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robertogreco : oklahoma   4

Why a US city is searching for mass graves - YouTube
"Nearly 100 years ago, a white mob destroyed an American neighborhood called “Black Wall Street,” murdering an estimated 300 people in Tulsa, Oklahoma. That incident — known as the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre — has been largely left out of US history books. Today, a century later, the city still has a lot of questions. For one, where are the bodies of the victims? As the city's mayor re-opens the search for mass graves, we take a look at what happened back in 1921…and why finding these graves still matters to the people of Tulsa."

[See also:
"An eyewitness account of the horrific attack that destroyed Black Wall Street"
https://www.vox.com/2016/6/1/11827994/tulsa-race-massacre-black-wall-street

"‘They was killing black people’
In Tulsa, one of the worst episodes of racial violence in U.S. history still haunts the city with unresolved questions, even as ‘Black Wall Street’ gentrifies"
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/local/wp/2018/09/28/feature/they-was-killing-black-people/?utm_term=.449564e853b6

"The Attack on Greenwood"
https://www.tulsahistory.org/exhibit/1921-tulsa-race-massacre/

"The 1921 Attack on Greenwood was one of the most significant events in Tulsa’s history. Following World War I, Tulsa was recognized nationally for its affluent African American community known as the Greenwood District. This thriving business district and surrounding residential area was referred to as “Black Wall Street.” In June 1921, a series of events nearly destroyed the entire Greenwood area."]
history  race  racism  oklahoma  tulsa  2019  us  1921 
march 2019 by robertogreco
Odyssey Leadership Academy
"The goal of Odyssey Leadership Academy is to focus on the values of identity formation, virtue development, compassion and the pursuit of wisdom through constructive mentoring relationships, transformative curriculum and real-world experiences in order to shape the next generation of thought leaders, innovators, storytellers, and visionaries to be voices of change in their communities and architects of repair in the world!

Our Mission

Believing that the pressing issues of our times (hunger, poverty, human trafficking, crime, oppression and injustice) demand individuals
possessing the skills, desire and courage to bring light to dark places, we seek to shape an educational experience that focuses on what truly matters in the human experience:
• Wisdom: the capacity to choose the Good, the Noble, the Beautiful and the Praiseworthy in life
• Virtue: the cultivation of habits that lead to well-being and full human flourishing
• Compassion: Literally, the ability to "suffer with"--to engage in the suffering of another; to spend oneself on behalf of the oppressed; to learn how to act out of an ethic of sacrificial love

Our Values

At Odyssey Leadership Academy, we are dedicated to fleshing out the following core values:

• Identity Formation
• Covenental Relationships / Mentoring
• The Pursuit of Wisdom, Virtue and Compassion
• Living intentionally, mindfully, transcendently, and sacrificially
• Vocation (from the Latin vocare="calling or mission")

At OLA, we believe that identity formation and the cultivation of wisdom and virtue happen best in the presence of deep, covenental relationships over the long haul. To this end, we are committed to fostering mentoring relationships between teacher and students and students to students in a safe, caring environment.

Our Language

At Odyssey Leadership Academy, you will hear us use words like calling, mission, intention, mindfulness, and passion as we pursue what it means to live wise, virtuous and compassionate lives on behalf of the common good.

You will also notice that we use a different vocabulary to talk about ourselves:

• Instead of "teacher," we call our instructors Mentors because we believe that building deep, long-lasting relationships is the core of who we are and what we do.
• Instead of "principal" or "superintendent," those who oversee the leadership functions are called Deans, for we believe it is their job not just to oversee the community life of the school, but, most importantly, to mentor the Mentors
• Instead of "district," we call our region of responsibility our Community as a way to identify the reciprocal relationship that should exist between the community and the school. We believe that the school should serve the needs of its local community and vice versa."

[See also:
https://twitter.com/OdysseyOLA
https://www.instagram.com/odysseyoyla/
https://twitter.com/OdysseyOYLA
https://www.instagram.com/odyssey_leadership/
https://twitter.com/samartin01 ]
schools  sfsh  lcproject  openstudioproject  education  learning  oklahoma  oklahomacity 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Undercover Agents Infiltrated Tar Sands Resistance Camp to Break up Planned Protest | Latest News | Earth Island Journal | Earth Island Institute
"After a week of careful planning, environmentalists attending a tar sands resistance action camp in Oklahoma thought they had the element of surprise — but they would soon learn that their moves were being closely watched by law enforcement officials and TransCanada, the very company they were targeting."
transcanada  tarsands  2013  resistance  politics  lawenforcement  activism  policestate  protest  oklahoma  energy  bigenergy  via:javierarbona 
august 2013 by robertogreco
BBC News - In Steinbeck's footsteps: America's middle-class underclass
"In The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck describes the harrowing journey of the Joad family - migrant workers forced to leave their home during the Great Depression - a story still relevant to those facing the realities of America's current economic crisis."<br />
<br />
"With the south-west in the grip of its worst drought for 60 years, old-timers here are beginning to talk about the Dust Bowl years, years Steinbeck chronicled in his Pulitzer Prize-winning book of migration, poverty and social injustice.<br />
<br />
I decided to retrace the route Steinbeck's fictional family took from Oklahoma City to Bakersfield, just north of Los Angeles. I hired a boaty old Mercury and put my foot down."
immigration  recession  unemployment  economy  johnsteinbeck  grapesofwrath  greatdepression  greatrecession  economics  2011  tentcities  poverty  oklahoma  newmexico  arizona  california  migration 
july 2011 by robertogreco

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