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A Message From the Future With Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez - YouTube
"What if we actually pulled off a Green New Deal? What would the future look like? The Intercept presents a film narrated by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and illustrated by Molly Crabapple.

Set a couple of decades from now, the film is a flat-out rejection of the idea that a dystopian future is a forgone conclusion. Instead, it offers a thought experiment: What if we decided not to drive off the climate cliff? What if we chose to radically change course and save both our habitat and ourselves?

We realized that the biggest obstacle to the kind of transformative change the Green New Deal envisions is overcoming the skepticism that humanity could ever pull off something at this scale and speed. That’s the message we’ve been hearing from the “serious” center for four months straight: that it’s too big, too ambitious, that our Twitter-addled brains are incapable of it, and that we are destined to just watch walruses fall to their deaths on Netflix until it’s too late.

This film flips the script. It’s about how, in the nick of time, a critical mass of humanity in the largest economy on earth came to believe that we were actually worth saving. Because, as Ocasio-Cortez says in the film, our future has not been written yet and “we can be whatever we have the courage to see.”"

[See also:
https://theintercept.com/2019/04/17/green-new-deal-short-film-alexandria-ocasio-cortez/

"The question was: How do we tell the story of something that hasn’t happened yet?

We realized that the biggest obstacle to the kind of transformative change the Green New Deal envisions is overcoming the skepticism that humanity could ever pull off something at this scale and speed. That’s the message we’ve been hearing from the “serious” center for four months straight: that it’s too big, too ambitious, that our Twitter-addled brains are incapable of it, and that we are destined to just watch walruses fall to their deaths on Netflix until it’s too late.

This skepticism is understandable. The idea that societies could collectively decide to embrace rapid foundational changes to transportation, housing, energy, agriculture, forestry, and more — precisely what is needed to avert climate breakdown — is not something for which most of us have any living reference. We have grown up bombarded with the message that there is no alternative to the crappy system that is destabilizing the planet and hoarding vast wealth at the top. From most economists, we hear that we are fundamentally selfish, gratification-seeking units. From historians, we learn that social change has always been the work of singular great men.

Science fiction hasn’t been much help either. Almost every vision of the future that we get from best-selling novels and big-budget Hollywood films takes some kind of ecological and social apocalypse for granted. It’s almost as if we have collectively stopped believing that the future is going to happen, let alone that it could be better, in many ways, than the present.

The media debates that paint the Green New Deal as either impossibly impractical or a recipe for tyranny just reinforce the sense of futility. But here’s the good news: The old New Deal faced almost precisely the same kinds of opposition — and it didn’t stop it for a minute."]
alexandriaocasio-cortez  2019  mollycrabapple  greennewdeal  speculativefiction  politics  policy  future  climatechange  globalwarming  1988  us  oil  petroleum  fossilfuels  environment  sustainability  puertorico  crisis  change  food  transportation  economics  capitalism  inequality  medicareforall  livingwages  labor  work  infrastructure  trains  masstransit  publictransit  americorps  unions  indigenous  indigeneity  childcare  care  caring  teaching  domesticwork  universalrights  healthcare  humanism  humanity  avilewis  naomiklein  skepticism  imagination  newdeal  fdr  wpa  greatdepression  moonshots  art  artists  collectivism  society 
april 2019 by robertogreco
Get Real | Tarence Ray
"What liberals like Paul Krugman still don’t understand about rural America"



"This question of why the rural working class often votes against its interests has been bugging liberals for a few decades now, and you can’t really blame them. Democrats still held a lot of sway in rural America for the first half of the twentieth century, but then things started to change. Neoliberal economics tore rural regions apart. Both jobs and people left in short order. Now these regions swing predominantly conservative, and liberals are left scratching their heads.

Today, rural America is largely viewed as politically and culturally “a world apart,” when in reality the picture is bleaker: conservatives simply maintain a stronger grasp on power in rural areas than liberals do. Liberals think that the majority of people in rural areas see this as a desirable state of affairs. Many of us don’t. It’s just that our voices have been erased by the overwhelming might of power and industry.

Krugman would do better to skip the psychoanalysis and examine the way power is actually constituted in rural America: to look at why and how ideology is formed, who does the forming, and what material interests are served by it. But he knows his audience, and he knows that they don’t really want to know the answers to those questions because that would mean they would have to actually believe in and fight for something. And they’re not going to do that. They’d rather be at brunch.

*****

As good Marxists, let’s state up front that the primary function of rural areas within the larger national economy is as a supply source of raw materials: food, oil, natural gas, coal, timber, and other resources. To keep these goods flowing out of rural areas —and profit flowing into capitalists’ pockets—freethinking dissent within the extractive regions must be squashed at all costs. Compare this with urban areas, where a greater productive capacity and larger middle classes can absorb and dilute a great deal of dissent. In rural areas, those impulses have to be stamped out before they can really take off; nothing less than the unchallenged flow of profit and resources is at stake. Conservatives understand this, and it’s why one of their foremost political strategies in rural areas is that of social control.

If you live in a rural community, extractive or not, you are likely confronted every day with an onslaught of images, dogmas, and various cultural reinforcements regarding your role within the national social structure. Perhaps the primary location for this “indoctrination” is the local school system. In many rural communities, it is well understood that while state power may be concentrated in the county courthouse, social power—the power to shape the ideological contours of the community, and therefore how it votes, prays, works, and obeys—is concentrated in the local school board."



"The only thing capable of breaking the conservative stranglehold on rural communities—and of breaking the power of their foot soldiers in the local school boards, chambers of commerce, and churches—is a nationwide political movement based in the actual interests of the working class: the service industry employees and care workers, the teachers and tenants. That’s because the right wing has their own institutions, programs, and forms of ideological preservation in rural areas. They have invested heavily in them for the last thirty years, and they will not stop until rural America is a useless ecological graveyard. Conservatives see their beliefs gradually losing support, and they have entered death cult mode. They want to squeeze as much profit and as many resources out of rural areas as possible, until we, too, have gone to the graveyard.

The result is a rapidly deteriorating economic landscape that stumps writers like Krugman. When he writes about the economic forces contributing to rural America’s decline “that nobody knows how to reverse,” the “nobody” he’s referring to is himself. Krugman’s liberalism, with its focus on slow incrementalism and social tinkering, has become incompatible with rural economies that are beholden to the whims of increasingly embattled industry. In the days when America’s economy was booming after World War II, when regulations meant to safeguard the financial interests of ordinary people didn’t necessarily threaten the immense wealth that was being produced throughout society, it was feasible that pro-business ideas could coexist with liberal doctrines like human rights and social welfare policies. But in the era of post-industrial capitalism, as wages decline, jobs are relocated, and the social safety net shrinks, it’s become impossible to square that contradiction.

So the best Krugman can offer is a kind of liberal realism: progressive values are simply incompatible with the minds of backwards yokels living out in the provinces, and we need to get real about that. This allows Krugman to erase all forms of rural radicalism: he doesn’t see us as powerless, silenced by the authoritarian regime of conservative social control, because he doesn’t see power at all.

But we know that rural radicalism exists, and we know that the rural working class can exert a great deal of leverage on entrenched power structures. The statewide teacher strikes in predominantly rural West Virginia serve as the best recent example. Our power is growing. It may take some time and experimentation, but conservatives will not reign unchallenged in rural America for eternity. We’ve never stopped fighting back."
rural  us  paulkrugman  politics  economics  2019  power  taranceray  liberals  neoliberalism  capitalism  democrats  republicans  ideology  incrementalism  elitism  society  socialwelfare  welfare  radicalism  humanrights  work  labor  workingclass  class  teachers  tenants  coal  westvirginia  newmexico  oil  gas 
march 2019 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: It Came From Below
"In a short book called Making Time: Essays on the Nature of Los Angeles, writer William L. Fox explores the remnant gas leaks and oil seeps of the city. At times, it reads as if he is describing the backdrop of a Hieronymus Bosch painting. Such is the strange and permanent apocalypse of 21st-century L.A.

Fox writes, for example, that “a methane vent opened up in the middle of Fairfax Street” back in 1985, and that it “burned uncontrollably for days before it could be put out.” At night, it was a world lit by flames. Astonishingly, he adds, in 1962 “a Hawthorne woman had a fire under her house—a house with no basement. She located the source of the problem when she went outside and touched a match to a crack in the sidewalk: A flame ran down to it.”

This city where sidewalks burn and sewers fill with oily ooze is a city built here almost specifically for that very reason; Los Angeles, in many ways, is a settlement founded on petroleum byproducts, and the oil industry for which the city was once known never actually left. It just got better at hiding itself.

It is already well known that there are oilrigs disguised in plain sight all over the city. The odd-looking tower behind Beverly Hills High School, for example, is actually a camouflaged oilrig; an active oil field runs beneath the classrooms and athletic fields. Even stranger, the enormous synagogue at Pico and Doheny is not a synagogue at all, but a movable drilling tower designed to look like a house of worship, as if bizarre ceremonies for conjuring a literal black mass out of the bowels of the Earth take place here, hidden from view. If you zoom in on Google Maps, you can just make out the jumbles of industrial machinery tucked away inside.

However, amidst all of this still-functional oil infrastructure, there are ruins: abandoned wells, capped drill sites, and derelict pumping stations that have effectively been erased from public awareness. These, too, play a role in the city’s subterranean fires and its poisonous breakouts of black ooze. "



"It is worth considering, then, next time you step over a patch of tar on the sidewalk, that the black gloom still bubbling up into people’s yards and basements, still re-asphalting empty gravel parking lots, is actually an encounter with something undeniably old and elementally powerful.

In this sense, Los Angeles is more than just a city; it is a kind of interface between a petrochemical lifestyle of cars and freeways and the dark force that literally fuels it, a subterranean presence that predates us all by millions of years and that continues to wander freely beneath L.A.’s tangled streets and buildings."
losangeles  nature  oil  geography  geology  2015  geoffmanaugh  bldgblog  centerforlanduseinterpretation  clui  petroleum  williamfox 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Frackman
"Frack Man is hungry for fossil fuel to frack for cash. Steer him through the earth using the UP arrow key to seek out shale rocks that he can frack for gas. Avoid the water, tunnel past the beds of shale rock and press SPACE to frack them. But beware... fracking up the world has unexpected consequences. Look out overhead for subsiding landscapes that'll cost you fracked cash; and if you frack the water supply it's pretty much GAME OVER.

Press SPACE to start"
fracking  games  seriousgames  gaming  energy  oil 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Are We There Yet? Passage of the transportation reauthorization bill would finally shift us toward more environmentally sustainable communities.
"Environmentalists' interest in the transportation bill is clear. Transportation accounts for more than two-thirds of the nation's oil use and about 25 percent of its carbon-dioxide emissions…Americans will be hooked on oil until they have workable alternatives to the automobile. Investing in urban light rail & regional high-speed rail networks; boosting funds for bus systems; constructing bike lanes; & focusing on repairing existing roads instead of building news ones are a first step in changing, at a fundamental level, how we move around. If we want Americans to ditch their cars, that will require giving them choices, and that means creating a mass-transit system that makes the car -- and not the bus -- look like a pain…

Reducing the reliance on our cars, of course, also serves U.S. national-security interests."
us  transportation  policy  infrastructure  masstransit  buses  lightrail  rail  highspeed  trains  density  publictransit  2011  environment  cities  cars  carfree  sustainability  politics  peakoil  oil  energy  highspeedrail 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Oil Oozes Through Your Life - NYTimes.com
"Michael Watts, a professor of geography and development studies at the University of California at Berkeley, agreed. “The complexity of these hydrocarbons is sort of remarkable,” he said. Even as a critic of oil dependency, he concedes that petroleum’s versatility is impressive: Not only does the American farm and grocery network rely on cheap fuel for low-cost shipping between the coasts, but food itself is grown using petroleum-based fertilizer. (Oil byproducts for food typically fall under federal regulation, although that doesn’t satisfy critics of petroleum-derived food colorings, for example.)

What will it take to wean us off oil? Professor Watts says the question forces scrutiny of “a very complicated set of connections in which what we’re confronting, because of this dependency, is not just, ‘Let’s develop a Prius.’”"
petrochemicals  oil  petroleum  environment  sustainability  chemistry  energy  oildependency  2011  via:javierarbona  classideas  tcsnmy 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Enriching Executives, at the Expense of Many - NYTimes.com
"Mr. Meyer’s favorite pay-and-performance comparison pits Statoil against ExxonMobil. Statoil, which is two-thirds owned by the Norwegian government, pays its top executives a small fraction of what ExxonMobil pays its leaders. But Statoil’s share price has outperformed Exxon’s since the Norwegian company went public in October 2001. Through March, its stock climbed 22.3 percent a year, on average, Mr. Meyer notes. During the same period, Exxon’s shares rose an average of 11.4 percent annually, while the Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index returned 1.67 percent, annualized."

"OTHER aspects of Statoil’s governance also appeal to Mr. Meyer. Its 10-member board includes three people who represent the company’s workers; management is not represented on the board. In addition, Statoil has an oversight group known as a corporate assembly, something that is required under Norwegian law for companies employing more than 200 workers…"
salaries  ceos  oil  stockholders  incentives  governance  boardmembers  executivepay  norway  exxonmobile  statoil  performance  pay-and-performance  2011  us  inequality  wealth  incomegap  income 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The Great American Bubble Machine | Rolling Stone Politics
"From tech stocks to high gas prices, Goldman Sachs has engineered every major market manipulation since the Great Depression -- and they're about to do it again"<br />
<br />
"The new carbon credit market is a virtual repeat of the commodities-market casino that's been kind to Goldman, except it has one delicious new wrinkle: If the plan goes forward as expected, the rise in prices will be government-mandated. Goldman won't even have to rig the game. It will be rigged in advance."
carboncredits  carbon  carbonoffsets  goldmansachs  matttaibbi  2011  bubbles  finance  tarp  bailout  markets  manipulation  greatdepression  dotcomboom  technology  housingbubble  housing  energy  oil  gasoline 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Energy prices: Tax away vulnerability | The Economist
"There are any number of good reasons to raise the petrol tax rate. The current rate no longer brings in enough money to cover current highway spending. Petrol taxes are an efficient way to raise revenue, and the government needs revenue; President Obama's deficit commission recommended an increase in the federal petrol tax rate. Burning oil produces carbon emissions, and dearer fuel would reduce America's sky-high per capita carbon footprint. But a higher tax rate would also diminish the possibility that a sudden rise in oil prices would throw the economy into recession. That would be a nice risk to minimise! And yes, higher tax rates would hit consumers just like rising oil prices. But those prices are rising anyway; better to capture the revenue and use it, all while improving behaviour.<br />
<br />
It's hard to take any fiscal hawk seriously so long as this measure isn't on the table. It's as close to a win-win solution as one is likely to find."
energy  2011  oil  tax  taxation  taxes  us  vulnerability  economics 
february 2011 by robertogreco
ClubOrlov: America—The Grim Truth [A bit over the top, but there are some major truths in here, especially about the worry that results from the financial precariousness we feel as part of our system, lack of social safety net]
"Americans, I have some bad news for you:

You have the worst quality of life in the developed world—by a wide margin.

If you had any idea of how people really lived in Western Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and many parts of Asia, you’d be rioting in the streets calling for a better life. In fact, the average Australian or Singaporean taxi driver has a much better standard of living than the typical American white-collar worker.

I know this because I am an American, and I escaped from the prison you call home.

I have lived all around the world, in wealthy countries and poor ones, and there is only one country I would never consider living in again: The United States of America. The mere thought of it fills me with dread.

Consider this…"
politics  collapse  us  economics  health  healthcare  expats  2010  via:mathowie  finance  well-being  qualityoflife  food  pharmaceuticals  work  balance  australia  fragmentation  teaparty  immigration  emmigration  canada  newzealand  japan  europe  comparison  middleeast  guns  safety  society  fear  dystopia  unemployment  decline  oil  peakoil  grimfutures  change  policy  freedom  germany  finland  italy  france  scandinavia  singlepayerhealthsystem  government  socialsafetynet  bankruptcy 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Worldchanging: Bright Green: Seeing Past the BP Spill
"Shouldn't a site whose purpose is to explore solutions to planetary problems be all over the planet's most visible current problem?
climate  worldchanging  energy  green  bp  gulfoilspill  oil  sustainability  systems  economics  alexsteffen  infrastructure 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Op-Ed Contributor - A Spill of Our Own - NYTimes.com
"Effectively, we’ve been importing oil and exporting spills to villages and waterways all over the world.
disaster  oil  gulfoilspill  us  energy  2010  demand  regulation 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Canada's image lies in tatters. It is now to climate what Japan is to whaling | George Monbiot | Comment is free | The Guardian
"So here I am, watching the astonishing spectacle of a beautiful, cultured nation turning itself into a corrupt petro-state. Canada is slipping down the development ladder, retreating from a complex, diverse economy towards dependence on a single primary resource, which happens to be the dirtiest commodity known to man. The price of this transition is the brutalisation of the country, and a government campaign against multilateralism as savage as any waged by George Bush."
politics  business  environment  government  canada  energy  2009  capitalism  democracy  climatechange  oil  pollution  oilsands  georgemonbiot 
december 2009 by robertogreco
The demise of the dollar - Business News, Business - The Independent
"In the most profound financial change in recent Middle East history, Gulf Arabs are planning – along with China, Russia, Japan and France – to end dollar dealings for oil, moving instead to a basket of currencies including the Japanese yen and Chinese yuan, the euro, gold and a new, unified currency planned for nations in the Gulf Co-operation Council, including Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, Kuwait and Qatar."
via:javierarbona  2009  china  middleeast  currency  japan  business  economics  politics  europe  recession  world  money  finance  iraq  crisis  energy  iran  russia  geopolitics  oil  gold  dollar  us 
october 2009 by robertogreco
“Off the Deep End: A Look at the Decline of Dubai” Slideshow | Fast Company
"Deserts have a way of reclaiming whatever is built upon them. In the case of Dubai, the global financial implosion has sent that process into overdrive. After six years of frenzied expansion, during which the emirate's population grew at 7% annually and nearly $600 billion went into construction (the world's tallest building! the world's largest shopping mall! the biggest man-made island! an indoor ski resort!), reality has come rushing into view." [via: http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2009/08/dubai-as-detroit/]
dubai  detroit  decay  decline  cities  oil  energy  desert 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Douglas Rushkoff » Front Page Translations
"The Goldman Sachs ultra-fast computer-transaction scandal: Big fast computers connected to the trading floor allow “connected” financial firms like Goldman Sachs to see our stock trades before they are actually executed. They can then take action based on our actions, by going back in time and buying what we want before we do, and selling to us at a higher price. By “regulating” this activity, the SEC simply perpetuates the illusion that this is a level playing field. It never was, it never will be. Retail traders are the patsies. This is just one of many methods used by a system that was not created to provide companies with investment capital, but rather the provide certain capitalists with the means to extract value from every transaction we make with each other." + "Oil speculation blamed for high oil prices" and "FDIC about to split banks into “good parts and bad parts”"
douglasrushkoff  finance  us  corruption  economics  oil  energy  manipulation  banking  goldmansachs 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Features: 'A narrower Atlantic' by Peter Baldwin | Prospect Magazine May 2009 issue 158
"Despite America’s move to the left under Obama, it’s still assumed that Europe & America are fundamentally different—in their economies, societies & values. But this is a myth...If we compare 4 areas: economy, social policy, environment & religion & cultural attitudes, the evidence in each case allows 2 conclusions. First, Europe is not a coherent or unified continent. The spectrum of difference within even the 16 countries of western Europe is far broader than normally appreciated. Second, with a few exceptions, the US fits into this spectrum...If there is anything that most separates American society from Europe, it is the continuing presence of an ethnically distinct underclass...No one is arguing that America is Sweden. But nor is Britain, Italy, or even France. And since when does Sweden represent “Europe”—at least anymore than the ethnically homogenous, socially liberal state of Vermont does America? Europe is not the continent alone & certainly not just its northern regions."
us  europe  culture  society  statistics  demographics  crime  poverty  literacy  education  socialism  nationalism  comparison  politics  similarities  differences  income  policy  socialpolicy  spending  perception  oil  environment  recycling  consumption  books  reading  energy  religion  govenment  science  barackobama  georgewbush  stereotypes  taxes  economics  evolution  health  families  healthcare  agriculture  secularism  healthinsurance  values 
june 2009 by robertogreco
MichaelMoore.com : Goodbye, GM ...by Michael Moore
"But you and I and the rest of America now own a car company! I know, I know -- who on earth wants to run a car company? Who among us wants $50 billion of our tax dollars thrown down the rat hole of still trying to save GM? Let's be clear about this: The only way to save GM is to kill GM. Saving our precious industrial infrastructure, though, is another matter and must be a top priority. If we allow the shutting down and tearing down of our auto plants, we will sorely wish we still had them when we realize that those factories could have built the alternative energy systems we now desperately need. And when we realize that the best way to transport ourselves is on light rail and bullet trains and cleaner buses, how will we do this if we've allowed our industrial capacity and its skilled workforce to disappear?"
gm  michaelmoore  detroit  economics  recession  bankruptcy  cleanenergy  retoolinggm  us  future  energy  oil  generalmotors  environment  transportation  trains  industry  transformation  gamechanging 
june 2009 by robertogreco
The Last Traffic Jam - The Atlantic (October 1972) [via: http://www.kottke.org/08/12/the-last-traffic-jam]
"Unless we exercise foresight and devise growth-limits policies for the auto industry, events will thrust us into a crisis that will lead to a substantial erosion of our domestic oil supply as well as the independence it provides us with, and a level of petroleum imports that could cost as much as $20 to $30 billion per year. (This in turn would produce a staggering balance-of-payments problem for the United States, and give the Middle Eastern suppliers a dangerous leverage over our transportation system as well.) Moreover, we would still be depleting our remaining oil reserves at an unacceptable rate, and scrambling for petroleum substitutes, with enormous potential damage to the environment."
1972  transportation  cars  energy  oil  politics  policy  history  urbanism 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Jim Kunstler : Zombie Economics
"We're heading into a hard work economy in which people derive their pleasures and gratification more traditionally -- mainly through the company of their fellow human beings (which is saying a lot, for those of you who have forgotten what that's about). Our current investments in "education" -- i.e. training people to become marketing executives for chain stores -- will delude Americans for a while about what kind of work is really available. But before long, the younger adults will realize that there are enormous opportunities for them in a new and very different economy. We will still have commerce -- even if it's not the K-Mart blue-light-special variety -- and the coming generation will have to rebuild all the local, multi-layered networks of commercial inter-dependency that were destroyed by the rise of the chain stores. In short, get ready for local business. It will surely be part-and-parcel of our local food-growing and manufacturing activities."
jameshowardkunstler  future  local  economics  crisis  greatdepression  relocalizing  gamechanging  finance  education  training  relationships  peakoil  us  politics  trains  oil  meltdown  disruption  inflation  zombies 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Jim Kunstler : The Nausea Express
"What we can't face is the prospect that we might become something other than an industrial "consumer" society. My narrative includes the conviction that we will have trouble producing food for ourselves as petro-agriculture fails, and since society can't go on without food production, I see this activity coming back much closer to the center of our daily lives. We're not ready to think about that. The downside of our unreadiness may be that a lot of Americans will go hungry in the decade ahead.
peakoil  bailout  politics  change  upheaval  society  gamechanging  jameshowardkunstler  crisis  2008  markets  agriculture  finance  food  future  nearfuture  oil  energy  local  consumerism 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Reversal of Fortune: Politics & Power: vanityfair.com
"Describing how ideology, special-interest pressure, populist politics, and sheer incompetence have left the U.S. economy on life support, the author puts forth a clear, commonsense plan to reverse the Bush-era follies and regain America’s economic sanity." ... "When the American economy enters a downturn, you often hear the experts debating whether it is likely to be V-shaped (short and sharp) or U-shaped (longer but milder). Today, the American economy may be entering a downturn that is best described as L-shaped. It is in a very low place indeed, and likely to remain there for some time to come."
josephstiglitz  economics  us  crisis  bailout  2008  banking  finance  money  policy  politics  sustainability  energy  longterm  future  taxes  biofuels  oil  gamechanging  regulation  subprime  meltdown  recession  wallstreet  reaganomics  georgewbush  housing  jobs  markets  unemployment  freemarkets  greatdepression  wealth  disparity  lending  reform  change 
october 2008 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: Could Globalization Be Going In Reverse?
"For the first time in recent decades, it seems there are now real reasons to question the logic underlying the official future of ever-increasing global trade. The biggest, of course, is the rapidly mounting cost of transportation...But transportation costs are not the only reasons why globalization as we know it might be in for some rapid evolution. Consider: *Far-flung supply chains may drop costs (even with higher oil prices), but the multiply climate change emissions. *Manufacturers and others are already increasingly aware of, and worried about, supply chain diversity. *transparency activism has blown the cover of secrecy off [skirting labor and environmental laws by doing business in countries with high levels of political corruption]...*Globalization suffers from some big disruptive vulnerabilities"
climatechange  worldchanging  gamechanging  deglobalization  globalization  globalwarming  trends  sustainability  environment  economics  future  society  oil  peakoil  localization  local  localism  money  futurism  shipping  transportation 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Globalization death watch, Part I | Gristmill: The environmental news blog | Grist
"The current transportation infrastructure is based on cars, trucks, airplanes, and cargo ships, which together consume about 70 percent of the gasoline used in the United States. While the greatest focus has been on cars, trucking and airline companies are facing collapse."

[see Bruce Sterling commentary at: http://blog.wired.com/sterling/2008/08/globalization-d.html ]
future  economics  transportation  green  global  local  localism  globalization  oil  deglobalization  culture  politics  futurism  gamechanging  travel  airlines  shipping  peakoil  energy 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Globalization death watch | Beyond the Beyond from Wired.com
"Globalization was built on cheap oil. As that era draws to a close, so will the current phase of global integration, whether Thomas Friedman, Wal-Mart, and all those involved in intercontinental trade like it or not."..."(((It's gonna be an amazing world if you have to grow your own food next door, and you commute to work on a bicycle, but your best friends are still Long Tail anime fanatics from Buenos Aires that you met on Facebook.)))"

[quotes and points to: http://gristmill.grist.org/story/2008/6/2/83853/49947 ]
culture  politics  economics  transportation  green  global  futurism  brucesterling  future  local  gamechanging  travel  airlines  shipping  oil  peakoil  energy  globalization  deglobalization 
august 2008 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: Do Gas Taxes Cover the Costs of Roads?
"the idea that roads don't pay for themselves -- and instead, must sap money from other funding sources -- seems like quite an admission from a highway department"
infrastructure  oil  roads  taxes  transit  us  public  policy  transportation  politics  cars  texas 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Blackbeltjones/Work: » If it walks like a singularity, and quacks like a singularity
"What kind of society...likely to get if...hitting peak oil...but it’s possible to process random junk biomass into crude oil for $100 a barrel"..."Fortune500 companies would be better off hiring science-fiction writers than MBA consultants right now."

[Now at: http://magicalnihilism.com/2008/06/17/if-it-walks-like-a-singularity-and-quacks-like-a-singularity/ ]
scifi  sciencefiction  singularity  technology  biomass  peakoil  oil  energy  future  futurism  mattjones 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Subsidies: a big culprit in high gas prices | csmonitor.com
"For wealthier nations that generally shun subsidies, the price of oil is quickly altering lifestyles...the results are encouraging... [but] Chile and South Korea – are now moving toward subsidies to appease political pressures."
oil  energy  economics  international  transportation  chile  us  china  money  world  global 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Calif. company says it has developed renewable gasoline | csmonitor.com
"San Diego, Calif.-based Sapphire Energy claims to have found a method of turning algae into an oil that can be refined into gasoline and other fuels that are both renewable and carbon-neutral."
sandiego  energy  alternative  fuel  oil  sustainability  environment 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Who needs tariffs when you have expensive oil? - How the World Works - Salon.com
"We usually think about technological improvements in productivity as benefiting the highly skilled & educated, and disenfranchising the poorly skilled & uneducated...in era of $127 dollar-a-barrel oil blue-collar workers who make physical things in the W
oil  energy  globalization  money  wealth  economics  society  class 
june 2008 by robertogreco
The oil price | Recoil | Economist.com
"Painful though it is, this oil shock will eventually spur huge change. Beware hunt for scapegoats..The first two oil shocks banished oil from power generation. How fitting if the third finished the job and began to free transport from oil's century-long
economics  oil  energy  future 
june 2008 by robertogreco
The Big Picture | The Costanza Energy Policy: 25 Ways to Drive Oil to $150
"What follows is a list of energy-related policies of the United States. On many of these, I have no opinion -- but I wanted to list as many as I could to demonstrate why Oil is where it is"
oil  energy  markets  policy  economics  politics  us  history 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Gas Prices Send Surge of Riders to Mass Transit - New York Times
"Parking lots at many bus and light rail stations are suddenly overflowing, with commuters in some towns risking a ticket or tow by parking on nearby grassy areas and in vacant lots."
economics  oil  public  transportation  transit  energy  cities  trends  via:migurski 
may 2008 by robertogreco
The decline and fall of the American empire of debt - How the World Works - Salon.com
"If you believe all the furious activity on Wall Street...is just bunch of speculation & froth that doesn't result in creation of anything real...never been better time for pointing out disasters that ensue when rest of world also realizes that WS is wear
finance  us  economics  markets  world  productivity  debt  wealth  oil  wallstreet  peakoil  energy  global  politics  geopolitics  corruption 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Oil Change International - Follow the Oil Money
"interactive tool that tracks the flow of oil money in US politics. Click on the search tools below to find out which companies are pumping their dirty oil money into politics, who is receiving it, and how it correlates to key climate, energy and war vote
2008  activism  corruption  environment  foreignpolicy  money  elections  visualization  politics  mapping  oil  transparency 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Ten things that won't change (no matter who gets elected) | FP Passport
"America's relationship with China, partisan divide, Dependence on foreign oil, decline in manufacturing jobs, flow of illegal drugs, Military spending, influence of lobbyists, U.S. support for Israel, Ethanol subsidies, The primary system"
china  change  geopolitics  politics  us  elections  2008  policy  history  drugs  military  oil  energy  ethanol  manufacturing  economics  foreign 
february 2008 by robertogreco
The End of Oil is Upon Us. We Must Move On - Quickly. | Autopia from Wired.com
"If there are any lingering doubts as to whether the age of oil is nearing its end, the International Energy Agency has put them to rest and made it clear that only a massive and immediate investment in sustainable energy will prevent a global crisis."
globalwarming  green  sustainability  environment  oil  peakoil  economics  energy  security  resources  dystopia  future  global  urbanism  utopia  wind  solar 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Kunstler on Peak Suburbia; Harpers Magazine on Detroit : TreeHugger
"serene conviction that we are at the end of the cycle -- and by that I mean the grand meta-cycle of the suburban project as a whole" "There is a wonderful article in the July issue of Harpers by Rebecca Solnit: Detroit Arcadia- Exploring the post-America
architecture  future  sustainability  cities  urban  farming  gardens  detroit  suburbs  suburbia  jameshowardkunstler  energy  cars  peakoil  oil  us  landscape  urbanprairie  agriculture 
june 2007 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Great streets, campuses, and pedestrian nostalgia
"What was genuinely never discussed, though, was not the idea that we need more highways and parking lots and one-way express lanes because everyone owns a car, but that everyone owns a car because they're surrounded by highways and parking lots and one-w
architecture  culture  landscape  nostalgia  oil  space  urban  colleges  universities  street  losangeles  local  design  urbanism  cars  transportation  environment  pedestrians  us  europe  walking  bikes  pollution  public  society 
may 2007 by robertogreco

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