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robertogreco : nuvu   10

Kate's Story - YouTube
[from the NuVu website:

"Kate Reed
Our first full time student, Kate Reed, completed her high school years (grades 9-12) at NuVu and graduated in 2017. She is currently pursuing an undergraduate degree in design and engineering at the dual degree program between RISD and Brown. Her story is inspiring and one of the reasons why we believe in the power of creative learning and encourage students to pursue their passions."]
nuvustudio  education  learning  schools  unschooling  deschooling  making  art  design  2016  lcproject  openstudioproject  tcsnmy  sfsh  alternative  nuvu 
april 2018 by robertogreco
School-as-Studio Immerses Students in Creative Problem Solving | Edutopia
"Nearly 50 students attend NuVu full time during the regular school year. That means they "do" middle or high school in a multiage setting without traditional classes. Some come for a trimester; others stay for multiple years. Students earn elective credits by choosing from a selection of two-week studio topics that are intentionally designed to cross disciplines. (Some high school students also take online courses to satisfy additional academic requirements.) Recent projects have focused on everything from futuristic fashion to biotechnology.

NuVu co-founder and chief creative officer Saba Ghole describes the studio approach this way: "We're deliberately mixing ages and grade levels. We want diverse perspectives and skill sets in each studio. We start with a theme for the trimester, develop design briefs, build in content, and then bring in interesting people to facilitate.""

NuVu co-founder and chief creative officer Saba Ghole describes the studio approach this way: "We're deliberately mixing ages and grade levels. We want diverse perspectives and skill sets in each studio. We start with a theme for the trimester, develop design briefs, build in content, and then bring in interesting people to facilitate."

A recent trimester, for example, focused broadly on health topics. One studio zeroed in on addressing the needs of low-income youth who are living with cerebral palsy. "How could our students design products, wearables, or clothing for a youth audience? We had physical therapists and doctors who coached our students to help frame the pain points," Ghole explains.

More insights came from a family in Mexico whose daughter has cerebral palsy. After research and Skype interviews to better understand the health issues and the user experience, a team of NuVu students designed an improved lift vest. "Existing ones are kind of ugly. Users wanted something functional but also fashionable," Ghole says. Another team designed a stabilizing hand brace with attachable tools (printed on a 3D printer) for drawing and painting.

In June, NuVu students will travel to Monterrey, Mexico, to field test their products. "It's a real issue, real audience. Theory meets tangible outcome," Ghole says.

Critique Culture

NuVu students learn through the design process -- questioning, researching, modeling, prototyping, and improving their work in response to feedback. They also communicate their ideas through final presentations and document their learning in portfolios.

"The critique culture is a new and uncomfortable space for many students when they arrive," admits Ghole. Coaches ease newcomers into the process, starting with self-portraits that students manipulate using Photoshop. When students can see their work improve with feedback and revision, "then it becomes intuitive," she says.

The design process and studio culture are cornerstones of the learning experience, but that doesn't mean every project unfolds in the same way. "The process is messy," Ghole acknowledges, "and there will be variations based on where you start. It's not a formula.""



"Into the Wider World

The creativity and energy that fuel the learning experience at NuVu are starting to spread to distant corners of the globe. Through a long-term collaboration with the American School of Bombay, Ghole regularly brings a team of highly specialized NuVu coaches to Mumbai, India.

Earlier this year, ASB middle school students took part in an immersive, four-day experience called Studio 6. They could choose from 11 studio topics, such as designing games to improve global health, producing documentary films about Mumbai, composing electronic music to tell stories, or making art for public spaces. Each studio was assigned a NuVu coach with deep content expertise -- such as a physician knowledgeable about global pandemics -- plus regular classroom teachers to help manage the learning experience.

For teachers and students alike, Studio 6 offers a change from school-as-usual. For staff, the week provides a context to implement instructional practices such as project-based learning, design thinking, interdisciplinary learning, and making and tinkering. For students, the experience is high on the fun factor, but not fluff.

Pip Curtis, principal of ASB middle school, says that each studio maps to important learning goals, including 21st-century skills such as collaboration and creativity. Students reflect on their own growth, receive peer feedback, and are assessed by coaches and teachers. (Read Curtis' reflections on the development of Studio 6 in the ASB journal, Future Forwards.)

Worth Considering

Are there ideas that other schools might borrow from NuVu? Here are a few to consider.

If your school is considering a shift to PBL, design thinking, or interdisciplinary learning, a short-term studio experience might give teachers a chance to test-drive these instructional strategies. How might you connect a short-term studio experience with professional learning goals? How could school leaders help to prepare teachers for a successful experience?

Does your school encourage a "critique culture"? How do you help students understand that formative assessment and revision will help them to produce higher-quality results and reach their own learning goals?

Do you encourage students to reflect on their problem-solving process? Consider different ways that students might capture their reflections, such as blogs, photo galleries, sketches, or videos of work in progress. (See examples on the NuVu website, including these reflections about the wheelchair project.)

How do you engage with experts? NuVu has been intentional about developing a go-to list of content experts from diverse fields who enjoy sharing what they know with students. How might you develop your own network of content experts? Please share your suggestions in the comments section below."

[via: http://willrichardson.com/post/121273290220/from-pbl-to-pbw ]
nuvu  nuvustudio  2015  education  studioclassroom  sabaghole  suzieboss  lcproject  tcsnmy  openstudioproject  howweteach  cv  howwelearn 
june 2015 by robertogreco
No Courses, No Classrooms, No Grades — Just Learning | MindShift
"NuVu is the brainchild of Saeed Arida, a former PhD student from MIT who believes that young people should be taught to solve real-world problems, like using new materials to design higher-quality prosthetics.

“Studios are not subjects in the traditional sense, as they involve finding a solution for a very real human problem,” said Arida. “What students do here is a very different kind of educational experience.”

Here’s How NuVu describes the program:
NuVu is a full-time magnet innovation center for middle and high school students. NuVu’s pedagogy is based on the architectural Studio model and geared around multi-disciplinary, collaborative projects. We basically teach students how to navigate the messiness of the creative process, from inception to completion.

No Courses: Instead, we have studios. Around 12 kids work closely with their 2 coaches on solving big (and small) open-ended problems.

No Subjects: Instead, everything is fused together. Students find themselves moving between a studio that requires them to design a telepresence robot to another that requires them to re-imagine Boston with a cable car system.

No Classrooms: Instead, we have an open space that changes all the time to adapt to the needs of every studio.

No One-Hour Schedule: Instead, students spend two weeks from 9-3 solving one problem.

No Grades: Instead, we have portfolios that document students’ design decisions and show their final products.

But can anyone visualize this happening in today’s public schools? Project-based learning programs like NuVu are not particularly common throughout the U.S., with notable exceptions like High Tech High and New Tech Network. Most K-12 classrooms in America are fairly new to project-based learning, or don’t offer it at all. Typically speaking, only the most elite schools in the wealthiest neighborhoods can afford to experiment with PBL.

NuVu got its start by partnering with Beaver County Day School in Brookline, Mass., an elite independent school attended by the sons and daughters of Harvard and MIT graduates, which is positioning itself as digitally-savvy and progressive institution. Notably, it was the first U.S. school to make it a requirement for students to take computer programming lessons.

NuVu’s program doesn’t come cheap. It costs $8,000 per student per trimester. The company offers scholarships, and to Arida’s credit, he’s looking for ways to involve students from public schools in the area by forging partnerships with neighboring public schools to make NuVu available as an elective.

But for most entrepreneurs, selling schools (particularly budget-strapped public schools) on incorporating PBL programs into their core curriculum is an ongoing challenge.

“We haven’t seen many of these project-based learning programs scale rapidly,” said Michael Staton, an investor at education-focused venture firm Learn Capital. “Partnering with schools is fine if you can figure out how to do that efficiently,” Staton added. “But most entrepreneurs have no idea.”

The crux of the problem, according to Staton, is that most schools are sticking to core subjects and the bell system, which doesn’t leave much time for exploratory projects. Outside of school, most students can only access project-based programs online and in their own time. The best known services are DIY.org, an instructional guide for budding makers, and the various project-based learn-to-code courses from Code.org, General Assembly, and Khan Academy. But most high schoolers would tell you that they’re already overwhelmed with juggling college admissions, after-school, clubs, volunteering and homework. Good luck adding another project to their plate."

The Tide Is Turning

To make PBL more mainstream, the change may need to come from within. There’s a movement afoot to make project-based learning an integral part of every child’s education. Organizations like P21 (Partnership for 21st Century Skills) and Buck Institute are helping to bridge the gap between entrepreneurs, businesses, teachers and state superintendents. P21 partners with representatives in 18 states, including Arizona, California, and Massachusetts, and provides teachers with tools and resources for project-based learning. In addition, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation habitually provides funding to PBL schools, particularly those that foster digital skills. These organizations’ aim is bring PBL programs into classrooms, rather than expecting students to participate in their free time.

Schools don’t need to follow NuVu’s model to the tee. In fact, this approach may seem radical, as students do not receive grades or formal examinations and the learning doesn’t happen in physical classrooms. But teachers can take inspiration from NuVu and the various interactive online courses. For instance, Muscatine High School in Iowa has found success with its G2 Global Generation Exponential Learning initiative. High schoolers learn math and engineering in classrooms and by making water purification systems, or building statistical models for new bus routes. Younger students at middle school research trash statistics, and participate in oral history projects.
Arida hopes that NuVu’s program will pave the way for ed-tech entrepreneurs to launch similar ventures in other states.

“We’re presenting a different way to think about education, he said. “Students are empowered to be creative, and actually execute on their ideas. Isn’t that the lesson we should be teaching our kids?”"
nuvu  nuvustudio  openstudiproject  lcproject  saeedarida  grades  grading  projectbasedlearning  schedules  scheduling  studioclassrooms  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  transdisciplinary  design  designthinking  2014  learning  education  unschooling  deschooling  schools  pbl 
april 2014 by robertogreco
RADical Design for LEARNING -- Survey Seminar and Practical Action Laboratory
"Wtf is going on? Why are people limping out of 20 years of schooling without directed motivation, a solid internal compass, or a commitment to passionately pursuing their interests? Let's examine why in a cozy, edgy, authentic seminar where we balance theory with real-world action (praxis). We'll study the radical learning greats such as Illich, Papert, and Llewelyn, with focused readings and videos followed by discussion. Whenever possible we'll try to have the authors or their direct students available for Q&A&Q. And through hands-on labs and projects we'll design and enact experience-based transformations, like improvised music, consciousness altering strategies, electronics workshops etc. We can't wait to see you realize your wonderful ideas!"
unschooling  deschooling  education  syllabus  jaysilver  ericrosenbaum  mit  learning  mitmedialab  medialab  lifelongkindergarten  amosblanton  lego  seymourpapert  ivanillich  gracellewelyn  bilalghalib  jefflieberman  making  hackerspaces  lcproject  makerspaces  openstudioproject  grading  rubrics  assessment  diy  notbacktoschoolcamp  johnholt  piaget  mitchresnick  leahbuechley  eleanorduckworth  nuvu  nuvustudio  holeinthewall  sugatamitra  sprout  elsistema  theblueschool  computerclubhouse  drishya  bakhtiarmikhak  sudburyschools  sudburyvalleyschool  samcassat  seanstevens  frostburn  quaker  criticalmass  burningman  paulofreire  quakers  sprout&co  jeanpiaget  syllabi 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Groupshot
"Informality is the condition of an unplanned system and arises spontaneously. While informal systems can be inefficient, they also provide a range of emergent and positive services.

Groupshot designs new processes and tools that engage the positive qualities of informality. The result is an enhancement of the capabilities of informal systems, and the optimal connection between the best of the informal and the benefits of the formal."
design  informality  informalsystems  nuvustudio  ibo  frontlinessms  instituteforgloballeadership  lcproject  glvo  india  informal  afghanistan  southafrica  capetown  groupshot  scalability  developingworld  nairobi  kenya  haiti  port-au-prince  technology  projectideas  classideas  humanitariandesign  nuvu  scale 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Please, NO Grades Teachers :: NuVu studio
"For our NuVu Studio, we wanted to create a space where students could learn how to learn in a way that nurtured their creative process and inspired them to innovate. In such an environment, we wanted our kids to work together, come up with many ideas – not just one answer or idea, freely discuss their ideas, look at things from multiple perspectives, defer all judgments, challenge assumptions, take as many risks and try out new moves, make tons and tons of mistakes AND learn from these mistakes, all as part of the process of discovery and innovation. And this meant very clearly for us, removing grading from our studio. But without grading, how would students be motivated to work? The motivation to do/create is a key aspect of the design studio. If you ask our students, the motivation to create comes from an intrinsic feeling based on the fact that they are working on real projects that they themselves feel are meaningful and matter. The students come up with the project idea…"
nuvustudio  education  learning  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  grades  grading  assessment  projectbasedlearning  problemsolving  studioclassroom  motivation  émilechartier  beavercountryday  reflection  self-reflection  2011  nuvu  pbl 
september 2011 by robertogreco
:: NuVu studio
"Students register for a specific studio such as “Balloon Mapping”, “Music and the City”, or “Future of Global Warming” of which there will be approximately 10 students, one Coach and an Assistant Coach. The Coach begins by providing a general overview of a problem to the students, an ambiguous real-world problem with potentially millions of answers. With the Coach’s help each student frames the problem from his/her perspective and enters into an iterative development process supported by the studio team of students & advisors.

Students are provided with access to outside resources – leading thinkers and experts – to whom they present their framework and receive feedback. Students document their process and progress, continually reviewing it with the Coach. They set parameters, synthesize, and continue refining, refining, refining. NuVu trains students to apply multiple perspectives to challenge and refine ideas over and over again until it becomes a natural way of learning."

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5ZlJVHfiYg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmY2_Xlhpng and
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4f4vb7GBIg&list=PL4D54C52BBC9A68D8 ]
education  engineering  highschool  lcproject  openstudio  mit  pedagogy  stem  design  make  innovation  technology  problemsolving  learning  boston  process  unschooling  deschooling  studioclassroom  designthinking  nuvu  nuvustudio 
november 2010 by robertogreco
designfiction :: NuVu studio
"In “Design Fiction Studio,” we will focus on experimental ways to combine science fiction story telling w/ new forms of media production. The students will be asked to write a short science-fiction story & expected to illustrate it in an experimental book. We will explore ways to combine alternative materials–such as very basic electronic elements, conductive inks, phase-&color-changing materials– w/ new kinds of fabrication & production techniques to learn both about materials & way they can be used in different kinds of fictional products.

Topics to be covered:

—Basic scifi writing skills to develop a short story or concept that will address a problem we may have in the near future.

—Experiment w/ new kinds of smart materials, design & interaction techniques to build an interactive book to illustrate the story.

—Discuss how writing fiction & building fictional objects can contribute to our thinking & allow us to bring into attention problems before they may even emerge."

[via: http://www.nearfuturelaboratory.com/2010/07/30/design-fiction-studio-for-young-minds/ ]
designfiction  education  future  learning  design  julianbleecker  mit  writing  classideas  nearfuture  brucesterling  scifi  sciencefiction  science  newmedia  multimedia  objects  fiction  designfictionstudio  nuvustudio  nuvu 
august 2010 by robertogreco

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