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robertogreco : oceans   77

Freightened Film - The Real Price of Shipping
"THE FILM
FREIGHTENED – The Real Price of Shipping, reveals in an audacious investigation the mechanics and perils of cargo shipping; an all-but-visible industry that relentlessly supplies 7 billion humans and holds the key to our economy, our environment and the very model of our civilisation.

Synopsis
FREIGHTENED_documentary_polarstarfilms90% of the goods we consume in the West are manufactured in far-off lands and brought to us by ship. The cargo shipping industry is a key player in world economy and forms the basis of our very model of modern civilisation; without it, it would be impossible to fulfil the ever-increasing demands of our societies. Yet the functioning and regulations of this business remain largely obscure to many, and its hidden costs affect us all. Due to their size, freight ships no longer fit in traditional city harbours; they have moved out of the public’s eye, behind barriers and check points. The film answers questions such as: Who pulls the strings in this multi-billion dollar business? To what extent does the industry control our policy makers? How does it affect the environment above and below the water-line? And what’s life like for modern seafarers? Taking us on a journey over seas and oceans, FREIGHTENED reveals in an audacious investigation the many faces of world-wide freight shipping and sheds light on the consequences of an all-but-visible industry."
film  shipping  sustainability  civilization  economics  globalization  oceans  cargo  environment 
27 days ago by robertogreco
Ama - The Pearl Diving Mermaids of Japan (Warning: Nudity) - Gakuranman
"One of the lesser-known but fascinating parts of Japanese culture is that of the Ama pearl divers. Ama (海女 in Japanese), literally means ‘woman of the sea’ and is recorded as early as 750 in the oldest Japanese anthology of poetry, the Man’yoshu. These women specialised in freediving some 30 feet down into cold water wearing nothing more than a loincloth. Utilising special techniques to hold their breath for up to 2 minutes at a time, they would work for up to 4 hours a day in order to gather abalone, seaweed and other shellfish."

[See also: https://jezebel.com/the-disappearing-ama-japans-tough-topless-free-divin-1679290183 ]

[Tangentially related:
https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/culture-of-jeju-haenyeo-women-divers-01068
https://roadsandkingdoms.com/2017/the-female-free-divers-of-jeju/
https://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/30/world/asia/hardy-divers-in-korea-strait-sea-women-are-dwindling.html ]
japan  ama  photography  diving  seaweed  shellfish  pearls  oceans 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Culture of Jeju Haenyeo (women divers) - intangible heritage - Culture Sector - UNESCO
"In Jeju Island, there is a community of women, some aged in their 80s, which goes diving 10m under the sea to gather shellfish, such as abalone or sea urchins for a living without the help of oxygen masks. With knowledge of the sea and marine life, the Jeju haenyeo (female divers) harvest for up to seven hours a day, 90 days of the year holding their breath for just one minute for every dive and making a unique verbal sound when resurfacing. Divers are categorised into three groups according to level of experience: hagun, junggun and sanggun with the sanggun offering guidance to the others. Before a dive, prayers are said to the Jamsugut, goddess of the sea, to ask for safety and an abundant catch. Knowledge is passed down to younger generations in families, schools, local fishery cooperatives which have the area’s fishing rights, haenyeo associations, The Haenyeo School and Haenyeo Museum. Designated by the provincial government as representating the island’s character and people’s spirit, the culture of Jeju haenyeo has also contributed to the advancement of women’s status in the community and promoted environmental sustainability with its eco-friendly methods and community invovlment in management of fishing practices."

[See also:
https://roadsandkingdoms.com/2017/the-female-free-divers-of-jeju/
https://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/30/world/asia/hardy-divers-in-korea-strait-sea-women-are-dwindling.html ]

[Tangentially related:
http://gakuran.com/ama-the-pearl-diving-mermaids-of-japan/
https://jezebel.com/the-disappearing-ama-japans-tough-topless-free-divin-1679290183 ]
jeju  korea  diving  fishing  shellfish  oceans  instangibleheritage  unesco 
october 2018 by robertogreco
elisehunchuck [Elise Misao Hunchuck]
[via: https://twitter.com/lowlowtide/status/1052233654074654720

"what a rare pleasure, listening 2 @elisehunchuck presenting her research on an incomplete atlas of stones: ‘Trangressions & Regressions’ @tudelft #ULWeek2018

“stones help us understand how the earth moves”—@elisehunchuck"]

"Elise Hunchuck (b. Toronto) is a Berlin based researcher and designer with degrees in landscape architecture, philosophy, and geography whose work focuses on bringing together fieldwork and design through collaborative practices of observation, care, and coordination. Facilitating multidisciplinary exchanges between teaching and representational methods as a way to further develop landscape-oriented research methodologies at multiple scales, her research develops cartographic, photographic, and text-based practices to explore and communicate the agency of disasters through the continual configuring and reconfiguring of infrastructures of risk, including memorials, monuments, and coastal defense structures.

A University Olmsted Scholar, Elise was recently a finalist for the 2017 Maeder-York Landscape Fellowship at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (Cambridge, US) and a research fellow with the Landscape Architecture Foundation (Washington DC, US). Her writing has appeared in The Funambulist and her research has been featured on BLDGBLOG. She has taught representational history and methods in the graduate architecture, landscape, and urban design departments at the Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, University of Toronto (Toronto, CA) and has been an invited critic in the undergraduate and graduate programs at the architecture, landscape, and urban design departments at the Daniels Faculty and the School of Architecture at Waterloo.

Elise is also a member of the editorial board of Scapegoat Journal: Architecture / Landscape / Political Economy.

For general enquiries, commissions, or collaborations, please contact directly via email at elisehunchuck [at] gmail [dot] com."

[See also:

"An Incomplete Atlas of Stones"
https://elisehunchuck.com/2015-2017-An-Incomplete-Atlas-of-Stones
https://cargocollective.com/elisehunchuck/An-Incomplete-Atlas-of-Stones-1
https://www.daniels.utoronto.ca/news/2018/02/21/elise-hunchuck-mla-2016-presents-incomplete-atlas-stones-aa-london
https://thefunambulist.net/articles/incomplete-atlas-stones-cartography-tsunami-stones-japanese-shoreline-elise-misao-hunchuck
https://thefunambulist.net/contributors/elise-hunchuck

"Warnings Along the Inundation Line"
http://www.bldgblog.com/2017/06/warnings-along-the-inundation-line/

"Century Old Warnings Against Tsunamis Dot Japan's Coastline"
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/century-old-warnings-against-tsunamis-dot-japans-coastline-180956448/

"How Century Old Tsunami Stones Saved Lives in the Tohoku Earthquake of 2011"
https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidbressan/2018/03/11/how-century-old-tsunami-stones-saved-lives-in-the-tohoku-earthquake-of-2011/#18355a8244fd

https://www.daniels.utoronto.ca/news/2017/06/28/bldgblog-features-incomplete-atlas-stones-elise-hunchuck-mla-2016

https://issuu.com/danielsfacultyuoft/docs/2016.04.11_-_2016_winter_thesis_rev ]
elisehunchuck  landscape  multispecies  morethanhuman  japan  iceland  tsunamis  design  fieldwork  srg  multidisciplinary  teaching  place  time  memory  disasters  risk  memorials  monuments  coasts  oceans  maps  mapping  photography  canon  scale  observation  care  caring  coordination  markers 
october 2018 by robertogreco
anja kanngieser on Twitter: "this is a long thread on #nauru, where i spent last week. nauru is currently most visible as a site for australia’s offshore detention of asylum seekers and refugees. it is also the location of a longstanding #phosphate mine
"this is a long thread on #nauru, where i spent last week. nauru is currently most visible as a site for australia’s offshore detention of asylum seekers and refugees. it is also the location of a longstanding #phosphate mine which covers over 2/3 of the island 1/22

#nauru is experiencing considerable #climatechange. im going to outline some of the social-environmental stresses i observed that nauruans, refugees and asylum seekers are facing, and why we need to talk about #colonialism and #environmental racism for #climatejustice 2/22

#nauru is a beautiful island. its main resource is #phosphate. germany colonised nauru in the late 1800s and in the early 1900s the british found phosphate and started to exploit it for fertiliser and munitions with australia and nz, who became nauru’s trustees in the 1920s 3/22

during both world wars #nauru was a strategic imperial site and was occupied by multiple nations. in the 1960s nauru gained independence and took over mining activities 4/22

these days its extremely hard to get onto #nauru. i was invited to do work on community #mitigation and #adaptation measures. my work involves speaking with community leaders, environment organisations, government workers, activists 5/22

it also involves making #bioacoustic recordings of environments - #nauru's mine, the reef, the lagoon. this means i spend a lot of time listening. this is some of what i was told: 6/22

#nauru is running out of land. there are too many people living on the coast, as topside (the mining site) has not been rehabilitated. its a moonscape up there - huge phosphate pinnacles segregated by steep drops. its hot - it feels like 50 degrees, and its super humid 7/22

no one really goes up there, except people working in the mine, ihms employees and the border force. and refugees and asylum seekers, because thats where the detention centres are. you cant play there or just hang out, its too hot, and if youre not in aircon its unbearable 8/22

#coastal erosion is bad around the north of #nauru. sea walls protect one area but then other areas get flooded. #kingtides flood the single road that runs around the island, meaning people cant get around to access services 9/22

houses on the coast side of the main road on #nauru get #inundated. because of a lack of land, people cant really move far 10/22

much of the ground water in #nauru is #contaminated, by waste, from overpopulated cemeteries leaking into the water lens, run off from the mine and sea water. there is a huge stress on water supplies 11/22

most of #nauru gets its water from the desalination plant, but it takes a long time to get water and if it breaks experts need to be flown in to fix it. not everyone has a water tank, so there are water shortages 12/22

its hard to grow food on #nauru so food is imported. there are long lines of people whenever a shipment of rice is due to arrive. cucumbers cost $13AUD, a punnet of cherry tomatoes $20AUD. people do not earn anywhere near enough money to be able to afford it 13/22

kitchen gardens have been established on #nauru, but they only feed the families that have them, a lot of people feel their soil is not adequate to growing food 14/22

reef fish stocks are depleted on #nauru, so there is a plan to build milkfish supplies in peoples home ponds. as the water is contaminated that means that the fish are contaminated. if people feed the fish to the pigs and eat the pigs, then that meat is also contaminated 15/22

the #phosphate dust from the mine causes respiratory issues in #nauru. it covers houses near the harbour and people refer to it as snow. while primary mining is almost complete, secondary mining is planned. this should last around 20 years, then the phosphate is gone 16/22

#nauru is getting hotter. its so hot that kids dont want to walk to school, which is not aircon. its so hot that no one is really outside during the day. the heat on the coast is not as bad as the heat on topside. but its still hot enough that you dont want to move 17/22

i was told that people remember it being 20 degrees cooler when they were kids. #nauru goes through extreme #droughts 18/22

there are issues with #biodiversity loss and strange movements of sea creatures. i recorded a dusk chorus at a mining site and heard only one bird. at the start of the year dead fish littered the reef. this happens periodically, no one could tell me why 19/22

the noddy birds, which people rely on for food, got a virus earlier this year and there were fallen noddy birds all over the roads. people have spotted orcas in #nauru’s waters. a dugong also washed up on shore. they are not known to inhabit that area 20/22

as i said, these issues affect everyone on #nauru. nauru is highly vulnerable to #climatechange. it is also hugely economically reliant on aid, on the money from the incarceration of refugees and asylum seekers and a rapidly diminishing natural resource: phosphate 21/22

this is why conversations about human rights and environmental justice in #nauru and the #pacific also need to include strong critiques of #neocolonialism, #racism and #paternalism. nauru wasnt always like this. these are ongoing impacts of colonisation 22/22"
nauru  climatechange  globalwarming  2018  anjakannigieser  environment  climatejustice  colonialism  islands  polynesia  australia  newzealand  activism  adaptability  oceans  fishing  health  biodiversity  multispecies  pacificocean  vulnerability  neocolonialism  racism  paternalism  colonization  birds  nature  animals  wildlife  water  waste 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Opinion | Wrap Your Mind Around a Whale - The New York Times
"The facts of a blue whale seem improbable; it is hard to wrap your mind around an animal with jaws the height of a football goal post. Those jaws are not just the ocean’s utmost bones (to borrow from Melville) but the utmost bones in the history of life on Earth.

And yet these superlative whales haven’t been huge that long. In fact, they emerged just about 4.5 million years ago, coinciding almost perfectly with the human era.

We are living right now in the age of giants. Blue whales, fin whales, right whales and bowhead whales are the largest animals, by weight, ever to have evolved. How did this happen? And what does this tell us about how evolution works?

Fossils show that the earliest whales were more obviously mammalian — they had four legs, a nose, maybe even fur. They had bladelike teeth and lived in habitats that ranged from woodlands with streams to river deltas, occasionally feeding in the brackish waters of shallow equatorial coasts. And they were the size of a large dog."
whales  nature  multispecies  history  naturalhistory  evolution  scale  size  oceans  mammals  via:lukeneff  foreden 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Open Ocean: 10 Hours of Relaxing Oceanscapes | BBC Earth - YouTube
"Be wowed by the brilliant hues of our blue planet and the incredible animals that live therewith this 10 hour loop."
slowtv  oceans  video  bbc  nature 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Atlas by Terisa Siagatonu | Poetry Magazine
"If you open up any atlas
and take a look at a map of the world,
almost every single one of them
slices the Pacific Ocean in half.
To the human eye,
every map centers all the land masses on Earth
creating the illusion
that water can handle the butchering
and be pushed to the edges
of the world.
As if the Pacific Ocean isn’t the largest body
living today, beating the loudest heart,
the reason why land has a pulse in the first place.

The audacity one must have to create a visual so
violent as to assume that no one comes
from water so no one will care
what you do with it
and yet,
people came from land,
are still coming from land,
and look what was done to them.

When people ask me where I’m from,
they don’t believe me when I say water.
So instead, I tell them that home is a machete
and that I belong to places
that don’t belong to themselves anymore,
broken and butchered places that have made me
a hyphen of a woman:
a Samoan-American that carries the weight of both
colonizer and colonized,
both blade and blood.

California stolen.
Samoa sliced in half stolen.
California, nestled on the western coast of the most powerful
country on this planet.
Samoa, an island so microscopic on a map, it’s no wonder
people doubt its existence.
California, a state of emergency away from having the drought
rid it of all its water.
Samoa, a state of emergency away from becoming a saltwater cemetery
if the sea level doesn’t stop rising.
When people ask me where I’m from,
what they want is to hear me speak of land,
what they want is to know where I go once I leave here,
the privilege that comes with assuming that home
is just a destination, and not the panic.
Not the constant migration that the panic gives birth to.
What is it like? To know that home is something
that’s waiting for you to return to it?
What does it mean to belong to something that isn’t sinking?
What does it mean to belong to what is causing the flood?

So many of us come from water
but when you come from water
no one believes you.
Colonization keeps laughing.
Global warming is grinning
at all your grief.
How you mourn the loss of a home
that isn’t even gone yet.
That no one believes you’re from.

How everyone is beginning
to hear more about your island
but only in the context of
vacations and honeymoons,
football and military life,
exotic women exotic fruit exotic beaches
but never asks about the rest of its body.
The water.
The islands breathing in it.
The reason why they’re sinking.
No one visualizes islands in the Pacific
as actually being there.
You explain and explain and clarify
and correct their incorrect pronunciation
and explain

until they remember just how vast your ocean is,
how microscopic your islands look in it,
how easy it is to miss when looking
on a map of the world.

Excuses people make
for why they didn’t see it
before."
poems  poetry  maps  mapping  terisasiagatonu  2018  california  samoa  pacificocean  oceans  colonization  water  globalwarming  islands  migration 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Global Fishing Watch |
"Hundreds of millions of people depend on the ocean for their livelihoods and many more rely on the ocean for food. However, the world’s oceans are threatened by global overfishing, illegal fishing and habitat destruction. Their sustainability depends on action by governments, fishery management organizations, citizens and the fishing industry itself.

This public beta version of Global Fishing Watch is available to anyone with an Internet connection and allows users to monitor when and where commercial fishing Apparent Fishing is occurring around the world.

* Citizens can see for themselves how their fisheries are being effectively managed and hold leaders accountable for long-term sustainability.

* Seafood suppliers can monitor the vessels they buy fish from.

* Journalists and the public can act as watchdogs to improve the sustainable management of global fisheries.

* Responsible fishermen can show they are adhering to the law.

* Researchers can address important fishery management questions.

We invite all fishery stakeholders to explore the Map. Global Fishing Watch is not an advocacy or enforcement agency, but a transparency tool to help enable awareness and discussion around fishery issues."
fishing  commercialfishing  activism  earth  maps  mapping  oceans 
july 2017 by robertogreco
SF - Pacifica Exclusion Area
"In accordance with section 304 of the National Marine Sanctuaries Act, as amended, (NMSA) (16 U.S.C. 1431 et seq.), the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has initiated a review of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS or sanctuary) boundaries, to evaluate the opportunity and effects of expanding the sanctuary's boundary. The process required by NMSA will be conducted concurrently with a public process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.)."
noaa  sanfrancisco  sfsh  classideas  oceans 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Radical Ocean Futures
[via: https://twitter.com/Oniropolis/status/871030625855307778 ]

"INTRODUCING RADICAL OCEAN FUTURES...A COLLABORATIVE #ARTSCIENCE INITIATIVE

Welcome intrepid explorer of the future oceans....

This project is founded on the belief that sometimes science fiction might succeed where scientific papers fall short. It blends art and science and merges scientific fact with creative speculation. The heart of the project is four short 'Radical Ocean Futures.' These are scientifically grounded narratives of potential future oceans. Each narrative is supported by both a visual and a musical interpretation to allow multiple entry points and stimulate the imagination. The purpose of this project is to explore tools that can help us to think creatively and imaginatively about our future oceans and assess how unexpected changes, along with human responses to those changes, may play out in a complex world that is, at its heart, surprising.

This project was financed through a science communications grant from The Swedish Research Council Formas and was featured online in WIRED."



"
Scenarios can help individuals, communities, corporations and nations to develop a capacity for dealing with the unknown and unpredictable, or the unlikely but possible. A range of scientific methods for developing scenarios is available, but we argue that they have limited capacity to investigate complex social-ecological futures because: 1) non-linear change is rarely incorporated and: 2) they rarely involve co-evolutionary dynamics of integrated social-ecological systems. This manuscript intends to address these two concerns, by applying the method of Science Fiction Prototyping to develop scenarios for the future of global fisheries. We used an empirically informed background on existing and emerging trends in marine natural resource use and dynamics to develop four ‘radical’ futures in a changing global ocean, incorporating and extrapolating from existing environmental, technological, social and economic trends. We argue that the method applied here can complement existing scenario methodologies and assist scientists in developing a holistic understanding of complex systems dynamics. The approach holds promise for making scenarios more accessible and interesting to non-academics and can be useful for developing proactive governance mechanisms."



"Sci-fi narratives - Science-based stories about our future oceans

Oceans back from the brink

FISH Inc

Rime of the last fisherman

Rising tide

Scenario building via science fiction prototyping

The four scenarios are built on a robust foundation of scientific knowledge, including:

1) Technological frontiers

2) Marine ecology, ocean and fisheries science

3) The global fishing and seafood industry

4) Marine management, governance and socio-economic shifts

The scenarios were developed following the method of Science-Fiction Prototyping, developed by Brian David Johnson when he was the futurist at Intel Corporation. Mr Johnson is now the futurist in residence at Arizona State University, Center for Science and the Imagination. This method is described in detail in the scientific paper currently under review at the journal Futures.

We have linked key elements in each of the narrative scenarios to relevant peer-reviewed academic papers, news articles from reputable publications and credible websites to give you the opportunity to explore beyond Radical Ocean Futures. We wish you well on your explorations into the future oceans and the scientific work that helps us to imagine them."



"The beautiful and engaging artworks that are a feature of the Radical Ocean Futures #artscience project were created by the world renowned Swedish concept artist and illustrator Simon Stålenhag. His work has been featured in; The Verge, Gizmodo, Booooooom.com and The Huffington Post among others. He has also successfully kickstarted collections of his work and has a number of exciting new projects in development. He is currently working on his third book.

Right from the beginning, this was a true creative collaboration and the original pieces of concept art that you see on this site, so vividly supporting the narrative scenarios of the future oceans, are the result of this collaboration. Below is a small sampling of his other work. If you would like to have the opportunity to work with Simon or see his iconic body of work, please head over to his website."
oceans  future  scifi  sciencefiction  classideas  designfiction  briandavidjohnson  prototyping  science-fictionprototyping  simonstålenhag  klaluna  kaitlynrathwell  andrewmerrie  patriciakeys  marcmetian  henrikösterblom 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Chris Hadfield on Twitter: "With celebrity death and elections taking the media by the nose, it’s easy to forget that this year saw a great many positives. Let’s look."
[See also: "99 Reasons 2016 Was a Good Year: Our media feeds are echo chambers. And those echo chambers don’t just reflect our political beliefs; they reflect our feelings about human progress. Bad news is a bubble too."
https://medium.com/future-crunch/99-reasons-why-2016-has-been-a-great-year-for-humanity-8420debc2823#.tj7kowhpd

"With celebrity death and elections taking the media by the nose, it’s easy to forget that this year saw a great many positives. Let’s look.

1. The Colombian government and FARC rebels committed to a lasting peace, ending a war that killed or displaced over 7 million people.

2. Sri Lanka spent five years working to exile the world’s deadliest disease from their borders. As of 2016, they are malaria free.

3. The Giant Panda, arguably the world’s second cutest panda, has official been removed from the endangered species list.

4. @astro_timpeake became the first ESA astronaut from the UK, symbolizing a renewed British commitment to space exploration.

5. Tiger numbers around the world are on the rise for the first time in 100 years, with plans to double by 2022.

6. Juno, a piece of future history, successfully flew over 588 million miles and is now sending back unprecedented data from Jupiter.

7. The number of veterans in the US who are homeless has halved in the past half-decade, with a nearly 20% drop in 2016.

8. Malawi lowered its HIV rate by 67%, and in the past decade have seen a shift in public health that has saved over 250,000 lives.

9. Air travel continue to get safer, and 2016 saw the second fewest per capita deaths in aviation of any year on record.

10. India’s dogged commitment to reforestation saw a single day event planting more than 50 million trees, a world record.

11. Measles has been eradicated from the Americas. A 22 year vaccination campaign has led to the elimination of the historic virus.

12. After a century, Einstein’s theory of gravitational waves has been proven correct, in a ‘moon shot’ scientific achievement.

13. China has announced a firm date for the end of the ivory trade, as public opinion is becoming more staunchly environmentalist.

14. A solar powered airplane flew across the Pacific Ocean for the first time, highlighting a new era of energy possibilities.

15. Costa Rica’s entire electrical grid ran on renewable energy for over half the year, and their capacity continues to grow.

16. Israeli and US researchers believe they are on the brink of being able to cure radiation sickness, after successful tests this year.

17. The ozone layer has shown that through tackling a problem head on, the world can stem environmental disasters, together.

18. A new treatment for melanoma has seen a 40% survival rate, taking a huge step forward towards long-term cancer survivability.

19. An Ebola vaccine was developed by Canadian researchers with 100% efficacy. Humans eradicated horror, together.

20. British Columbia protected 85% of the world’s largest temperate rainforest, in a landmark environmental agreement.

21. 2016 saw the designation of more than 40 new marine sanctuaries in 20 countries, covering an area larger than the United States.

22. These marine reserves include Malaysia’s 13 year struggle to complete a million hectare park, completed this year.

23. This also includes the largest marine reserve in history, created in Antarctica via an unprecedented agreement by 24 nations.

24. Atmospheric acid pollution, once a gloomy reality, has been tackled to the point of being almost back to pre-industrial levels.

25. Major diseases are in decline. The US saw a 50% mortality drop in colon cancer; lower heart disease, osteoporosis and dementia.

26. Uruguay successfully fought tobacco companies to create a precedent for small countries looking to introduce health-focused legislation.

27. World hunger has reached its lowest point in 25 years, and with poverty levels dropping worldwide, seems likely to continue.

28. The A.U. made strides to become more unified, launching an all-Africa passport meant to allow for visa-free travel for all citizens.

29. Fossil fuel emissions flatlined in 2016, with the Paris agreement becoming the fastest UN treaty to become international law.

30. China announced a ban on new coal mines, with renewed targets to increase electrical capacity through renewables by 2020.

31. One third of Dutch prison cells are empty as the crime rate shrank by more than 25% in the last eight years, continuing to drop.

32. In August went to the high Arctic with some incredible young artists. They helped open my eyes to the promise of the next generation.

33. Science, economics, and environmentalism saw a reversal in the overfishing trends of the United States this year.

34. @BoyanSlat successfully tested his Ocean Cleanup prototype, and aims to clean up to 40% of ocean-borne plastics starting this year.

35. Israel now produces 55% of its freshwater, turning what is one of the driest countries on earth into an agricultural heartland.

36. The Italian government made it harder to waste food, creating laws that provided impetus to collect, share and donate excess meals.

37. People pouring ice on their head amusingly provided the ALS foundation with enough funding to isolate a genetic cause of the disease.

38. Manatees, arguably the most enjoyable animal to meet when swimming, are no longer endangered.

39. Grizzlies, arguable the least enjoyable animal to meet while swimming, no longer require federal protection in US national parks.

40. Global aid increased 7%, with money being designated to helping the world’s 65 million refugees doubling.

41. 2016 was the most charitable year in American history. China’s donations have increased more than ten times since a decade ago.

42. The Gates Foundation announced another 5 billion dollars towards eradicating poverty and disease in Africa.

43. Individual Canadians were so welcoming that the country set a world standard for how to privately sponsor and resettle refugees.

44. Teenage birth rates in the United States have never been lower, while at the same time graduation rates have never been higher.

45. SpaceX made history by landing a rocket upright after returning from space, potentially opening a new era of space exploration.

46. Finally - The Cubs won the World Series for the first time in 108 years, giving hope to Maple Leafs fans everywhere. Happy New Year.

There are countless more examples, big and small. If you refocus on the things that are working, your year will be better than the last."
chrishadfield  optimism  2016  improvement  trends  humanity  earth  environment  economics  health  poverty  refugees  crime  news  imprisonment  incarceration  prisons  us  canada  india  reforestation  forests  vaccinations  measles  manatees  tigers  giantpandas  wildlife  animals  multispecies  endangeredanimals  change  progress  oceans  pollutions  peace  war  colombia  government  srilanka  space  science  pacificocean  china  energy  sustainability  costarica  electricity  reneableenergy  britishcolumbia  ebola  ozone  africa  uruguay  smoking  disease  healthcare  dementia  mortality  environmentalism  italy  italia  bears  grizzlybears  spacex  gatesfoundation  angusharvey 
january 2017 by robertogreco
This Deep Sea Fisherman Posts His Discoveries on Twitter and OH MY GOD KILL IT WITH FIRE
"Roman Fedortsov is a deep sea fisherman in Russia. And he’s been taking photos of OH MY GOD WHAT IS THAT?

Seriously, I just took a quick three-minute scroll through Fedortsov’s Twitter page, and he has photos of ocean creatures that look like they’re from the most twisted Jim Henson movie ever produced. (If Jim Henson did a ton of fucking acid.)

The English-language site Moscow Times posted a handful of the photos, but I’ve found even more on Fedortsov’s Twitter. The fisherman is reportedly based in Murmansk, which is a real place in Russia, and not another planet where Hell has opened up and set demons free to roam the land and the seas."

[See also:

"Reasons to be proud of Twitter: we can accommodate such wildly specialised content verticals as... this. https://gizmodo.com/this-deep-sea-fisherman-posts-his-discoveries-on-twitte-1790323479 "
https://twitter.com/hautepop/status/811333399973654528

"Though actually, sharing photos of Fish Infrastructure is really valuable. Never seen this before - the scale! https://twitter.com/rfedortsov/status/804996047529476097 [video] "
https://twitter.com/hautepop/status/811357193450770432 ]
nature  oceans  animals  fish  fishing  russia  deapsea  twitter  socialmedia  2016  romanfedortsov  commercialfishing  mattnovak 
december 2016 by robertogreco
These Beautiful Maps Reveal the Secret Lives of Animals
"New technology lets mapmakers follow baboons, vultures, and everything in between."

[See also: http://wheretheanimalsgo.com/

"Tracking wildlife with technology in 50 maps and graphics

For thousands of years, tracking animals meant following footprints. Now satellites, drones, camera traps, cellphone networks, apps and accelerometers allow us to see the natural world like never before. Geographer James Cheshire and designer Oliver Uberti take you to the forefront of this animal-tracking revolution. Meet the scientists gathering wild data – from seals mapping the sea to baboons making decisions, from birds dodging tornadoes to jaguars taking selfies. Join the journeys of sharks, elephants, bumblebees, snowy owls and a wolf looking for love. Find an armchair, cancel your plans and go where the animals go."]
maps  mapping  animlas  multispecies  wildlife  books  2016  via:anne  technology  migration  jamescheshire  oliveruberti  birds  oceans  sharks  elephants  bumblebees  owls  seals  baboons 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Fathom - Embrace the Deep
"INTRODUCING THE FATHOM DRONE

Fathom allows you to explore places that until now, you could only imagine.
Snorkel with it, dive with it, fish with it, take it on the go. It’s up to you.

SIMPLE TO USE

For too long underwater exploration has been limited to those with extensive funding and years of training. We want to change this. With the Fathom drone, anyone can explore their closest body of water with ease – simply plug it in, launch the app, and go explore.

UNCOMPROMISING FUNCTIONALITY

At the end of the day, we understand that you need something that functions flawlessly. That’s why the Fathom drone was built around one guiding principal – ensuring it would always deliver the functionality you need, when you need it most.

BEAUTIFULLY DESIGNED

Just because you may get your hands dirty doesn’t mean you have to look bad doing it. Special consideration was given to the Fathom drone’s design to ensure that it would look just as much at home on land as it does in the water.

SUPERIOR CONTROL

The world’s first jet propelled consumer underwater drone.
Drawing inspiration from the reaction control systems aboard spacecraft, the Fathom drone’s steering and propulsion gives you the fine tune control you need, when you need it – using only one propulsive motor."

[via: https://twitter.com/somebadideas/status/666463773386006529 ]
drones  oceans  submarines  edg  srg 
november 2015 by robertogreco
Research shows Aboriginal memories stretch back more than 7,000 years
[Wayback: https://web.archive.org/web/20161109160141/http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/09/2015/research-shows-aboriginal-memories-stretch-back-more-than-7000-years ]

"Aboriginal society has preserved memories of Australia’s coastline dating back more than 7,000 years. That’s the conclusion that University of the Sunshine Coast Professor of Geography Patrick Nunn reached in a paper published in Australian Geographer.

The study looks at Aboriginal stories from 21 places around Australia’s coastline, each describing a time when sea levels were significantly lower than today. Professor Nunn said present sea levels in Australia were reached 7,000 years ago and as such any stories about the coastline stretching much further out to sea had to pre-date that time.

Stories describe changes

“These stories talk about a time when the sea started to come in and cover the land, and the changes this brought about to the way people lived – the changes in landscape, the ecosystem and the disruption this caused to their society,” he said.

“It’s important to note that it’s not just one story that describes this process. There are many stories, all consistent in their narrative, across 21 diverse sites around Australia’s coastline.”

Professor Nunn said his interest in how stories met science was piqued during his extensive tenure at the University of the South Pacific in Fiji. He said the time span of the memories in the Australian Aboriginal stories he studied, however, appeared unmatched by any other culture.

“Anything that goes back thousands of years – nearly 10,000 years in some cases – has to be quite exceptional,” he said.

“It’s a remarkable time period when we consider our own memories and what we can remember even with the aid of books and other information.

“I believe these stories endured that long partly due to the harshness of Australia’s natural environment, which meant that each generation had to pass on knowledge to the next in a systematic way to ensure its survival.”"

[more:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00049182.2015.1077539 ]
aborigines  aboriginal  australia  history  climatechange  maps  mapping  memory  oraltradition  stories  storytelling  patricknunn  coastline  ecosystems  landscape  oceans  sealevel 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Paul Nicklen (@paulnicklen) • Instagram
"Paul Nicklen National Geographic Fellow and photographer; public speaker; conservationist; explorer; founder of SeaLegacy; Canadian. www.paulnicklen.com "
photography  instagram  nature  animals  via:anne  paulnicklen  nationalgeographic  oceans  instagrams 
july 2015 by robertogreco
1 | Adidas Knit These Sneakers Entirely From Ocean Plastic Trash | Co.Exist | ideas + impact
"As engineers work to find new ways to pull some of the trillions of pieces of plastic trash out of the ocean, companies are coming up with new uses for it. Like soap bottles, surfboards, and now shoes: Adidas just released a new prototype for a sneaker woven entirely out of ocean trash.

The sample shoe was made from illegal gill nets dredged up from the ocean by the nonprofit Sea Shepherd. "It's a fishing net that was spanning the bottom of the sea like a wall, and killing pretty much every fish passing by," says Cyrill Gutsch, founder of Parley for the Oceans, a new Adidas-supported nonprofit that is helping the company develop a larger strategy for fighting ocean waste. "They confiscated this net, and we're bringing it back to life."

Adidas is knitting the shoe using the same innovative technology they use to create Primeknit shoes with zero waste. "Knitting in general eliminates waste, because you don't have to cut out the patterns like on traditional footwear," says Eric Liedtke, Adidas Group executive board member of global brands. "We use what we need for the shoe and waste nothing."

For now, they'll turn to sources like fishing nets and easier-to-reach beach trash for their material source; Liedtke says they have no worries about finding enough to supply the line of shoes when it launches later this year. They won't be using the tiny fragments of plastic that swirl, soup-like, in places like the Pacific Gyre, though that could change as new technology becomes available. "If you want to take it out of the ocean, you can trawl for days and days and get a tiny spoonful of plastic," Gutsch says. "At this point we didn't see a feasible technology. What we believe now is that you can instead avoid the microplastic that's coming into the system."

The bigger aim of the program is not just to recycle plastic into shoes, but to help avoid plastic waste in the first place. Parley for the Oceans is working on new technology both to intercept plastic trash—and to change plastic itself.

"We're going to end ocean plastic pollution only if we're going to reinvent the material," says Gutsch. "We need a plastic that is not the current plastic—it's a design failure. It causes a lot of problems. Plastic doesn't belong in nature, it doesn't belong in the belly of a fish, it doesn't belong out there. The ultimate solution is to cut into this ongoing stream of material that never dies, is to reinvent plastic." Because without a reinvention, the plastic still exists in your shoe, which, presumably, you'll throw out again at some point, putting the plastic back into the system—and potentially the ocean.

A green chemist on the organization's staff is beginning development of a plastic alternative that could dissolve harmlessly if it was thrown out into nature. "That's the ultimate vision, but it's a moonshot," he says. "Right now it's far away. So we do what we can. That means we're going out there and cleaning up as much as we can. We're saving life. Every piece of plastic that we collect, every single piece, can save a bird, a turtle, even a whale."

As Adidas adapts the material, it may eventually start to include it in other products. "We don't have to limit ourselves," says Lietke. "We can put this in T-shirts, we can put this in shorts, we can put this in all kinds of stuff.""
materials  glvo  recycling  adidas  knitting  fishingnets  oceans 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Myth of the Garbage Patch – The New Inquiry
"The massive plastic trash gyre isn’t an island, it’s the disaster of capital circling the globe on ocean currents"



"Missing from that myth is a key series of related facts. That the debris breaks down into microscopic pieces. That the garbage actually constitutes more of a “plastic soup” than any kind of patch or island, and that its pollutants are, as a result, widely dispersed. That what breaks down doesn’t remain solely in the Garbage Patch; that anywhere ocean currents converge is this toxic soup. That this soup is suffused with Bisphenol A, pthalates, polychlorinated biphenyls, persistent organic pollutants, and other remainders from discarded commodities that contribute directly to the ocean acidification killing fragile ecosystems from the coral-based Great Barrier Reef off of Australia to Inuit territories in the Arctic. Far from a solid, particulate island, the Garbage Patch is, along with the rest of the ocean’s water, in constant motion. And it doesn’t necessarily stay at surface. In 2010 a team of ecologists, studying ocean garbage patches, observed that the plastic in them accounted for only a small portion of the plastic that has been produced since World War II. “[W]e don’t know what this plastic is doing,” said marine biologist Andres Cozar Cabañas, who worked on the team, adding only that it “is somewhere — in the ocean life, in the depths.”"



"Green capitalism is still capitalism, fundamentally unsustainable and exploitative, and while the world’s most privileged consumers insulate themselves, its devastating ecological effects hit poor communities living in the world’s severest locations especially hard. While Americans and Europeans with money can fill their diets with certified “ethical” fish, this isn’t really an option for native people in the circumpolar North—including the Inuit of Greenland and Canada, the Aleuts, Yup’ik, and Inupiat of Alaska, the Chukchi and other tribes of Siberia, or the Saami of Scandinavia and western Russia—whose cultures as well as diets depend on the ocean. Living, working, and fishing at the edge of glacial sheets, these people can’t really choose not to eat fish with plastic embedded in their scales, or the exorbitant concentrations of pollutants in the larger marine mammals high up in the food web—the ringed seals, walruses, narwhals, and beluga whales—that are both dietary staples and sources of clothing and building materials. Because of the cold and low Northern sunlight, pollutants break down especially slowly – over the course of decades or even centuries, according to Marla Cone, author of Silent Snow: The Slow Poisoning of the Arctic. Cone has also noted that even in the 80s Arctic mothers had seven times more PCBs in their milk than their counterparts in Canadian cities.

“At the periphery of the global capitalist system,” writes Chris Chen in “The Limit Point of Capitalist Inequality,” “capital now renews ‘race’ by creating vast superfluous…populations from the…descendants of the enslaved and colonised.” It’s no accident that plastic pollutants pool in the communities that capitalism has historically treated—and continues to treat—as refuse. Somewhere in that convergence—in the attitude that everything that gets thrown away stays far away—lies the second myth of the Garbage Patch.

“It’s been the end of the world for somebody all along,” says writer, spoken-word artist, and indigenous academic Leanne Simpson. Recent studies show that marine pollution and ocean acidification, once thought a separate if parallel disaster to climate change, are in fact contributing to global climate disruption, suggesting that, ecologically speaking, there is no such thing as somebody else’s end of the world. Although the idea of the Garbage Patch is entrenched in the collective imagination, we can use language to help dislodge it. We can begin this process by rejecting the myths of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. We must stop thinking and talking in terms of an island that captures everything we throw away in a faraway fever dream of plastic bags and marine birds, and begin to map out the deeply interconnected web of plants, animals, humans, and non-living things in which we actually exist. We must recognize that capitalism depends on us not seeing this web and that capitalism will never fix marine pollution or climate change. As long as, like Andres Cozar Cabañas’ missing plastic, there are lives whose fates remain distant and unaccounted for, everybody’s fates are at risk."
environment  garbage  plastic  recycling  oceans  capitalism  green  greencapitalism  2015  mayaweeks  chrischen  globalwarming  climatechange  greatpacificgarbagepatch  andrescozarcanañas 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Warm-Blooded Fish Discovered Near San Diego | KPBS
"The opah has also been called the moonfish due to its unusually round, silvery body. But the opah's shape isn't its only unusual trait. In a surprise finding, San Diego researchers have discovered that it's also warm-blooded.

In a study published Thursday in Science, researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in La Jolla describe the opah as the first example of a fish that can warm its entire body above the temperature of surrounding waters.

Researchers reeled in more than 20 opah off the coast of San Diego for the study. Temperature measurements revealed that all parts of the fish were warmer than its environment. Scientists already know that tuna and certain species of shark can selectively warm specific body parts, but the opah's self-heating extends throughout its entire body.

"It's the first fish that actually has a warm heart," said study author and fisheries research biologist Nick Wegner. "This is significant because it allows the fish to stay at depth in cold water and function at a higher level."

Over the last three years, Wegner has been catching lots of opah during surveys for the Southwest Fisheries Science Center. He's not sure why his catch of opah has been increasing in California. He said it's common in Hawaii, where it's often sold for meat.

At first Wegner thought they were probably sluggish creatures like most of the fish in similarly deep, chilly waters. But he's learned that the opah — despite looking like a manhole cover that sprouted fins — is actually a fast and formidable predator. He thinks the opah's advantage is its elevated body temperature.

"At warmer temperatures, muscles contract faster and they have more power," he said. "It can swim around faster, respond faster and see better than these animals that are the same temperature as that cold water."

The researchers dissected some of the opah for clues about how its body temperature is regulated. They found an intricately woven circulatory system. The opah's veins and arteries overlapped tightly. That density allows blood in the veins, warmed by vigorous muscle movement, to transfer heat into the arteries, chilled by oxygen entering the blood from cold surrounding waters through the fish's gills.

Warm blood is often thought to be a unique property of mammals and birds. But Wegner said marine biologists can now point to the opah as one major exception."
fish  biology  sandiego  oceans  2015  opah  noaa 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Study finds ancient clam beaches not so natural - University Communications - Simon Fraser University
"Casting a large interdisciplinary research net has helped Simon Fraser University archaeologist Dana Lepofsky and 10 collaborators dig deeper into their findings about ancient clam gardens in the Pacific Northwest to formulate new perspectives.

Lepofsky’s research team has discovered that Northwest Coast Indigenous people didn’t make their living just by gathering the natural ocean’s bounty. Rather, from Alaska to Washington, they were farmers who cultivated productive clam gardens to ensure abundant and sustainable clam harvests.

In its new paper published by American Antiquity, Lepofsky’s team describes how it isolated novel ways to date the stone terraces that created clam beaches. These beaches are certainly more than 1,000 years old and likely many thousands of years older. The researchers identified many places where people built gardens on bedrock — creating ideal clam habitats where there were none before. This, the researchers concluded, clearly challenges the notion that First Nations were living in wild, untended environments.

“We think that many Indigenous peoples worldwide had some kind of sophisticated marine management, but the Pacific Northwest is likely one of the few places in the world where this can be documented,” says Lepofsky. “This is because our foreshores are more intact than elsewhere and we can work closely with Indigenous knowledge holders.”

The researchers, who worked with First Nations linguistic data, oral traditions and memories, geomorphological surveys, archaeological techniques and ecological experiments, belong to the Clam Garden Network. It’s a coastal group interested in ancient clam management.

“Understanding ancient marine management is relevant to many current issues,” says Lepofsky.

Her team is comparing clam garden productivity to that of modern aquaculture and assessing whether the shell-rich beaches of clam gardens help buffer against increasing ocean acidification. The team will also build experimental clam gardens, applying many of the traditional cultivation techniques learned from First Nations collaborators as a means of increasing food production and food security today.

This latest study is on the heels of one done a year ago by Lepofsky and her collaborators. The original three-year study published in PLOS ONE found that these ancient gardens produced quadruple the number of butter clams and twice the number of littleneck clams as unmodified clam beaches. It was the first study to provide empirical evidence of the productivity of ancient Pacific Northwest clam gardens and their capacity to increase food production.

The Tula Foundation, Parks Canada, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and Wenner Gren, among other groups, are funding the team’s studies.

Key highlights of new study:

• Northwest Coast Indigenous peoples from Alaska to Washington State managed clam beaches in a variety of ways. These included replanting of small clams and building rock terrace walls at the low-low tide line to create clam gardens.

• Northwest Coast First Nations language terms indicate clam gardens were built in specific places by rolling the rocks for two purposes. One was to create rock-walled terraces ideal for clam growth. Another was to clear the beaches of unwanted rubble that would limit clam habitat.

• The researchers developed novel ways to date the clam gardens and their preliminary excavations revealed that many date to more than 1,000 years ago.

• Working on these clam gardens posed some logistical challenges since many are only visible for about 72 daylight hours per year.

• Extensive air and ground surveys revealed that clam gardens can be found from Alaska to Washington State, but in some places, such as the Gulf Islands, recent rising sea level obscures the rock walls. In some areas, clam gardens made possible the dense ancient First Nations settlements that dot our coastline.

As Canada's engaged university, SFU is defined by its dynamic integration of innovative education, cutting-edge research and far-reaching community engagement. SFU was founded almost 50 years ago with a mission to be a different kind of university—to bring an interdisciplinary approach to learning, embrace bold initiatives, and engage with communities near and far. Today, SFU is a leader amongst Canada's comprehensive research universities and is ranked one of the top universities in the world under 50 years of age. With campuses in British Columbia's three largest cities—Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby—SFU has eight faculties, delivers almost 150 programs to over 30,000 students, and boasts more than 130,000 alumni in 130 countries around the world."
britishcolumbia  cascadia  firstnations  nativeamericans  2015  clams  clamming  food  fisheries  clamgadens  washingtonstate  alaska  oceans  danalepofsky 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Is demand for sustainable seafood unsustainable?
"Consumers want more than fisheries can supply, and certification standards are falling."
fishing  commercialfishing  2015  food  oceans  brianpalmer  sustainability 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Slow Fish 101 — Medium
"Like many natural resources, the world’s fish populations are declining under pressure from unrestrained harvesting, mismanagement, and environmentally destructive practices. Slow Food believes we all have the power to change the course by making informed, responsible decisions. Meet Slow Fish, a solution to a broken system and a celebration of sustainable fishing and delicious, renewable seafood.

THE STATE OF THE OCEAN
In the past 30 years, global fish consumption has doubled and wild fish populations simply can’t keep up.

Industrialized fishing has the capacity and technology to permanently damage ecosystems by removing fish at an alarming rate. The Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that 80% of fish stocks are being depleted at or above their capacity, and the problem is only growing. In early April, California began research into declining sardine catches. The state may shut down sardine fishing entirely.

The problem of overfishing is compounded by the earth’s changing climate. Warmer temperatures and acidified water have devastating impacts on coral reef systems, home to much of the ocean’s biodiversity.

Illegal fishing, a foreign concept to most Americans, has become increasingly common as governmental regulations seek to limit catches to protect fish populations. In March, the Obama administration introduced a plan to crack down on illegal harvesting in the United States, a black market estimated to be worth at least $20 billion."

WHICH FISH?
The state of the seas is not hopeless, and you can help. Slow Food recommends seeking out fresh fish from local purveyors that hasn’t been frozen and shipped across the world. Consider eating a variety of species, not just the salmon and tuna endemic to supermarkets around the country.

Smaller forage fish, like anchovies, recover more quickly and typically consume fewer raw materials to reach maturity than top-level predators. Plus, they’re delicious.

To help sort through the bewildering array of species available to consumers, a number of guides are available. Users can search by species and receive recommendations about the sustainability and health risks of their choices. Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch and National Geographic both offer comprehensive guides.

AQUACULTURE
Aquaculture is the farming of fish, shellfish and plants in water environments. Ocean and freshwater seafood can be raised in permeable enclosures or contained tanks. In response to overfishing and increased demand for seafood, aquaculture has emerged as an important source of seafood. Today 73% of Tilapia is sourced from farms.

If managed responsibly, aquaculture has the potential to be a solution to global demand for seafood — governments and conservation organizations are partnering with industry to develop and implement standards that protect ecosystems, consumers and farmers.

But we’re not quite there yet. Although it’s presented as a sustainable alternative to wild-caught fish, aquaculture is criticized for compromising local ecosystems and consuming a great deal of resources. Its use of antibiotics, chemicals and genetically-modified fish have raised concerns about public health. Slow Food opposes the current system.

SLOW FISH IN THE US
Fishing is a $30 billion industry in the United States. From Alaska to Santa Barbara to Cape Cod and beyond, American fisheries produce a staggering quantity and array of products. These resources need responsible management.

Congress is currently considering re-authorizing the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the main regulatory mechanism for our country’s fishing industry. It seeks to establish an optimal catch size that will promote local economies in coastal areas while also protecting the long-term health of fish populations.

Slow Food USA is pushing for a new Magnuson-Stevens Act. We’re committed to the future of American seafood, a future that’s healthy, delicious, and sustainable for fish and fisherman."
fishing  commercialfishing  slow  slowfishing  2015  keithgotcliffe  lloydellman  slowfood  oceans  aquaculture  us  policy 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Brave Robots Are Roaming the Oceans for Science | WIRED
"We’re bobbing in the sea just south of Santa Cruz, California; the Paragon is a pickup truck-shaped vessel, cabin in front and a flat deck with edges about a foot high, run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. There’s no bathroom on board. “Guys, it’s super easy. Any time, you’re welcome to go over the side,” says Jared Figurski, the MBARI marine operations division’s jack of all trades. “Ladies just…let us know and we can set that up on the back deck too.”

While the old adage goes that scientists know more about the surface of the moon than the seafloor, that’s a two-dimensional way of thinking. The oceans remain mysterious up and down the water column: the incredibly complex chemical and biological relationships, or how exactly the oceans are changing under the weight of global warming and other human meddling … acidity, temperatures, currents, salinity. And the most powerful tool to help figure all that out is the drone. MBARI has a fleet of them, three different kinds—autonomous machines that prowl the open oceans gathering data, allowing researchers to monitor it in real time. The machines do not tire, and they cannot drown. They survive shark bites. They can roam for months on end, beaming a steady stream of data to scientists sitting safely onshore.

So while aerial drones may get all the love, it’s autonomous underwater vehicles like the one the Paragon just snagged that are doing the grunt work of ocean science. They’re the vanguard of the robotization of Earth’s oceans."
oceans  robots  exploration  srg  edg  science  2015  mattsimon  via:debcha  mbari  drones  woodshole  auvs 
april 2015 by robertogreco
The Fisherman’s Dilemma - The California Sunday Magazine
"Off the coast of California, a radical experiment has closed hundreds of miles of ocean to fishing. Will it lead to better catches for years to come?"



"Maricich’s decision to throw in his lot with fish counters rather than catchers is in part economic, but it also stems from one truth that in a backdoor kind of way unites fishermen and conservationists: After all the closures and commissions, all the surveys and reappraisals, the ocean is still deeply mysterious. In the 1970s and 1980s, a profound knowledge deficit led to a policy of killing fish first and asking questions later. In the 2000s, the corrective — to close fishing grounds first and ask questions later — has been equally burdened by the problem of the vastness of the ocean.

Which was why the research Tim Maricich has been doing with the Nature Conservancy over the past three years is so important. It suggests that the regulatory overhaul and the federal and state closures are working. “We’re pretty consistently finding species like the yelloweye rockfish, which are deemed overfished,” the Nature Conservancy’s Mary Gleason told me. “That suggests that the formal stock assessments are probably underestimating their abundance and that the Rockfish Conservation Areas are probably contributing to their rebuilding. We’re seeing big schools of fish — widow rockfish, chilipepper rockfish. It’s gotten the fishermen pretty excited. They’re hoping some of this data might support opening up some of the closed areas.”"



"A decade later, the first comprehensive results are starting to emerge from scuba surveys. Jenn Caselle, a research biologist also from the University of California at Santa Barbara, has logged thousands of dive hours in the same cold water and kelp I experienced in Monterey. She’s found a noticeable change there, particularly around Anacapa Island, where I was now fishing. “The important message from the Channel Islands over ten years,” she says, “is that the fish inside the reserves are increasing. But here’s the key point. The populations of many fished species outside the reserves are also increasing — not as fast, but they’re increasing. This is really important because it was feared that the redistribution of fishing effort could cause scorched earth outside the reserves. That’s not happening.”"



"Evidence like Caselle’s isn’t good enough for some critics. Ray Hilborn, a professor of aquatic and fisheries science at the University of Washington who’s frequently cited by fishermen as a counterweight to the “enviros,” claims there’s no evidence that the sanctuaries are having a comprehensive effect. Hilborn had taken part in the establishment of California marine reserves and found the science guidelines lacking in academic rigor. “If they had done it correctly,” he says, “there would have been adequate control groups, like with any experiment. They would have set up three reserves and three non-reserves and then compared the fish in each after five and then ten years.”

But Caselle argues that a control for an experiment the size of the Channel Islands network is an impossibility. “The hypothesis is that the total effect of a network is greater than the sum of its parts,” she says. “But that is very difficult to measure. That would require having another region that is similar in all ways to Southern California but without marine protected areas. Essentially, there are no controls for entire networks.” In other words, the entire California approach to linking its fragmented coast is a leap of faith. A leap of faith where the default is not fishing instead of fishing."



"Were all these fish the result of the reserve? Or was it just a good day, as can happen, even when there aren’t that many fish around? It cannot yet be scientifically documented. Since many fish that are specifically protected by the reserves, like rockfish, can live many dozens of years, it may be a long time until we know the extent to which reserves populate other fishing grounds. By the end of the day, when the mate cleaned our catch and the dozen-odd fishermen aboard the Cobra all had a bag or two of fillets to show, there seemed to be a grudging feeling that the Channel Islands experiment had shifted something. As we motored back to port, a retired chef who’d been fishing next to me muttered, “I’ll tell you what, if it wasn’t for these closures, there wouldn’t be any fish at all.”

This thought stayed with me as I made my way to the airport. After boarding a plane I checked my phone before shutting it down for the trip back east. Atop the headlines was the news that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration had closed the entirety of the East Coast from Provincetown, Massachusetts, to the Canadian border to both commercial and sport cod fishing —  at least until May, in an effort to reverse declining fish populations in the Gulf of Maine. These were grounds I’d helped deplete over the past decade. After the latest stock assessment it was revealed that cod had dipped to an even lower level than had previously been assumed. The remaining stocks from Cape Cod to the Gulf of Maine, a population upon which colonial New England built its economy, were now reported to be between 3 and 4 percent of what would be required to have a sustainable fishery.

As I considered this news, I thought how the fishermen of California might have avoided a similar fate. The Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program recently surveyed the range of fisheries off California and moved many of the state’s groundfish species off its red “Avoid” list. In the decades ahead, commercial fishermen might enjoy rebuilt runs of rockfish and lingcod, surging runs of white sea bass and squid, all of them dashing through the regrown kelp in pursuit of sardines and anchovies that are also, apparently, on the rebound.

With the spring migrations coming on, the usual time I’d head to Gloucester for cod, I thought about what I might do instead. Was there something else I could fish? Maybe mackerel would swing through our waters as they once did in my youth but now only do on occasion. Maybe the blackfish would make an appearance if they hadn’t been hit too hard by lobstermen whose Long Island Sound lobster had grown scarce. Or maybe I’ll just hang it up and not fish at all this season."

[See also: http://aeon.co/magazine/science/a-radical-model-for-saving-californias-ocean-fisheries/ ]
paulgreenberg  coreyarnold  california  fisheries  fishing  commercialfishing  2015  oceans  pacificocean  montereybay  timmaricich  natureconservancy  conservation  rayhilborn  stevegaines  jenncaselle  aancapaisland  channelislands  environmentalism  economics 
march 2015 by robertogreco
REMUS SharkCam: The hunter and the hunted on Vimeo
"In 2013, a team from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution took a specially equipped REMUS "SharkCam" underwater vehicle to Guadalupe Island in Mexico to film great white sharks in the wild. They captured more than they bargained for."

[via: http://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/remus-sharkcam-the-hunter-and-the-hunted

"When the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution team took their REMUS “SharkCam” underwater vehicle — equipped with six camera views — to Mexico’s Guadalupe Island, they expected to track and film great white sharks for scientific study. They had no idea that they would get the first recorded close-ups of predatory behavior by sharks in the wild." ]
sharks  video  animals  oceans  ocean  2014  cameras 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Science Studio
"The Weight of Mountains

Here’s a short film by a children’s book illustrator about “the processes by which mountains are created and eventually destroyed, based upon the work of British geographer L. Dudley Stamp.” It’s eye-meltingly gorgeous and starkly scientific. The tone is meditative and incantatory, turning geological terms into epic poetry. If you’ve ever wanted to read John McPhee’s “Annals of the Former World” but only have 11 minutes, watch this."

[Direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/87651855

"This is a short film about the processes by which mountains are created and eventually destroyed. It is based upon the work of British geographer L. Dudley Stamp, and was shot in Iceland.

Physical geography and geology is an enormous and fascinating subject, and this film only touches upon the surface of the discipline. For those who wish to further advance their knowledge in this field, additional reading and research is recommended.

The film was created as part of The Weight of Mountains filmmaker residency program. For more information please visit twom.is/

Animation courtesy of NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio" ]
via:vruba  2014  johnpablus  ldudleystamp  mountains  earth  science  earthscience  landscape  geology  film  scale  height  geography  history  naturalhistory  oceans  atmosphere  platemovement  platetectonics  sun  frost  eathering  wind  weather  erosion  glaciers  ice  rain  water  denudation  nature  gravity  johnmcphee 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The undersea drones revealing the ocean's secrets - CNN.com
"Beyond averting disasters, the drone is being used on missions to break new water in understanding the 95% of the world's oceans that remain unexplored. Wave Gliders are measuring acidification levels and environmental damage, and monitoring wildlife to aid conservation efforts. They are searching for new sources of fuel, chemicals and medicines, and providing security against mines and other hazards.

Hine believes the drone has already transformed exploration and foresees rapid progress. "The more you use the more efficient they are because if you launch 50 you only use one ship -- which is the bulk of expense," he says. "It's a paradigm shift toward using large fleets for wider coverage and research. And the (sensor) technology gets better the more you use it."

The fleet is expanding steadily -- this summer saw the largest set of Gliders yet probing the Arctic ice to chart the effects of warming as well as to search for hydrocarbons. Such capabilities have earned the company a growing list of conservation, fuel and military clients.

The current SV3 model is being upgraded to improve power storage, reliability and the sophistication of its algorithm, but experts believe the systems are already mature."

[See also: http://www.liquidr.com/technology/waveglider/sv3.html
and http://openrov.com/ ]
oceans  drones  oceanography  droneproject  2014  openrov  waveglider  liquidrobotics  robots 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Baja's Secret Miracle on Vimeo
"Mario Castro, a fisherman that decided to change the destiny of his community, narrates this wonderful story that takes us in a journey of decades, to understand how the town of Cabo Pulmo created the world's most robust marine reserve."
mexico  film  elianaalvarezmartinez  mariocastro  bajacalifornia  bajacaliforniasur  cabopulmo  fishing  oceans  ecology  srg  edg  ocatvoaburto 
august 2014 by robertogreco
I’ve been waiting 16 years to know: what is the ocean dandelion? | Deep Sea News
"You are one animal, that’s clear, but you’re not one cell. You’re trillions of cells all working together in a cooperative fashion. And the product of all that cooperation is singular: one unique YOU made up of trillions of individual cells. Biologists talk about this in terms of ‘levels of organization.’ On one level, you’re trillions of cells, on another level, you’re one unique animal. So far we’re talking two levels of organization. Level 1: cell. Level 2: animal. Can you imagine what kind of crazy weird creature would exist if we add a third level?

Imagine a creature that is not just made up of trillions of cells, but also hundreds of animals. All these animals work together in the same way your cells work together, creating a kind of superorganism. Ants could be considered a superorganism, all working together with one queen.  Siphonophores, like the ocean dandelion, take this whole idea one step further.

The ocean dandelion is like an ant colony on steroids. Like an ant colony, each ocean dandelion is a collection of individual animals, all working together for the colony. There are different jobs for different members. Some protect the colony, some catch food, some reproduce. But there is one key difference between an ant colony and an ocean dandelion: individual ants work together, but still remain separated from one another, for members of the ocean dandelion colony, this isn’t true. They actually share tissues with one another. They have one shared community stomach, so what one animal eats, all get to digest.

Forget the hammer and sickle: Communism, your symbol should be the ocean dandelion.

Crazy to think about, but beautiful to look at. Each ‘petal’ of the disintegrated ocean dandelion I saw  years ago was actually a single member of the colony, able to survive a short time on its own before starving to death. A change in pressure, or bumpy ride to the ocean’s surface, may have been what caused the colony to collapse.

Despite the time that’s passed since I first saw the ocean dandelion, there’s still a lot we don’t know. What does it eat? How does it reproduce? But we know something about how it’s put together, and I never would have guessed the answer would be so strange. Twelve-year-old me would be thrilled."
biology  science  nature  oceans  marinelife  2014  superorganisms 
march 2014 by robertogreco
earth
"a visualization of global weather conditions
forecast by supercomputers
updated every three hours

ocean surface current estimates
updated every five days"
climate  weather  wind  maps  mapping  earth  visualization  oceans  currents  temperature  realtime 
january 2014 by robertogreco
The ocean is broken | Newcastle Herald
"IT was the silence that made this voyage different from all of those before it.

Not the absence of sound, exactly.

The wind still whipped the sails and whistled in the rigging. The waves still sloshed against the fibreglass hull.

And there were plenty of other noises: muffled thuds and bumps and scrapes as the boat knocked against pieces of debris.

What was missing was the cries of the seabirds which, on all previous similar voyages, had surrounded the boat.

The birds were missing because the fish were missing.

Exactly 10 years before, when Newcastle yachtsman Ivan Macfadyen had sailed exactly the same course from Melbourne to Osaka, all he'd had to do to catch a fish from the ocean between Brisbane and Japan was throw out a baited line.

"There was not one of the 28 days on that portion of the trip when we didn't catch a good-sized fish to cook up and eat with some rice," Macfadyen recalled.

But this time, on that whole long leg of sea journey, the total catch was two.

No fish. No birds. Hardly a sign of life at all.

"In years gone by I'd gotten used to all the birds and their noises," he said.

"They'd be following the boat, sometimes resting on the mast before taking off again. You'd see flocks of them wheeling over the surface of the sea in the distance, feeding on pilchards."

But in March and April this year, only silence and desolation surrounded his boat, Funnel Web, as it sped across the surface of a haunted ocean.

North of the equator, up above New Guinea, the ocean-racers saw a big fishing boat working a reef in the distance. …"

[Read on.]
oceans  environment  ocean  fishing  pollution  anthropocene  2013 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Marinexplore - The Ocean's Big Data Platform
"Marinexplore.org is the easiest way to explore, discover, and share public ocean data."
community  data  marine  oceans  via:vruba  maps  mapping 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Adrift: tracking the global ocean circulation
"Want to know where your message in a bottle will turn up or track down the path of local floating pollution? Welcome to adrift, a website inspired by research into ocean circulation by Dr Erik Van Sebille and the delightful book Moby Duck.

Here you can explore how all kinds of objects drift through the ocean - from rubber duckies to plastic pollution - and where each object might end up if it is washed out to sea from your beach.

The website uses a scientific method that is based on observed tracks revealed by buoys in the Global Drifter Program and other scientific research in this field. On this website you can see where ocean-going debris travelled after the Fukushima disaster or the path rubber ducks may have taken after the famous Friendly Floaties spill revealed in Moby Duck."
environment  maps  oceanography  oceans  currents 
october 2013 by robertogreco
I do not believe that financial markets make the... • see things differently
"I do not believe that financial markets make the economy more efficient. The analogy I use is Earth. If it were reduced to the size of a basketball, it would be smoother than a billiard ball. However, at a human scale, there are mountains and oceans we can exploit….

The guy talking about making markets more efficient is thinking of something like rolling rocks down a mountain to power useful work. This indeed makes the Earth smoother, wearing down mountains and filling in oceans. But … [that] bears no resemblance to what people really do. They’re more likely to build a hydroelectric dam that holds water back, that is it keeps the system farther from equilibrium, not moves it closer."

—Aaron Brown, Red-Blooded Risk

[Shared with me in response to my tweet of this quote "Compared to its breadth, the Earth’s surface is flat: smoother than a billiard ball, the Himalayas a fingerprint." from: http://edgeca.se/the-lay-of-the-land/ ]
efficiency  markets  finance  aaronbrown  smoothness  scale  mountains  earth  oceans  2013 
august 2013 by robertogreco
‘Blue’ Businesses Eye a Planning Sea Change | Voice of San Diego
"Lots of industries under what’s being called the “blue economy” umbrella aren’t new. But they’re banding together with new technologies to confront some major hurdles to the work they want to do in the oceans.

The phrase encompasses ancient industries like maritime travel, defense, fishing, boat-building, shipping and cartography. But it also includes innovative “blue tech” endeavors like underwater robots, submarines, aquaculture, wind energy and desalination.

Their combined footprint in San Diego is big. More than 1,400 companies in the blue economy generate more than $14 billion in sales, according to a 2012 report produced by the San Diego Workforce Partnership, the Regional Economic Development Corporation and the Maritime Alliance, an interest group organized in 2007 to promote the blue economy."
blueeconomy  oceans  sandiego  kellybennett  2013  economics  business  robots  seabotix  regulation  aquaculture  desalination  fishfarms  marinespatialplanning 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Ocean Discovery Institute
"For the past decade, Ocean Discovery Institute has been empowering urban and diverse young people to protect our ocean and natural environment, improve the health of our communities, and strengthen our quality of life. Ocean Discovery Institute is the only non-profit in the San Diego region expressly dedicated to educating urban and diverse youth through ocean science.

WHY THE OCEAN? The ocean and our coastlines are an extraordinary educational resource intrinsic to San Diego. All of the primary concepts in science and conservation can be taught through ocean science including: mathematics, engineering, physics, biochemistry, geology, astronomy, ecology, physiology, molecular/biotechnology, environmental sciences, technology/computer science, and biomechanics. Using the ocean as an educational tool capitalizes on young people’s instinctive attraction to the sea and builds knowledge of our planet’s defining feature.

Ocean Discovery Institute heads up a series of initiatives that incorporate education, scientific research, and environmental stewardship. Currently these initiatives reach 5,000+ low-income students and community members each year. All of Ocean Discovery Institute’s programming is provided tuition-free. To ensure continued effectiveness, regular program assessments are conducted by a professional external evaluator with a doctorate from Harvard University."

[New building going up in City Heights: http://www.sdcitybeat.com/sandiego/article-11965-watch-this-space.html ]
sandiego  ocean  science  oceans  oceandiscoveryinstitute  cityheights  youth  openstudioproject  environment  education 
july 2013 by robertogreco
‘Phones, Drones and Genomes’: Top Sectors Where SD Makes a Mark | Voice of San Diego
"In the post-World War II era, San Diego made a big investment in companies working in atomic energy, medical research and aerospace – realms where San Diego had made a wartime name for itself. That investment helped set the stage for many of the region’s subsequent discoveries. And it helped grow clusters of companies.

Now, half a century later, the landscape has evolved. What are the places, niches, realms where San Diego’s making a mark nationally and internationally? Part of our reporting quest to discover and outline potential barriers to innovation in San Diego is defining what innovation is and where San Diego fits in the larger conversation.

Here’s a tentative list we’ve put together, with the help of some great suggestions, of the areas where San Diego is making a big impact. What did we miss? Let us know below.

Drones
Stem Cells
Genomics
Wireless communications
Software and software analytics
Clean tech and Blue tech
Cybersecurity
craft brewing"
sandiego  economics  economy  kellybennett  drones  stemcells  craigventer  genomics  illumina  generalatomics  northropgrumman  qualcomm  software  cleantech  bluetech  oceans  robotics  cybersecurity  beer 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Essay on in the insights that come with immersion in the deep, cold sea: Change Observer: Design Observer
"Once you’re drinking what the fish drink and hearing what they hear, you notice phenomena inconceivable on land."
barbaraflanagan  swimming  oceanswimming  oceans  santabarbara  california  totalimmersion  2011 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Gigantic New SuperOrganism with 'Social Intelligence' is Devouring the Titanic (Today's Most Popular)
"In 2000, Roy Cullimore, a microbial ecologist and Charles Pellegrino, scientist and author of Ghosts of the Titanic discovered that the Titanic --which sank in the Atlantic Ocean 97 years ago -- was being devoured by a monster microbial industrial complex of extremophiles as alien we might expect to find on Jupiter's ocean-bound Europa. What they discovered is the largest, strangest cooperative microorganism on Earth.<br />
<br />
Scientists believe that this strange super-organism is using a common microbial language that could be either chemical or electrical -a phenomenon called "quorum sensing" by which whole communities "sense" each other's presence and activities aiding and abetting the organization, cooperation, and growth."
science  biology  life  history  titanic  superorganisms  oceans  cooperation  growth  organization  sensing  microbes  microorganisms  via:javierarbona  ecology  extremophiles  2011 
april 2011 by robertogreco
College of Exploration
"…a global learning network. We work with partners around the world on innovative and exploratory learning programs about our environment, the earth, the ocean, technology, leadership, learning and creativity.

We are organized as a collegium concerned with programs about our understanding of, and our relationships with and between, our inner and outer worlds.

The College of Exploration is incorporated in the Commonwealth of Virginia USA as a not for profit with 501c3 status with the US Internal Revenue Service.

We co-explore with a range of partners to produce and offer educational and research programs. Since 1991 TCOE has partnered in a wide range of innovative education events - both online and on-site. We believe in co-design, co-operation and collaborative projects!

The CofE strives to provide learners of all ages and backgrounds with exciting online, and onsite opportunities to actively explore the world around them as well as their own responses to the world."
education  science  collaboration  via:hrheingold  oceans  environment  technology  leadership  learning  creativity  collegeofexploration  online  web  systems  systemsthinking 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The Mariana Trench To Scale [Pic] | I Am Bored
"The Mariana Trench To Scale [Pic]. It`s the deepest part of the world`s ocean and the lowest elevation of the surface of the Earth. Yeah, it`s that deep."
scale  oceans  visualization  geography  oceanography  science  web  earth  illustration  maps  mapping  tcsnmy  marianatrench 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Waterpod Is a Floating Green Home in New York City - NYTimes.com
"The Waterpod isn’t the only project exploring water-based living. Last year, Patri Friedman, a former Google engineer, co-founded the Seasteading Institute, based in Palo Alto, Calif., which is developing a floating home based on the design of an oil rig, with $500,000 in financing from Peter Thiel, a PayPal founder. Mr. Friedman, who said he sees the ocean as “a new frontier for pioneers to try things out,” plans to have a single-family prototype built next year, and has set a goal of housing 100,000 people in the next 25 years."
nomads  neo-nomads  environment  sustainability  art  design  architecture  homes  housing  shelter  future  mobility  floating  oceans  water  waterpod 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Ultrasound Kills Red Tides | Mother Jones
"Dangerous red tides that kill fish and marine mammals and are toxic, even carcinogenic, to humans, might be destroyed using bursts of ultrasound."
via:javierarbona  redtide  ultrasound  oceans  oceanography  toxins  food  shellfish  coastal  coasts 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Waterpod™ Project
"floating, sculptural, eco-habitat designed for the rising tides. It will depart on May 1, 2009, from the Newtown Creek between Brooklyn & Queens, navigate down the East River, explore the waters of New York Harbor, docking at several Manhattan piers on the Hudson River before continuing onward.The Waterpod demonstrates future pathways for water-based innovations. As a sustainable, navigable living space, the Waterpod showcases the critical importance of the environment and art, serving as a model for new living, d.i.y. technologies, art & dialogue. It illustrates positive interactions between communities: private and corporate; artistic and social; aquatic and terrestrial while exploring the cultural richness of New York's five boroughs and beyond. The Waterpod embodies self-sufficiency and resourcefulness, learning and curiosity, human expression and creative exploration."
nomads  neo-nomads  environment  sustainability  art  design  architecture  homes  housing  shelter  future  mobility  floating  oceans  water  waterpod 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Waterpod: A Nomad Habitation for the Climate Changed Future - Dwell Blog - dwell.com
"While scientists usually get the big headlines for research and forecasts related to global warming, many artists and designers are proposing their own noteworthy responses to this monumental problem. As resources are extinguished and species go extinct, populations explode and oceans rise, we need radically creative thinking to make sufficiently drastic change. The world of art and design is a likely idea incubator.

In the spring of 2009, a collective of artists will launch a new work called Waterpod that proposes a lifestyle shift toward waterborne nomadism, beginning on the East River with a group of eager and willing collaborators. Waterpod is a floating shelter designed to house a small community, capable of moving with tides and floods while keeping its clutch safe and dry."
nomads  neo-nomads  environment  sustainability  art  design  architecture  homes  housing  shelter  future  mobility  floating  oceans  water  waterpod 
december 2008 by robertogreco
TOPP [Tagging of Pacific Predators] - "Follow the adventures of leatherback turtles, white sharks, elephant seals, salmon sharks, albatross, and 18 other species on TOPP"
"began in 2000 as one of 17 projects of the Census of Marine Life, an ambitious 10-year, 80-nation endeavor to assess and explain the diversity and abundance of life in the oceans, and where that life has lived, is living, and will live."
via:tomc  sharks  animals  biology  birds  classideas  data  environment  fish  geography  maps  mapping  reference  research  science  interactivity  locative  location-based  tagging  oceans  wildlife  nature  turtles  realtime  tracking  pacific  marine 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Empty Oceans Series | csmonitor.com
"Today, fish stocks are disappearing and undersea ecosystems are changing in ways that raise alarm. How did this happen? And what must be done to reverse these trends and sustain life in the world's seas?"
oceans  environment  world  sustainability  history  fisheries  trends  international  global 
june 2008 by robertogreco
TED | Talks | Robert Ballard: Exploring the ocean's hidden worlds (video)
"takes us on a mindbending trip to hidden worlds underwater, where he and other researchers are finding unexpected life, resources, even new mountains. He makes a case for serious exploration and mapping. Google Ocean, anyone?"
education  exploration  oceans  science  ted  classideas  videogames  learning  robertballard 
june 2008 by robertogreco
The JASON Project
"nonprofit subsidiary of the National Geographic Society...connects young students with great explorers & great events to inspire & motivate them to learn science...designed for 5-8th grade classrooms but are flexible enough to be adapted for higher or lo
education  weather  exploration  science  curriculum  teaching  learning  classideas  geography  history  oceans  collaboration  interactive  1to1  schools  elearning  environment  1:1 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Self Catching Fish
"If it works, the system could eventually allow black sea bass to be released into the open ocean, where they would grow to market size, then swim into an underwater cage to be harvested when they hear the signal."
animals  fish  food  oceans  via:regine 
april 2008 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Transmitting live from below the Antarctic Ice
"we can now listen directly to "an acoustic live stream of the Antarctic underwater soundscape." This "live stream" is recorded via hydrophones attached to "an autonomous, wind and solar powered observatory located on the Ekström ice shelf."
bldgblog  arctic  life  sound  audio  water  oceans  soundscapes 
april 2008 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Map shows toll on world's oceans
"Only about 4% of the world's oceans remain undamaged by human activity, according to the first detailed global map of human impacts on the seas."
climate  ecology  ecosystems  environment  impact  marine  maps  oceans  pollution  science  world  research  via:foe 
february 2008 by robertogreco
PingMag - The Tokyo-based magazine about “Design and Making Things” » Archive » Corey Fishes: Adventures On The High Seas
"Photographer Corey Arnold is based in Portland, Oregon - but every couple of months, he is drawn to the high seas. Actually, he works as a tough fisherman off the shores of Alaska or on the icy waters of the Barents Sea."
photography  fishing  food  oceans  sea  animals  work  pingmag 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Climate Change: Giant Squids Invade The Dead Zones Of California
"The massive squid predators feed off the "free suffocated food at the edge of that anoxic zone," writes senior ocean analyst Kate Wing. "Like a jubilee for cephalopods.""
squid  animals  oceans  food  deadzone  anoxiczone 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Malacca Strait Pirates - Article Text, page 1 - National Geographic Magazine
"Modern pirates have long plagued Southeast Asia’s Strait of Malacca, robbing sailors, kidnapping crews, and stealing entire ships."
piracy  pirates  images  photography  oceans  crime  culture  shipping  ships  transportation  asia  international 
november 2007 by robertogreco
designboom - imaginative sea creatures [order and natural history at the herzog august bibliothek]
"wasn't a naturalist, and never left holland, dutch huguenot publisher louis renard succeeded in turning motley collection of drawings from east indies into one of the rarest, most fantastic evocations of exotic aquatic life ever published"
drawing  glvo  animals  biology  plants  illustration  discovery  history  science  fantasy  myth  fish  oceans 
october 2007 by robertogreco
When is a fish not a fish? When it's a jelly! | csmonitor.com
"Black jellyfish usually live deep in the sea. But every five to eight years, they rise to the surface where they can be seen by humans."
jellies  jellyfish  oceans  sea  biology  marine  life  science  animals  glvo 
september 2007 by robertogreco
California's attack of the jumbo squid - earth - 23 July 2007 - New Scientist Environment
"Ferocious, pack-feeding jumbo squid have invaded waters off California's central coast and are devouring local fish populations. Researchers say global warming and overfishing are likely to blame."
squid  animals  globalwarming  oceans  marine 
july 2007 by robertogreco
TED | TEDBlog: Step into the open ocean with Tierney Thys
"the Mola mola, or giant ocean sunfish. Basking, eating jellyfish, and getting massages, this behemoth offers clues to life in the open ocean"
animals  science  biology  molamola  oceans  marine  fish  planet  environment 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Handhelds help turn kids into marine biologists | CNET News.com
"On a clear day in March, a group of 10-year-olds were playing marine scientists from a lookout point in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, at a spot known for its views of humpback whales."
technology  children  schools  learning  handhelds  1to1  laptops  education  science  biology  hawaii  whales  wireless  marine  oceans  teaching  students  1:1 
may 2007 by robertogreco
collision detection: Is this sea creature real or CGI?
"Dumbo Octopus"..."Deep-sea life is so aggressively odd-looking that it's indistiguishable from Hollywood CGI creations."
photography  science  oceans  marine  octopus  biology  animals  cgi 
may 2007 by robertogreco
FOXNews.com - Japanese Researchers Find Dolphin With 'Remains of Legs' - Science News | Current Articles
"Japanese researchers said Sunday that a bottlenose dolphin captured last month has an extra set of fins that could be the remains of back legs, a discovery that may provide further evidence that ocean-dwelling mammals once lived on land."
animals  biology  evolution  oceans  science  dolphins 
november 2006 by robertogreco
Ambassadors of the Environment
"Ambassadors of the Environment (AOTE) is a truly innovative educational experience designed to promote a better understanding of how nature works and to create an appreciation for the value of our natural heritage in order to guide the next generation to
local  science  animals  environment  oceans  education  nature  learning  homeschool 
june 2006 by robertogreco
Hairy, blind, blonde lobster discovered - The World - Breaking News 24/7 - NEWS.com.au
"A HAIRY, blonde, blind 'lobster' discovered in the South Pacific has confounded marine researchers, who have created an entirely new species group to accomodate it."
animals  biology  science  oceans 
march 2006 by robertogreco
TOPP: Tagging Of Pacific Pelagics
"The Tagging of Pacific Pelagic (TOPP) research project explores the Pacific, using a carefully selected group of animals from its ecosystems to gather data about their world. As a pilot program of the Census of Marine Life (COML), an international endeav
science  animals  world  oceans  global  technology  geography 
february 2006 by robertogreco

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