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robertogreco : outside   2

Get out now
“GET OUT NOW. Not just outside, but beyond the trap of the programmed electronic age so gently closing around so many people…. Go outside, move deliberately, then relax, slow down, look around. Do not jog. Do not run…. Instead pay attention to everything that abuts the rural road, the city street, the suburban boulevard. Walk. Stroll. Saunter. Ride a bike, and coast along a lot. Explore…. Abandon, even momentarily, the sleek modern technology that consumes so much time and money now…. Go outside and walk a bit, long enough to forget programming, long enough to take in and record new surroundings…. Flex the mind, a little at first, then a lot. Savor something special. Enjoy the best-kept secret around—the ordinary, everyday landscape that rewards any explorer, that touches any explorer with magic…all of it is free for the taking, for the taking in. Take it. take it in, take in more every weekend, every day, and quickly it becomes the theater that intrigues, relaxes, fascinates, seduces, and above all expands any mind focused on it. Outside lies utterly ordinary space open to any casual explorer willing to find the extraordinary. Outside lies unprogrammed awareness that at times becomes directed serendipity. Outside lies magic.”

—John Stilgoe, Outside Lies Magic
johnstilgoe  austinkleon  walking  noticing  looking  observing  seeing  exploration  landscape  attention  serendipity  outside  outdoors 
february 2017 by robertogreco
fieldnotes.in: A Fieldnote on Theory and Practice
"Thomas Steele-Maley @steelemaley:
@mosspike @mpowers3 @AshAusp @TheHeadKnuckle on that list—see Roberts (2012) Beyond Learning by Doing….and Stilgoe (2009) Outside Lies Magic

David Sebek @TheHeadKnuckle:
@steelemaley @mosspike @mpowers3 @AshAusp Stilgoe gets inconsistent feedback on Amazon, is it more theory or is it practical? #dtk12chat
5:47 AM - 16 Jul 2015

– It depends on the person, I suppose and our view of theorizing fields prior, amongst and after “practice”. Both Stilgoe and Roberts demand intellect from the reader, but are accessible in that they cause flights of imagination, aha moments, and connections. When we talk of teachers in the field, their experiences will have longer term benefit in terms of phenomenology and beyond, if they can grasp through narrative and theory their purpose of doing what we want them to do outside the school walls/in the field…. How many, will walk outside the school walls and do an experiential activity – love it and start to mutate the system of schooling they see for their kids– a few…. But more, may see the experience as a fun part of a training and grasp to connect and make pathways to learning anytime, anywhere – instead defaulting to the conventional (sometimes monolithic feeling) school structures and ideology. So yes, practical field guides to practice are nice at times and there *is* an elephant in every school which parlays the belief that teachers need guidebooks to follow…. To me, if teachers are outside more, seeing time differently, spending more time to drive their own learning and exploring – they are starting to see the unseen – one of the purposes of Stilgoe and Roberts work – and mine also. So whatever causes that to happen is better than it not happening. To turn catalyst moments to pathways of innovation in education though – we must theorize (research), design, prototype,experiment, retheorize…."
thomassteele-maley  johnstilgoe  jayroberts  theory  2015  education  practice  fieldguides  davidsebek  teaching  learning  outsideliesmagic  experience  experientiallearning  howwelearn  howweteach  outside  exploration  praxis 
july 2015 by robertogreco

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