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robertogreco : oddfuture   28

Interview: Earl Sweatshirt ["Earl Sweatshirt Fights Off Bad Vibes On Some Rap Songs he finds new ways to be himself."]
"As a poet’s son, Earl is serious about the stewardship of the oral tradition. Rappers are descendants of the African griots, Sweatshirt reasons. He worries about the ramifications of the generational disconnect that’s rending a schism between rap fans in their 30s and 40s and fans in their 20s over modern vagaries like triplet flows and trap drum sounds. In our first talk, which happened on a tense, uncertain Election Day afternoon, Earl was both miffed about a Twitter row where rap fans scoffed at Genius head of A&R Rob Markman’s suggestion that the Texas vet Scarface is a top-five hip-hop talent and excited to link the fun-house grunts and ad-libs of Playboi Carti’s Die Lit back to the climate of amateurish discovery at the dawn of hip-hop. Division is a two-way street; Earl wishes younger hip-hop fans had a greater interest in the classics, and he thinks older ones have a responsibility to behave more responsibly. (Asked about the year in Kanye West and Eminem media gaffes, Earl offered a withering line: “You can tell who really just started using the internet.”) When I caught up with him again a few weeks later, he opened up about the tough year in his family, the change in his creative process, and his dueling appreciations for Dilla and OVO production. You’d be hard-pressed to find another rap diehard with the same depth of knowledge and even-handed sense of intergenerational connectedness in 2018. “I only get better with time,” he promises in “Azucar.”"



"It takes the discourse up a notch. It’s not for the sake of exclusivity. It’s not to alienate anyone, but it does demand a kind of basic musical knowledge, whether it’s intuitive or learned over time. Yeah, it’s more human. Sometimes it takes people more time to get into that human bag. I always just revert back to when I was younger because that’s when you haven’t learned so much, and all this bullshit hasn’t become, like, calloused on your brain. I go off what would make me soar in my room by myself as a child. And it’s often more complex than what you’ll do sitting there taking yourself seriously as some smart adult. Just, like, some fucking technical wizard or scientist, you know what I mean?"



"Talk to me about feeling disconnected from your older raps. Is it difficult to perform stuff that you made when you were in an angrier place?
Yeah. Some of the stuff. I mean, I’m 24, bro. The shit that I’m performing spans from when I was 18 to now. So, there’s a difference in perspective and the information I had and the fuckin’ attitude, the way I wrote even. You say you noticed the difference, how I wrote more technically? I’ve had to relearn some of these tongue twisters that I left for myself. So I’m really excited to be performing new shit, because it provides a more honest and whole picture of the person that is standing in front of people, because I can actually be myself in real time. I don’t have hits to fall back on. I got to go into, like, a personal bag. So, I only rely on meaning what I say.

How do you feel like you’re different now? Are you in a better space? Earlier in the year, we got word that you canceled some tour dates, and you were saying there was depression. Is that something you’ve worked through?
I’m working on it, man. It’s a day-to-day thing. For a long time this year, I was still kind of in shock and still can be shocked by the fact that my dad died. That shit really threw me the fuck off.

It’s something you don’t plan for, and it’s something that can take months to understand. I lost mine at the top of the decade, and it’s not normal. It’s not a thought process that you get used to. And especially at your age.
Yeah, it really fucked me up. We make movies in our heads, you know? Where this happens. And then this happens as a result of that. It’s kind of like … having faith, I guess. It’s like, I know this is going to happen. So, then when that shit happened with my pops … I talked to my brother, who I saw was doing better. He’s about eight years older than me. He was at a different place with my pops, and I remember asking him like, “Yo, how do you — you know — we know the same nigga, like … how are you not as mad as me?” This nigga was like, “Because I had to come back as an adult and spend time with him as an adult.” I did work with the intention of being able to come back literally this year, at the top of this year. I’d finally pledged, like, “I’m going home. I can do it. I can see this.” And he died. Going through that existential thing, plus other existential elements of my pops, him being a public figure, the public figure that he is. And then being Earl Sweatshirt on top of it?"
earlsweatshirt  2018  oddfuture  music  ofwgkta  hiphop  rap  keorapetsekgositsile  thebenerudakgositsile  denmarkvessey  neoteny  polish  learning  unlearning  children 
january 2019 by robertogreco
The GQ&A: Earl Sweatshirt | GQ
"Hip-hop heads world 'round: Earl Sweatshirt's major label debut, Doris, drops today. (But you already knew that.) In this revealing sit-down, BYARD DUNCAN gets the nineteen-year-old to open up about everything from his struggles with addiction to his time in Samoa to his girlfriend. Yup, girlfriend."
earlsweatshirt  2013  oddfuture  music  ofwgkta  rap  hiphop  thebenerudakgositsile 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Where’s Earl Sweatshirt? | The New Yorker
"Word from the missing prodigy of a hip-hop group on the rise."

[bookmarking this as a standalone, but it was already here:
https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:5f4973c0f027 ]

[follow-up:
"How's Earl"
https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/hows-earl ]

[See also:

"Complex Exclusive: We Found Earl Sweatshirt"
https://www.complex.com/music/2011/04/complex-exclusive-we-found-earl-sweatshirt

"Odd Future's Earl Sweatshirt – found in Samoa?"
https://www.theguardian.com/music/2011/apr/15/earl-sweatshirt-odd-future-samoa

"Odd Future’s Earl Sweatshirt Speaks"
http://www.vulture.com/2011/05/odd_futures_earl_sweatshirt_sp.html

"What’s Life Like for Odd Future’s Earl Sweatshirt in that Secret Samoan Academy?"
http://www.vulture.com/2011/05/whats_life_like_for_odd_future.html

"Earl Sweatshirt's Coral Reef Academy Friend Says "New Yorker" Story Is False"
https://www.complex.com/music/2011/06/earl-sweatshirt-coral-reef-academy-friend-says-new-yorker-story-is-false

"The story of Odd Future's Earl Sweatshirt gets another knot"
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/music_blog/2011/06/the-story-of-odd-future-earl-sweatshirt-gets-another-knot.html

"Earl Sweatshirt in Samoa"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aHiqNeVTj7c
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqLdt-s944s ]
oddfuture  ofwgkta  music  parenting  2011  newyorker  kelefasanneh  hiphop  keorapetsekgositsile  fame  youth  adolescence  identity  earlsweatshirt  thebenerudakgositsile  rap 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Earl Sweatshirt and Vince Staples - Inside the Beat - Ep. 1 - YouTube
"In the first episode of Inside the Beat we explore the sonic imaginations of Earl Sweatshirt and Vince Staples. Earl explores the trippy possibilities of producing sound, while Vince takes us on a lyrical journey of inspiration through his hometown, Long Beach, CA.

Noisey teamed up with producers from all over the world in a seven part original documentary series to investigate the genesis of their music through their own personal stories. This is Inside the Beat."
earlsweatshirt  oddfuture  2014  music  ofwgkta  vincestaples  rap  hiphop  thebenerudakgositsile 
july 2018 by robertogreco
M.C. Earl Sweatshirt: A Leaf in the Wind - YouTube
"Earl Sweatshirt is a nineteen-year-old m.c. and one of the more popular members of the Los Angeles-based hip-hop group Odd Future. Here, Earl riffs on inspiration, solidifying one’s identity, and what he’s (not) looking forward to."
earlsweatshirt  music  2013  video  rap  hiphop  oddfuture  ofwgkta  thebenerudakgositsile 
july 2018 by robertogreco
The 18-year-old rapper bold enough to just be MIKE - YouTube
"MIKE and the sLUms crew are changing the model for internet-bred rappers.

Listen to MIKE’s music here: https://mikelikesrap.bandcamp.com/ "

[See also:
"The 18-Year-Old Rapper Bold Enough to Just Be MIKE: MIKE and the sLUms crew are changing the model for internet-bred rappers."
https://theoutline.com/post/2420/the-18-year-old-rapper-bold-enough-to-just-be-mike

"The rapper MIKE [https://twitter.com/t6mikee ] is carving a different kind of path for himself as an internet rapper [https://mikelikesrap.bandcamp.com/music ]. While many Soundcloud [https://soundcloud.com/t6mikee ]and Youtube musicians are focused on chasing fast fame, MIKE, whose given name is Michael Jordan Bonema, says he’s more interested in creating a lasting community where he, his collective of friends (which goes by sLUms [https://soundcloud.com/wastedareas ]), and his fans can communicate and feel comfortable. After his well-received full length album from earlier this year, May God Bless Your Hustle [https://mikelikesrap.bandcamp.com/album/may-god-bless-your-hustle ], MIKE is poised to blow up and he plans to bring everyone along for the ride." ]

[More:

MIKE's YouTube channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiXfXIX2s6MKt4N2KkBdg2Q

sLUms YouTube channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVPti_6jZhRsDIi7Fhz-6wA/videos

"MIKE - 40 STOPS (PROD SIXPRESS)" (from the Outline video)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mEE6VHXQy-Q

"MIKE Should Be Your New Favourite Teen Rapper"
https://noisey.vice.com/en_uk/article/j5gwjg/mike-wait-for-me-video-premiere-by-water

MIKE on Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/mikelikesrap/

MIKE's music:
https://lnk.to/MIKE-ByTheWaterEP
https://open.spotify.com/artist/1wlzPS1hSNrkriIIwLFTmU
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/by-the-water-ep/id1275512315?app=music&ign-mpt=uo%3D4
https://soundcloud.com/t6mikee ]
music  oddfuture  mike  edg  soundcloud  bandcamp  thirdculturekids  earlsweatshirt  identity  communication  nyc  michaeljordanbonema  internet  web  rap  ofwgkta  2017  hiphop  thebenerudakgositsile 
october 2017 by robertogreco
Earl Sweatshirt: ‘Canadians Are Weirdos’ - The New York Times
[See also:

"After Exile, Career Reset: Earl Sweatshirt Is Back From the Wilderness" (2012)
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/06/arts/music/earl-sweatshirt-is-back-from-the-wilderness.html

"Loose Cannons, Now Firing Freely: Earl Sweatshirt and ASAP Ferg, Hip-Hop Progressives" (2013)
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/18/arts/music/earl-sweatshirt-and-asap-ferg-hip-hop-progressives.html

"Review: Earl Sweatshirt’s Latest Album Goes to Dark Places" (2015)
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/24/arts/music/review-earl-sweatshirts-latest-album-goes-to-dark-places.html ]

"Q: The rap collective you’re a member of, Odd Future, became famous very rapidly after you were sent by your mother to a school for troubled youth in Samoa. Did missing out on that success further your resolve to sort through the behavior issues that got you there?
A: Hell, no. Not initially, and not the way that Odd Future was coming out — it was like a temper tantrum. It was perfect. But throwing a temper tantrum in a residential treatment facility is so much less cool than throwing a temper tantrum on TV.

Q: While you were in Samoa, your whereabouts were pieced together by fans and bloggers. Did it make you worry about how much information is available online?
A: One day I hope to not have a Twitter, to be sick enough that I don’t have to use the Internet. But since we came up online, I have to be online. Twitter is a real addiction, like the color of it, the process of it.

Q: When you came home to finish your senior year of high school last year, did you have a bad case of senioritis?
A: Oh, my God, I couldn’t concentrate at all! The combination of being a senior and having a career, being the only person in my high school who didn’t have a question mark about anything, just waiting for school to end? It was tight.

Q: You were just in Toronto. How was that?
A: It was crazy. Canadians are weirdos, though. They are so nice — overbearing nice, like grandmother nice. Toronto is like a city of grandmas.

Q: The rapper Drake is from Toronto. Is he grandma nice?
A: Dude, Drake is grandma nice. He was at Frank Ocean’s show in L.A. and got into an argument with Tyler, the Creator’s mom. I left and came back in the room, and she was apologizing to him for how she came at him, and he was saying: “It’s all love. I love you, Mom. I love moms.” Drake loves moms.

Q: Your mother is a law professor at U.C.L.A. Does she ever pressure you to go to law school or anything?
A: No. My mom’s down for what I’m doing now that she knows I’m not unraveling. When she sent me to Samoa, it wasn’t like, “No rap music!,” you know what I mean? I didn’t get thrown in the cellar for swearing.

Q: Rick Ross was dropped from Reebok because of a lyric about date rape on “U.O.E.N.O.” Odd Future’s music often crosses similar lines.
A: Rick Ross! If he was everything that he rapped about, he’d be the worst coke-dealing mass murderer ever. People got mad because he said something bad on a cool song. That was ridiculous on Reebok’s part. You picked up Rick Ross, he’s cocaine — that’s what his entire career is.

Q: I think Reebok was responding to the social-media outpouring.
A: Everyone’s like sheep on social media, like one person starts making noise, and everyone’s like, ‘Hey, yeah!’ and then you got a whole bunch of people making noise at you.

Q: In 2011, The New Yorker reported that your dad, the South African poet Keorapetse Kgositsile, had not listened to your music. Has he since?
A: I haven’t shown him any music. Like if I was a plumber, I wouldn’t bring a sink home to my parents. I’m not actively trying to bring my work into the house.

Q: Your parents gave you the middle name Neruda after Pablo Neruda. You can see why people are curious.
A: Yeah, it just happens to be that people like to associate poetry and rap music. I think that idea is kind of corny. I think rap music is rap music. I mean, are there heavy writing aspects of it? Absolutely. In a sense is it poetry? Yeah. I’ve heard that so much, growing up in a house with poetry. But I think people like to use that as a shortcut for who’s good and who’s not. It’s like the word “lyrical” — “lyrical” is the worst word in the entire world.

Q: So it’s not a shocking concept that rap could be poetry.
A: It’s actually so familiar that it’s annoying"
oddfuture  ofwgkta  earlsweatshirt  2013  interviews  keorapetsekgositsile  asapferg  rap  hiphop  thebenerudakgositsile 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Tyler, the Creator and the Ironic(ish) Style of His Golf Wang Line | Billboard
“Tyler had grown up drawing doughnuts on his pants and dressing his own way and doing stuff,” says Clancy. “These guys are just making clothes for themselves, and then it’s a no-brainer for me as a manager to say, ‘OK, this is an obvious business.’ As I always say, the margin on socks is better than the margin on CDs, that’s for sure,” says Clancy. There even is a sneaker collaboration: Vans Syndicate x Odd Future, a collection of Old Skool Pro “S” suede shoes (those are skate shoes to laymen), in four colors, that came out in 2013. New colorways debut in July.


But while Tyler designs, he doesn’t think of himself as a designer: “I f—ing hate fashion and everything about it. I just like making stuff and it happens to be in f—ing cotton and, like, materials. But that shit [of the fashion world] is disgusting.” A healthy distrust of the corporate fashion industry, which exploits blind consumerism and false need, quite ironically makes for good business among post-millennials in the Internet age.


“I don’t want it to be like f—ing Rocawear or, I don’t know, a lot of things that come and go,” says Tyler. “That’s why I don’t give out free clothes to famous people. That actually could be the worst thing possible, if famous people wore Golf Wang
lcproject  clothing  tylerthecreator  ofwgkta  2014  projectideas  glvo  making  openstudioproject  oddfuture  golfwang 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Tyler, The Creator Returns to Jimmy Fallon With New Song, Plays the Piano, Jumps on Some Stuff - Hollywood Prospectus Blog - Grantland
"It's a performance that, some two years later, is still culturally relevant. The Odd Future collective's first nationally televised performance, "Sandwitches" by Tyler, The Creator and Hodgy Beats, backed by the Roots, on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon."
oddfuture  ofwgkta  2013  jimmyfallon  music  performance  rembertbrowne 
march 2013 by robertogreco
The American Crawl : Not Quite EverythingEverything: Why Our Approach to Music Education is Kinda Awful
"And all of this is to prelude a simple question: Why did I have to wait so long for this opportunity? While I was already a music “fan” and immersed in family practices that included going to musical performances, singing at family gatherings, and enthusiastically drumming on car dashboards, it really wasn’t until college that I was able to see music as a source of study, as a place to connect passion with purpose, a place to learn new ways of listening…

we leave music instruction into the hands of people who are inclined on the production side of things (and even then in only limited ways such as marching bands and big band numbers). Why do we wait to make the study of music, its history, and the cultural meaning of it an option only for those students that eventually matriculate into universities?"
anterogarcia  2011  ofwgkta  music  education  teaching  appreciation  listening  popularculture  oddfuture  culture  culturalstudies  semiotics  engagement  classideas  instruction  academics 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Tegan and Sara vs. Tyler, the Creator: The Internet reacts - Click Track - The Washington Post
"The beef, in three sentences:

Tyler's brutal, fascinating, endlessly cynical new disc, "Goblin," is pockmarked with homophobic and misogynistic slurs and rape and murder fantasies, for which critics (read: mostly white guys) have largely given him a pass.

Tegan and Sara's Sara Quin posted an open letter on the duo's website condemning Tyler and asking if he's getting away with behavior another artist wouldn't because potential critics fear "[t]he inevitable claim that detractors are being racist, or the brush-off that not “getting it” would indicate that you’re “old” (or a [expletive])?

Tyler quickly responded with a tweet: "If Tegan And Sara Need Some Hard [Expletive], Hit Me Up!""
oddfuture  music  ofwgkta  2011 
may 2011 by robertogreco
News Desk: Looking for Earl Sweatshirt : The New Yorker
[full article this references is available online (contrary to what is says in the text)
"Where’s Earl?"
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2011/05/23/wheres-earl ]

"Earl’s real name is Thebe Neruda Kgositsile, and his father is Keorapetse Kgositsile, one of South Africa’s most celebrated poets. Sanneh spoke with Kgositsile, and learned that the father knew of Earl’s success, but had not listened to the music. “When he feels that he’s got something to share with me, he’ll do that,” Kgositsile said. “And until then I will not impose myself on him just because the world talks of him.”

The person most responsible for Earl, however, is of course his mother, whose marriage to Kgositsile fell apart about a decade ago. She asked that The New Yorker not publish her name because she feared that Earl’s fans would harass her, and she is fiercely trying to protect her teen-age son from the exigencies of sudden fame. “There is a person named Thebe who preëxisted Earl,” Earl’s mother told Sanneh. “That person ought to be allowed to explore and grow, and it’s very hard to do that when there’s a whole set of expectations, narratives, and stories that are attached to him.”"
oddfuture  ofwgkta  music  parenting  2011  newyorker  kelefasanneh  hiphop  keorapetsekgositsile  fame  youth  adolescence  identity  earlsweatshirt  thebenerudakgositsile  rap 
may 2011 by robertogreco
…your writing about him has a strange kind of ambiguity. …… I’m not trying to diagnose or accuse you… - a grammar
"Online writing & criticism tend to really lead the reader around by the nose — dragging horses straight to the water of the author’s opinion. It’s partly just the format…partly because of way people read online…skimmy & ungenerous: The average comments box is full of people who have clearly read text mostly in search of something to be critical or superior about. So it helps to be explicit…If you quote, for instance, a vile misogynist lyric, a lot of readers will be much more attuned to the question of whether you know it’s vile & misogynist — rather than the fact that they know it & don’t need you to tell them…

However: I sorta feel like “excoriating” pieces often suffer from the same problems of glib skimming, ungenerous interpretation, and easy superiority. Often it makes them a lot less excoriating than they want to be: They become little rallies for people who already agree with you, people who read words on the internet in order to be told what they already know."
nitsuhabebe  writing  online  reading  web  internet  skimming  groupthink  echochambers  commenting  reinforcement  ofwgkta  text  superiority  criticism  nuance  oddfuture 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Tyler, the Creator: Visionary Rapper or Obnoxious Teenager? -- Vulture
"Tyler, the Creator is ringleader and figurehead of the much-discussed L.A. hip-hop/skater/visual-art crew Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All. Today, XL Records releases his second album, Goblin, the first Odd Future product you can pay money for in a store. Below: eleven thoughts about the album. All reprehensible language and sentiments are Tyler's fault; all overthinking is mine."

[Follow-up: http://agrammar.tumblr.com/post/5398465751/oh-man AND http://agrammar.tumblr.com/post/5426410117/i-read-that-tyler-piece-more-or-less-the-way-you ]
nitsuhabebe  culture  writing  music  criticism  hiphop  oddfuture  ofwgkta  tyler  2011 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Odd Future, energy, inclusion, and exclusion - a grammar
"Most everyone wants to be inside the circle of this kind of massive energy, not excluded by it."

"So how big of a deal is this? For those who can bracket it and enjoy the many amazing things about the music, it’s one of the least interesting things about the group—misogyny and homophobia are everywhere, but music this vital is not, necessarily. But if you, or truths you care about, are on the business end of those taunts, it’s an incredibly significant deal; it might as well be a picket line you’re crossing. This, in the end, is the hopelessly selfish complaint I’m making: I wish I could embrace the pleasure I get from this music without feeling like a scab, without knowing I can bracket things and include myself in a way that’s not so possible for others around me."
oddfuture  music  nitsuhabebe  sxsw  inclusion  exclusion  energy  2011  ofwgkta  inclusivity  inlcusivity 
march 2011 by robertogreco

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