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Carol Black on Twitter: "THREAD Brief tutorial in why innovations in institutional education always "fail.""
"THREAD

Brief tutorial in why innovations in institutional education always "fail."
2. First ask yourself: Why does the existing education system consistently fail a large percentage of kids?

(Aside from the obvious issues of poverty, inequity, racism, trauma.)

3. The existing system fails because one size does not fit all. One size will never fit all. There is nothing that you can do on this earth that will work for everybody.

4. The existing public system fails the kids who don’t fit the demands of the existing system. Kids who are too high-energy, too independent, too creative, too introverted, too extraverted, too rebellious.

5. So you work, and work, and make changes to the system. You open it up, you make it accommodate students who are more high-energy, more independent, more creative.

6. And it still fails for a large percentage of kids. Maybe a slightly smaller percentage. Maybe a slightly larger percentage. But it still fails for a lot of kids.

Why?

7. Because one size does not fit all. One size will never fit all. There is nothing that you can do on this earth that will work for everybody.

8. So you say, “We need to get back to basics! What kids need is high expectations! None of this “progressive” nonsense! What kids need is direct instruction and accountability!”

9. So you work, and work, and make changes to the system. You create lengthy lists of standards, you identify the knowledge and skills that kids need to master, you test them to make sure they’re mastering those skills.

10. And it still fails for a large percentage of kids. Maybe a slightly smaller percentage. Maybe a slightly larger percentage. But it still fails for a lot of kids.

Why?

11. Because one size does not fit all. One size will never fit all. There is nothing that you can do on this earth that will work for everybody.

12. So you say, both of these models are too extreme! What we need is a balanced education that has some freedom of choice but also a rich curriculum with high standards!

13. So you work, and you work, and make changes to the system. You come up with project-based models, you have “genius hour” on Fridays, but you also have a full standards-based system with testing and accountability.

14. And it still fails for a large percentage of kids. Maybe a slightly smaller percentage. Maybe a slightly larger percentage. But it still fails for a lot of kids.

Why?

15. Because one size does not fit all. One size will never fit all. There is nothing that you can do on this earth that will work for everybody.

16. So here’s an idea: maybe we need to stop trying to find the One Best Way of Educating All Children.

Maybe we need to recognize that children are different, they will always be different, and it’s a good thing that they’re different.

17. Maybe we need to recognize that the child who will grow up to be a jet pilot, and the child who will be a poet, and the child who will be a chef in a fast-paced restaurant, and the child who will be a forest ranger, and the child who will be a research scientist +

18. + and the child who will be a finish carpenter, and the child who will be a software engineer, and the child who will be a kindergarten teacher, and the child who will be a firefighter, are really different children, and they may need different approaches to education.

19. They need different amounts of social stimulation and quiet time. Different amounts of freedom to explore and structured instruction. Different amounts of feedback and independence. Different amounts of hands-on and text-based learning. Different tools. Different paths.

20. Maybe one child will blossom in a quiet, calm, formal education environment. One child will blossom in a noisy, open, makerspace environment. One child will blossom in an outdoor, nature-based environment. One child will blossom in a democratic free school.

21. One child will blossom by homeschooling or unschooling and apprenticeships in the wider community. One child will blossom with a combination of these.

22. And before you say it’s not possible to provide all those options, I’d like to point out that it might be more cost-effective to provide a stable array of options in every community than it is to overhaul and “reform” the whole system from decade to decade.

23. (Might not be as profitable for Pearson, though!) 🤔

24. But that’s just the cost in money. The cost in children’s lives when a child is stuck for twelve years in an educational environment they simply can’t thrive in –– when a child fails, day after day after day, year after year after year — it’s unfathomable.

25. Because one size does not fit all. One size will never fit all. There is nothing that you can do on this earth that will work for everybody.

Because people are different, people will always be different, and it’s a good thing that they’re different.

26. When can we start looking at education this way?"

[Also here: https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/975766319600615424.html ]
carolblack  education  sfsh  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject  onesizefitsall  unschooling  deschooling  diversity  options  learning  children  howwelearn  howweteach  schools  schooling  edreform 
march 2018 by robertogreco
Jen Delos Reyes | Rethinking Arts Education | CreativeMornings/PDX
[video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXWB7A1_zWA ]

"On the complex terrain of arts education today and expanded ways of valuing knowledge.

What should an arts education look like today? Can education change the role of artists and designers in society? How does teaching change when it is done with compassion? How does one navigate and resist the often emotionally toxic world of academia? With the rising cost of education what can we do differently?

Bibliography:

Streetwork: The Exploding School by Anthony Fyson and Colin Ward

Teaching to Transgress by bell hooks

Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope by bell hooks

Education Automation: Comprehensive Learning for Emergent Humanity by Buckminster Fuller

Talking Schools by Colin Ward

Learning By Heart: Teachings to Free the Creative Spirit by Sister Corita Kent and Jan Steward

The Open Class Room by Herbert Kohl

Deschooling Society by Ivan Illich

Why Art Can’t Be Taught by James Elkins

Education and Experience by John Dewey

Freedom and Beyond by John Holt

Notes for An Art School edited by Manifesta 6

Black Mountain: An Exploration in Community by Martin Duberman

Teaching as a Subversive Activity by Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner

We Make the Road By Walking by Myles Horton and Paulo Friere

Education for Socially Engaged Art by Pablo Helguera

Rasberry: How to Start Your Own School and Make a Book by Sally Rasberry and Robert Greenway

This Book is About Schools edited by Satu Repo

Art School: (Propositions for the 21st Century) edited by Steven Henry Madoff"
via:nicolefenton  jendelosreyes  2014  art  arteducation  education  booklists  bibliographies  anthonyfyson  colinward  bellhooks  buckminsterfuller  sistercorita  coritakent  jansteward  herbertkohl  ivanillich  jameselkins  johndewey  johnholt  manifesta6  martinduberman  blackmountaincollege  bmc  unschooling  deschooling  informal  learning  howwelearn  diy  riotgirl  neilpostman  charlesweingartner  paulofriere  pablohelguera  sallyraspberry  robertgreenway  saturepo  stevenhenrymadoff  lcproject  openstudioproject  standardization  pedagogy  thichnhathahn  teaching  howweteach  mistakes  canon  critique  criticism  criticalthinking  everyday  quotidian  markets  economics  artschool  artschoolconfidential  danclowes  bfa  mfa  degrees  originality  avantgarde  frivolity  curriculum  power  dominance  understanding  relevance  irrelevance  kenlum  criticalcare  care  communitybuilding  ronscapp  artworld  sociallyendgagedart  society  design  context  carnegiemellon  social  respect  nilsnorman  socialpracticeart  cityasclassroom  student-centered  listening  love  markdion  competition  coll 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Wired 7.01: The Revenge of the Intuitive
"The trouble begins with a design philosophy that equates "more options" with "greater freedom." Designers struggle endlessly with a problem that is almost nonexistent for users: "How do we pack the maximum number of options into the minimum space and price?" In my experience, the instruments and tools that endure (because they are loved by their users) have limited options.

Software options proliferate extremely easily, too easily in fact, because too many options create tools that can't ever be used intuitively. Intuitive actions confine the detail work to a dedicated part of the brain, leaving the rest of one's mind free to respond with attention and sensitivity to the changing texture of the moment. With tools, we crave intimacy. This appetite for emotional resonance explains why users - when given a choice - prefer deep rapport over endless options. You can't have a relationship with a device whose limits are unknown to you, because without limits it keeps becoming something else.

Indeed familiarity breeds content. When you use familiar tools, you draw upon a long cultural conversation - a whole shared history of usage - as your backdrop, as the canvas to juxtapose your work. The deeper and more widely shared the conversation, the more subtle its inflections can be.

This is the revenge of traditional media. Even the "weaknesses" or the limits of these tools become part of the vocabulary of culture. I'm thinking of such stuff as Marshall guitar amps and black-and-white film - what was once thought most undesirable about these tools became their cherished trademark."

"Since so much of our experience is mediated in some way or another, we have deep sensitivities to the signatures of different media. Artists play with these sensitivities, digesting the new and shifting the old. In the end, the characteristic forms of a tool's or medium's distortion, of its weakness and limitations, become sources of emotional meaning and intimacy.

Although designers continue to dream of "transparency" - technologies that just do their job without making their presence felt - both creators and audiences actually like technologies with "personality." A personality is something with which you can have a relationship. Which is why people return to pencils, violins, and the same three guitar chords."
howwework  thetoolsweuse  intuition  intuitive  via:vruba  1999  familiarity  limitations  mediation  experience  toolmaking  features  featurecreep  options  freedom  seams  distortion  software  design  creativity  technology  culture  tools  constraints  tradition  art  intimacy  brianeno  music  seamlessness 
november 2012 by robertogreco
To Win Toddler Food Battles, Take A Softer Approach : NPR
""Young children are very, very good at regulating their intake so they are getting the proper amount of calories & fat and carbohydrates and protein for growth—as long as they're offered a healthy range of items,"…

…scientific research backs up the softer approach. In labs set up to look like preschools, kids who were offered a high-calorie first course, chose—on their own—a lower-calorie second course. & those offered a low calorie first course? They opted for a second course w/ higher calories.

In other words, they self-regulated. But Garber says this built-in appetite control can go haywire when parents interfere. In another experiment, kids were given a meal, followed by a snack free-for-all.

"And what they found was the kids who had mothers who were more restricted, when the mother wasn't present or wasn't putting restrictions on & the kid was exposed to snack foods, like cookies for example, that child ate significantly more cookies when the control was not applied"
parenting  food  pickyeaters  children  health  options  choice  tcsnmy  classideas  research  behavior  self-regulation  self-control 
february 2011 by robertogreco
The Strength of Weak Ties » Retrofit. A Twitter Rubric?
"Why do teachers have to own the tool?

If I’m a student, I now have a choice, but the wrong one. Use tool as I see fit for my needs, or succumb to wishes of teacher who wants me to use it as they have defined it, all in name of giving grade…

We all know what they’ll do.

But why not give them real choice? Maybe they’ll use Twitter, Facebook, index cards. Why limit choices? Why limit how they use a particular tool? Why be so prescriptive?

I’d rather think educators would give students a palette to choose from. You select how you want to represent your ideas, & you describe for me how well they worked, or didn’t. Describe for me your growth throughout learning experience, & role particular tool or tools of your choosing…There’s your assessment.

If you haven’t see the work of Cormier, Siemens, Downes & Kop in their PLENK2010 course…It’s a refreshing & innovative approach that emphasizes student choice & empowerment in how they choose to learn, & represent understanding."
rubrics  teaching  learning  assessment  connectivism  davidjakes  twitter  tcsnmy  choice  ownership  options  weakties 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Sheena Iyengar on the art of choosing | Video on TED.com
"Sheena Iyengar studies how we make choices -- and how we feel about the choices we make. At TEDGlobal, she talks about both trivial choices (Coke v. Pepsi) and profound ones, and shares her groundbreaking research that has uncovered some surprising attitudes about our decisions."
choices  choice  economics  culture  psychology  motivation  sheenaiyengar  via:carwaiseto  ted  social  preferences  research  self  success  independence  collaboration  interdependence  interdependency  tcsnmy  learning  options  identity 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Time magazine = traditional schools « Re-educate
"This is a revolution in our society, and education policymakers and legislators are either unaware or acting as if they hope it will go away. It’s not going to. The days of average schools for average kids—and pre-fab curricula passed down from above—will soon go the way of Time magazine. People will simply stop settling for an average education for their kids when they can choose from the rising number of options that are customized just for them."
stevemiranda  schools  education  future  changer  revolution  botiqueschools  scale  pscs  pugetsoundcommunityschool  tcsnmy  choice  customization  policy  us  society  differentiation  differentiatedlearning  options  charterschools 
june 2010 by robertogreco
How to deal with poverty in schools « Re-educate
"Perhaps that’s one way to define wealth: the ability to choose from many options. In this way, our schools are suffering from a poverty that is much more profound than just a lack of money. Our schools—teachers & students—are suffering from a staggering lack of options...a profound absence of the possibility of anything interesting happening."
pscs  pugetsoundcommunityschool  tcsnmy  small  transformation  lcproject  cv  schools  education  poverty  options  wealth  change  gamechanging  deschooling  optimism  stevemiranda  choices  teaching  scale 
june 2010 by robertogreco
The Referendum - Happy Days Blog - NYTimes.com
"The Referendum is a phenomenon typical of (but not limited to) midlife, whereby people, increasingly aware of the finiteness of their time in the world, the limitations placed on them by their choices so far & the narrowing options remaining to them, start judging their peers' differing choices w/ reactions ranging from envy to contempt. The Referendum can subtly poison formerly close & uncomplicated relationships, creating tensions between the married and the single, the childless & parents, careerists & the stay-at-home...The problem is, we only get one chance at this, with no do-overs. Life is, in effect, a non-repeatable experiment with no control. In his novel about marriage, “Light Years,” James Salter writes: “For whatever we do, even whatever we do not do prevents us from doing its opposite. Acts demolish their alternatives, that is the paradox."...One of the hardest things to look at in this life is the lives we didn’t lead, the path not taken, potential left unfulfilled."
happiness  life  psychology  culture  marriage  parenting  choices  relationships  via:kottke  regret  time  limitations  limits  options  children  perspective  choice  philosophy  aging  emotions  love  midlife  careers  families  health  referendum  envy  contempt  decisions  competitiveness  jealousy 
october 2009 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: Great Schools: 2. Environment and Choice
"always know a terrible school when I see classes which seem to be the same. Why, if you had 2 3rd grade classrooms, or 2 11th grade English courses, would these be, in any way, similar?...only reason...you have bought in completely to idea of education as industrial processing & idea of students as interchangeable raw material waiting to be stamped into pre-ordained form. If you have more than 1 of anything in a school, you should be creating choices...Would this child be better with this teacher? or that?...this reading approach...classroom environment...syllabus? Lincoln Park created those choices & helped students & parents make intelligent decisions...wildness of MultiAge room, 120 students & 5 teachers in an immense open space, fabulous for many, but surely not for all. So students could be in relatively traditional environments or in fully "open classroom" environments, w/ teachers who had also chosen their environments...quite amazing how well all these rooms seemed to run."
education  tcsnmy  learning  schools  progressive  choice  alternative  lcproject  schooling  options  unschooling  deschooling  schooldesign  lincolnpark  irasocol  conformity  industrial 
july 2009 by robertogreco
russell davies: the invention of everybody / here comes air
"So much of the debate about new media, deaths of media, blah blah blah, is about what's the new model going to be? If it's not A, then what's B? when of course, there probably won't be a single dominant model, there'll be tons of different ones. Old ones, new ones, all mixed together, often within the same organisation. At the moment our organisational options are limited: there's Government, The Corporation, The Charity and The Cooperative. And that's about it. The internet means that (as Mr Shirky says) Group Action Just Got Easier but as anyone who tries to start a new sort of organisation will tell you, the legal niceties haven't caught up with that yet."

[Same can be said about schools.]
russelldavies  stevenjohnson  clayshirky  choice  innovation  options  schools  media  education  communities  networks  ideas  business  books  internet  web2.0  groups 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Online NewsHour: Report | Ca. High School Teaches High Tech | April 17, 2008 | PBS
"There is not one solution for a community of 100,000 people. Ergo, there is not one solution for a state; ergo, there is not one solution for a country. No, we need a quiver. That is what massive customization is about. That is what the future is about, and that's what globalization is about. We need a quiver of differentiated options for people. That's what we need. And this is one of them, and there are others."
education  policy  choice  variety  schools  public  larryrosenstock  change  reform  options  learning  technology  hightechhigh  sandiego  charterschools 
august 2008 by robertogreco
KPBS > News > Local News - High Tech High Leader Heads to DNC
"Rosenstock: I'm a strong believer in moving away from monolithic solutions. I think we need places like High Tech High and we need places like other types of schools that are differentiated from the norm in terms of practices. And we don't see enough of those."
education  policy  choice  variety  schools  public  larryrosenstock  change  reform  options  learning  technology  hightechhigh  sandiego  charterschools 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Borderland » Blog Archive » The Devil is in the Details
"Sizer’s vision is of community-based approach to education in which wide variety of schools would present range of true options to families. In locked-down standardized system, those options can never be explored...& true choices will never be availabl
schools  education  learning  reform  change  policy  choice  alternative  options  lcproject  community  local  standardization  charterschools 
june 2008 by robertogreco
The Advantages of Closing a Few Doors - New York Times
"In series of experiments, 100s of students could not bear to let options vanish, even though it was obviously a dumb strategy...did not care so much about maintaining flexibility in future....but avoid immediate pain of watching a door close."
bias  economics  psychology  decisionmaking  choices  options 
february 2008 by robertogreco

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