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robertogreco : openstudio   57

Dear America: If you love kids, let your schools show your affection. - Taught by Finland
"I told them about how Finnish first and second graders have about four hours of school every day, which is more like a half-day back in the United States. Not only that, but kids in Finland have a 15-minute break built into every hour of instruction (more on that later); this means that a 4-hour school day involves just three hours of classroom time for first and second graders! This is incredible news to American parents and teachers, but it’s even more amazing to Italians. I spoke with one parent who told me that her daughter, a student at a public elementary school in Bologna, does 8-hour school days (8:00 am to 4:00 pm) with barely any time for recess. Oh. My. And I used to think that a typical schedule at an American elementary school was too much for kids!

The Finnish approach of providing less academic instruction to young kids is sensible. As students in Finland grow older, they generally spend more hours at school. For example, my sixth graders are in school about six hours every day compared with the four they used to have as first and second graders. 7- and 8-year-olds thrive on shorter school days because they need lots of time for free play. Sixth graders, not as much.

When you are in school for eight hours (or even six), there is little time and energy to play afterwards. School this long can easily kill creativity, not necessarily by what happens during lessons, but by the space it takes up in the lives of young children. Research has shown that kids only start to enter a deeper level of play—where creativity and problem-solving skills develop—after 30 minutes of uninterrupted free time. If you’re a young American and Italian student, these long stretches of free play are non-existent in schools, so the only hope is that you’d have time after the school day. But that’s unlikely to happen when you’re flat-out exhausted, your homework is burning a hole in your backpack and your bedtime is just a couple of hours from when you return home.

Finns—who are typically reserved—may not be pinching and coddling babies on the street, but they’re making sure that their children are getting what they need at school. Sometimes this looks like keeping the school day short for young kids. Of course, my argument hinges on the assumption that 7- and 8-year-old Finns are spending their after school hours engaged in free play, not structured tasks like private tutoring and organized sports (as is common practice in the United States).

In January of this year, I wanted to see how most of the first and second graders at my school were using their free time after school. I wanted to be sure that I wasn’t just thinking wishfully that Finnish kids were playing deeply after their last class. I wasn’t disappointed. For three hours, I attended their iltapäivä kerho (“afternoon club”)—a subsidized public program that enrolls 70% of the first and second graders at my school—that was exclusively play-oriented. The adult supervisors told me that they don’t even encourage the kids to complete their meager amounts of homework before they head home at 4:00 pm because they believe young children just need time to play with their friends. And that’s exactly what I saw these 7- and 8-year-olds doing: playing dress-up, building with legos and drawing.

As I mentioned earlier, Finnish kids are entitled to take a 15-minute break for every 45 minutes of instruction. Finland takes this so seriously that it’s even guaranteed by law. While I was visiting Rome, I was told that typically Italian high school students get just 10-minutes of break every day (and they’re expected to eat during this time)! On top of this, they will spend most of the school day in just one classroom; teachers come to them. Meanwhile, kids in Finland—young and old—receive 15-minute unstructured breaks throughout the school day and they have the opportunity to slip outside for fresh air during these times, even when it’s freezing.

Obviously, these 15-minute breaks are not long enough to provide young students with time for deep play, but they’re just long enough to refocus children. So, first and second graders in Finland are putting in three hours of high-quality classroom work every morning—because they’re paced by frequent breaks—and in the afternoon, they’re playing deeply throughout the entire afternoon. That’s a pretty sweet deal for kids.

But the case of Italy still befuddles me. They clearly love children but their schools—with their long and nearly recess-less school days—do not show evidence of their affection. I feel the same way about many American public elementary schools. We say we love children (and I know, deep down, we do) and yet, we send our kids to kindergarten at the age of five and they receive full-day academic instruction. We give young children just 20-minutes or so of recess for an entire school day. We throw dozens of standardized tests at our kids, starting in third grade or even younger, narrowing their curriculum and stressing them out, along with their teachers. We require young American kids to attend school each day for nearly twice as long as young Finnish children, leaving them with little time and energy for play after school.

By providing things like frequent breaks, shorter school days and less standardized tests, Finnish schools are not doing anything particularly innovative. This tiny Nordic country is simply making sensible decisions that support the wellbeing of all children. And when you stop to think about it, this is exactly what all school systems should be doing."
finland  education  schedules  scheduling  classtime  recess  2014  timwalker  lcproject  openstudioproject  play  freeplay  unschooling  deschooling  policy  us  italy  schools  teaching  learning  howwelearn  unstructuredtime  openstudio 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Recess
"Recess is a nonprofit artists’ workspace open to the public.  At once a studio and exhibition space, Recess initiates lasting connections between artists and audiences, presenting ambitious projects that embrace experimentation and focus on process.

Our signature program, Session, invites artists to use our storefront space to realize long-term projects that take advantage of our built-in public audience.

Expanding upon Session’s goal to define contemporary art in collaboration with an active audience, Recess hosts performances and event series, a critical writing program, online programs, and enjoys meaningful partnerships with likeminded institutions."



"Mission

Recess’s mission is to support the rigorous process of the contemporary artist by creating a space for productive activity that initiates a partnership with the public.

Our model combines studio and exhibition platforms, offering artists flexible space in which to generate new work. With agency to determine the visibility of their project and the parameters of its presentation, Recess artists realize ambitious goals in dialogue with an inquisitive audience.

Free and open to the public, Recess offers critical exposure for the artists we support while fostering an approachable environment that promotes valuable visual and intellectual interactions.

History

Recess was formed in May of 2009 to align with evolving conditions of creative practice and its public reception. When searching for an ideal location, we were acutely aware that emerging artists cannot afford to live or work in proximity to exhibition communities. Securing a platform to gain visibility and develop their creative goals and professional career is often an insurmountable task.
On site in Soho, we began challenging the established arts community to embrace changing modes of artistic production that were taking advantage of an active public. Recess eagerly stepped into the liminal space between polished gallery and private studio to take on ambitious projects that don’t “fit” squarely within the boundaries of these customary contexts.

In February of 2011, we received a wonderful invitation to collaborate with Charlotte Kidd and Dustin Yellin of Kidd Yellin Studios in Red Hook. Kidd Yellin offered Recess a project room in their dynamic art space to serve as second site for Session. With access to Kidd Yellin’s gallery, studios and vibrant artists community, Session artists began working to further Recess’ mission in this neighborhood. Recess’s final project at Kidd Yellin Studios concluded in December, 2011.

In summer of 2012, Recess began collaborating with Dustin Yellin by opening an additional space for Session at Pioneer Works, Center for Art & Innovation, the new arts space at 159 Pioneer Street in Red Hook, one of Brooklyn’s prominent arts destinations."
stuidos  art  openstudioproject  openstudio  audience  recess  nyc  collaboration  lcproject  studios  glvo 
august 2014 by robertogreco
A CURIOUS .ORG
"Acurious.org provides one-of-a-kind workshops driven by the curiosity of your child. We aim to induce wonder and spark enthusiasm for the everyday world around us. We consider play, the mysterious work of the child, to be an advanced and sophisticated endeavor, profoundly central to a child’s individual development and theories about the world. Our workshops encourage discovery through free play, tinkering, and imagination.

Acurious.org is Bryan Welch and Marina McDougall.

Marina McDougall is an independent curator with a particular interest in the intersections of art and science, and nature and culture.

She has organized exhibitions and public programs for the Exploratorium, the Museum of Jurassic Technology, MIT Media Lab, the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, and the California Academy of Sciences.

She is the co-editor of Science Is Fiction: The Films of Jean Painleve (MIT Press/Brico Press, 2000) and is currently working on the creation of a large-scale garden called the Garden of Forking Paths.

Marina is a core member of the Studio for Urban Projects, a research and working group that perceives art as a means of advancing civic engagement and furthering public dialogue.

To contact Marina: marina (at) studioforurbanprojects.org

Bryan Welch is an educator who is deeply committed to creating learning environments that honor the creativity and independence of children.

He holds an interdisciplinary BA in education and journalism from UC Berkeley, and has taught and developed curriculum for alternative educational programs in the US and Japan since 1997.

He is directing a documentary that chronicles the history of the Modern School movement, a remarkable 50 year experiment in educational freedom and communal living.

Please see here for Bryan's resume.

To contact Bryan: bryan (at) acurious.org"
education  lcproject  openstudio  learning  children  bryanwelch  marinamcdougall  art  science  nature 
august 2014 by robertogreco
magazine / archive / Barbara Visser | MOUSSE CONTEMPORARY ART MAGAZINE
"Contemporary capitalism prods us to make the most of our potential, sticking with the program and doing our best. Sven Lütticken offers fascinating insights into the concepts of sleep and boredom and the potential of refusal as a counter-politics of the times, whose hero might be Melville’s Bartleby, the scrivener who not only stops writing but also explains that he would “prefer not to.” Intuition tells us that these modern concepts developed between the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution are as anachronistic as they are absolutely timely today."



"The music video shows the band performing in front of a giant silhouette of a cassette tape. Bow Wow Wow, with their “pirate” look, promoted a medium associated with pirating music, but also a medium that was creating new markets and contributed to making music ever more portable, ever more intimate (the Sony Walkman was introduced globally in 1980), thus helping to make the day a “media day.” Technology may be an emancipatory force and hasten the demolition of patriarchy, but this hardly means that “school’s out forever,” as the song has it: if anything, school is everywhere and learning is life-long, a permanent retooling of the subject. Of course, the song was released in a period with mass (youth) unemployment, with old industries in decline. If a sizable (well-educated) part of the no future generation would go on to have careers in the economic bubble produced by deregulation, mass unemployment nevertheless became structural in western European states, which are still shuffling around members of the former working class from one pseudo-job to the next."



"Meanwhile, popular discourse tends to dream of boredom as a psycho-temporal mode that is under threat and that is as important as sleeping, being a sort of waking equivalent of sleep: “It’s sad to think kids of this generation won’t be able to experience boredom like we have. Consider how boredom was handled at a younger age, as though it was a matter of solving a problem. Do children really need to worry about that, or can they just boot up their iPad? […] Instead of embracing boredom and using it as a creative application, we choose to replace it with some ‘busy’ activity. Instead of sitting in thought, we impulsively pull out our phones.”(21) However, relearning how to be bored is not a Craryesque exercise in imagining a different future beyond catastrophe, but rather an attempt at improving one’s performance: “It probably sounds a little counterintuitive to suggest to anyone that they start slacking off, but in reality it’s about as important to your brain’s health as sleeping is. Being bored, procrastinating, and embracing distraction all help your brain function. In turn, you understand decisions better. You learn easier.”(22)

Boredom is a modern concept. Just as people had gay sex before modern notions of homosexuality were around, this does of course not mean that premodern people never experienced states that we would now characterize as boredom. Rather, it means that boredom “in the modern sense that combines an existential and a temporal connotation” only become a theoretical concept and a problem in the late 18th century—in fact, the English term boredom emerged precisely in that moment, under the combined impact of the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution. As Elizabeth Goodstein puts it, boredom “epitomizes the dilemma of the autonomous modern subject,” linking “existential questions” to “a peculiarly modern experience of empty, meaningless time.”(23) Boredom became a crucial notion for the 1960s avant-garde in different ways. On the one hand, the Cagean neo-avant-garde (Fluxus) embraced boredom as a productive strategy; on the other, the Situationist International attacked boredom as a disastrous symptom of capitalism.

In the late 1960s, Situationist and pro-situ slogans such as “Boredom is always counter-revolutionary” and “there’s nothing they won’t do to raise the standard of boredom” made the term a battle cry, though it is not particularly prominent in Debord’s writings. Boredom for the SI was a symptom of the inhuman nature of capitalism. As Raoul Vaneigem put it: “We do not want a world in which the guarantee that we will not die of starvation is bought by accepting the risk of dying of boredom.”(24) Boredom is a kind of byproduct of industrial labor that creates new markets for entertainment, for while boredom during working hours is unavoidable and can only be alleviated in part by half-hearted measures (playing music to the workers), boredom also infects “free time,” where various leisure activities and the products of the entertainment industry are ready to help—if only, as the slogan has it, “to raise the standard of boredom.”"



"Thus Bartleby, or Bartleby’s phrase, exists in a now-time for many of today’s real-time, just-in-time workers. But does its potential remain just that? Do we ultimately prefer to “not do” anything with it and about it? What are the possibilities and the limitations of an anachronistic politics and aesthetics of boredom, sleep, laziness, and “preferring not to?” The imperative to perform non-stop is insidious; we are constantly reminded that we may miss out altogether if we don’t get with the program. Recently, Nobel Prize winner Peter Higgs noted that “Today, I wouldn’t get an academic job. It’s as simple as that. I don’t think I would be regarded as productive enough.”(34) He would, in other words, be seen as slothful, and rejected in favor of more promising and productive candidates. Today’s academia is marked by a drive for quantification and control; immaterial labor needs to become measurable. The increasing integration of art in the academic system, with the rise of artistic PhD programs, is another example of this. The seeming paradox is that we are dealing with a form of labor that is already beyond measure, that is intensified and permanent (24/7). However, what is measured is not temporal input (as in the days of punch cards) but output. When a university transforms its offices into “flex-work stations” with a “clean-desk-policy,” the hidden agenda seems to be to make sure that employees stay away from the office as much as possible—making the whole world their potential office.

In the edu-factory, as elsewhere, “associations of liberated time” need to be formed that go beyond individual qualms about the system’s insane extension and intensification of labor—qualms that must remain inefficient if they remain individual. While it is obvious that an aesthetic-political liberation of time will never be linear, and is always ready to collapse under the contradictory temporal demands made on its various participants, this does not make the project any less crucial and urgent. A genuine “association of liberated time” should not only comprise artists and academics, but also their less visible counterparts: migrants workers performing jobs that combine rote routine with the “dynamic” precarity of neoliberalism, or illegal sans-papiers whose motto is a state-imposed “never work,” as they are forbidden from “taking away jobs” and terrorized into boredom while struggling to find a place to sleep.(35)"
laziness  sloth  capitalism  liberation  freedom  2014  svenlütticken  labor  work  resistance  anarchism  bartlebythescrivner  hermanschuurman  demoker  guydebord  karlmarx  marxism  communism  dedollehond  paullafargue  situationist  malcomclaren  bowwowwow  pirating  music  1980s  lifelonglearning  unemployment  idleness  leisure  leisurearts  artleisure  sleep  boredom  learning  raoulvaneigem  freetime  openstudio  openstudioproject  lcproject  revolution  fluxus  productivity  giorgioagamben  potentiality  hermanmelville 
july 2014 by robertogreco
SCHOOLHAUS
"Schoolhaus is a design studio classroom inspired by our desire to remedy the growing divide between learning and education. While learning is a universal way of life, education is the institutionalization of that way of life— at times to the detriment of learning, and at excessive cost to the student. But there are aspects of both education and learning that are valuable, and not necessarily mutually exclusive. Schoolhaus is Aesthetic Apparatus’ attempt to combine what we consider the best of education (a social community, invested and informed guidance) with the best of learning (self-motivation, one-on-one mentorship) and embed them into a studio discipline (working-world applications with opportunities for invention and entrepreneurship.)

Schoolhaus works like a group-mentorship, held on-site during operating hours at Aesthetic Apparatus. Similar to a studio, each student submits an application or letter of intent for consideration. Enrollment is limited to 12 students at any one time — the size of a comfortable classroom. Schoolhaus can be used as a stand-alone design education or to supplement a previous design education. Anyone of any ability is welcome to apply; beginners, amateurs, even seasoned veterans. Once accepted, students may stay with the Schoolhaus as long as they and the studio feel is necessary. The curriculum begins with the student’s own self-initiated goals for learning. As the studio gains better understanding of the student’s strengths and weaknesses, learning is augmented with suggested and mentored study. Client-based or studio-based projects may be introduced, as well as inter-student mentorships or new creative ventures. The curriculum is amenable, the goal is to create a shared place for human-scale learning.

This program offers neither an earned degree or certification. We question the requirement of either in the working profession of graphic design. That said, higher education is essential for those who wish to pursue a deeply academic or pedagogical pursuit of graphic design. If this is the case, we suggest attending an undergraduate and graduate degree path at an accredited institution, as is required for future consideration of professorship. What Schoolhaus does offer is intimate, responsive, one-on-one creative guidance within the context of a close-knit group studio in preparation for a creative position in graphic design.

We are now accepting initial applications for an initial 2-month preliminary Schoolhaus starting August 1. The current tuition subscription for Schoolhaus is $500/month."

[Aesthetic Apparatus: http://aestheticapparatus.com/ ]
studiohaus  aestheticapparatus  openstudioproject  certification  design  learning  education  unschooling  deschooling  mentoring  mentorship  openstudio  studioclassroom  schooldesign  via:ethanbodanr  graphicdesign  minneapolis 
june 2013 by robertogreco
NIAD Art Center - Empowering Artists with Disabilities in Richmond California : NIAD Art Center
"For 30 years, NIAD Art Center (National Institute of Art & Disabilities) has been offering a studio arts program to adults with developmental and other physical disabilities in Richmond, California.

NIAD’s program mission has four equal elements:

1. To develop the capacity for creative expression in people with developmental and other physical disabilities, increasing their sense of personal identity and dignity.
2. It provides a gallery and other exhibition opportunities for their work, thereby validating their art, enhancing their self-esteem and providing earnings for their personal use.
3. It fosters socialization and inclusion through field trips to museums, art galleries, artists’ studios and community events.
4. It increases the public’s understanding of the artistic ability of people with disabilities.

The Center operates an open studio with each client focusing on their own art production and career. Up to 40 adults per day work with five professional artists creating visual art in ceramics, fiber art, printmaking, painging, sculpture, mixed media, and drawing. The teachers/mentors facilitate learning skills, but leave the artistic decisions to each individual client. The studio environment focuses on art creation while also building the independent living skills of observation, concentration, decision-making, project management, cooperation, and exploration.

Frequent trips to galleries, museums, and artists’ studios supplement material presented at NIAD and strengthen client confidence in interacting with the public. All art materials are supplied by NIAD. The art that is produced is shown at our three on-site gallery spaces and on our website, as well as in other galleries and other exhibition spaces. When art is sold, the artist receives 50% of the sale.

NIAD was co-founded in 1982 by Elias Katz, Ph.D., clinical psychologist, and the late Florence Ludins-Katz, artist and educator, after ten years of pioneering work in the field. NIAD has received the Helen Crocker Award from the San Francisco Foundation, the Vineyards Award from the Golden Gate Chapter of the National Association of Fund-Raising Executives, and a citation from the California State Council on Developmental Disabilities and Advocacy, Inc.
NIAD receives funding from the Regional Center of the East Bay to pay for the clients’ participation in the program. Unfortunately, this only covers approximately two-thirds of the program expenses. Individuals, public and private foundations and corporations, supplement the proceeds from art sales and special events. Please consider expressing your support by stopping by our galleries or donating online."
art  disability  disabilities  richmond  bayarea  berkeley  openstudio  openstudioproject  timothybuckwalter 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Critical Making | materials protocols and culture
"Critical Making will operationalize and critique the practice of “making” through both foundational literature and hands on studio culture. As hybrid practitioners, students will develop fluency in readily collaging and incorporating a variety of physical materials and protocols into their practice. With design research as a lens, students will envision and create future computational experiences that critically explore social and culturally relevant technological themes such as community, privacy, environment, education, economics, energy, food, biology, democracy, activism, healthcare, social justice, etc.

While no previous technical knowledge is required to take this course, class projects will involve basic programing, electronic circuity, and digital fabrication design. While tutorials and instruction will be provided, students will be expected to develop basic skills in each of these areas in order to complete the course projects. The course will result in a final public show of student work.

The course goals are:

• develop a critical understanding of emerging making technologies and their role within the current cultural and social context
• establish proficiency with the fundamental concepts, methods, and practices of physical modeling, sketching, form giving, electronic prototyping, and hands on making across a range of materials
• improve students ability to make expressive, physical, interactive objects that critique and advance computing culture through the production of making and artifact creation
• advance the communication and presentation skill of students through the process of the studio critique

projects

This is a studio class with time devoted to lecture, discussion, practice activities, design worksessions, and critique of student work. This course will consist of two Provocations and a Final Project demonstrating a functional interactive object set within a real life context and scenario. There will also be a series of Field Activities and in class sessions that are incuded as a portion of your particpation grade.

readings

Readings will be assigned throughout the semester. Everyone is expected to read the readings. One or two people will be selected for each reading to prepare a class presentation. Each student is expected to engage in class discussions when readings are assigned. This counts towards your class participation grade.

zip.crit

Most classes will begin with a zip.crit. A zip.crit is a rapid crit of an interface, object, design, etc. We will be rotating through the class roster and choosing one person to do a zip.crit each class. That person will select an interface, object, design, instructable, kickstarter, toy, etc. At the beginning of class that person will briefly introduce the object, interface, design to us. The class will collectively critique the artifact.

evaluation

Work and performance in the course will be evaluated after each Provocation and the Final Project. In addition, the process of exploration is as important as the final product, so it is important that students manage time well and devote time to working on the assignments during the course of a week. If class time is given as a worksession and is not put to good use, students’ grades will be penalized. For assignments done in teams, students will be graded on individual contributions as well as synthesis with the team. Work that is late will be decremented in grade.

rules of engagement

One of the main learning exercises in this course is the critique. We will be building this skill throughout the semester Each of the assignments will be critiqued in class.

Be there!

Critique days mandatory attendance. If you are not in class or late, we will deduct from your attendance grade. There will be no exceptions.

Attendance of all classes is mandatory. You are allowed one absence for the semester without penalty (except critique days); thereafter you will receive zero credit for the missed studio. To receive an additional excused absence, you must ask in advance, and receive an acknowledgment from the instructor.

Excusable absences include family emergencies, job interviews, and presenting at a conference. It does not include wanting to leave early for long weekend or vacation. To receive credit for attendance, you must arrive on time. No late assignments will be accepted

Be active!

During the in class critique everyone is expected to be engaged in the discussion. Assignments, timely attendance, and in-class and team participation are a critical part of the grade. Bringing examples from outside of the class is considered to be an assignment and is also important.

Be attentive!

No laptops, phones, electronics out or used during critique and at other selected parts of class.

grading criteria

participation in assignments
good use of class time: attendance, critiques, (NO multitasking)
problem selection
rigorous design explorations
quality of craftsmanship and level of completion
quality of the team’s reflection and communication about a design solution and process
For projects done in teams, students will be graded on individual contributions as well as synthesis with the team.
Work that is late will be decremented in grade.

PARTICIPATION 20%
PROVOCATION 1 20%
PROVOCATION 2 20%
FINAL PROVOCATION 40%"

[See also: http://www.paulos.net/
http://www.krisfallon.com/
http://www.isopoddesign.com/ ]
education  sustainability  making  classideas  syllabus  2013  ericpaulos  krisfallon  chrismeyers  environment  biology  democracy  activism  healthcare  socialjustice  studioculture  openstudio  openstudioproject  makers  berkeley  bayarea  programming  coding  computing  electronics  digitalfabrication  technology  learning  lcproject  kickstarter  instructables  prototyping  glvo  edg  srg  syllabi 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Open Studio | Yollocalli Arts Reach
"Yollocalli’s studio spaces are open to youth and free to use whenever we are open!

Youth can also take advantage of our artist residency program and attend our “Open Studio” class.   Here, youth work alongside an emerging artist, gaining from their expertise, and developing hands-on practice in a variety of mediums. Yollocalli recruits practicing artists who are emerging in the field and who have a passion for teaching and learning from teens.

The artist residency and “Open Studio” setting foster an informal environment where students and artists can gain from each other."

[via: http://youmedia.org/toolkit/research ]

[.pdf for download here: http://dmlcentral.net/sites/dmlcentral/files/resource_files/yolloguidebook_r5.pdf ]
yollocalli  openstudioproject  lcproject  openstudio  art  youth  teens  chicago  informallearning 
may 2013 by robertogreco
HOMAGO Guidebook
"This guidebook was developed to help facilitate and inspire organizations, schools and institutions to provide informal learning spaces for teens. With this guidebook people can begin to use homago practices within an Open Studio format."

[via: http://youmedia.org/toolkit/research ]
homago  openstudioproject  lcproject  openstudio  yollocalli  hangingoutmessingaroundgeekingout 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Personal Learning and Creation Time in Middle School
"Children are often unfamiliar with the concept of selecting and pursuing a topic or project of their choice that has very few rules or bounds associated with it. As a result, they are often at a loss as to how to proceed. They can have difficulty with the concept of doing something at school that is not for a "grade."

This Instructable provides a framework for implementing personal learning and project time in a middle school setting, although it could easily be adapted for use at any grade level.

By participating in personal learning and creation time, learners will gain first hand knowledge and experience in bringing an original idea from concept to final product, which will serve them well for the rest of their lives."
google20%  via:rushtheiceberg  openstudio  tcsnmy  cv  howwelearn  learning  unstucturedtime  plp  grades  grading  freedom  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  2012 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Keynote by Sumana Harihareswara - Open Source Bridge wiki
“It can be pretty tough to decide that free is better than safe.”

"When you do outreach, help these kids fight their parents. And of course that's a bit strong -- we don't actually want fights. We want to help kids persuade their parents that we're legit and that this hobby is worthwhile."

"Providing random low-key social time is important ... and it's worthwhile to work towards diversity in the participants, so that girl can tell her mom, yes, there will be other girls there.”

“Empowerment is like turtles, it goes all the way down.”

“maybe you can start by giving them a tiny, tiny task that they can start with. That first free taste. Manager time versus maker time…”

“I'm asking you for the kind of hospitality that my parents showed new arrivals, sometimes on zero notice.”

"[T]his work of hospitality, of disciplined empathy, is how we get to a more perfect union."
hobbies  wikipedia  meaningmaking  meaning  permission  soacesofpermission  socialtime  low-keysocialtime  openstudio  cv  empowerment  risktaking  risk  safety  safe  society  deschooling  unschooling  freedom  gender  girls  culture  hospitality  makertime  2012  community  welcome  empathy  teaching  opensource  learning  sumanaharihareswara  makerstime  makersschedule 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Collaborative Workspaces: Not All They're Cracked Up to Be - Design - The Atlantic Cities
"Being a part of group is awesome (go team!) but so is individual effort. The uncritical embrace of collaboration above all else can lead, as a social scientist at the SPUR panel remarked, to the reverse of what was intended: group-think, conformity, consensus for the sake of peace-making. Further, the suburban corporate campus, even when it attempts, as Facebook and Google are, to approximate urban environment, can often serve to exacerbate the type of self-reinforcing behaviors Bill Bishop explored a few years ago in his book, The Big Sort: Why the Clustering of Like-Minded America is Tearing Us Apart. Forest City’s Alexa Arena, another participant in the SPUR panel, says that her company’s anthropological research while working on the more iterative workspace model seen in its 5M Project revealed that employees working in these environments found that their best ideas came not while in that bustling, lively office but more likely when they were in their own neighborhoods hanging…"
schooldesign  classroomdesign  2012  variety  adaptability  flexibility  work  attention  furniture  openstudioproject  openstudio  lcproject  tcsnmy  allornothing  unintendedconsequences  brainstorming  collaboration  susancain  extroverts  introverts  howwework  officedesign  architecture  design  workplace  workspace  allisonarieff  groupthink  solitude  productivity  workspaces 
january 2012 by robertogreco
The Studio-X NY Guide to Liberating New Forms of Conversation - Reading Room - Domus
"Studio-X is a multifunction outpost of Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation in lower Manhattan. Alternately a studio space for several of GSAPP's research groups (including C-Lab, Netlab, Living Architecture Lab and Urban Landscape Lab), exhibition space, and events venue, Studio-X's flexible programming makes it a uniquely unpredictable site where architectural and urban thinkers interact with a curious public. Now exporting its model to other cities around the world where GSAPP has a presence, including Rio de Janeiro, Beijing, and Amman, Studio-X marks its first publication with The Studio-X NY Guide to Liberating New Forms of Conversation. José Esparza talked to the book's editor and Studio-X NY's former programming director Gavin Browning, as well as Glen Cummings and Aliza Dzik of New York design firm MTWTF, who designed the book."
process  competition  hierarchy  typologies  transformation  documentation  tabularasa  blankslate  studio-xny  craigbuckley  markwigley  danielperlin  innovation  creativity  rapidresonse  multidisciplinary  mixed-use  classroomdesign  informality  informal  workshops  studios  schooldesign  learningspaces  glvo  openstudio  columbia  nyc  studio-x  glencummings  gavinbrowning  design  adaptability  flexibility  adaptivespaces  lcproject  interdisciplinary  books  domus  architecture 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Doors of Perception weblog: xskool: breathing the same air
"…We converged, instead, on the idea that "X" means: this place, this moment, these people. Breathing the same air. Only here, only now.

Our group also embraced the idea of no curriculum, no standardised process, no teachers, and no certificates…

1 An explanation: Xskool enables people to create unique events in which change-minded people participate, interact, and reflect.

2 Xskool is not for people who see themselves as leaders, role models, experts or 'change agents'. Xskoolers might well be leaders, role models etc - but that is not for them to decide…

5 At each xskool encounter, a host venue or location will present a task or a question for the visiting group to work on. At West Lexham our task was to build this path:

6 Each xskool group will also work on a question or questions of its own. This question will not be posed in advance; rather, it will emerge from a mindfully-orqanised process [such as Open Space or World Café] when the group first assembles at the location…"
xskool  education  learning  johnthackara  2011  curriculum  uncurriculum  curriculumisdead  change  community  events  unschooling  deschooling  unconferences  openstudioproject  openstudio  open  process  doing  making  collaboration  collaborative  lcproject 
august 2011 by robertogreco
DesignCrossing: X-School... Reflections on the path
"Last month John Thackara ran his first 'X-School'…to continue a conversation about what a 'school' for a new design paradigm should look like. Myself and a group of design minds got together in the countryside to thrash it out over a weekend of chat and activity.

Whenever we talked about what we thought 'X-School' could be, somewhere in my head I heard 'Fight Club', as in 'the first rule of Fight Club is you do not talk about Fight Club', except of course, we were there to talk about X-school, and... nobody got hurt.  We played some games, we built a flint path, we slept under the stars and swam in the river, we drank real ale and ate pizza and we talked about X-school.  It wasn't like a 'conference', or 'workshop', or even as John put it 'a country house weekend', it was something new.'

…there is enormous value in doing, there is enormous value in not defining your purpose, but most of all there is enormous value in sharing that experience with others."
xskool  johnthackara  unfinished  purpose  community  meaning  doing  improvisation  2011  experience  conversation  sharing  designeducation  education  lcproject  learning  fightclub  conferences  unconferences  workshops  unworkshops  openstudio  openstudioproject  openschools 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Disruption Department: More inspiration, this time at home.
"She [13 yo] listed four things that would help her be more creative and more helpful to those around her:

1. A public studio where she could go work on projects. The place would be stocked with all the necessary resources/equipment, as well as ample space for her to work. It would be open whenever, and she could use it whenever she wanted.

2. Essential: A private space. She needs a “room of her own” so to speak, where she can relax, chill-out, think, and be a kid.

3. Her own computer with continuous internet. To be creative, she says she needs access whenever she wants, not just when it’s available or by appointment.

4. A more stable and comfortable living space.

She notes these would all be extremely valuable to becoming the person she wants to be.

But you know what she said was more valuable?  Ears.

Listen to her!  A. said, “I’m tired of people in general looking down on the future.  It gets on my nerves when they look down on us and say we can’t do anything”…"
thedisruptiondepartment  education  children  adolescence  learning  listening  lcproject  openstudio  openstudioproject  mentoring  creativity  innovation  needs  teens  2011  schools  schooldesign  unschooling  deschooling  entrepreneurship 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Open Studio - Wikipedia
"A studio or workroom which is made accessible to allcomers, where artistic or creative work can be viewed and created collaboratively. An Open Studio is intended to foster creativity and encourage experimentation in an atmosphere of cultural exchange, conversation, encouragement, and freedom of expression."

"In the 21st Century, the Open Studio (often taking the form of a virtual or internet location) focuses on the creative act of making and sharing, in a flexible space equipped with a range of contemporary media and multimedia. Artists and non-artists come together in a social act of collaboration, the only entry requirements being an inquisitive nature, a curiosity about new and traditional media, and a lack of inhibition about creating in a semi-public space."

[Previously cited here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/1200831066/this-morning-i-stumbled-upon-this-event-poster ]
openstudio  tcsnmy  cv  lcproject  creativity  collaboration  sharing  conversation  encouragement  engagement  exchange  culturalexchange  expression  art  history  theory  practice 
july 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - TEDxEastsidePrep - Shawn Cornally - The Future of Education Without Coercion
[These are killing learning in schools]

No product = Failure [Product is emphasized over process]

What if they don't do anything? [Worry that they won't learn anything if given control of their learning]

3.9 ≠ 4.0 [Loss of motivation, feeling beyond recovery, no meaning]
education  learning  schools  tcsnmy  success  failure  science  teaching  process  productoverprocess  processoverproduct  time  scheduling  schedules  classschedules  2011  shawncornally  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  questioning  student-led  student-initiated  openstudio  unschooling  coercion  deschooling  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  extrinsicmotivation  overjustification  schooliness  schooling  creativity  absurdity  wonder  colleges  universities  admissions  gameofschool  playingschool  alfiekohn 
june 2011 by robertogreco
8 Big Ideas of the Constructionist Learning Lab « Generation YES Blog
"learning by doing…We all learn better when learning is part of doing something we find really interesting…

technology as building material…If you can use technology to make things you can make a lot more interesting things…

hard fun…We learn best & work best if we enjoy what we are doing…doesn’t mean “easy”…

learning to learn…Many students get the idea that “the only way to learn is by being taught.” This is what makes them fail in school & life…

taking time…students at school get used to being told every 5 minutes or every hour: do this, then do that…If someone isn’t telling them what to do they get bored. Life is not like that. To do anything important you have to learn to manage time for yourself…

you can’t get it right without getting it wrong…To succeed you need the freedom to goof on the way…

do unto ourselves what we do unto our students…

we are entering a digital world…where knowing about digital technology is as important as reading and writing…"
education  learning  technology  teaching  curriculum  tcsnmy  sylviamartinez  garystager  seymourpapert  constructionism  1999  howwework  howwelearn  cv  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  learningbydoing  projects  projectbasedlearning  openstudio  time  persistence  interestdriven  failure  timemanagement  freedom  modeling  schools  digital  making  constructing  pbl 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Children learning by themselves and progressive inquiry | FLOSSE Posse
"…children learn even better if they have a “granny figure” supporting them…

…good teachers is a bit like a granny: supports students, is interesting in their work and praise them. I think, however, even better teachers than a random granny is an expert of a domain acting the granny way. An excellent expert-teachers (can be a granny, too) is able to guide pupils in their inquiry by challenging their thinking and by providing new perspectives to the students inquiry. The point is to guide, not to instruct.

The progressive inquiry learning, a pedagogical model that has been widely studied, experimented and partly took in use in Finland, is close to Mitra’s way of teaching (I call it teaching, although there is very little teaching in a traditional sense). In my talk in Ankra I explained how progressive inquiry learning works and how pupils and students in all levels of education—from kindergartens to universities—can be guided to do research."

[Examples follow]

[via: http://www.downes.ca/post/55666/ ]
teemuleinonen  progressiveinquiry  tcsnmy  learning  education  pedagogy  teaching  student-centered  studentdirected  learner-centered  learner-ledcommunities  sugatamitra  grandmothers  guideontheside  2011  via:steelemaley  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  mentoring  modeling  instruction  guidance  lcproject  cv  howwelearn  howwework  informallearning  autodidacts  outdoctrination  research  toshare  unconferences  openstudio  openworkshops  prototyping 
june 2011 by robertogreco
P R O J E C T  M  :  T H I N K  W R O N G
"Sure, we may not be known in the in circles. We may not fill the pages of design annuals. And we may never see our names in lights. But, we do know how to save the rain forest with a waterproof book. We do know how to build a park with a postcard. And we know how to bring water to a community with a few pages of newsprint.

We are part of a design movement. We believe that ability equals responsibility. And we are not the only ones. So, we built a lab where designers like you can make a difference. We are building the tools that will build the future. And this is where you come in."

"The human brain tends to think along pre-determined linear thought pathways. Such linear thinking can inhibit true innovation and creative exploration. Project M will encourage, and provide techniques for, “thinking wrong” to generate new ideas and design directions to challenge the status-quo."
maine  design  architecture  change  social  johnbielenberg  alabama  california  activism  humanitariandesign  gamechanging  poptech  sanfrancisco  projectm  projectmlab  lcproject  openstudio  communityservice  halecounty 
may 2011 by robertogreco
OK Do | Dreaming objects – A meeting with Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby
"AD: The question of art and design is problematic. A lot of people want to see us as artists, but we definitely see ourselves as designers trying to push the discipline forward, asking questions about design and through it. In fact, we launched the term critical design ten years ago in order to describe our work. Sometimes people think it simply means criticism; that we are negative about everything, anti-consumerist and against design. Some people relate it to critical theory; to Frankfurt school and anti-capitalist thinking. We are definitely aware of it, but then again not in that category either. Critical design is about critical thinking – about not taking things at face value. It’s about questioning things, and trying to understand what’s behind them. In essence, our objective is to use design as a means for applying skepticism to society at large."
art  design  dunne&raby  fionaraby  anthonydunne  learning  unschooling  deschooling  criticalthinking  questioning  unproduct  undesign  science  research  parallelworlds  paralleluniverses  social  society  democracy  education  thinking  philosophy  glvo  lcproject  openstudio  anti-consumption  functionalfictions  okdo  interviews  potential  herenow  presentations  narratives  change  sustainability  slow 
may 2011 by robertogreco
OK Do | Happiness resides at home – Interview with Tuula Pöyhönen of ONNI
"What made you take your work home in the first place?

It felt ridiculous to keep the flat empty the whole day and rent a space for a shop where I couldn’t work on my products. This way, I can combine design work and shop-keeping just like the clothiers, shoemakers and other similar professionals did in the olden times. Also, it makes integrating family and work life easier…

Does it ever feel uncomfortable that your home is open to the public?…

If a visitor gets uneasy to enter a space that is my home, it’s not really my problem…

What are the best things about having an open home?…

I prefer to invite them [clients] over in order to show them the atmosphere of my home. It conveys what I’m like and how I work; the mentality that underpins my design. In my opinion, it’s nonsense to claim that a design professional is someone who is able to adopt to different clients’ wishes. I think that clients should go to designers who are on the same wavelength to begin with."

[Wayback: http://web.archive.org/web/20110103104057/http://www.ok-do.eu/articles/happiness-resides-at-home/ ]
okdo  onni  tuulapöyhönen  finland  livework  openstudio  glvo  lcproject  space  place  life 
may 2011 by robertogreco
INTHECONVERSATION: Art Leisure Instead of Art Work: A Conversation with Randall Szott [Truly too much to quote, so random snips below. Go read the whole thing.]
"Sal Randolph talks w/ Randall Szott about collections, cooking, "art of living," & infra-institutional activity."

"undergrad art ed seemed overly concerned w/ 'how & what to make' sorts of questions…"

"in my possibly pathetic & overly romantic vision of considered life, I am quite hopeful about ability of (art & non-art) people to improve their own experience & others' in both grand & mundane ways"

"I would like to build along model of public library. Libraries meet an incredibly diverse set of needs & desires"

"art is a great conversation…tool for making meaning & enhancing experience, but it is highly specialized, & all too often, closed conversation of insiders"

"I am deeply committed to promoting "everyday" people who are finding ways to make lives more meaningful - devoted amateurs to a variety of intellectual pursuits, hobbyists, collectors, autodidacts, bloggers, karaoke singers, crafters, etc…advocate for a rich, inclusive understanding of human meaning-making."
2008  salrandolph  randallszott  leisure  art  living  collecting  food  cooking  life  slow  thinking  philosophy  unschooling  deschooling  credentials  artschool  education  learning  skepticism  everyday  vernacular  language  work  leisurearts  dilletante  generalists  cv  distraction  culture  marxism  anarchism  situationist  lcproject  tcsnmy  intellectualism  elitism  meaning  sensemaking  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  projectbasedlearning  projects  openstudio  crossdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  thewhy  why  audiencesofone  canon  amateurs  artleisure  darkmatter  pbl  artschools 
may 2011 by robertogreco
InCUBATE [Quotes from the 'about' page]
"InCUBATE is a research group dedicated to exploring new approaches to arts administration and arts funding. We at InCUBATE act as curators, researchers and co-producers of artists projects. These activities have manifested in a series traveling exhibitions called Other Options, an artist residency program, and various other projects such as Sunday Soup (a monthly meal that generates funding for a creative project grant). We don’t have non-profit status, instead we are interested in what kinds of organizational strategies could provide more direct support to critical and socially-engaged art and culture beyond for-profit or non-profit structures. Our core organizational principle is to treat art administration as a creative practice. By doing so, we hope to generate and share a new vocabulary of practical solutions to the everyday problems of producing under-the-radar culture. Currently we do not have a physical location and we work together on an ongoing project basis."

"Finally, it is worth noting how various models such as a labor unions, community centers, block-clubs, or religious institutions seem to resolve some of the key problems facing our concept of the slow build. Consider how these institutions provide space and resources, exert political influence, and allow for the participation of wider demographics. Our task for the future is to produce these effects without instituting a rigid hierarchy or overtly moralizing and dogmatic system in order to affect a more equitable, participatory, and democratic future."
art  economics  social  community  collaboration  anarchism  incubate  randallszott  lcproject  openstudio  curation  curating  hierarchy  flatness  slow  chicago  democracy  culture  culturehacking  activism  administration  engagement  organizations  organization  equity  participatory  residencies  pop-upculture  exhibitions  projects  horizontality  horizontalidad  ncm  participatoryart  everyday  amateurs 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Week 304 – Blog – BERG
"I’m looking forward to travel pausing for a bit, and having everyone back in the same room. There have been lots of changes recently, and the Room – which in my head I’ve started capitalising, Room not room – is nothing if not a culture – a particular stance to design and the world, and shared values – a way to work which is beautiful, popular and inventive – and a network of people in which ideas transmit, roll round and mutate, and come back in new forms and hit you in the back of the head. The Room is what it’s all about. It’s a broth that requires more investment than we’ve been giving it recently. So, yeah, that."
mattwebb  theroom  openstudio  work  howwework  networkedlearning  networks  berg  berglondon  sharedspace  space  place  learningplaces  learningspaces  2011  schooldesign  lcproject  tcsnmy  culture  sharedvalues  invention  creativity  cv  socialemotionallearning  shaedspace  sharedtime  community  communities  howwelearn  socialemotional 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Dream School | Powerful Learning Practice
"I know part of the answer to re-envisioning education comes in the learning communities we are creating – deep, sustained, communities that have hard, messy conversations and become safe places where we ask controversial questions that push for positive change. But part of the problem is getting participants to buy in and make time and truly commit to spending time in community, building trust and learning together. It takes time and energy and folks have to understand it is developmental. The shift will come if they will invest themselves, the very best part of themselves."

"When we let learning rule the school structure, teachers will have to evolve into much more than the delivery vehicle – the person who simply deconstructs knowledge into small, bite sized pieces that can be memorized and regurgitated on tests. Rather, teachers will become connected coaches who understand how to use appreciative inquiry to help students construct and validate their own learning."
schools  projectdreamschool  sherylnussbaum-beach  willrichardson  education  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  learning  connectedlearning  connectedlearners  networkedlearning  networks  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  student-centered  studentdirected  self-directed  openstudio  learner-centered  learner-ledcommunities  theindependentproject  teaching  pedagogy  modeling  via:steelemaley  schoolstart-ups  change  future  schooldesign  tcsnmy  community 
april 2011 by robertogreco
A learning mash-up.
"We need them….dedicated and passionate teachers and learners who see learning as a design that the learner moves, shapes and feeds forward as positive action in our world….educational communities need them, those with social imagination….experts, yes experts."

[Thomas is too kind — flattered to be mentioned amongst the likes of Dennis Littky, Dougald Hine, and Leigh Blackall.]
thomassteele-maley  leighblackall  dennislittky  dougaldhine  ego  cv  collegeunbound  ivanillich  unschooling  deschooling  learning  teaching  education  democraticschools  democracy  schools  tcsnmy  openstudio  student-centered  self-directedlearning  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  studentdirected  students  tcsnmy7  tcsnmy8  modeling  criticaleducation 
april 2011 by robertogreco
HORT | better taste than sorry.
"Even the word “HORT” is great. It’s a German word for an after school care center. Why did they choose it?

“HORT – a direct translation of the studio’s mission. A creative playground. A place where ‘work and play’ can be said in the same sentence. An unconventional working environment. Once a household name in the music industry. Now, a multi-disciplinary creative hub. Not just a studio space, but an institution devoted to making ideas come to life. A place to learn, a place to grow, and a place that is still growing. Not a client execution tool. HORT has been known to draw inspiration from things other than design.”"

[Another post on Hort from the same blog: 
http://bettertastethansorry.com/2009/11/eike-konig-everyday-is-like-christmas/ ]

[And look at this, the video that started this whole Hort binge is also on the blog: 
http://bettertastethansorry.com/2011/03/a-tribute-to-eike-konig/ ]
hort  eikekönig  play  learning  studioclassroom  lcproject  design  education  playgrounds  unschooling  deschooling  graphics  graphicdesign  teaching  tcsnmy  openstudio  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  learningplaces  learningenvironments 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Stump The Teacher: Innovation Day 2011
"Today was the actual “Innovative Day” as students came to school with their supplies, resources, and an abundance of enthusiasm. We broke the students into working areas based on their topics of choice and the resources needed. There was a section for building, art, music, technology, videos, cooking, physical education, and more. Variety was the name of the game as there were over 200 different learning projects being worked on over the course of the day. Many students were working independently but there were plenty of learning groups that developed throughout the day as well. Students started helping each other with projects and ended up learning more than they even originally planned. Here is just a sample of the great work that was done."
unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  cv  openstudio  interestdriven  studentdirected  tcsnmy  teaching  learning  schools  curriculumisdead  curriculum  innovationday  2011  students  google20%  unstructuredtime 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Don’t tell me what you’re passionate about « Re-educate Seattle
"School can help facilitate this process. One of the best things we can do is to give kids autonomy in how they spend their time, including time in which they’re not required to do anything in particular.

As educators we can stand back & observe how they spend that time. Students will fill those unscheduled slots w/ activities that give them joy. (This is the part that many people have a hard time believing. They think kids are lazy & unless they’re told what to do, they’ll just sit around…not true.) Then we don’t have to ask them what they want to be when they grow up. Instead, we can say things like, “I’ve noticed you’re spending a lot of time drawing superhero characters. Would you like to meet a professional illustrator?”

The way traditional schools are structured causes kids miss out on these opportunities. They spend their days sitting through required classes, then it’s home to decompress from the stress of school w/ video games or YouTube videos, then it’s homework time…"
openstudio  unschooling  deschooling  stevemiranda  pscs  pugetsoundcommunityschool  progressive  democratic  freeschools  autonomy  motivation  choice  entrepreneurship  identity  self  productivity  google20%  education  schools  schooliness  trust  learning  teaching  passion  unstructuredtime 
february 2011 by robertogreco
CITYterm: Admission » Admitted Students » Outside Lies Magic
"Get out now. Not just outside, but beyond the trap of the programmed electronic age so gently closing around so many people at the end of our century. Go outside, move deliberately, then relax, slow down, look around. Do not jog. Do not run. Forget about blood pressure and arthritis, cardiovascular rejuvenation and weight reduction. Instead pay attention to everything that abuts the rural road, the city street, the suburban boulevard. Walk. Stroll. Saunter. Ride a bike, and coast along a lot. Explore.

Abandon, even momentarily, the sleek modern technology that consumes so much time and money now, and seek out the resting place of a technology almost forgotten. Go outside and walk a bit, long enough to forget programming, long enough to take in and record new surroundings.

Flex the mind, a little at first, then a lot. Savor something special. Enjoy the best-kept secret around--the ordinary, everyday landscape that rewards any explorer, that touches any explorer with magic."
architecture  books  via:britta  johnstilgoe  pedestrians  walking  biking  bikes  psychogeography  noticing  learning  landscape  classideas  openstudio  classtrips  fieldtrips  bighere  exploration  looking  cities  urban  urbanism  builtenvironment  visibility  meandering  deliberate 
february 2011 by robertogreco
DesignInquiry
"non-profit educational organization devoted to researching design issues in intensive team-based gatherings. An alternative to the design conference, it brings together practitioners from disparate fields to generate new work & ideas around a single topic.

…selects a topic to explore at an intensive gathering of presentations, discussions, & workshops. We invite professionals, educators & students of diverse disciplines to contribute to the topic in any way they think is appropriate. We share these responses, while working toward a publication that binds the outcome: a free-to-download boost of information, meant to inspire & inform its readers.

…an alternative to one-way delivery of a standard conference: each participant contributes & is equally responsible for the quality of the gathering; a collaborative production where we both learn and teach the aesthetics and ethics that are central to Design (& life). Days become nights; the program doesn't stop when dinner is served."
design  unconferences  conferences  togo  designinquiry  lcproject  glvo  restaurants  collaboration  collaborative  making  doing  northeast  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  generativewebevent  generativeevents  makegood  openstudio  education  learning  alternative  alternativeeducation  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  schools  schooldesign  maine  montreal  generativewebevents 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Our experimental rockets are our people – Blog – BERG
"Our culture and way of working is what makes us BERG. And our culture is made by our people. Everyone here has a colossal impact on the life of the room. Nobody just “fits in,” we grow together — learning, teaching and developing as we go. Tom and Matt B are irreplaceable, we’ll miss them enormously!

That said, one of the things that makes me most pleased is that the studio is a place that people travel through and move on from. I’m proud of our alumni! When they achieve great things, I admit I take a good deal of satisfaction that a fellow traveller has carried a little bit of BERG into the world.

We keep it quiet, but the secret history of our name is that is stands for the British Experimental Rocket Group. Our experimental rockets are our people.

So what next?

The studio will grow and change. We’re established enough that we can treat these moments as opportunities."
berglondon  berg  mattwebb  culture  learning  openstudio  lcproject  howwework  howwelearn  people  hr  teaching 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Brightworks: An Extraordinary School
"Brightworks is a school that reimagines the idea of school. In September 2011, we will offer a one-of-a-kind K-12 curriculum: students explore an idea from multiple perspectives with the help of real-world experts, tools, and experiences, collaborate on projects driven by their curiosity, and share their findings with the world. Brightworks does away with tests, grades and homework, instead supporting each student as they create a rich and detailed portfolio of their work. Brightworks offers a sliding-scale tuition option to all applicants.

At Brightworks, we believe that a school should serve as a learning commons and a community workshop, an intellectual and creative heart of the neighborhood it resides in. Brightworks will also offer after-school, evening and weekend workshops for children and adults."
education  sanfrancisco  curriculum  pedagogy  learning  teaching  experiential  science  schools  schooldesign  lcproject  testing  grading  homework  sharing  collaboration  tcsnmy  community  agitpropproject  the2837university  children  unschooling  deschooling  bryanwelch  alternative  progressive  make  making  doing  thinkering  tinkering  openstudio  gevertulley  brightworks 
february 2011 by robertogreco
The Control Shift: A Grassroots Education Revolution Takes Shape | MindShift
“I think parents understand that schools need to do something different – but the ‘different’ doesn’t equate to anything really different at the end of the day because they want their kids to pass tests, get to college, do all the things that we define as traditionally successful. Parents say, ‘There are places that are experimenting on that stuff, but don’t experiment on my kid. I want those grades, I want those scores.’” [Welcome to my world.]

“…Traditional approaches to learning are no longer capable of coping w/ a constantly changing world. They have yet to find a balance btwn the structure that educational institutions provide & the freedom afforded by the new media’s almost unlimited resources, w/out losing a sense of purpose & direction. The challenge is to find a way to marry structure & freedom to create something altogether new.”
teaching  change  reform  edtech  willrichardson  douglasthomas  johnseelybrown  tcsnmy  toshare  purpose  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  parents  cv  schools  policy  meaning  freedom  openstudio  lcproject  newmedia 
february 2011 by robertogreco
HOME : WHERE THEY CREATE by paul barbera
"My name is Paul Barbera. I am an interior based photographer - As I travel for assignments, I look up artists & creatives. This is a visual document of their creative environments."
photography  creativity  howwework  studios  openstudio  work  via:lizettegreco  design  interiors 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Running Head: Self-Directed Student Attitudes (JUAL)
[Quote references: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct01/vol59/num02/The-Benefits-of-Exploratory-Time.aspx ]

"…also less tangible benefits of self-directed learning. Wolk outlines the benefits of exploratory time, which he defines as an hour or more per day in which students pursue projects & topics of their own choosing. Among these benefits he states that exploratory time "nurtures a love for learning, encourages meaningful learning through intrinsic motivation, creates true communities of learners, nurtures creativity, develops self-esteem & celebrates uniqueness"…Wolk recommends teachers turn over at least 20% of school day to students in order to achieve these benefits. He states that trusting students is paramount to the success of such time. "We must trust that students have educational & intellectual interests & curiosities, deeply meaningful questions about the world, & an innate desire to know & understand. We must trust that students want to learn & that they are willing to work hard in that learning. The next step is ours. We must give them time to own their learning"…"
stevenwolk  schools  openstudio  google20%  unstructuredtime  learning  self-directedlearning  tcsnmy  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  sudburyschools  sudbury  progressive  freeschools  democratic  children  intrinsicmotivation  lcproject 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Exploration | Brain Rules |
"The desire to explore never leaves us despite the classrooms and cubicles we are stuffed into. Babies are the model of how we learn—not by passive reaction to the environment but by active testing through observation, hypothesis, experiment, and conclusion. Babies methodically do experiments on objects, for example, to see what they will do.

Google takes to heart the power of exploration. For 20 percent of their time, employees may go where their mind asks them to go. The proof is in the bottom line: fully 50 percent of new products, including Gmail and Google News, came from “20 percent time.”"

[via: http://twitter.com/adversarian/status/29358290395725824 ]
exploration  google20%  unschooling  deschooling  brainrules  learning  invention  curiosity  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudio  experimentation  teaching  education  brain 
january 2011 by robertogreco
OK Do | Research Through Practice – Monitor MEMEX Founder Boy Vereecken on Oeuvre and Design Education
"Q: What kinds of methods do you use in your teaching?

The methods are very much influenced by the fact that instead of giving classes or assignments, I have appointments with the Master students in the course of their final projects. The meetings are based on guiding and reflection.<br />
I usually introduce the students to design research through my own research-based projects. …discussion certainly plays an important role in workshops.

Q: This brings to my mind the phrase “doing research by design”, which points out research being part of the design process.

I definitely consider that an applicable approach. In the context of design, the tendency is to conceive research and execution as separate entities. Students tend to be done with the research part when moving on to working with visual means. The main aim of the platform is to encourage students to integrate research more profoundly into their practice."
education  research  teaching  design  learning  lcproject  openstudio  glvo  workshops  modeling  teacherasmasterlearner  teacherascollaborator  discussion  conversation  memex  okdo  aaltouniversity  boyvereecken 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Thoughts on Google’s 20% time « Scott Berkun
Google’s 20% time is more of an attitude and culture than a rule…It’s worth noting that people at Google work very hard on their 80% time. It’s not as if every Friday is 20% day and work shuts down on all existing projects so people can do their 20% things…The 20% time concept isn’t new. 3M developed a 15% time rule in the 1950s with the same exact intentions and basic philosophy. Masking tape and Post-it notes are two notable products that were concieved and developed by individual engineers working without formal budgets, plans or management support…the Google founders mention at their talk at TED that Montessori school philosophy influenced their ideas on 20% time…Google’s culture has a resistance, or even distrust, of hierarchy – they often use voting, peer review, and debate to make decisions or decide which new projects and features to add."
google  innovation  management  productivity  culture  google20%  tcsnmy  openstudio  lcproject  freedom  autonomy  authority  montessori  3m  work  philosophy  creativity  unschooling  unstructuredtime  via:rushtheiceberg 
january 2011 by robertogreco
OK Do | Small, small, small – Noriko Daishima’s home in Shanghai is also a café and a shop
"Designer Noriko Daishima runs a small shop, café and creative studio in her home in Shanghai. Located in the French Concession, on Xingguo Lu, she calls her place Le Petit Xiaoxiao (small, small, small) and keeps it open for friends and their friends during the weekends. Last Saturday, we visited Noriko for a chat and green tea."

"Like us, many people found their way to Noriko’s through a friend’s recommendation. We heard about the place from Satoko and Kok-Meng, a Shanghai-based couple who met each other at Le Petit Xiaoxiao and later founded KUU design office together. “I wanted to create a small creative community by making my home a meeting place,” Noriko tells us about her activities resonating Chinese communality. “I have made many new friends at my place.”"

[Update 18 July 2012: Sad to see this post is gone and not available in the Wayback Machine.]

[Some related links:
http://lepetit-xiaoxiao.eco.to/ (Noriko Daishima's website)
http://lepetit-xiaoxiao.eco.to/weblog/ (Noriko Daishima's blog)
http://lepetitxiao.jugem.jp/ (Noriko Daishima's other blog)
http://showroom-shanghai.net/ (collaboration with Nicole Teng of But Cake)
http://www.sugarednspiced.com/plum-gallery/ (Plum Gallery has shown Noriko Daishima's work)
http://www.tastebites.net/cooking-with-noriko/ (cooking with Noriko Daishima)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/yanbing/529552230/ (a photo at Le Petit Xiaoxiao)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/reelene/505347206/ (a photo at Le Petit Xiaoxiao)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/reelene/504656722/ (a photo at Le Petit Xiaoxiao)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lepetit-xiaoxiao/ (Le Perit Xiaoxiao's Flickr account?)

http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g308272-d969465-Reviews-Le_petit_xiao_xiao-Shanghai.html (Le Petit Xiaoxiao on Trip Advisor) ]
norikodaishima  lcproject  community  social  meetingplace  creativity  make  making  art  design  schooldesign  shanghai  thirdplaces  homes  fabrication  handmade  openstudio  work  workspace  cafes  lepetitxiaoxiao  thirdspaces  openstudioproject  workspaces 
december 2010 by robertogreco
p:ear
"p:ear builds positive relationships w/ homeless & transitional youth through education, art & recreation…

To truly exit homelessness, kids must develop the internal strength, skills & foresight to make healthy choices. p:ear provides a safe, non-judgmental environment in which youth are trusted to outgrow unproductive & harmful behaviors. We offer individualized mentoring & education programs in a safe, reliable setting designed to foster trust, build self-esteem & to teach…kids – who all too often are regarded by society as disposable, "hopeless cases" – that they are valuable individuals w/ a future who have something vital to contribute to this community.

p:ear staff & volunteers serve as mentors, friends, & role models, while p:ear's unique programs create opportunities for young people to grow intellectually, express themselves constructively, communicate in positive ways & engage in meaningful interactions w/ the larger community of Portland."

[via: http://www.theonepercent.org/Projects.htm?projid=167 ]
portland  oregon  education  lcproject  homeless  homelessness  mentoring  art  arts  learning  openstudio  community 
december 2010 by robertogreco
At the Core of the Apple Store: Images of Next Generation Learning (full-length and abridged article) | Big Picture
"What are the essential features of the Apple Store’s learning culture?

* The learning experience is highly personalized and focused on the interests and needs of the individual customer.

* Customers can make mistakes with little risk of failure or embarrassment. Thinking and tinkering with the help of a staff member provide opportunities for deep learning.

* Challenges are real and embedded in the customer’s learning and work.

* Assessment is built right into the learning, focusing specifically on what needs to be accomplished.

A disruptive innovation? We think so. The Apple Store has created a new type of learning environment that allows individuals to learn anything, at any time, at any level, from experts, expert practitioners, and peers."
apple  applestore  learning  schooldesign  innovation  via:cervus  education  lcproject  technology  williamgibson  geniusbar  retail  studioclassroom  openstudio  thirdplaces  problemsolving  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  personalization  individualized  challenge  disruption  assessment  deeplearning  21stcenturylearning  learningspaces  thirdspaces 
december 2010 by robertogreco
ball nogues interview
"mark allen…'machine project'. they work in a kind of nexus, a community that is bound by mutual interests. this could be an interest in cooking, or gardening, mathematics, ad so on. they do workshops on everything, like computational crochet to baking with a light bulb… it's an approach to art & life…

advice to the young?

…it's very important to not be constrained by categorization…categories that define people in a particular way can kill a lot of good, creative

inspiration by trying to fit into a specific group…can be very limiting for people. I would always encourage everyone to be critical of categorical thinking…another thing that's going on is people are starting to disassociate their hands from their brain…there is no sense of meaning, materiality, or gravity in what they make…it's always important to balance those things out - but not entirely.

you should be able to dream as well."
ball-nogues  benjaminball  gastonnogues  loasangeles  architecture  design  interdisciplinary  craft  art  glvo  advice  childhood  markallen  machineproject  interviews  categorization  meaning  materiality  making  doing  make  life  openstudio  lcproject  learning 
december 2010 by robertogreco
:: NuVu studio
"Students register for a specific studio such as “Balloon Mapping”, “Music and the City”, or “Future of Global Warming” of which there will be approximately 10 students, one Coach and an Assistant Coach. The Coach begins by providing a general overview of a problem to the students, an ambiguous real-world problem with potentially millions of answers. With the Coach’s help each student frames the problem from his/her perspective and enters into an iterative development process supported by the studio team of students & advisors.

Students are provided with access to outside resources – leading thinkers and experts – to whom they present their framework and receive feedback. Students document their process and progress, continually reviewing it with the Coach. They set parameters, synthesize, and continue refining, refining, refining. NuVu trains students to apply multiple perspectives to challenge and refine ideas over and over again until it becomes a natural way of learning."

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5ZlJVHfiYg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmY2_Xlhpng and
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4f4vb7GBIg&list=PL4D54C52BBC9A68D8 ]
education  engineering  highschool  lcproject  openstudio  mit  pedagogy  stem  design  make  innovation  technology  problemsolving  learning  boston  process  unschooling  deschooling  studioclassroom  designthinking  nuvu  nuvustudio 
november 2010 by robertogreco
You Media
"YOUmedia is an innovative, 21st century teen learning space housed at the Chicago Public Library's downtown Harold Washington Library Center. YOUmedia was created to connect young adults, books, media, mentors, and institutions throughout the city of Chicago in one dynamic space designed to inspire collaboration and creativity.

High school age teens engaging with YOUmedia can access thousands of books, over 100 laptop and desktop computers, and a variety of media creation tools and software, all of which allow them to stretch their imaginations and their digital media skills. By working both in teams and individually, teens have an opportunity to engage in projects that promote critical thinking, creativity, and skill-building."
via:cervus  chicago  lcproject  openstudio  libraries  socialmedia  education  digitalstorytelling  newmedia  collaboration  contentcreation  community  unschooling  deschooling  learning  criticalthinking  creativity  youmedia 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Try Not to Cry! : Stager-to-Go
"Kids in the Constructionist Learning Laboratory were free to work on personally meaningful projects, regardless of what they were, as long as they were “doing something.” They had five hours of uninterrupted time each day for project development and we were freed from all curriculum and assessment requirements by the Governor and legislature in order to truly reform the system and reacquaint damaged students with their sense of power as learners.

Any and all volunteers who could generate student interest in a project were welcome in our classroom. I often felt as if we were on Gilligan’s Island since we had a constant stream of visitors and volunteers despite working within a prison.

Blunt Youth Radio volunteers visited twice a week to work with kids on radio projects. This gave some kids a tremendous voice – literally and figuratively."
constructionist  constructivism  garystager  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudio  openschools  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  seymourpapert  voice  thisamericanlife  teaching  projectbasedlearning  pbl 
october 2010 by robertogreco
P.O.S.Z.U. » Learning from A Pattern Language
[Wayback: http://web.archive.org/web/20100701115028/http://www.poszu.com/2010/06/22/learning-from-a-pattern-language/ ]

"In short, the educational system so radically decentralized becomes congruent with the urban structure itself. People of all walks of life come forth, and offer a class in the things they know and love: professionals and workgroups offer apprenticeships in their offices and workshops, old people offer to teach whatever their life work and interest has been, specialists offer tutoring in their special subjects. Living and learning are the same. It is not hard to imagine that eventually every third or fourth household with have at least one person in it who is offering a class or training of some kind.”"

[via: http://bettyann.tumblr.com/post/1198788931 ]
christopheralexander  apatternlanguage  education  learning  urban  urbanism  schools  decentralization  apprenticeships  deschooling  unschooling  tcsnmy  openstudio  life  glvo  sharing  openschools  teaching  lcproject  1977 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Steven Johnson: Where good ideas come from | Video on TED.com
"People often credit their ideas to individual "Eureka!" moments. But Steven Johnson shows how history tells a different story. His fascinating tour takes us from the "liquid networks" of London's coffee houses to Charles Darwin's long, slow hunch to today's high-velocity web."
stevenjohnson  art  creativity  ideas  innovation  thinking  connectivity  hunches  interconnectivity  youtube  philosophy  cafeculture  incubation  timberners-lee  web  online  internet  lcproject  crosspollination  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  generalists  coffeehouses  ted  enlightenment  networks  space  place  thirdspaces  patterns  behavior  evolution  systems  systemsthinking  liquidnetowork  collaboration  tcsnmy  learning  theslowhunch  slowhunches  slow  darwin  eurekamoments  google20%  openstudio  cv  gps  sputnik  thirdplaces  charlesdarwin  interconnected 
september 2010 by robertogreco
The Factory - Wikipedia
"The Factory was Andy Warhol's original New York City studio from 1962 to 1968, although his later studios were known as The Factory as well. The Factory was located on the fifth floor at 231 East 47th Street, in Midtown Manhattan. The rent was "only about one hundred dollars a year". The building no longer exists."
lcproject  openstudio  openstudioproject  andywarhol  art  history 
august 2010 by robertogreco
…My heart’s in Accra » TEDGlobal: Transforming voting, and education
"Emily Pilloton has big idea for small community. She & her design firm, Project H are focused on transforming education in Bertie County, NC...

firm focuses on 6 principles: Design through action. Design with, not for. Design systems, not stuff. Document, share & measure. Start locally and scale globally. Build.

In the spirit of 5th principle – & because she fell in love w/ community – she & Matt now live there...working on 3 projects designed to transform local education system through design.

[1] rebuilds computer labs from place designed for “kill & drill”, getting students to take tests. Now it’s a creative, open space for exploration & interaction... [2] educational playground system invites students to learn kinetically... [3] project to teach design within public schools...

While this is a small story – 1 course, 13 students, 1 year – it’s a model for how design could lead education in future & how small communities might use education to transform themselves."
emilypilloton  projecthdesign  northcarolina  ethanzuckerman  2010  design  designthinking  tcsnmy  small  rural  problemsolving  ict  education  schools  openstudio  openstudioproject  do  doing  tinkering  exploring  making  creativity  activism  community  lcproject  systems  action  building  change  gamechanging  unschooling  deschooling  projecth 
july 2010 by robertogreco
TEDxNYed: This is bullshit « BuzzMachine [video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTOLkm5hNNU]
"lecturing [is] bullshit...remind of us of? classroom...entire structure of ed system built for industrial age...old media: 1-way, 1-size-fits-all...we must question this very form...enable students to question [it]...lecture does have place...But not be-all-end-all of ed...Do what you do best & link to rest...we need to move students up edu chain. They don’t always know what they need to know, but why don’t we start by finding out?...test to find out what they don’t know [not what they have learned]. Their wrong answers aren’t failures, they're needs & opportunities...must stop culture of standardized testing & teaching...stop looking at ed as product...turn out every student giving same answer – to process...every student looks for new answers...every school [should] copy Google’s 20%...encouraging & enabling creation & experimentation...Rather than showing diplomas...show portfolios...far better expression of thinking & capability?...school becomes not factory but incubator."
lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  learning  schools  schooling  jeffjarvis  teaching  lectures  tedxnyed  unconferences  criticalthinking  plp  tcsnmy  google20%  openstudio 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Why Apple’s $40 billion matters to us « Re-educate
"The traditional school model hinders imagination and creativity because it’s very hard to be original when you’re constantly being asked to produce. On the contrary, the progressive school where I work does not schedule regular classes on Fridays. Instead, we leave that space open for field trips, guest speakers, or just socializing. Here’s a quick story—taken from Imagination First, by Eric Liu and Scott Noppe-Brandon—about Whole Foods founder and CEO John Mackey that illustrates the point: “As often as possible, in good quarters or bad, he will clear his calendar for days at a time. During those blank hours, he reads. He thinks. He gets lost in science fiction, economic theory, comic books. He notices where resistance arises, where inspiration flares. He’s not trying, Mackey insists, to cultivate imagination. There’s no plan. He merely trusts that letting things unfold nonlinearly is the best approach to growth that is enduring and, well, organic.”"
pscs  learning  creativity  stevemiranda  tcsnmy  openstudio  time  imagination  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  freetime  progressive  pugetsoundcommunityschool 
march 2010 by robertogreco

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