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robertogreco : occupy.here   8

LibraryBox
"LibraryBox is an open source, portable digital file distribution tool based on inexpensive hardware that enables delivery of educational, healthcare, and other vital information to individuals off the grid."
libraris  hardware  opensource  occupy.here  librarybox  piratebox  classideas  projectideas  via:unthinkingly 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Beautiful Interfaces
"Beautiful Interfaces Deepweb/Darknet – P2P Gallery, is a project focus in create file-sharing networks to show and support media art as a data outside of the conventional WWW. Created in 2013 by Miyö Van Stenis was part of the first edition of The Wrong - New Digital Art Biennale as an official pavilion called Beautiful Interfaces: The Deep in the Void, an Deepweb file-sharing exhibition.

BI The privacy paradox

Beautiful Interfaces: The privacy paradox explores the concept of privacy versus self-exposure, through a platform that allows distribution and creates content in a more independent and anonymous way. In the era of algorithm prediction, all our online actions have a digital trace, used by companies and governments to predict our behaviors. The artists in the exhibition comment on dichotomous situations between the private and the public.

This new edition of Beautiful Interfaces is a decentralized network to show and distribute new media art - a web island accessible via a private network from hacked wifi routers, which are not connected to the Internet. Each router has a private network, allowing visitors to connect from their own devices, cell phones or ipads, in order to view the exhibition.

Beautiful Interfaces: The privacy paradox is powered by Occupy.here

Occupy.here developed by Dan Phiffer in 2011, it’s a custom OpenWRT, free, anonymous and uncensored resource for share media information in the virtual space. For more information visit http://occupyhere.org "

[see also:
https://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/offline-wireless-network-art-show

"Beautiful Interfaces: The Privacy Paradox is the very first offline wireless network-based group show. Displayed by five private networks powered by hacked routers emitting straight from the New York city-based multidisciplinary workspace and art gallery REVERSE, the exhibition showcases digital works by Jennifer Lyn Morone, Heather Dewey-Hagborg, LaTurbo Avedon, Annie Rose Malamet and Carla Gannis that you can view using your favorite mobile electronic devices—smartphones, tablets, etc.—starting from April 14th.

Beautiful Interfaces questions personal data’s safety in the Internet Age. As we reach a tipping point; the one when there are no boundaries anymore between private and public, the artists, and curators Helena Acosta and Miyö Van Stenis, team up to explore privacy issues online. By creating an anonymous data-sharing platform, they explore and critique corporate and government influence and surveillance, and warn us about how web-based algorithms are used to take advantage of our online behaviors and browsing habits—and how it seems like it's just the beginning, regarding the ever-growing use and efficiency of facial recognition tools.

Bring your device to REVERSE from April 14 to May 15, 2016 to safely enjoy a few network-based eye candies. As part of the CreativeTech Week New York 2016, a panel discussion called "Post Privacy: is privacy becoming a thing of the past?" will also accompany the exhibition, with participation from the creator of occupy.here, Dan Phiffer, curator Lior Zalmanzon, and the artists Carla Gannis and Jennifer Lyn Morone."]
occupy.here  danphiffer  darknet  deepweb  jenniferlynmorone  heatherdewey-hagborg  laturboavedon  annierosemalamet  carlagannis 
march 2016 by robertogreco
This Mesh We're In: Why Communities Are Building An Internet That's More Local | Fast Company | Business + Innovation
"Recently, a pair of artists in New York put forward an unusual plan for teaching middle school students about the Internet: specifically, by teaching them how to get off it and build their own.

OurNet will combine two series of lessons: one on building a social network, and the other dedicated to constructing a private network, or "darknet," in the classroom. In the process, write Joanne McNeil and Dan Phiffer in their proposal, students will learn important concepts about how the Internet works. Last week the project was awarded a $35,000 grant from a MacArthur Foundation digital learning initiative.

Unlike the physical networks of Time Warner and Verizon or the virtual networks of Facebook and Instagram, however, the networks they and their students build will be noncommercial, and limited to people in their Wi-Fi range. That’s not just a way to simplify the lesson: It’s a deliberate choice to help students think about alternatives to corporate Internet providers and platforms built around advertising and tracking.

"This is an opportunity for the students to see what kind of middlemen they don’t need to connect—the idea that you can socialize with people without going on Facebook, or the idea that you can actually have a network that’s not through an ISP," says McNeil.

OurNet is part of a growing movement that aims to consider and build alternative computer networks. The wireless network idea adds to a growing number of small, independent, nonprofit wireless community networks, often organized as so-called "mesh networks" for their weblike, decentralized design, in which each node—a phone, for instance, or a sophisticated wireless router—relays the connection onwards to the next node. OurNet, with one central classroom router, will have an even simpler structure, though it shares the mesh networks' philosophy of decentralization.

The ad hoc approach has gained attention for its usefulness in more extreme situations. Various mesh networks have been deployed to improve communication at Occupy Wall Street and at Hong Kong's Occupy Central, for instance, and the State Department has funded their installation in Detroit and Tunisia, where they're thought of as a way to extend Internet service and avoid government surveillance. They've also been used to improve communications after disasters to replace severed communications links.

One network in Red Hook, Brooklyn, built by activists as a way to help the neighborhood stay connected and get emergency updates after superstorm Sandy struck New York in 2012, last week received a grant from one of the city's resiliency initiatives."
joannemcneil  danphiffer  education  internet  ournet  wireless  meshnetworks  ows  occupywallstreet  occupy.here  sarahgrant  subnodes  stevenmelendez  infrastructure  shahselbejerthorpe  guifi  guifi.net  hyperboria  isp  chicagomeshnetjefflunt  nycmesh  history  web  raspberypi  projectideas  edtech 
may 2015 by robertogreco
PirateBox by David Darts
"PirateBox is a self-contained mobile communication and file sharing system. Simply turn it on to transform any space into a free and open communications and file sharing network."

[See also: http://piratebox.cc/
http://piratebox.cc/openwrt:diy

http://occupyhere.org/
http://librarybox.us/index.php ]

[via: http://www.furtherfield.org/programmes/event/piratebox-cutlery-auto-net ]
projectieas  occupy.here  hardware  darknets  networks  opensource  communication  glvo  openstudioproject  lcproject  tecnology  davidarts  librarybox  wifi  filesharing 
february 2015 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] interpretation roomba
"Part of the reason these two quotes interest me is that I've been thinking a lot about origin stories and creation myths. I've been thinking about how we recognize and choose the imagery and narratives — the abstractions — that we use to re-tell a story. There's nothing a priori wrong with those choices. We have always privileged certain moments over others as vehicles for conveying the symbolism of an event."



"I've been thinking about history as the space between the moments that come to define an event. History being the by-product of a sequence of events pulling apart from each, over time, leaving not just the peaks a few dominant imagery but the many valleys of interpretation.

When I think of it this way I am always reminded of Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics in which he celebrates "the magic in the gutter". The "gutter" being the space between frames where action is unseen and left to imagination of the reader. These are the things I think of when I consider something like the 9/11 Memorial and the construction of a narrative around the event it commemorates.

Not much is left to abstraction and so it feels as though the memorial itself acts as a vacuum against interpretation, at all. It is a kind of "Interpretation-Roomba" that moves through your experience of the venue sucking up any space in which you might be able to consider the event outside of the master narrative."



"After the panel some of us went out for drinks and for people of a certain it was difficult not to fall prey to moments sounding exactly like our parents and saying things like: The kids today, they don't know what it was like back in the day when all we had were bulletin board systems... I mention this for a couple reasons.

The first is to ask the question: Is a slow network akin to no network at all? It is hard to imagine going back to the dial-up speeds of the 1990's Internet and I expect it would be a shock to someone who's never experienced them but I think we would all do well to keep Staehle's comments about the time to broadcast and the time to relay in mind.

The second is that as we were all sitting around the table waxing nostalgic about 28.8 Kbps modems I remember thinking: Actually, when I first discovered the web I wanted the next generation to be able to take this for granted. I wanted the "kids" to live in a world where the Internet was just part of the fabric of life, where it didn't need to be a philosophical moment everytime you got online.

The good news is that this has, by and large, happened. The bad news is we've forgotten why it was important in the first place and if it feels like the Network is governed by, and increasingly defined, by a kind of grim meathook fatalism I think maybe that's why.

Somewhere in all the excitement of the last 20 years we forgot, or at least neglected, the creation myth and the foundational story behind the Network and in doing so we have left open a kind of narrative vacuum. We have left the space to say why the Network exists at all to those who would see it shaped in ways that are perhaps at odds with the very reasons that made it special in the first place."



"A question I've been asking myself as I've been thinking about this talk is: Does a littlenet simply transit data or does it terminate that data? Is a littlenet specific to a place? Are littlenets defined by the effort is takes to get there? That seems a bit weird, almost antithetical to the idea of the Network, right?

Maybe not though or maybe it's less about littlenets acting like destinations or encouraging a particular set of rituals but instead simply taking advantage of the properties the Network offers to provide bespoke services. For example, what if bars ran captive portal networks that you couldn't get out of, like Dan Phiffer's Occupy.here, but all they did was offer access to a dictionary?

That might seem like an absurb example at first but let it sink in for a minute or two and if you're like me you'll find yourself thinking that would be kind of awesome. A dictionary in a bar is a polite of saying We're here to foster the conversation on your own terms rather than dictate it on ours.

A dictionary in a bar would be a "service" in the, well, service of the thing that bars don't need any help with: conversation, socializing, play. People aren't going to stop frequenting bars that they don't have dictionaries in them, but a bar with a dictionary in it is that much better.

If a littlenet does not terminate then does it or should it engage in traffic shaping? What separates littlenet from a fake cell phone towers? What about deep packet inspection (DPI) ? What about goatse? If a littlenet does not drink the common carrier Kool-Aid is it still a Network or just gated-community for like minded participants?

None of these problems go away just because a network is little and, in fact, their little-ness and the potential ubiquity of littlenets only exascerbates the problem. It casts the questions around an infrastructure of trust as much as an infrastructure of reach in to relief.

We have historically relied on the scarcity and the difficulty of access to the tools that can manipulate the Network at, well, the network layer as a way to manage those questions of trust. Ultimately, littlenets force those larger issues of how we organize (and by definition how we limit) ourselves as a community to the fore. It speaks to the question of public institutions and their mandates. It speaks to the question of philosophy trumping engineering.

It speaks to the question of how we articulate an idea of the Network and why we believe it is important and what we do to preserve those qualities."



"It goes like this: If we liken the network to weather what does it mean to think of its climate as too hostile for any one person to survive in isolation? What would that mean, really? I have no idea and I recognize that this is one line of argument in support of a benevolent all-seeing surveillance state but perhaps there are parallels to be found in the way that cold-weather countries organize themselves relative to the reality of winter. Regardless of your political stripes in those countries there is common cause in not letting people face those months alone to die of exposure.

I really don't know how or whether this translates to the Network in part because it's not clear to me whether the problem is not having access to the Network, not having unfettered access to the Network (think of those Facebook-subsidized and Facebook-only data plans for mobile phones) or that the Network itself, left unchecked, is in fact a pit of vipers.

Should the state suspend reality in the service of a mandate for the Network the way that they sometimes do for universal health care or, if you live in the US, the highway system? Is that just what we now call network neutrality or should we do more to temper the consequences of assuming the Network is inherently hostile? To activiely foster a more communitarian sensibilities and safeguards?

You're not supposed to say this out loud, particularly in light of events like the Snowden revelations, but the reality is that societies announce that 2+2=5 because "reasons" all the time."



"My issue is that we have spent a good deal of the last 500 years (give or take) trying to make visibility a legitimate concern. We have spent a lot of time and lot of effort arguing that there is a space for voices outside the dominant culture and to now choose to retract in to invisibility, as a tactic, seems counter-productive at best and fitting the needs of people who were never really down the project at worst.

The only reason many of know each other is because we were willing, because we desired, to stick our head above the parapet and say "I am here". Acting in public remains complicated and is still decidedly unfair for many but if the creation myth of visibility is one of malice-by-default then we might have a bigger problem on our hands."



"The problem I have with littlenets is that I want to live in a world with a "biggernet" that doesn't make me sad or suspect or hate everyone around me. The concern I have with littlenets is that they offer a rhetorical bluff from which to avoid the larger social questions that a networked world lay bare. And that in avoiding those questions we orphan the reasons (the creation myths) why the Network seemed novel and important in the first place.

There's a meme which has bubbling up more and more often these days, advanced by people like Ingrid and others, that perhaps libraries should operate as internet service providers. That the mandate of a publicly-minded institution like a library is best suited to a particular articulation of the Network as a possibility space.

Libraries lend books on the principle that access to information is value in and of itself not because they know what people will do with that knowledge. Libraries have also been some of the earliest adopters of littlenets in the service of that same principle in the form of electronic distribution hubs. I bet some of those littlenets even have dictionaries on them.

So, despite my reservations and in the interests of defaulting to action maybe we should all endeavour to run our own read-only littlenets of stuff we think is worth preserving and sharing. If the politics and the motives surrounding the Network are going to get all pear-shaped in the years to come then maybe littlenets are our own samizdat and the means to save what came before and to say as much to ourselves as to others: This is how it should be."
aaronstraupcope  2014  history  storytelling  time  memory  scottmccloud  abstraction  gaps  memorial  objects  artifacts  shareholdervalue  motive  confidence  internet  web  purpose  networks  littlenets  meshnetworks  community  communities  occupy.here  visibility  invisibility  legibility  illegibility  samizdat  realpolitik  access  information  ingridburrington  libraries  sharing  online  commons 
october 2014 by robertogreco
jedahan/haiku-wifi · GitHub
"haiku wifi is a neighborhood bulletin board, hosted on a router, living in the wireless cloud.

look for wireless networks to see the current haiku. connect to the haiku network to write a new haiku."

[in use: http://cooper-wifi-poetry.tumblr.com/]
poetry  writing  wifi  projectideas  occupy.here  haiku  classideas  via:caseygollan 
march 2014 by robertogreco
LibraryBox
"LibraryBox is an open source, portable digital file distribution tool based on inexpensive hardware that enables delivery of educational, healthcare, and other vital information to individuals off the grid."

[via: https://twitter.com/davidtedu/status/438579734922805248 ]

[See also: http://occupyhere.org/
https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:a567897ee14f ]

"Expanded Hardware
LibraryBox v2.0 now runs on a wide variety of hardware, including the preferrred MR3020, but also the MR3040, the WR703N, and much more. Now you can choose the hardware best for your particular need, and build your LibraryBox to suit.

Statistics
LibraryBox v2.0 now collects statistics on its use, and displays them to users. On the homepage, you can see the top 10 most downloaded items, and on the statistics page you can see both number of users per day and a full list of all downloads. These statistics are completely anonymous, and no identifying information about users is retained.

Bootstrap 3.0
The entirety of the web interface has been redesigned. Not only is the web front end now on the USB drive (making development much easier) but it's based on the Bootstrap 3 framework. This standard makes it simple for libraries and individuals to modify the interface to suit their needs.

Auto Sync/Mesh
LibraryBox v2.0 has a service built in that will allow you to have installed Boxen located in physically inaccessible areas that can be automatically updated simply by bringing a "master" box into range of their wifi signal. The remote Boxen will automatically see the Master, and update their content to match, no intervention or attention necessary.

Easier Installation
Making your own LibraryBox couldn't be much easier than the v2.0 makes it. Copy some files, update one file via a web browser, and then just wait while the software does its work. One-step installation!

Custom Configurations
We've moved most of the request configuration options to the USB thumb drive, allowing users to very easily change things like the SSID of the LibraryBox, the power of the wifi, the wifi channel, and even the local hostname of the LibraryBox server. It's never been easier to customize to just your needs."
librarybox  networks  wifi  diy  projectideas  openstudioproject  routers  occupy.here  darknets  distributed  distributednetworks  opensource 
february 2014 by robertogreco
occupy.here / a tiny self-contained darknet
"What is it?
Each Occupy.here router is a LAN island in an archipelago of affiliated websites.

Anyone within range of an Occupy.here wifi router, with a web-capable smartphone or laptop, can join the network “OCCUPY.HERE,” load the locally-hosted website http://occupy.here, and use the message board to connect with other users nearby. The open source forum software offers a simple, mobile-friendly interface where users can share messages and files.

The project has developed in parallel with the Occupy movement and seeks to offer a network of virtual spaces where both committed activists and casual supporters can communicate.

Due to its distributed and autonomous design, Occupy.here is inherently resistant to Internet surveillance. Building up a collective network infrastructure that is owned and controlled by its users can lay the groundwork for other uses and applications. We don't have to choose between abstaining from social media and entrusting our data to corporate interests. We just need to take a greater responsibility for our own online services.

The idea
The project started in October 2011, with the goal to create a written supplement to the spoken conversations in Liberty Square (aka Zuccotti park). I wasn’t able to spend as much time in the park as I wanted, so I thought about how I might connect with others who passed through intermittently via an “offline forum.” Restricting the forum to those within the local wifi range created a self-selecting audience, and also (perhaps) created one more incentive to visit the occupation.

Since Liberty Square has been cleared and the Occupy Wall Street movement is now more decentralized, the goals for the project have adjusted. Instead of (or, perhaps, in addition to) augmenting the experience of being in an OWS encampment, we are building an archipelago of virtual spaces to host conversations similar to those in Liberty Square. More than ever, both “activists” and ”non-activists” alike need to have spaces for open discussion.

The new focus is to create a distributed network of wifi locations, each serving those in its immediate vicinity. These separate networks will soon be able to connect to each other, although that functionality is still under development.

How you can help
The project seeks collaborators of all kinds. You can help write the code, build and host your own wifi node, or simply participate in the conversation.

Dan Phiffer is the founder and lead developer, with further contributions from GitHub user Phaeilo. You should join us!"

[See also; http://rhizome.org/editorial/2013/oct/1/tiny-self-contained-darknet/ ]
danphiffer  occupy  ows  occupywallstreet  codeforamerica  networks  wifi  diy  projectideas  openstudioproject  routers  occupy.here  darknets  distributed  distributednetworks  opensource 
october 2013 by robertogreco

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