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DAVID GRAEBER / The Revolt of the Caring Classes / 2018 - YouTube
"The financialisation of major economies since the '80s has radically changed the terms for social movements everywhere. How does one organise workplaces, for example, in societies where up to 40% of the workforce believe their jobs should not exist? David Graeber makes the case that, slowly but surely, a new form of class politics is emerging, based around recognising the centrality of meaningful 'caring labour' in creating social value. He identifies a slowly emerging rebellion of the caring classes which potentially represents just as much of a threat to financial capitalism as earlier forms of proletarian struggle did to industrial capitalism.

David Graeber is Professor of Anthropology, London School of Economics and previously Assistant Professor and Associate Professor of Anthropology at Yale and Reader in Social Anthropology at Goldsmiths, University of London. His books include The Utopia of Rules: On Technology, Stupidity, and the Secret Joys of Bureaucracy (2015) Debt: The First 5000 Years (2011) and Fragments of an Anarchist Anthropology (2004). His activism includes protests against the 3rd Summit of the Americas in Quebec City in 2001, and the 2002 World Economic Forum in New York City. Graeber was a leading figure in the Occupy Wall Street movement, and is sometimes credited with having coined the slogan, 'We are the 99 percent'.

This lecture was given at the Collège de France on the 22nd March 2018."
davidgraeber  care  caring  teaching  nursing  economics  capitalism  labor  work  employment  compensation  resentment  bullshitjobs  finance  politics  policy  us  uk  workingclass  intellectuals  intellectualism  society  manufacturing  management  jobs  liberalism  values  benefits  nobility  truth  beauty  charity  nonprofit  highered  highereducation  activism  humanrights  os  occupywallstreet  opportunity  revolution  revolt  hollywood  military  misery  productivity  creation  creativity  maintenance  gender  production  reproduction  socialsciences  proletariat  wagelabor  wage  salaries  religion  belief  discipline  maintstreamleft  hospitals  freedom  play  teachers  parenting  mothers  education  learning  unions  consumption  anarchism  spontaneity  universalbasicincome  nonprofits  ubi 
may 2018 by robertogreco
elementary blog — Switching from macOS: The Basics
"We’ve been getting a ton of traffic at elementary.io and hearing a lot of chatter from Apple users after the underwhelming MacBook Pro event last week—mainly that Apple has abandoned the “Pro” market for which so many of their products are named. With this week-ish-long series, I’d love to show you how elementary OS is great for both casual computer users and professional developers. Particularly those coming from or more familiar with macOS.
Today I’m kicking off with: The Basics."
mac  osx  linux  elementaryos  os 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Qubes OS Project
"What is Qubes OS?

Qubes OS is a security-oriented operating system (OS). The OS is the software that runs all the other programs on a computer. Some examples of popular OSes are Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Android, and iOS. Qubes is free and open-source software (FOSS). This means that everyone is free to use, copy, and change the software in any way. It also means that the source code is openly available so others can contribute to and audit it.

Why is OS security important?

Most people use an operating system like Windows or OS X on their desktop and laptop computers. These OSes are popular because they tend to be easy to use and usually come pre-installed on the computers people buy. However, they present problems when it comes to security. For example, you might open an innocent-looking email attachment or website, not realizing that you’re actually allowing malware (malicious software) to run on your computer. Depending on what kind of malware it is, it might do anything from showing you unwanted advertisements to logging your keystrokes to taking over your entire computer. This could jeopardize all the information stored on or accessed by this computer, such as health records, confidential communications, or thoughts written in a private journal. Malware can also interfere with the activities you perform with your computer. For example, if you use your computer to conduct financial transactions, the malware might allow its creator to make fraudulent transactions in your name.

Aren’t antivirus programs and firewalls enough?

Unfortunately, conventional security approaches like antivirus programs and (software and/or hardware) firewalls are no longer enough to keep out sophisticated attackers. For example, nowadays it’s common for malware creators to check to see if their malware is recognized by any popular antivirus programs. If it’s recognized, they scramble their code until it’s no longer recognizable by the antivirus programs, then send it out. The best antivirus programs will subsequently get updated once the antivirus programmers discover the new threat, but this usually occurs at least a few days after the new attacks start to appear in the wild. By then, it’s typically too late for those who have already been compromised. In addition, bugs are inevitably discovered in the common software we all use (such as our web browsers), and no antivirus program or firewall can prevent all of these bugs from being exploited.

How does Qubes OS provide security?

Qubes takes an approach called security by compartmentalization, which allows you to compartmentalize the various parts of your digital life into securely isolated compartments called qubes.

This approach allows you to keep the different things you do on your computer securely separated from each other in isolated qubes so that one qube getting compromised won’t affect the others. For example, you might have one qube for visiting untrusted websites and a different qube for doing online banking. This way, if your untrusted browsing qube gets compromised by a malware-laden website, your online banking activities won’t be at risk. Similarly, if you’re concerned about malicious email attachments, Qubes can make it so that every attachment gets opened in its own single-use disposable qube. In this way, Qubes allows you to do everything on the same physical computer without having to worry about a single successful cyberattack taking down your entire digital life in one fell swoop.

Moreover, all of these isolated qubes are integrated into a single, usable system. Programs are isolated in their own separate qubes, but all windows are displayed in a single, unified desktop environment with unforgeable colored window borders so that you can easily identify windows from different security levels. Common attack vectors like network cards and USB controllers are isolated in their own hardware qubes while their functionality is preserved through secure networking, firewalls, and USB device management. Integrated file and clipboard copy and paste operations make it easy to work across various qubes without compromising security. The innovative Template system separates software installation from software use, allowing qubes to share a root filesystem without sacrificing security (and saving disk space, to boot). Qubes even allows you to sanitize PDFs and images in a few clicks. Users concerned about privacy will appreciate the integration of Whonix with Qubes, which makes it easy to use Tor securely, while those concerned about physical hardware attacks will benefit from Anti Evil Maid.

How does Qubes OS compare to using a “live CD” OS?

Booting your computer from a live CD (or DVD) when you need to perform sensitive activities can certainly be more secure than simply using your main OS, but this method still preserves many of the risks of conventional OSes. For example, popular live OSes (such as Tails and other Linux distributions) are still monolithic in the sense that all software is still running in the same OS. This means, once again, that if your session is compromised, then all the data and activities performed within that same session are also potentially compromised.

How does Qubes OS compare to running VMs in a conventional OS?

Not all virtual machine software is equal when it comes to security. You may have used or heard of VMs in relation to software like VirtualBox or VMware Workstation. These are known as “Type 2” or “hosted” hypervisors. (The hypervisor is the software, firmware, or hardware that creates and runs virtual machines.) These programs are popular because they’re designed primarily to be easy to use and run under popular OSes like Windows (which is called the host OS, since it “hosts” the VMs). However, the fact that Type 2 hypervisors run under the host OS means that they’re really only as secure as the host OS itself. If the host OS is ever compromised, then any VMs it hosts are also effectively compromised.

By contrast, Qubes uses a “Type 1” or “bare metal” hypervisor called Xen. Instead of running inside an OS, Type 1 hypervisors run directly on the “bare metal” of the hardware. This means that an attacker must be capable of subverting the hypervisor itself in order to compromise the entire system, which is vastly more difficult.

Qubes makes it so that multiple VMs running under a Type 1 hypervisor can be securely used as an integrated OS. For example, it puts all of your application windows on the same desktop with special colored borders indicating the trust levels of their respective VMs. It also allows for things like secure copy/paste operations between VMs, securely copying and transferring files between VMs, and secure networking between VMs and the Internet."
qubesos  os  linux  privacy  security 
october 2016 by robertogreco
TempleOS - Wikipedia
"TempleOS (formerly SparrowOS or LoseThos in development) is a biblical themed lightweight operating system created over the span of a decade by programmer Terry A. Davis. The software is a x86-64 bit, multi-tasking, multi-cored, public domain, open source, ring-0-only, single address space, non-networked, PC operating system for recreational programming.[1] The operating system was designed to be the Third Temple according to Davis and uses an interface similar to a mixture of DOS and Turbo C. Davis describes the operating system as a modern x86_64 Commodore 64 with C in place of BASIC.

History

Davis was born December 1969 and has been diagnosed with schizophrenia since the mid-1990s.[weasel words] Development for TempleOS began in 2003 after Davis suffered from a series of manic episodes that left him briefly hospitalized for mental health issues.[2][3]

Davis is a former atheist who believes that he can "talk with God" and that God told him the operating system he built was God's official temple. According to Davis TempleOS is of 'Divine' intellect due to the inspired nature of the code. According to Davis, God said to create the operating system with 640x480, 16 colors display and a single audio voice. The operating system was coded in a programming language, developed by Davis in C/C++ called "HolyC". The OS runs a file system called "Red Sea".[4]"
operatingsystems  via:ablaze  sparrowos  templeos  os  bible  terrydavis  religion 
july 2016 by robertogreco
How to turn your sluggish old Mac or PC into a faster Chromebook | The Verge
"Earlier today we published a story about Neverware [http://www.theverge.com/2016/2/17/11030406/neverware-google-chromebook-chromium-os-education-microsoft ], a New York City startup that is helping schools refurbish old Windows PCs and Macs that had been abandoned as unusable, converting them into "Chromebooks" students can actually work on. Neverware charges schools a licensing fee for every machine it enables this way, but it also offers the software for free to individual users. And starting today, you can set up most computers to dual boot into their original operating system or Chrome, meaning you don't have to get rid of anything on your machine to give it a spin as a Chrome-capable laptop.

Now these aren't technically "Chromebooks" because that name is a trademark reserved for the laptops created by Google and its hardware partners. A Google representative suggested we call them Chrome laptops, or Chromium laptops. I'm partial to Chromiumbook myself. In any case, you'll find that the experience is mostly indistinguishable from Chrome, and that all the Google apps and services you expect work without a hitch.

I have been using a six-year-old Dell Latitude laptop running Neverware's CloudReady software for a few weeks. In Chrome it boots in under 30 seconds and runs fast enough for me to use it as my only computer at work. In Windows, well, not so much. As we noted in our feature, an irony of the cloud computing era is that a lot of older machines discarded as obsolete actually have far more horsepower, in terms of pure hardware, than the latest Chromebooks coming to market.

Older machines will probably still have problems Neverware can't fix — my Lenovo's battery, for example, leaves a lot to be desired — but if you have some spare hardware lying around that no longer works, Neverware's software is an interesting and easy way to try and resurrect it as a netbook that you can get some real value out of. The download is available here. [http://www.neverware.com/freedownload ]"

[See also: “Neverware turns your tired laptop into a speedy Chromebook”
http://www.engadget.com/2016/02/18/neverware-turns-your-tired-laptop-into-a-speedy-chromebook/ ]

[See also: http://www.neverware.com/ ]

[See also: "What's the dopest old laptop to install Chrome OS on?: Free your mind of time and space"
http://www.theverge.com/2016/2/19/11075148/the-dopest-old-laptop-to-install-chrome-os ]

[See also: "Wanna convert your old computer into a 'Chromebook'? Read this first"
http://www.computerworld.com/article/3036161/cloud-computing/cloudready-convert-old-computer-into-chromebook.html ]
neverware  2016  reuse  technology  onlinetoolkit  cloudready  chromebooks  os  operatingsystems 
february 2016 by robertogreco
I Live in a Digital Dumpster Fire | Motherboard
"Right now, I can't see what tabs I have open, because I have too many open. I have 167,998 unread Gmail messages. I am writing this, right now, on a TextEdit file called Untitled 199, and I have exactly 32 instances of the program open. My dock is a disaster, and, very recently, my desktop had thousands of files on it. Oddly enough, my trash bin is empty.

I exist, digitally, in the equivalent of a dumpster fire. I wouldn't have it any other way. Or rather, I don't think I can exist any other way. I thought I was alone. I am not.

It turns out there are plenty of digital hoarders out there, and maybe we don't give a shit about virtual cleanliness because it doesn't really matter anymore.

"I don't particularly think digital clutter is a bad thing. It's just a consequence of how people use computers, asynchronously," ​Matthew Hughes, a British tech journalist who lives much like me, told me. "We don't use computers in a systematic, one-task-at-a-time kind of way, do we? We're always doing multiple things at once, and digital clutter is just a consequence of that."

[embedded tweet with image: "this is my desktop"]

I've tweeted photos of my desktop before, and had a mix of reactions. Most people are horrified. Some people want me to throw my computer in the trash—nothing will save it now, it's ruined forever, they say. I get it. But when I went looking for people like me, I didn't have much trouble finding them.

​Adrian Sanabria, a security researcher, told me that he opens tabs until his computer crashes. While he doesn't think that digital clutter and tab overload is totally harmless ("I've come the realization that I have anxiety over losing something interesting that I want to read," he said), fast internet connections, Google images, and search apps are making it very easy to throw shit wherever we want without adversely affecting our lives.

[image: Matthew Hughes's desktop]

We're creating massive, disgusting haystacks of files, but finding the needle we want is effortless, so who cares?

"I use FoundApp, and it is FANTASTIC for finding things. It works like Mac OS X’s Finder, but you can have it log into Google Drive, Dropbox, Evernote—all your cloud stuff, and it will index and search those locations along with your local hard drive," Sanabria told me. "I have no idea what folder my files are in, and I don’t care."

Sanabria has also done away with his folder of memes and gifs that he used to have at the ready to deploy on Twitter at a moment's notice. Now, he finds them on Google much faster.

[image (animated GIF): "My desktop, pre-purge"]

There's the stereotype of the journalist, the professor, the academic, who has papers cluttered all over their office. I once walked past Bob Woodward's desk at the Washington Post, and he had mountains upon mountains of … stuff, everywhere. With a computer, you can be like that without showing other people.

One thing that surprised me about the people I talked to is they haven't always been like this (I have). Sanabria used to have inbox zero. So did Brian Fung, a great tech policy reporter with the Washington Post. And then, Twitter happened.

"I used to be an inbox zero kind of guy—leave no message unread, no RSS item unchecked, etc. But then with Twitter, I got used to just jumping into the feed for short stints. And then one day I woke up and realized, 'You know what? It's okay if you don't get through it all," he told me. "Since then, I've started treating my RSS feed like a slower version of Twitter. I ignore irrelevant emails. They pile up. It's fine. The desktop is much more manageable if you don't, you know, actually use the desktop."

[image "My dock"]

Fung "organizes" his desktop in reverse chronological order, and I do too. He says it turns the desktop into something like email—the most recent downloaded files show up at the top of any folder you're using to upload files with, and then it's easy.

We're not slobs, we're not overwhelmed, I don't even really think of myself as a hoarder. I eventually trash everything and forget about it. The thing that modern operating systems and modern search tools have done is make a whole host of systems viable. They work.

[image (animated GIF): "An inefficient way of deleting files"]

That said, I was wondering what life might be like if I cleaned up my act a bit. I purged my desktop. I set up a new folder for screenshots, which I used constantly, and I made my computer save them there automatically. I try to close my tabs when I can't see the icons anymore. I used a program called Sublime Text to write.

It's not for me. It's more effort than it's worth. Bury me with all my files; I'll know where to find them."
hoarding  digitalhoarding  search  os  technology  organization  digital  desktops  culture  spotlight  jasonkoebler  matthewhughes  adriansanabria  foundapp  clutter  finder  2015 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Why I’m Saying Goodbye to Apple, Google and Microsoft — Backchannel — Medium
"I’d periodically played with Linux and other alternatives on my PC over the years, but always found the exercise tedious and, in the end, unworkable. But I never stopped paying attention to what brilliant people like Richard Stallman and Cory Doctorow and others were saying, namely that we were leading, and being led, down a dangerous path. In a conversation with Cory one day, I asked him about his use of Linux as his main PC operating system. He said it was important to do what he believed in—and, by the way, it worked fine.

Could I do less, especially given that I’d been public in my worries about the trends?

So about three years ago, I installed the Ubuntu variant — among the most popular and well-supported — on a Lenovo ThinkPad laptop, and began using it as my main system. For a month or so, I was at sea, making keystroke errors and missing a few Mac applications on which I’d come to rely. But I found Linux software that worked at least well enough, and sometimes better than its Mac and Windows counterparts.

And one day I realized that my fingers and brain had fully adjusted to the new system. Now, when I used a Mac, I was a bit confused."



"As mobile computing has become more dominant, I’ve had to rethink everything on that platform, too. I still consider the iPhone the best combination of software and hardware any company has offered, but Apple’s control-freakery made it a nonstarter. I settled on Android, which was much more open and readily modified.

But Google’s power and influence worry me, too, even though I still trust it more than many other tech companies. Google’s own Android is excellent, but the company has made surveillance utterly integral to the use of its software. And app developers take disgusting liberties, collecting data by the petabyte and doing god-knows-what with it. (Security experts I trust say the iPhone is more secure by design than most Android devices.) How could I walk my talk in the mobile age?"



"So I keep looking for ways to further reduce my dependence on the central powers. One of my devices, an older tablet running Cyanogenmod, is a test bed for an even more Google-free existence.

It’s good enough for use at home, and getting better as I find more free software — most of it via the “F-Droid” download library — that handles what I need. I’ve even installed a version of Ubuntu’s new tablet OS, but it’s not ready, as the cliche goes, for prime time. Maybe the Firefox OS will be a player.

But I’ve given up the idea that free software and open hardware will become the norm for consumers anytime soon, if ever—even though free and open-source software is at the heart of the Internet’s back end.

If too few people are willing to try, though, the default will win. And the defaults are Apple, Google and Microsoft.

Our economic system is adapting to community-based solutions, slowly but surely. But let’s face it: we collectively seem to prefer convenience to control, at least for the moment. I’m convinced more and more people are learning about the drawbacks of the bargain we’ve made, wittingly or not, and someday we may collectively call it Faustian.

I keep hoping more hardware vendors will see the benefit of helping their customers free themselves of proprietary control. This is why I was so glad to see Dell, a company once joined at the hip with Microsoft, offer a Linux laptop. If the smaller players in the industry don’t themselves enjoy being pawns of software companies and mobile carriers, they have options, too. They can help us make better choices.

Meanwhile, I’ll keep encouraging as many people as possible to find ways to take control for themselves. Liberty takes some work, but it’s worth the effort. I hope you’ll consider embarking on this journey with me."
apple  google  microsoft  dangilmour  linux  opensource  2015  community  hardware  dell  cyanogenmod  ios  android  windows  mac  osx  f-droid  ubuntu  firefoxos  firefox  os  mozilla  lenovo  richardstallman  corydoctorow  libreoffice 
march 2015 by robertogreco
ubermix
"The ubermix is an all-free, specially built, Linux-based operating system designed from the ground up with the needs of education in mind. Built by educators with an eye towards student and teacher empowerment, ubermix takes all the complexity out of student devices by making them as reliable and easy-to-use as a cell phone, without sacrificing the power and capabilities of a full operating system. With a turn-key, 5 minute installation, 20 second quick recovery mechanism, and more than 60 free applications pre-installed, ubermix turns whatever hardware you have into a powerful device for learning."

[via: https://twitter.com/bengrey/status/567056041675096065 ]
linux  os  ubermix  education 
february 2015 by robertogreco
elementary OS
"Community Driven.
elementary has a single goal: to provide the best possible experience for our community. We're driven by a desire to be better, not by a paycheck. Contributors aren't profit-maximizers, they're purpose-maximizers.

Transparent and Open.
We believe in the power of open source and global collaboration. That means anyone can download, use, modify, and contribute to the code we've written to bring their ideas to life. The code is developed in the open, meaning it's available for review, scrutiny, and improvement by tens of thousands of developers all around the world. All before it hits your system.

Beautiful and Usable.
elementary is crafted by designers and developers who believe that computers can be easy, fun, and gorgeous. By putting design first, we ensure we're not compromising on quality or usability.

Modern Computing.
elementary OS is a free replacement for Windows on the PC and OS X on the Mac. It comes with what you'd expect, like a fast web browser and an app store with thousands of apps. Plus some things you may not expect, like free updates and no known viruses.

Speedy
Luna has been engineered from the ground up to be light on its toes. It starts up quickly, logs in instantly, and uses the bare minimum of resources so that your apps enjoy a speed boost as well. And with Luna, you get the same Linux foundation chosen for the world’s fastest supercomputers.

Full of Features
When you install elementary, you’re not just installing an operating system. You’re installing an excellent suite of custom tailored apps that let you get right to business. Easily surf the web, check your email, listen to music, and tackle everyday tasks or pleasures."

[via: https://twitter.com/davecormier/status/567052161247227904 ]
os  elementaryos  linux 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Jolicloud - Joli OS
"Joli OS is a free and easy way to turn any computer up to 10 years old into a cool new cloud device. Get on the Web and instantly connect to all your Web apps, files and services using the computer you already own. You may never need to buy a new computer again.<br />
<br />
It’s easy. Just download Joli OS. It installs in just 10 minutes."
software  free  opensource  freeware  os  jolicloud  joli  jolios  linux  cloud  web  netbooks 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Google Chrome OS and GooOS
"the browser is increasingly the sole point of interface for our interaction with computers. In a way, real operating systems are becoming irrelevant. Google's got it exactly right with Google Chrome OS: a browser sitting on top of a lightweight Unix layer that acts as the engine that the user doesn't need to know a whole lot about with the browser as the application layer. OS X might be the last important traditional desktop operating system, if only because it runs on desktops, laptops, the iPhone, and the inevitable Apple netbook/tablet thingie. But even OS X (and Windows and Google Chrome OS and Gnome and etc.) will lose marketshare to the WebOS...as long as users can run Firefox, Safari, or Chrome on whatever hardware they own, no one cares what flavor of Unix or tricked-out DOS that browser runs on."
kottke  technology  internet  google  os  gooos  googlechrome  googlechromeos  browsers  browser 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Sugar Labs—learning software for children
"The award-winning Sugar Learning Platform promotes collaborative learning through Sugar Activities that encourage critical thinking, the heart of a quality education. Designed from the ground up especially for children, Sugar offers an alternative to traditional “office-desktop” software. Sugar is the core component of a worldwide effort to provide every child with equal opportunity for a quality education. Available in 25 languages, Sugar’s Activities are used every school day by almost one-million children in more than forty countries.
sugralabs  sugar  olpc  os  linux  opensource  education  learning  children  software  interface  gui 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Sugar Labs—learning software for children
"Sugar provides a simple yet powerful means of engaging young children in the world of learning that is opened up by computers and the Internet. Sugar promotes sharing, collaborative learning, and reflection. Children develop skills that help them in all aspects of life.
sugar  sugarlabs  olpc  os  software  learning  constructivism  comics 
march 2009 by robertogreco
SqueakNOS
"We want to get rid of the operating system under Squeak. For this we know we will need to implement lots of low level things, we are not afraid, but we want to take a little different approach: Implement the bare minimum as native code (a mix of assembly and C), and then do everything else in Squeak. The people originally in the group only knew low level PC stuff, so we started with this, however there is already people participating that want to give Apple/PowerPC a try!"

[via: http://astares.blogspot.com/2008/08/squeaknos-boots-on-olpc.html ]
squeak  squeaknos  alankay  programming  virtualization  os 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: Time for Rambling OLPC Speculation
"goals of Sugar were too important to simply say "They're foolish to try."...still a chance it'll all work out, depending on how much time is left on the clock. I don't think they've done a bad job; they've just failed to pull off the nigh impossible."
olpc  sugar  os  development 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: More Idle Speculation on Something that Won't Happen: How Microsoft could p0wn OLPC
"It seems to me that Microsoft needs a greenfield OS project. They need to mothball XP, and all these cheap laptops that can't run Vista will just drag them down further."
olpc  windows  microsoft  os 
march 2008 by robertogreco
glee. by Kokoromi
"Glee. by Kokoromi is a one-player collection game that uses live musical input (from your line-in or MP3 player) to create the gameplay."
audio  games  processing  sound  music  input  gaming  play  geometry  windows  mac  os  x  Linux 
january 2008 by robertogreco
gOS - Home
"An alternative OS with for the masses."
os  alternative  google  googleapps  Linux  webos  web  software  opensource 
november 2007 by robertogreco
There is no Web Operating System (or WebOS) (by Jeremy Zawodny)
"I've been getting quite frustrated and annoyed by the writing I've read in various places about the idea of a WebOS, Google OS, Yahoo OS...There is no Web Operating System. There will be no Web Operating System."
culture  data  opensource  services  socialsoftware  webos  web  trends  smallpieceslooselyjoined  technology  internet  web2.0  platform  os  yahoo  google 
september 2007 by robertogreco

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