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robertogreco : oratory   4

What Bill Clinton Wrote vs. What Bill Clinton Said - Politics - The Atlantic Wire
"Most experienced public speakers know how to deviate and alter and add flourishes to their prepared remarks on the fly, but few do it as well as Clinton. (Even if you disagree with what he's saying.) As you can see below, from a purely rhetorical standpoint nearly all of his changes enhanced the text in some way and brought added emphasis to arguments."

"Here is copy of the speech as it was written and provided to the media by the Democratic Party. Here's a transcript of what Clinton actually said, (as compiled by The New York Times.) Our version below is based off the written text with Clinton's insertions in italics and his deletions struck out. See what you think of his oratory skills."
oratory  publicspeaking  delivery  writing  improvisation  comparison  speechwriting  speeches  billclinton  dnc  2012 
september 2012 by robertogreco
35 Greatest Speeches in History | The Art of Manliness
"There was not currently a resource on the web to my liking that offered the man who wished to study the greatest orations of all time-from ancient to modern-not only a list of the speeches but a link to the text and a paragraph outlining the context in which the speech was given. So we decided to create one ourselves. The Art of Manliness thus proudly presents the “35 Greatest Speeches in World History,” the finest library of speeches available on the web.
via:cburell  education  politics  history  management  reference  leadership  literature  philosophy  ethics  speech  speeches  lectures  oratory  selfimprovement  speaking  rhetoric  tcsnmy 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Charlotte Higgins says one of the most interesting aspects of Barack Obama's speeches is the enormous debt they owe to the oratory of the Romans | World news | The Guardian
"Here's the thing: to understand the next four years of American politics, you are going to need to understand something of the politics of ancient Greece and Rome.
via:regine  barackobama  rhetoric  speech  oratory  elections  2008  ancientgreece  ancientrome  communication  cicero 
november 2008 by robertogreco
antonomasia: Definition from Answers.com
"a figure of speech that replaces a proper name with an epithet (the Bard for Shakespeare), official address (His Holiness for a pope), or other indirect description; or one that applies a famous proper name to a person alleged to share some quality associated with it, e.g. a Casanova, a little Hitler. Antonomasia is common in epic poetry: Homer frequently refers to Achilles as Pelides (i.e. son of Peleus)."
words  oratory  speech  names  naming 
november 2008 by robertogreco

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