardmemory  ideas  kombolói  cv 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Commonplace: a wiki-like way to store and browse Markdown writings
"What is Commonplace?

I write quite a bit, usually in Markdown, but I usually keep all my markdown files scattered around my hard-drive. Commonplace is a simple wiki-like system to store and browse your markdown files. It works by reading .md files from a directory you configure (my advice would be to keep this directory backed up through Dropbox). The name draws inspiration from commonplace books.

Commonplace is not meant to be a markdown editor, even though it includes basic editing capabilities. There are a number of tools that do the markdown editing job extremely well - I happen to use Byword for Mac but you get to choose your own poison. If you edit the markdown files in an external editor, changes are reflected here after a refresh."
markdown  ruby  wikis  webdev  commonplacebooks  search  notes  notetaking  text  via:frankchimero  webdesign 
february 2015 by robertogreco
A Friend Visits my Slotin Notes - Just Wrought
"And just like that, Thia Stephan Hyde was making plans to  pay my notes a visit.  All that day she updated me with emails and pictures  from her time with my darlings. At the end of it she sent me the following lovely email, which she has graciously allowed me post. Reading it felt like an injection of light straight into my worn-out artist’s heart."



"There is a sub-genre of theatre people who are absolute full-on theatre geeks. We are the ones who revel not only in the delight and the accolades of the performances themselves, but who glory in the research that leads up to the live show. Theatre geeks don’t think of it as “homework”, theatre geeks actually get off on endless hours of dramaturgy, historical research and literary cross-referencing, and GO off on intellectual tangents that may not have any direct correlation with any actual decision put into the work of rehearsal or performance. . . though I insist that you never, ever know what tiny tidbit of historical backstory or arcane research may lead to a tiny choice that lifts a performance from serviceable to inspired.

Anyway, when playwright Paul Mullin mentioned on Face Book that he wondered if someone in New York might have a chance to go visit some materials he had loaned to the Library for the Performing Arts here in town, I was an instantly enthusiastic volunteer! (and I am already registered as a researcher at said library, because – why? I am a theatre geek. You got it.)"



"About 25 minutes later, the boxes arrived, very officially delivered on a cart, signed out from the page who brought them to the librarian, and then signed out again from him to me. I was told to turn in my pen, as only pencils are allowed at the desks, and was told that yes, I could take photos of the material. But I could only have one box at a time, and could only remove one folder at a time from each box. Where to start, where to start? I guessed that “Box 1” was the earliest of the papers (Ding Ding Ding Ding Ding!!), and I started with the “generative notes” folder, which was fascinating. Truly, from just a few scribbled words on a few pages (the very first said: “The relationship of horror and happiness”) through longer philosophical paragraphs and charts of dramatis personae and timelines through feedback from early draft read-throughs, I got to see the “birth” of a play."



"And SO much more. Honestly, I found almost every scribble compelling.

Moving on to other folders, I found out:

That Paul’s own father had been a physicist. (I never knew this.)

That a fellow named Thomas Keenan who was associated with Los Alamos after the fact thought the play contained a “disturbing amount of non-pertinent philosophy and mental meandering”. (Paul pointed out that of course THAT is of what a play consists. . . Hamlet, for example)

That a CD was being rushed to “Anzide’s”, which tickled me because I adore Jim Anzide, and got to work with him in a Circle X production of a play written by another favorite of mine, Tom Jacobson.

That Louis Slotin was not covered by insurance and that the US Government haggled and dragged its heels over compensating his family and returning his belongings to them. And that though they didn’t want to do so at first, eventually the government decided that it would be good to give sick leave pay to the other scientists for the days they had been hospitalized, as it had “been determined advisable in order to ensure confidence on the part of employees . . . who may perform similar operations or experiments in the future.” Sigh.

That I had forgotten how we all used to live by the FAX machine! The faxes, the faxes, the piles of FAXES!"
via:vruba  libraries  research  names  naming  references  paulmullin  thiastephenhyde  2013  writing  science  theater  metadata  meta  geeks  theatergeeks  intertextuality  howwework  howwelearn  facebook  fandom  losalamos  notes  notetaking  time  memory 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Inside the Mind of Hans Ulrich Obrist
"The celebrity curator may be a phenomenon on the rise, but before Klaus Biesenbach and Paola Antonelli, there was Hans Ulrich Obrist. Obrist, who’s currently the co-director of exhibitions and programs and director of international programs at London’s Serpentine Gallery, has a list of curatorial accomplishments so long, it’s daunting. He started out small enough, organizing a show in his kitchen in 1991 (he was 23) that included contributions from Christian Boltanski and Fischli & Weiss; in the decades since, he’s curated and co-curated more than 250 exhibitions, including the first Berlin Biennale and the first Manifesta. He’s also known for his ongoing conceptual projects, among them do it, a roving show built around artist-given instructions for viewers, and The Interview Project, for which he’s racked up more than 2,000 hours of conversation so far, with artists, writers, philosophers, scientists, and others.

It turns out he’s also been taking notes the whole time — making diagrams and sketches, scribbling down ideas and keywords. And when artist Paul Chan, who’s also the founder and publisher of Badlands Unlimited, found out that these copious notes and drawings existed, he knew he wanted to release them.

“I wanted to publish them because I’m surprised they exist, still,” Chan told Hyperallergic over email. “Badland’s publishing program is mindlessly simple: we publish things that no one knew existed. The poems of Yvonne Rainer, speeches on democracy by Saddam Hussein, afternoon interviews of Marcel Duchamp, and now this. I didn’t know he made them. Did you?”

The resulting book, Think Like Clouds, premieres at the New York Art Book Fair, where Badlands has also mounted a small exhibition of the some of the artworks — or whatever you might call them. “I don’t know if these drawings are important,” Chan said. “I don’t even know if they are in fact drawings. This is to me their appeal.”

Badlands sent us six of Obrist’s sketches specifically related to his curatorial practice:"
hansulrichobrist  notes  notetaking  doodling  drawing  drawings  scribbles 
october 2013 by robertogreco
DrupalCon Portland 2013: DESIGN OPS: A UX WORKFLOW FOR 2013 - YouTube
"Hey, the dev team gets all these cool visual analytics, code metrics, version control, revision tagging, configuration management, continuous integration ... and the UX design team just passes around Photoshop files?

Taking clues from DevOps and Lean UX, "DesignOps" advocates more detailed and durable terminology about the cycle of user research, design and production. DesignOps seeks to first reduce the number of design artifacts, to eliminate the pain of prolonged design decisions. DesignOps assumes that the remaining design artifacts aren't actionable until they are reasonably archived and linked in a coherent way that serves the entire development team.

This talk will introduce the idea of DesignOps with the assumption that the audience has experience with a basic user research cycle — iterative development with any kind of user feedback.

DesignOps is a general approach, intended to help with a broad array of questions from usability testing issues, documentation archiving, production-time stress, and general confusion on your team:

What are the general strategies for managing the UX design process?
How do you incorporate feedback without huge cost?
What happened to that usability test result from last year?
How much space goes between form elements?
Why does the design cycle make me want to drink bleach?
WTF why does our website look like THIS?
* Features turnkey full-stack (Vagrant ) installation of ubuntu with drupal 7 install profile utilizing both php and ruby development tools, with all examples configured for live css compilation"
chrisblow  contradictions  just  simply  must  2013  drupal  drupalcon  designops  fear  ux  terminology  design  audience  experience  shame  usability  usabilitytesting  work  stress  archiving  confusion  relationships  cv  canon  collaboration  howwework  workflow  versioncontrol  versioning  failure  iteration  flickr  tracker  creativecommons  googledrive  tags  tagging  labels  labeling  navigation  urls  spreadsheets  links  permissions  googledocs  timelines  basecamp  cameras  sketching  universal  universality  teamwork  principles  bullshitdetection  users  clients  onlinetoolkit  offtheshelf  tools  readymadetools  readymade  crapdetection  maps  mapping  userexperience  research  designresearch  ethnography  meetup  consulting  consultants  templates  stencils  bootstrap  patterns  patternlibraries  buzzwords  css  sass  databases  compass  webdev  documentation  sharing  backups  maintenance  immediacy  process  decisionmaking  basics  words  filingsystems  systems  writing  facilitation  expression  operations  exoskeletons  clarification  creativity  bots  shellscripts  notes  notetaking  notebo 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Why Medium Notes Are Different and How to Use Them Well — About Medium — Medium
"On Medium, we don’t have comments on posts; instead we have “notes.” They hang off to the side of paragraphs and are shown when you click/touch the little indicator on the side.

Arguably, traditional comments—the kind you see beneath most blog posts and pretty much every other media artifact on the web—do the same thing (in ideal circumstances). Notes are much better for the type of ideas and stories people share on Medium. Here’s why (and how they work):

The most obvious thing that’s different about Medium Notes is that they live on the paragraph level rather than below an entire post. Not only that—notes can (optionally) highlight specific text within the paragraph:

This has many advantages. For one, notes are great for feedback. It’s the central mechanism for Medium’s collaboration feature—which lets authors get feedback before they post. Being able to quickly highlight some text and say “typo” is so easy, people are willing to do it frequently. (Personally, I find it fun.)

By making notes private by default, we remove much of the incentive to spam or troll. If you’re not adding value, you’re not seen.

A third option under the private/public note control for authors is to “Dismiss” the note. This is useful for cleaning up your own view.

The note-leaver won’t know you’ve dismissed it from your view and will still see it until they delete it.

I like to leave notes on my own posts. It’s a nice way to add contextual information that doesn’t need to be in the main flow of text."
writing  commenting  communities  design  annotation  community  medium  evanwilliams  context  asides  collaboration  feedback  2013  via:tealtan  notes 
april 2013 by robertogreco
I’m just a working-class guy trying to take part in the conversation that all the smart people are having. What books should I read?
QUESTION (in part):

"I’m just a working-class guy trying to take part in the conversation that all the smart people are having. This brings me to my question: What books should I read? There are so many books out there worth reading, that I literally don’t know where to start."

ANSWER (in parts):

"We’re not on a ladder here. We’re on a web. Right now you’re experiencing a desire to become more aware of and sensitive to its other strands. That feeling you’re having is culture. Whatever feeds that, go with it. And never forget that well-educated people pretend to know on average at least two-thirds more books than they’ve actually read."

"Come up with a system of note-taking that you can use in your reading. It’s okay if it evolves. You can write in the margins, or keep a reading notebook (my preference) where you transcribe passages you like, with your own observations, and mark down the names of other, unfamiliar writers, books you’ve seen mentioned (Guy D. alone will give you a notebook full of these). Follow those notes to decide your next reading. That’s how you’ll create your own interior library. Now do that for the rest of your life and die knowing you’re still massively ignorant. (I wouldn’t trade it!)"

"Ignore all of this and read the next cool-looking book you see lying around. It’s not the where-you-start so much as the that-you-don’t-stop."

SEE ALSO: the books recommended

[Orginal is here: http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2012/08/31/dear-paris-review-john-jeremiah-sullivan-answers-your-questions/ ]
books  reading  literacy  2013  advice  learning  lifelonglearning  canon  wisdom  ignorance  readinglists  lists  recommendations  curiosity  booklists  notetaking  notes  observations  education  religion  libraries  truth  howilearnedtoread  readingnotebooks  notebooks  howwelearn  culturalliteracy  culture  hierarchy  hierarchies  snobbery  class  learningnetworks  oldtimelearningnetworks  webs  cv  howweread  borges  film  movies  guydavenport  huntergracchus  myántonia  willacather  isakdinesen  maximiliannovak  robertpennwarren  edithwharton  denisjohnson  alberterskine  karloveknausgaard  jamesjoyce  hughkenner  richardellmann  stephengreenblatt  harukimurakami  shakespeare  vladimirnabokov 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Mobile Diaries: discovering daily life | Johnny Holland
"In the early stages of design, rather than evaluate or validate specific user requirements or priorities, we are interested in exploring possibilities. As the opening quote suggests, we seek to engage with the various stakeholders the design project may eventually effect and gain an understanding of the unique design situation from their perspective. In Zimmerman et al.’s  (2004) framework for discovering and extracting knowledge during the design process, this is known as the Discovery phase of design. In this article we introduce Mobile Diaries as a field work method that can be utilised in the early stages of design to immerse into people’s everyday life.

This exploratory approach to self-reporting allows participants  to create and share a rich picture of their world, be they grandmothers, bankers, students, young parents or employees. In this article we describe Mobile Diaries, and provide examples of the kinds experiences they can enable."

[via: http://prosimian.com.au/constructed-histories/ ]
notes  mapping  maps  persona  natalierowland  peggyhagen  video  living  life  sms  blogging  research  notetaking  collage  photography  classideas  ethnography  autoethnography  design  diaries  mobilediaries  mobile  documentation  johnnyholland 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Interactive Exhibition | Take Note
"Notes surround us. Whether in the form of lab notebooks, fieldnotes, sketchbooks, class notes, or surreptitious shorthand notes on plays and sermons, notetaking forms the basis of every scholarly discipline as well as of most literate people’s daily lives. Millennia after a potsherd from second-century Egypt, notes remain the lowest common denominator of information management. Like written responses to reading, manuscript records of speech cut across different cultures, different fields, and even different phases of life: students take notes on their professors’ lectures, which in turn form the product of professors’ notes on books. And from Aristotle's philosophy to the works of 20th- century thinkers like Saussure and Wittgenstein, many of the foundational texts of Western culture have been transmitted or even generated by notes. Yet the definition of notes remains contentious: should we be speaking of “annotation” or “notetaking”? The former emphasizes something done to a text…"
via:mattthomas  takenote  2012  notetaking  notes  history 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Notebooks
"Burned all my notebooks
What good are notebooks
If they won't help me survive?

But a curiosity of my type remains after all the most agreeable of all vices --- sorry, I meant to say: the love of truth has its reward in heaven and even on earth." ---Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, 45

'They're, well, notebooks --- things I find amusing, outrageous, strange or otherwise noteworthy; notes towards works-in-glacial-progress; hemi-demi-semi-rants; things I want to learn more about; lists of references; quotations from the Talking Heads where appropriate. If you can help with any of these, I'd be grateful; if you can tell me of anything I can profitably prune, I'd be even more grateful.

There is a list of frequently asked questions (FAQ), along with answers, and a colophon, which explains more than anyone would want to know about how these pages are put together. If your question isn't answered in either place, feel free to write, though, sadly, I can't promise a timely reply.'
notes  curiosity  nietzsche  commonplacebooks  notetaking  notebooks  via:selinjessa  cosmashalizi  unbook 
september 2012 by robertogreco
The Spark File — The Writer’s Room — Medium
"for the past eight years or so I've been maintaining a single document where I keep all my hunches: ideas for articles, speeches, software features, startups, ways of framing a chapter I know I'm going to write, even whole books. I now keep it as a Google document so I can update it from wherever I happen to be. There's no organizing principle to it, no taxonomy--just a chronological list of semi-random ideas that I've managed to capture before I forgot them. I call it the spark file.…

…the spark file itself is not all that unusual: that's why Moleskins or Evernote are so useful to so many people. But the key habit that I've tried to cultivate is this: every three or four months, I go back and re-read the entire spark file. And it's not an inconsequential document: it's almost fifty pages of hunches at this point, the length of several book chapters. But what happens when I re-read the document that I end up seeing new connections that hadn't occurred to me the first (or fifth) time around … it feels a bit like you are brainstorming with past versions of yourself. … The key is to capture as many hunches as possible, and to spend as little time as possible organizing or filtering or prioritizing them. (Keeping a single, chronological file is central to the process, because it forces you to scroll through the whole list each time you want to add something new.)"
stevenjohnson  2012  writing  hunches  sparkfiles  notetaking  notes  commonplacebooks  rereading  moleskines  evernote  habits  via:Preoccupations  ideas  memory  cv  scrolling  pagination 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Metropolis M » Magazine » 2011 No5 » dOCUMENTA (13) Thinks Ahead
"A collection of notes is a curious archive of attempts. Attempts to understand the language we use, the logic we trace, and the images we generate to understand life today. Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, the artistic director of dOCUMENTA (13), would say that these notebooks are “worlding” exercises, weaving and stringing together different potentials.’"

"we are really interested in exploring artistic research. Artists, like scientists, are pioneers when it comes to creating new forms of connectivity between worlds that seem to have nothing in common with each other. They embark on the endless study of everything that contributes to different formulations of what we call reality. Taking artistic research seriously means accepting disorganisation within the relationship between disciplines that deal with contemporary art. The rise of cultural studies, critical theory, and the many variations of post-Marxist understanding of the relationship between art and economics is the fruit of…"
sketchbooks  worldbuilding  worlding  sensemaking  meaningmaking  meaning  cv  howwethink  howwecreate  howwelearn  howwework  research  art  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  interdisciplinary  interdisciplinarity  artisticresearch  connections  potentials  sketching  drawing  language  logic  deschooling  unschooling  glvo  notebooks  2012  carolynchristov-bakargiev  chusmartinez  documenta(13)  documenta  understanding  notetaking  notes  learning 
may 2012 by robertogreco
dOCUMENTA (13) - dOCUMENTA (13)
"Note taking encompasses witnessing, drawing, writing, and diagrammatic thinking; it is speculative, manifests a preliminary moment, a passage, and acts as a memory aid.

With contributions by authors from a range of disciplines, such as art, science, philosophy and psychology, anthropology, economic- and political theory, language- and literature studies, as well as poetry, 100 Notes – 100 Thoughts constitutes a space of dOCUMENTA (13) to explore how thinking emerges and lies at the heart of re-imagining the world. In its cumulative nature, this publication project is a continuous articulation of the emphasis of dOCUMENTA (13) on the propositional, underlining the flexible mental moves to generate space for the possible. Thoughts, unlike statements, are always variations: this is the spirit in which these notebooks are proposed."

[via: http://frieze.com/issue/article/books2027/ AND http://halloween-in-january.tumblr.com/post/21407577412 AND http://www.jennasutela.com/frieze ]
publishing  conversations  collaborations  essays  notebooks  hatjecantz  memoryaids  memory  noticing  witnessing  writing  drawing  diagrammaticthinking  thinking  2012  2011  notetaking  notes  literature  language  economics  politics  politicaltheory  philosophy  anthropology  art  psychology  books  documenta(13)  documenta 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Journal of W. Ross Ashby
"while a 24 year old medical student…Ross [Ashby] started writing a journal…44 years later, his journal had 7,400 pages, in 25 volumes…

…digitally restored images of all 7,400 pages & 1,600 index cards are available on this web site in various views, with extensive cross-linking that is based on the keywords in Ross's original alphabetical index…

The user interface has been made as intuitive as possible, with links and pop-up information attached to everything that stood still long enough…

To browse Ross's Journal, you can perform any of the following:

1. Select a volume from the Bookshelf.
2. View the 14½ subject categories in the Other Index.
3. Browse through the 678 keywords in the alphabetical Index.
4. Enter a page number between 1 and 7189 here: then press Enter.
5. If you are looking for journal entries around a particular date use the Timeline.
6. You could read the 2,300 transcribed journal entry Summaries.
7. Throw caution to the wind, and jump to a Random page."
information  indexcards  timelines  indexes  cybernetics  systemstheory  systems  staffordbeer  toaspireto  iamnotworthy  journals  notebooks  notetaking  notes  rossashby 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Casey A. Gollan: Notes + Links: Week 4 [Casey Gollan sets the new standard in week notes. This is the ultimate record of a week's learning.]
"I’m sick & tired of things so vast I can’t understand them. Genetics. Capitalism. International relations…

Everything in my experience confirms that I am here. I stretch almost compulsively, feeling out my body’s physicality…

Somehow I have landed in a nunnery. Dedicated to the advancement of science & art. There should just be a fucking school, where people go to learn multiplication in the reproductive sense.

We are the scum of earth. The thought leaders. There is some debauchery, but in comparison this is a place of rigor. Home of chaste workers.

What’s disturbing is that the educated go out & control world. I met a consultant who has broken trust down to a science, which she sells to corporations. Trust, she says, is good for business. & what about business? What’s that good for? I asked her. She smiled smart-but-dead-like & said, you have to believe that growing the economy is good for the world. Consulting is a desired job—maybe the quintessential job—of the educated class."
adhd  add  self-help  digitalportfolios  blogging  handwrittennotes  deschooling  education  art  walking  nyc  cooperunion  evidenceoflearning  howwelearn  thisislearning  unschooling  adventure  notetaking  notes  2012  caseygollan  weeknotes 
february 2012 by robertogreco
old paradigms for a new mode « savasavasava
"Blair talks about an interesting concept: florilegium.

“… which, rather than summarizing, selected the best passages or “flowers” from authoritative sources.”

Tweets can be thought of as forced florilegium – the constraint of 140 characters forces us to distill the important or best information (our own or from others) and share it. the idea that each tweet is a specially picked flower puts the onus on the author of the tweet to be trusted to have picked the ‘best flower’ to share. this also points to the role of curator that individuals often play – we choose what to tweet based on how we would like ourselves and the communities we are affiliated with to be represented."

…Twitter allows for varied forms of note-taking, some covered by Blair, but also beyond those examples partly because of the affordances of the new tools. a type of collaborative note-taking manifests in the ‘chat’ communities on Twitter during their scheduled meetings…"

[See the comments too.]
2012  notes  florilegium  summarization  annotation  sharing  notetaking  archiving  quotes  cv  twitter  savasaheli 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Sci-Fi Hi-Fi — Twitter, Instagram, and the Journalistic Impulse
"…glaring weakness of “realtime” services like Twitter & Instagram as journalistic outlets: their narrow focus on “the now” & their relative disregard for the archival. While…the off-the-cuff, throwaway nature of Twitter or Instagram may be a big part of their appeal to otherwise reluctant amateur journalists…it’s a pretty poor journal that can’t be easily recalled later.

I’ve struggled a bit with this (I still dearly wish I could access my earliest tweets to put together my own tweet book), but I’ve recently found comfort in my friend Kellan’s notion of “long form tweeting.” Increasingly, I’ve come to think of Twitter & Instagram as notebooks where I develop & discuss ideas that I later elaborate on on my personal blog (I like to think of it a bit like F Scott Fitzgerald’s notebooks full of fragmentary ideas…). ”Real time” services are great for journalistic impetus and visceral feedback, but I’ve come go think of Tumblr as my final draft."
buzzandersen  twitter  instagram  tumblr  writing  fscottfitzgerald  journals  archives  archival  journalism  fragmentaryideas  noticing  longform  longformtweeting  tweeting  2011  notes  notetaking  thinkingoutloud 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The social life of marginalia - Bobulate
"Even if we can capture intention and overcome sharing, we might come back to consider what was formerly known as the commonplace book. How might new book designers — of any format — replicate its sense of wholeness and real-time cataloging online? Do we need to?

It’s critical that the new book designer consider how and where these marks might be shared. I’m not suggesting that all annotations be social lest we become self-conscious in our book-relationships. One of the principal pleasures of taking notes is the intimacy with a passage, the outright honesty with which one might scribble, “Gasp!” or “Hogwash,” or “True that,” for later reminding. But there will need to be equal consideration given to what to keep personal as to what to make shareable.

After all, some sentiments are best left between you and your margins."
books  annotation  reading  notetaking  marginalrevolution  commonplacebooks  via:russelldavies  sharing  lizdanzico  robinsloan  jamesbridle  cv  memory  organization  notes  bookmarks  kindle  amazon  meaning  makingmeaning  meaningmaking 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Only Collect; that is to say, collect everything,... | Coldbrain.
"I differ slightly from Rachel in terms of where it all lives. She uses DEVONthink, a program with which I’m admittedly not completely familiar. I’ve played a lot with Evernote, and whilst it kinda did what I wanted it to, there was always something vaguely uncomfortable about the mass of different types of information in there. Notes, screengrabs, clipped web pages, links, photos. It was all in once place, but it all seemed a bit disorganised, which was the opposite of what I wanted.

Instead, I try and use one piece of software for each task.1 I stick my bookmarks in Delicious, my lists and notes as plain text in Simplenote (by way of Notational Velocity), my photos in iPhoto and occasionally Flickr, &c. In short, one thing well."

[Something similar to this works for me too, though I'm not really sure whether it's because that's best for me or if it's because I've invested so much time in specialized buckets. And the "Only Collect" article is a gem — glad to see it pop up again.]

[Points to http://idlethink.wordpress.com/2008/11/26/only-collect/ AND http://al3x.net/2009/01/31/against-everything-buckets.html]
matthewculnane  everythingbuckets  collecting  bookmarks  bookmarking  del.icio.us  commonplacebooks  cv  notes  notetaking  devonthink  evernote  information 
october 2010 by robertogreco
SoundPaper - A notes app for iPad
"SoundPaper is the best way to take notes on your iPad.

It tracks what you type and draw while recording audio, so you'll never worry about missing an important detail.

While playing back your recording, just tap a word; SoundPaper will jump right to that point in the audio.

If you need to use another document or app, SoundPaper will automatically pause the recording. When you come back, just tap the "Record" button. SoundPaper will continue from where you left off.

Use SoundPaper's powerful drawing tool for quick sketches. It's easy to edit them, too. Tap a drawing to select it, or tap twice to select an individual stroke. From there, you can drag it to wherever you want, or tap "Delete" to get rid of it. Use two fingers to zoom and scroll."
ipad  applications  notes  notetaking  recording  audio  soundpaper  tcsnmy  lcproject  gestures  scrolling  zooming 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Cornell Notes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [via: http://ayjay.jottit.com/links_for_students]
"The Cornell note-taking system is a widely-used notetaking system devised in the 1950s by Walter Pauk, an education professor at Cornell University. Pauk advocated its use in his best-selling How to Study in College, but its use has spread most rapidly in the past decade."
notetaking  education  howto  organization  learning  cornellnotes  notes 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Simplenote - Fast, free, synchronized notes for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad - Home
"Simplenote replaces the Notes app on your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad. When you download Simplenote, you get free access to our web app and a variety of desktop apps, so you can access your notes from anywhere."
applications  iphone  notetaking  notes  ios 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Weeknotes.com | Talent & Fervor
"Weeknotes are updates about what your business has been doing over the past seven days or so.
aggregator  berg  schulzeandwebb  berglondon  transparency  workplace  business  tcsnmy  storytelling  notes  weeknotes  webservice  collaboration  blogging  feeds 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Software Garden Products: Dan Bricklin's Note Taker App
"Dan Bricklin's® Note Taker App (a Software Garden® product) is an app for the Apple iPhone and iPod touch.
iphone  applications  notes  notetaking  handwriting  ios 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Snarkmarket: Tracking Your Ideas, in Time and Space, With the iPhone
"So, here’s the hack: a simple iPhone-optimized page that’s nothing but a big text field. It’s a Notes substitute. But here’s what’s cool:
iphone  webapps  notetaking  snarkmarket  location  google  geolocation  notes  ideas 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Reinvented Software - Together for Mac OS X - Keep Your Stuff Together, Find It Again Instantly
"Together lets you keep everything in one place. Text, documents, images, movies, sounds, web pages and bookmarks can all be dragged to Together for safe keeping, tagged, previewed, collected together in different ways and found again instantly."
software  mac  osx  organization  tagging  productivity  library  database  applications  together  notes  via:preoccupations  libraries 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Online Web Notes - UberNote
" UberNote is an all purpose notes and personal information manager accessible through your Internet web browser. Do you use yahoo mail, gmail, or hotmail? Just like those systems allow you to access your email, UberNote is used to access your personal no
notes  productivity  tools  onlinetoolkit  webapp  notetaking  reminders  gtd  applications 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Cornell Notetaking Method Custom PDF Generator
"create custom notetaking sheets for any or all of your classes. The custom sheets can be blank (Cornell Style), ruled, or graph style. They are output with your name, the name of your class, and the date - that is, if you provide that information."
onlinetoolkit  pdf  generator  notetaking  productivity  notes  tools  gtd  studentsupplylist  classideas 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Rands In Repose: Sweet Decay
"halfway through those pages of horrible cursive, I stopped expecting to be graded and started writing for myself...primary goal of a notebook is to get out of the way...I needed lines in 3rd grade when I was learning how to write. I’m good now, thanks.
writing  notebooks  moleskine  productivity  paper  journals  reviews  tools  notes  notetaking  process  howwework  children  schooliness  deschooling  unschooling  homeschool  creativity  gifts  srg  glvo 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Linus Pauling Research Notebooks - Special Collections
"As with many scientists, Linus Pauling utilized bound notebooks to keep track of the details of his research as it unfolded. A testament to the remarkable length and diversity of Dr. Pauling's career, the Pauling Papers holdings include forty-six research notebooks spanning the years of 1922 to 1994 and covering any number of the scientific fields in which Dr. Pauling involved himself. In this regard, the notebooks contain many of Pauling's laboratory calculations and experimental data, as well as scientific conclusions, ideas for further research and numerous autobiographical musings."
linuspauling  experiments  science  chemistry  notebooks  notetaking  database  history  notes  reference 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Remember everything. | Evernote Corporation
"Evernote allows you to easily capture information in any environment using whatever device or platform you find most convenient, and makes this information accessible and searchable at anytime, from anywhere."
software  productivity  evernote  memory  web  online  internet  search  bookmarks  bookmarking  aggregator  semanticweb  webapps  notetaking  mindmapping  gtd  memex  database  onlinetoolkit  iphone  notebooks  notes 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Lawsuit Claim: Students' Lecture Notes Infringe on Professor's Copyright | Threat Level from Wired.com
"Those notes are illegal, Faulkner and Moulton contend, since they are derivative works of the professor's copyrighted lectures."
copyright  education  law  plagiarism  notes  ip  colleges  universities 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Evernote Offers a Backup For Your Brain | Compiler from Wired.com
"Evernote wants to be a database for every bit of knowledge in your life. It takes all of the digital data you collect throughout your day, both the important and the inconsequential, and stores them in a centrally-located library that's accessible in an
lifelogging  memory  notes  notetaking  productivity  backup  evernote  windows  mac  catalog  archiving  applications  software  service  online  web  onlinetoolkit  internet 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Mindomo - Web-based mind mapping software
"Mindomo is a versatile Web-based mind mapping tool, delivering the capabilities of desktop mind mapping software in a Web browser - with no complex software to install or maintain."
charts  collaboration  collaborative  diagrams  drawing  mindmap  mindmapping  notes  organization  onlinetoolkit  visualization  visual 
december 2007 by robertogreco
blog.pmarca.com: Applied note-taking taken to a whole new level
"New aspirational goal for any aspiring lifehacker: write notes on a pad of paper without taking the pad out of your pocket!"
howwework  notetaking  writing  paper  notes 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Edgies 2.0 | Edgies | ONERIVER
"Edgies is a Stickies type memo and launcher application. Unlike Stickies, it won't take spaces on the screen."
mac  osx  notes  software  utilities  widgets 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Weblogg-ed » What’s Your Process?
"What do you do when you read a couple of sentences in a post or article that really resonate? How do you capture and organize those snippets? What tools? How often do you recall those sentences, access them? How do you search? Is your process working?"
comments  search  notetaking  notes  writing  blogging  process  organization  howwework  software  information  informationmanagement 
october 2007 by robertogreco

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