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robertogreco : p2p   40

Local Area Network
"Inspired by grassroots independent publishing, we will collectively build an online publication within our local area network. We will each contribute a page to this publication, exploring what it might mean to reintroduce a sense of locality to our networks. These contributions might take the form of manifestos, essays, proposals, recipes, or personal corners of the net.

Special thanks to Michèle Champagne, Garry Ing, Greg J. Smith

Visit dat://local-area-network.hashbase.io/a-b-z-txt on Beaker.

Schedule

Thursday, August 23

• 10:30–11:00 — Mindy talks about Artist as Networker
• 11:30–12:00 — Jon talks about p2p and time

Friday, August 24

• 09:30–10:00 — Coffee
• 10:30–10:45 — Exercise 1: Browsing
• 10:45–11:00 — Exercise 2: Profiling
• 11:00–12:30 — Exercise 3: Speed Dialoguing
• 12:30–14:00 — Lunch
• 14:00–14:30 — Exercise 3 Recap: Network Circle
• 14:30–15:30 — Group Discussion
• 15:30–16:00 — Tutorial: Dat and Beaker
• 16:00–17:00 — Reading Discussion

Saturday, August 25

• 09:30–10:00 — Coffee
• 10:00–10:15 — Introduce prompt and examples of grassroots publishing
• 10:15–12:15 — Initial brainstorm
• 12:15–12:30 — Introduce statement: A _____ that _____.
• 12:30–14:30 — Lunch
• 14:30–14:45 — Tutorial: Beaker APIs
• 14:45–17:00 — Begin building personal webpages
• 17:00–18:00 — Table crits

Sunday, August 26

• 09:30–10:00 — Coffee
• 10:00–10:30 — Tutorial: CSS to Print
• 10:30–12:30 — Continue building personal webpages
• 12:30–13:30 — Lunch
• 13:30–15:30 — Continue building personal webpages
• 15:30–16:30 — Begin printing
• 16:30–18:00 — Final Presentations

Overview

Day 1

A series of micro-exercises that create a word bank about each participant. As a group, we will discuss the current state of online communities and speculate on the type of content and interactions we would like to see on new networks.

• Exercise 1: Browsing — A public reading of each participant's past 7 browser searches. Collect 7 keywords.
• Exercise 2: Profiling — List 7 keywords of yourself from the perspective of an algorithm.
• Exercise 3: Speed Dialoguing — A 3-minute conversation in pairs, after which a single keyword must be selected. Continue for 1.5 hours until every possible pair has been created.
• Exercise 3 Recap — One person picks a conversation, reads the respective keyword, and briefly describes how it was selected. The corresponding person selects another conversation, and the process repeats until every person has been selected.

◦ Seita - Rory — bone to bone
◦ Rory - Mike — co-sin
◦ Mike - Stephanie — Russian ketchup
◦ Stephanie - Matt — Craigslist Roommates
◦ Matt - Timur — house plant
◦ Timur - Cyrill — Fleur & Manu
◦ Cyrill - Cezar — Santa Claus
◦ Cezar - Davis — Park Slope
◦ Davis - Taulant — textiles
◦ Taulant - Kenton — the nine
◦ Kenton - Omar — Loblaws
◦ Omar - Derrick — The Wire
◦ Derrick - Sam P — mesh network
◦ Sam - Ysabel — Jane the Virgin
◦ Ysabel - Brian H — train commute
◦ Brian H - Sam G — Annie Albers
◦ Sam G - Josh — fern
◦ Josh - Julia — nomadic / travel
◦ Julia - John C — running
◦ John C - Brian S — bedtime
◦ Brian S - Allison Parrish — adjunct (at NYU)
◦ Allison P - Florence — mukbang
◦ Florence - Mubashir — self taught
◦ Mubashir - Javid — Mexican food
◦ Javid - Seita — Japan

[images]
Some notes from Cyrill, Sam P, Tau

Based on all of the harvested keywords, begin to speculate what the tenants of a new online community might be. What are the values? What are the goals? How do we want to be represented? Do we want it public? Do we want it private? Do we want to create something which reflects the individuals, the community, or both?

• Group Discussion
◦ Internet personas and self-representation
◦ Imperfect algorithms
◦ Passive/Active consumption
• Reading Discussion
*For excerpts and files, please visit dat://local-area-network.hashbase.io/a-b-z-txt/readings/ on Beaker.
◦ Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities
◦ Vannevar Bush, “As We May Think”
◦ A Pattern Language, “Mosaic of Subcultures”
◦ Ted Nelson, Computer Lib/Dream Machine
◦ Maarten Hajer & Arnold Reijndorp, In Search of a New Public Domain
◦ Kev Bewersdorf, “Reversing the Flow of Internet Expansion”
◦ Laurel Schwulst, “My website is a shifting house next to a river of knowledge. What could yours be?”

Day 2 and 3

Inspired by grassroots independent publishing, we will collectively build an online publication within our local area network. We will each contribute a page to this publication, exploring what it might mean to reintroduce a sense of locality to our networks. These contributions might take the form of manifestos, essays, proposals, recipes, or personal corners of the net.

• Some references
*For all references, please visit dat://local-area-network.hashbase.io/a-b-z-txt/references/ on Beaker.
◦ Whole Earth Catalog
◦ New Woman's Survival Guide
◦ Dome Books 1 & 2
◦ Autoprogettazione
◦ Computer Lib/Dream Machine
◦ Inflato Cookbook
◦ How to Build Your Own Living Structures
• Statement: A _____ that _____.
◦ A proposal for good gossip (Mike)
◦ A text that strengthens from collective readership (Brian H)
◦ An algorithm that gives you 9 friends (Cezar)
◦ A manifesto that overcrowds until reaching illegibility (Seita)
◦ A website that keeps you warm (Davis)
◦ A drawing scripture decoded for its disciples (Derrick)
◦ A local guide to hypnosis (Julia)
◦ A series of short stories with multiple outcomes (Javid)
◦ A manual to close down the street (John C)
◦ An example of a structured format that collects items for sharing (Kenton)
◦ A speculative source of value (Omar)
◦ An interface to fill the peer-to-peer web with procedurally-generated nonsense (Allison)
◦ A flag to rule (Cyrill)
◦ A tutorial for creating a dark aesthetic (Rory)
◦ A narrative that encourages people to unfollow others (Florence)
◦ A text that shows the value of collective, unified thought (Josh)
◦ A space to give more than I receive (Sam G)
◦ A reading experience for slow life (Matthew)
◦ A set of directions that takes you on a blind date (Stephanie)
◦ An acknowledgment of the context in which the internet operates and this space exists (Mubashir)
◦ A service that maps connected peers (Sam P)
◦ A dedicated day for tidying your network presence (Tau)
◦ An interface that promotes continuous real life interactions (Timur)
◦ A page that reconsiders “local area network” through neighbourhood civic infrastructures (Brian S)

Some Projects

[images]

View all projects on Beaker Browser at
dat://local-area-network.hashbase.io/a-b-z-txt .

[images]

Steph, A website for a blind date
dat://d4d4cf7526a7bea710f18eb9797c6cb3e3354d59041d711a2d630222eb144644/

[images]

Brian H, A text that strengthens from collective readership
dat://ffb9a22300a2c76a43c4e5b204b66d6f28edbda0fdad8cabd0d24ddaa79687f9/
Download A-B-Z-Times.ttf

[images]

Mubashir, An acknowledgment of the context in which the internet operates and this space exists
dat://837cf6bca44d16229dd6bc4681f52c82bae4f05f2c672f284efb632cfc83b932/

[images]

Sam P, A service that maps connected peers
dat://e5225908fe650662e6f709c579cb35cefdab2cabcc06d8ebd80c2a3bc351b9be/

[images]

Florence, A narrative that encourages people to unfollow others
dat://8bd0ba7d8dcdbc110fb89cd4528ad191ec4bb3a4e6d8a373fc2173d0b6c2aa98/

Documentation

[images]

Photos by Garry Ing"
mindyseu  jürglehni  jongacnik  p2p  p2pweb  beakerbrowser  dat  christopheralexander  apatternlanguage  janejacobs  vannevarbush  tednelson  maartenhajer  arnoldreijndorp  kevbewersdorf  laurelschwulst  2018  local  grassroots  publishing  p2ppublishing  web  webdev  webdesign  garrying  michèkechampagne  gregsmith  wholeearthcatalog  manifestos  survivalguide 
17 days ago by robertogreco
Laurel Schwulst, "Blogging in Motion" - YouTube
"This video was originally published as part of peer-to-peer-web.com's NYC lecture series on Saturday, May 26, 2018 at the at the School for Poetic Computation.

It has been posted here for ease of access.

You can find many other great talks on the site:
https://peer-to-peer-web.com

And specifically more from the NYC series:
https://peer-to-peer-web.com/nyc "

[See also:
https://www.are.na/laurel-schwulst/blogging-in-motion ]
laurelschwulst  2019  decentralization  p2p  web  webdesign  blogging  movement  travel  listening  attention  self-reflection  howwewrite  writing  walking  nyc  beakerbrowser  creativity  pokemon  pokemonmoon  online  offline  internet  decentralizedweb  dat  p2ppublishing  p2pweb  distributed  webdev  stillness  infooverload  ubiquitous  computing  internetofthings  casygollan  calm  calmtechnology  zoominginandout  electricity  technology  copying  slow  small  johnseelybrown  markweiser  xeroxparc  sharing  oulipo  constraints  reflection  play  ritual  artleisure  leisurearts  leisure  blogs  trains  kylemock  correspondence  caseygollan  apatternlanguage  intimacy 
18 days ago by robertogreco
Scratching the Surface — 102. Laurel Schwulst
"Laurel Schwulst is a designer, writer, teacher, and webmaster. She runs an independent design practice in New York City and teaches in design programs at Yale and Rutgers. She previously was the creative director for The Creative Independent and a web designer at Linked By Air. In this episode, Laurel and Jarrett talk about how horses got her into graphic design, what websites can be, the potential of the peer-to-peer internet, and how writing and teaching influence her practice."

[Direct link to audio: https://soundcloud.com/scratchingthesurfacefm/102-laurel-schwulst ]
jarrettfuller  scratchingthesurface  laurelschulst  2018  interviews  design  web  online  internet  are.na  lynhejinian  mindyseu  decentralization  neilpostman  charlesweingartner  juliacameron  teachingasasubversiveactivity  teaching  education  learning  howwelearn  kameelahjananrasheed  research  archiving  cv  roombaghost  graphicdesign  websites  webdev  webdesign  p2p  beakerbrowser  decentralizedweb  dat  p2ppublishing  p2pweb  distributed 
january 2019 by robertogreco
The Radical Tactics of the Offline Library on Vimeo
[parts of the video (from the introduction): "1. Libraries existed to copy data. Libraries as warehouses was a recent idea and not a very good one 2. The online world used to be considered rhizomatic but recent events have proven that it is actually quite arboretic and precarious. 3. A method of sharing files using hard drives is slow, but it is extremely resilient. This reversalism is a radical tactic agains draconian proprietarianism. 4. There are forces and trends that are working against portable libraries."]

[Book is here:
http://networkcultures.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NN07_complete.pdf
http://networkcultures.org/blog/publication/no-07-radical-tactics-of-the-offline-library-henry-warwick/ ]

"The Radical Tactics of the Offline Library is based on the book "Radical Tactics: Reversalism and Personal Portable Libraries"
By Henry Warwick

The Personal Portable Library in its most simple form is a hard drive or USB stick containing a large collection of e-books, curated and archived by an individual user. The flourishing of the offline digital library is a response to the fact that truly private sharing of knowledge in the online realm is increasingly made impossible. While P2P sharing sites and online libraries with downloadable e-books are precarious, people are naturally led to an atavistic and reversalist workaround. The radical tactics of the offline: abandoning the online for more secure offline transfer. Taking inspiration from ancient libraries as copying centers and Sneakernet, Henry Warwick describes the future of the library as digital and offline. Radical Tactics: Reversalism and Personal Portable Libraries traces the history of the library and the importance of the Personal Portable Library in sharing knowledge and resisting proprietarian forces.

The library in Alexandria contained about 500,000 scrolls; the Library of Congress, the largest library in the history of civilization, contains about 35 million books. A digital version of it would fit on a 24 TB drive, which can be purchased for about $2000. Obviously, most people don’t need 35 million books. A small local library of 10,000 books could fit on a 64 GB thumb drive the size of a pack of chewing gum and costing perhaps $40. An astounding fact with immense implications. It is trivially simple to start collecting e-books, marshalling them into libraries on hard drives, and then to share the results. And it is much less trivially important. Sharing is caring. Societies where people share, especially ideas, are societies that will naturally flourish."
libraries  henrywarwick  archives  collection  digital  digitalmedia  ebooks  drm  documentary  librarians  alexandriaproject  copying  rhizomes  internet  online  sharing  files  p2p  proprietarianism  sneakernet  history  harddrives  learning  unschooling  property  deschooling  resistance  mesopotamia  egypt  alexandria  copies  decay  resilience  cv  projectideas  libraryofalexandria  books  scrolls  tablets  radicalism  literacy  printing  moveabletype  china  europe  publishing  2014  copyright  capitalism  canon  librarydevelopment  walterbenjamin  portability  andrewtanenbaum  portable  portablelibraries  félixguattari  cloudcomputing  politics  deleuze  deleuze&guattari  web  offline  riaa  greed  openstudioproject  lcproject 
november 2018 by robertogreco
enoki
"An experimental platform tool for peer-to-peer publishing

Free
Culture wants to be free. No monthly hosting fees or billing to keep up with.

Decentralized
Instead of being confined to a centralized platform, publish directly with Dat.

Offline first
No internet? No problem. Sync changes automatically when reconnecting.

Own your content
This is a tool! Your content stays with you, not a greedy platform.

Archival
Easily go back in time and revert to previous versions of your site whenever!

Open source
Built with open source projects; released as an open source project."
enoki  p2p  publishing  web  online  internet  webdev  webdesign  cms  free  opensource  archives  archival  offline  decentralization  beakerbrowser  dat  p2ppublishing  decentralizedweb  p2pweb  distributed 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Peer-to-Peer Web
"As incumbent tech platforms face growing scrutiny over their global influence, it is clear that we must envision decentralized, user-owned alternatives to counter the status quo. But how do we build those alternatives? What do their implementations look like, and how do we address their technical and ethical challenges in the face of increasing user adoption?

Peer-to-Peer Web is for those new to the decentralized web, who are curious in exploring the possibilities that lie beyond a centralized internet controlled by platform monopolies. Through a series of presentations and workshops, we examine the social, political, ethical and economic potentials and challenges of the peer-to-peer movement.

Built and published with Enoki
yo@peer-to-peer-web.com "



"It would be inaccurate to say Peer-to-Peer Web is winding down, it’s just time for new things. A year has passed since we began hosting a series of relaxed and informative hangouts for anyone interested in the evolving web.

We leave behind an archive containing hours of talks given by participants at hangouts in Los Angeles, New York City, and Berlin. They range in topic, but have in common a hopeful speculation of possible futures, online, offline, and that liminal space inbetween.

Of course, without the community that grew around these afternoons the last year wouldn’t have been as meaningful; thank you to the hundreds of participants across every city, not only for attending, but for actively contributing towards the ongoing discourse of the distributed web.

This leaves us with the question: what’s next?

Jon-Kyle (Los Angeles) will be active at Whyspace, a non-place for questioning. In this time of solutionism, when there is a technological answer for everything, remember to ask questions. The first event will be at MozFest in London on October 24th.

Louis from (Berlin) has announced a new project at broadcast.sh called “db, a user-owned peer-to-peer broadcasting platform”. Through a growing library of radio shows, DJ sets, interviews, lectures and recorded panels, db shapes itself as an experiment into the independent funding of creative communities and their work using p2p infrastructure.

You can read further about the project at broadcast.sh, and subscribe to the platform’s newsletter for ongoing updates at TinyLetter."
p2p  beakerbrowser  dat  networks  losangeles  nyc  berlin  jon-kylem  web  online  internet  inbetween  liminality  p2ppublishing  decentralizedweb  p2pweb  distributed 
october 2018 by robertogreco
The Creative Independent: On exploring how to be online in radical ways [interview with Tara Vancil, co-creator of Beaker Browser]
"Web developer Tara Vancil discusses the peer-to-peer web, the current state of self-publishing, and the future of the internet."


"[Q] I love that Beaker has a built-in editor. There’s this all-in-one feel to it where you can browse and publish websites from the browser. I was curious what self-publishing means for you and why it’s important?

[A] Well, there’s this myth floating around on the web that the very first web browser, it was called WorldWideWeb, made by Tim Berners-Lee actually had an editor built into it. Now, I’ve never been able to 100% confirm this with him, or anybody, but there’s kind of just the shared history that goes around on the web, so I’m willing to believe it. When I found that out, it was really interesting because we had been building the early prototype of Beaker and it was quite different from what it is now. It did have a button that let you create a website from the browser, so self-publishing was a part of Beaker very early on. But we didn’t fully understand how important facilitating self-publishing would be. It was fairly recently that we decided to put in an editor. We thought it would be too much work to maintain, we thought people wouldn’t care, we thought they’d prefer to use their own editors. And then one day, we just realized like, “You know what? No, a browser really should help people participate in the web.”

So self-publishing, for me, is not necessarily about owning your content. It’s not all about enabling creativity. There are other tools that enable creativity. I think it’s about creating opportunities for the widest swath of people to participate on the web. I think right now, there are so many barriers that can pop up at any given moment when you decide, “I want to make an app, I want to make a game, I want to publish my portfolio, or I want to create an interactive art piece.” With Beaker, self-publishing is about reducing as many of those barriers as possible, so that literally everybody can have some hope of meaningfully participating on the web. Because why not? That’s what the web is. It’s this really strange thing.

I like to call the web humanity’s shared language. We’ve all come together, by some miracle, as a society to define a set of rules and technical standards about how we will communicate, how our computers will communicate with each other, and people all over the world use this. I mean, that’s pretty miraculous that we’ve managed to do that. So why shouldn’t everybody be able to build stuff on it, and share things on it? It seems really sad that right now that’s not the case, and I think it’s also boring.

[Q] There seems to be a general feeling that HTTP doesn’t provide a productive space any longer. Recently there’s been a lot of interest in going offline or just slowing down. I wanted to get your thoughts on the offline first movement and if you align yourself with it?

[A] Offline first is a funny concept to me because it’s rooted in both very corporate ideology and very anti-corporate ideology. So there’s one meaning for offline first, I think it was coined by Google, and this was a way for building applications such that low-power devices in places that have really bad connectivity could cache an application’s or website’s assets so that it can still function well. I think this is an honorable effort to build applications with the expectation that we don’t live in an equitable world, but we have to remember that a corporation like Google is motivated to do that because they want to sell more devices, and they want to further the reach of Gmail and their other tools.

And then there’s the other side of the movement, where offline first means something very different to another group of people. If you’ve heard of Secure Scuttlebutt, it’s a peer-to-peer online friends space. It’s a place for people to post content and share things with their friends without having to connect through something like Twitter or Facebook. And a lot of the folks that participated there in the early days were really interested in finding ways to live a little more independently, to maybe not depend entirely on the electrical grid, or to be able to live on a boat, or to maintain their own garden. I think that reflects an interest in slowing down, and a reaction to the speed of consumption that the web of today demands of us.

So at the end of the day, I think offline first—by both definitions—is rooted in the observation that we don’t live in an equitable world, and modern applications do not serve everybody. They don’t serve every kind of lifestyle. I’m definitely interested in living in a home with electricity and modern amenities but I’m also really interested in doing that responsibly, and I care a lot about my own sanity and other people being able to maintain their sanity in this hyper-connected world. I think a lot of us are perhaps exploring how we do that for the long-term. So I like being online and I want to continue being online, but I think looking to these communities that are exploring how to be online in radical ways, is really important.

[Q] Beaker is a good example of that. In my own exploration of the peer-to-peer web, I’ve needed to either be sent a link directly from somebody, or be in connection with the HTTP web to find websites on the p2p web. I’m curious what the longer-term goals are? Is it sort of like in tandem with the current web, or is the goal to replace HTTP with peer-to-peer protocols?

[A] Yeah, there’s an interesting effect on the peer-to-peer web where you kind of have to bootstrap your experience somehow. You either have to have a chat open with a friend so that you can send links between each other, or you need to have a curated list of websites and projects that you want to visit. And interestingly, I think that’s a problem that the HTTP web suffers from as well. It’s an aggregation problem. If you think back to the early days of the HTTP web, someone—or some company—had to go out there and crawl the web, and collect the links that they found, and then publish them somewhere. That’s just a fact of how networks work. It’s hard to aggregate content independently.

So I think what that means is that if the peer-to-peer web is going to become a part of the web as we know it, then so are search engines and aggregators. And maybe those search engines will use HTTP just because it’s easier for that purpose. Maybe not. I’m not sure that we need to replace HTTP entirely to fix what’s wrong with the web. I think we need to replace HTTP in cases where it encourages centralization of governance over our communities, and it discourages innovation and the ownership of our online experiences. That’s why I think it’s so important that people are able to publish their own websites, for example, because a website can be anything. It can be the place where you post your micro-blogs, like your tweets. It can be a place where you post blog posts, which is pretty obvious. It could be a place where you post photos or art projects, and I feel that the HTTP web makes it so difficult to do that right now. As a result, we’re cornered into the situation where we have to publish on Twitter, and Facebook, and Instagram. And that’s fine, those are pretty cool platforms, but they also constrain us, and I think we’re starting to understand the limits and the consequences of that.

[Q] It might be a positive thing that you can’t search the peer-to-peer web currently, in that it has to be such a personal connection where my friend will send me a link to a website. HTTP is a constant process of following links to other links. On the p2p web it’s more about accessing a page and then reading it to the end, and then maybe going offline after that.

[A] Yeah, there’s a certain finiteness to it, which is blissful at times. I’m not sure it’ll stay that way forever. There’s a lesson to be learned about how it feels to use the peer-to-peer web. I’ve found websites where I couldn’t believe I found them. It felt like I’d just stumbled upon a treasure. Like, “Wow, this person is out there and they’ve made this thing. I want to read everything they’ve posted,” and then that’s the end of it. It’s a really satisfying experience.

[Q] It also feels like you have to forget what you thought the web was when you’re approaching the p2p web. I find it pretty difficult to describe what the peer-to-peer web is, and I think maybe that’s not just me. It’s broad, it’s many different things, it’s multi-layered.

What does your ideal web look like?

[A] I want a web that I can build on. I love building on the web so much. To me, websites are my canvas. I grew up in a family that I think looked down on anything that smelled of creativity. I grew up hunting, watching football, and playing sports. There’s no creative exploration in that. I became exposed to the creative process fairly late in my life, and the canvas for me is websites. I love the feeling that I get when I sit down with a blank slate, and I know how to use the tools, I know how to wield HTML and CSS and bend it to my will. I want a web that is conducive to that, and I don’t want to just build standalone websites. I would love to build things that are meaningful to people, that have users, and then I want those users to be able to take what I’ve made and be able to shape it into something new.

On the web today, I feel like I can build something amazing, and I can go out and find people who want to use what I’ve built. But it’s a very rigid process. To build something, I first of all probably have to find investment because launching a service on the web, launching an app that’s actually going to get wide usage, is really, really expensive. So I think I want a web that makes that process cheaper, and distributes the cost of bandwidth and storage across its users. And then beyond that, I want a web that doesn’t try to lock down the experience of … [more]
beakerbrowser  taravancil  2018  publishing  self-publishing  online  internet  time  longevity  ephemeral  ephemerality  collaboration  technology  design  decentralization  radicalism  web  webdev  webdesign  seeding  p2p  peertopeer  http  dat  decentralizedweb  independence  hashbase  p2ppublishing  p2pweb  selfpublishing  distributed 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Dat Project - Welcome!
"A distributed data community
Dat is a nonprofit-backed data sharing protocol for applications of the future."
distributed  p2p  sharing  data  collaboration  beaker  hashbase  dat  beakerbrowser  webdev  webdesign  p2ppublishing  decentralizedweb  p2pweb 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Beaker | An experimental P2P browser
"Beaker is a Peer-to-Peer Web Browser, made for users to run applications independently of hosts. Using P2P Hypermedia, Beaker separates frontend apps from backend services, so that users are completely in control of their software and data.

[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bem9nRpyPEs ]

"Beaker is a Peer-to-Peer Web Browser which lets users build socially and publish independently. Using P2P web-hosting, Beaker separates the frontend app from backend servers, so that users are completely in control of their applications.

At a high level, Beaker introduces concepts from BitTorrent into the Web. Anybody can publish a site immediately, independently, and for free, using only their browser.

Sites can contain files, data, media, and fully-featured applications. Using them, users can publish content without ceding control of the content to either an app or service. There is no walled garden. The keys that control each site remain in the user’s browser.

Public Peer services provide optional cloud hosting, so users don’t have to keep their devices online to self-host. These services provide the uptime of a traditional host, but with no lockin; a user can migrate from one service to another without any disruption.

With forking, you can modify any site, and deploy it instantly. Users can rebuild applications to work exactly how they like. Our mission is to put the tools of creation back into the users’ hands. It will be weird, chaotic, and creative – just like the Web should be!

Beaker was forked from Chrome. It is free and open-source."

[Update: mentioned here https://www.are.na/blog/scene%20report/2018/08/13/decentralized-web-summit.html ]
browsers  peertopeer  p2p  software  mac  osx  applications  internet  web  online  chrome  opensource  webdev  webdesign  beaker  hashbase  dat  beakerbrowser  p2ppublishing  decentralizedweb  p2pweb  distributed 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Designing a space for self-directed learners — The experimental year — Medium
"Imagining the space
Without being too prescriptive yet about how it will converge or evolve, these are some abstract ideas:

Unstructured and non-linear
Most traditional learning journeys are structured in a very specific, deliberate manner, often designed to progress in terms of complexity. Self-directed learners may want to learn according to what provokes our curiosity instead, and that may mean starting from the middle and proceeding to pick out material in order of interest instead of what is being defined by a typical structure.

Design and curate our own learning experience
Related to the point above, we want to be able to decide how we want to learn, what is important to learn, how much we want to learn.

Tap into the collective wisdom
We want to learn widely and deeply, and that involves trying to access as much information as possible, from the widest variety of sources as possible. Somebody unexpected may suggest obscure that may never make it into a mainstream course but it may be a collective deep-learning experience for a few like-minded people.

Anyone can learn as a peer
The most ideal scenario will be a five year old learning astro-physics with a seventy-eight year old, with an astro-physicist providing feedback as they go along. Is that absurd? But why not?

Include the best learning sources: people and places
Apart from theory, people and places are the greatest sources of information. Imagine learning art history and being able to communicate with art historians, or get suggestions from the learning network where to visit in order to have an experiential learning experience.

Display connections and context
The fascinating thing about learning is that each learning node is connected possibly infinitely to others. An example:
…history-art-philosophy-politics-economics-sociology-psychology-neurology…

So, how can we visualize this network of relationships?

Allow for divergence or depth anytime
At any given point in the learning experience, we can diverge into a related subject or go deeper into the existing subject, with visible signposts to what is possible next.

Magical sorting
Any extensive network comes with a great amount of noise. Being able to find what we need with any given context from the widest sources possible is a huge challenge. I have not thought this through yet, but I imagine this to be a weightage compromising of relevancy, peer ratings (users of the same network), social-network relationships (people we know) coupled with other less obvious engagement metrics."

[later: https://medium.com/the-experimental-year/designing-a-self-directed-learning-network-work-in-progress-v0-1-ad6ba3b883b0#.x9prh7tp5

"Some basics I wanted to design around:

1. Mobile first. Anybody in the world can participate and learn on the go, especially emerging markets — people with low cost mobile phones but not the more expensive desktops.

2. It is a network of learning paths, each path is represented by a stack of cards. Each card would represent a node and they can be rearranged in any manner. Anybody can create or fork one.

3. The cards will be links to external content — there is great content out there, just not easily discoverable or strung together in a cohesive manner, or people may have specific learning preferences (disliking videos, for example).

4. The network is designed for the diversity of learning. It will be weighted according to the learner’s preferences — social trust or metrics, but the goal is not to reach consensus (like wikipedia). There should not be one top quality path on Philosophy for example, but a diversity of them, and ideally a way to visualize or track their divergences. There should not be one way to learn most things.



New constraints were set

1. It has to be a web app.

2. Tap only, no gestures.

3. To not rely on the browser tab bar for backwards navigation.

4. No complicated animations to load any interactions or screens.

5. Render information as quickly as possible, with the lowest bandwidth/processing costs as possible. (no zooms, I guess :~\)

6. Try to keep it simple stupid.

With these, I was free from thinking about the interaction patterns, and it brought me clarity on the areas I should focus on."]
winnielim  education  self-directedlearning  self-directed  linear  non-linear  learning  diversity  networks  webapps  web  online  internet  p2p  unstructured  unschooling  deschooling  peertopeer  lcproject  openstudioproject  linearity  nonlinear  alinear 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Sneakernet - Wikipedia
"Sneakernet is an informal term describing the transfer of electronic information, especially computer files, by physically moving removable media such as magnetic tape, floppy disks, compact discs, USB flash drives (thumb drives, USB stick) or external hard drives from one computer to another, usually in lieu of transmitting the information over a computer network. The term, a tongue-in-cheek play on Ethernet,[citation needed] refers to the use of someone wearing sneakers as the transport mechanism for the data."
p2p  peer2peer  filesharing  sneakernets  networks  hardware  usbdrives  sneakernet 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Mapping the Sneakernet – The New Inquiry
"Digital media travels hand to hand, phone to phone across vast cartographies invisible to Big Data"



"Indeed, the song was just one of many media files I saw on people’s phones: There were Chinese kung fu movies, Nigerian comedies, and Ugandan pop music. They were physically transferred, phone to phone, Bluetooth to Bluetooth, USB stick to USB stick, over hundreds of miles by an informal sneakernet of entertainment media downloaded from the Internet or burned from DVDs, bringing media that’s popular in video halls—basically, small theaters for watching DVDs—to their own villages and huts.

In geographic distribution charts of Carly Rae Jepsen’s virality, you’d be hard pressed to find impressions from this part of the world. Nor is this sneakernet practice unique to the region. On the other end of continent, in Mali, music researcher Christopher Kirkley has documented a music trade using Bluetooth transfers that is similar to what I saw in northern Uganda. These forms of data transfer and access, though quite common, are invisible to traditional measures of connectivity and Big Data research methods. Like millions around the world with direct internet connections, young people in “unconnected” regions are participating in the great viral products of the Internet, consuming mass media files and generating and transferring their own media.

Indeed, the practice of sneakernets is global, with political consequences in countries that try to curtail Internet access. In China, I saw many activists trading media files via USB sticks to avoid stringent censorship and surveillance. As Cuba opens its borders to the world, some might be surprised that citizens have long been able to watch the latest hits from United States, as this Guardian article notes. Sneakernets also apparently extend into North Korea, where strict government policy means only a small elite have access to any sort of connectivity. According to news reports, Chinese bootleggers and South Korean democracy activists regularly smuggle media on USB sticks and DVDs across the border, which may be contributing to increasing defections, as North Korean citizens come to see how the outside world lives.

Blum imagines the Internet as a series of rivers of data crisscrossing the globe. I find it a lovely visual image whose metaphor should be extended further. Like water, the Internet is vast, familiar and seemingly ubiquitous but with extremes of unequal access. Some people have clean, unfettered and flowing data from invisible but reliable sources. Many more experience polluted and flaky sources, and they have to combine patience and filters to get the right set of data they need. Others must hike dozens of miles of paved and dirt roads to access the Internet like water from a well, ferrying it back in fits and spurts when the opportunity arises. And yet more get trickles of data here and there from friends and family, in the form of printouts, a song played on a phone’s speaker, an interesting status update from Facebook relayed orally, a radio station that features stories from the Internet.

Like water from a river, data from the Internet can be scooped up and irrigated and splashed around in novel ways. Whether it’s north of the Nile in Uganda or south of Market St. in the Bay Area, policies and strategies for connecting the “unconnected” should take into account the vast spectrum of ways that people find and access data. Packets of information can be distributed via SMS and mobile 3G but also pieces of paper, USB sticks and Bluetooth. Solar-powered computer kiosks in rural areas can have simple capabilities for connecting to mobile phones’ SD cards for upload and download. Technology training courses can start with a more nuanced base level of understanding, rather than assuming zero knowledge of the basics of computing and network transfer. These are broad strokes, of course; the specifics of motivation and methods are complex and need to be studied carefully in any given instance. But the very channels that ferry entertainment media can also ferry health care information, educational material and anything else in compact enough form.

There are many maps for the world’s internet tubes and the electric wires that power them, but, like any map, they reflect an inherent bias, in this case toward a single user, binary view of connectivity. This view in turn limits our understanding of just how broad an impact the Internet has had on the world, with social, political and cultural implications that have yet to be fully explored. One critical addition to understanding the internet’s global impact is mapping the many sneakernets that crisscross the “unconnected” parts of the world. The next billion, we might find, are already navigating new cities with Google Maps, trading Korean soaps and Nigerian comedies, and rocking out to the latest hits from Carly Rae Jepsen."
access  africa  internet  online  connectivity  2015  anxiaomina  bigdata  digital  maps  mapping  cartography  bias  sneakernets  p2p  peer2peer  uganda  music  data  bluetooth  mobile  phones  technology  computing  networks  northkorea  christopherkirkley  sms  communication  usb  andrewblum  sneakernet 
march 2015 by robertogreco
FutureEverything 2015: Alexis Lloyd & Matt Boggie on Vimeo
"From New York Times R&D Labs, Alexis Lloyd and Matt Boggie talk about our possible media futures, following the early days of the web - where growth was propelled forward by those making their own spaces online - to the present, where social platforms are starting to close down, tightening the possibilities whilst our dependency on them is increasing. Explaining how internet users are in fact participatory creators, not just consumers, Alexis and Matt ask where playing with news media can allow for a new means of expression and commentary by audiences."
public  media  internet  web  online  walledgardens  participation  participatory  2015  facebook  snapchat  open  openness  alexisloyd  mattboggie  publishing  blogs  blogging  history  audience  creativity  content  expression  socialnetworks  sociamedia  onlinemedia  appropriation  remixing  critique  connection  consumption  creation  sharing  participatoryculture  collage  engagement  tv  television  film  art  games  gaming  videogames  twitch  performance  social  discussion  conversation  meaningmaking  vine  twitter  commentary  news  commenting  reuse  community  culturecreation  latoyapeterson  communication  nytimes  agneschang  netowrkedculture  nytimesr&dlabs  bots  quips  nytlabs  compendium  storytelling  decentralization  meshnetworking  peertopeer  ows  occupywallstreet  firechat  censorship  tor  bittorrent  security  neutrality  privacy  iot  internetofthings  surveillance  networkedcitizenship  localnetworks  networks  hertziantribes  behavior  communities  context  empowerment  agency  maelstrom  p2p  cookieswapping  information  policy  infrastructure  technology  remixculture 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Open Garden | /firechat
[See also: "FireChat – the messaging app that’s powering the Hong Kong protests"
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/sep/29/firechat-messaging-app-powering-hong-kong-protests

"#BBCtrending: Hong Kong's 'off-grid' protesters"
http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-29411159

"Faced with network surveillance, Hong Kong student demonstrators go P2P"
http://boingboing.net/2014/09/29/faced-with-network-surveillanc.html ]

[Description here is from the iTunes page: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/firechat/id719829352 ]

"FireChat introduces a new way to chat: "off-the-grid".
Now you can chat with people around you – even if there is no Internet connection or mobile phone coverage.

Whether you’re on the beach or in the subway, at a big game or a trade show, camping in the wild or at a concert, or even travelling abroad, simply fire up the app with a friend or two and find out who else is there.



FireChat enables a new type of communication: “firechats”. These live and anonymous discussion groups can gather as many as 10,000 people simultaneously.

And you can also create your own firechats about anything that interests you - whether it's the NY Yankees, Game of Thrones, League of Legends or Italian food.

Get FireChat and start bringing people together.

Wait, how does this app work without an Internet connection or any type of mobile coverage? The magic comes from one of Apple’s iOS 7 most advanced technologies: the Multipeer Connectivity Framework, which FireChat is built upon.



We’re Open Garden. Welcome to a new era of open communications.


Please meet us on Twitter @OpenGarden and Facebook www.facebook.com/OpenGarden.

Features:

• Instantly chat with anyone around you on iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch
• Works even without any Internet connection or cellular phone coverage
• Choose your own unique username and avatar
• Create your own ‘firechats’ for live discussions with up to tens of thousands of simultaneous users
• See what people are talking about in your country in the ‘Everyone’ mode
• Off-the-grid communications work with devices up to 200 feet of your location
• Multi-hop capabilities extend the range of off-the-grid communications
• No significant impact on battery consumption,

• FireChat is designed for iOS 7.

Please note that FireChat is not meant for secure or private communications. Other people nearby may see your messages. It's just like if you were playing music at home, people across the street might hear it too."

[See also: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.opengarden.firechat&hl=en ]
firechat  messaging  android  ios  communication  decentralization  mesh  meshnetworking  bluetooth  meshnetworks  networks  organization  iphone  opengarden  p2p 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Approval Economy: In Practice | GeorgieBC's Blog
"I have talked a lot in this blog about money and society and the need for new solutions. My opinion from years of volunteering is that money ruins every volunteer effort. As soon as a need receives funding, it becomes a noun and a product instead of an action. As soon as a project is allowed to fundraise, there is a need to manufacture scarcity, to withhold work until payment is received and to continue the need for the project. And as soon as a project receives money, the motives of the person receiving money are suspect.

I do not want to go to a ‘crowd funding website’ and ask a centralized go-between to stand between me and anyone who chooses to support me. I do not want to waste my time creating glossy videos and applications to explain to strangers what you already know, my work. I do not want to ally myself with corporate media or NGO’s, I am trying to make both obsolete. I do not want to develop a persona, tell you all about my personal life, appear on panels and talks to become a character and a brand; I am an action not a noun and I value my right to privacy.

I do not want to be the designated official person for any action I initiate, I want to be free to let others take my place whenever I find people willing. I want to continue to promote others instead of seeking to enhance my own reputation for a livelihood. I want to give freely my ideas and work to anyone who can use them instead of hoarding them to myself for profit.

I do not want to ask you to support every action I take. I will not delay my work waiting for approval or funding. Most of what I work on are things that nobody knows of or supports, that is why I give them my priority. I do not want to jump on popular, widely supported causes to gain support. I want to continue to speak even when everyone disagrees with me as they very frequently do. I want to speak for Gaza when the world says it is anti-semitic to do so, I want to speak for the DRC when the west doesn’t know or care where that is, I want to speak for the Rohingya when no one believes me. I want to criticize democracy, consensus, peer to peer economies, libertarianism and Marxism when everyone I know supports them. I want to advocate for people who have no supporters or funding behind them and tell people about things they may not want to know about.

I do not want to sell you a book, a talk, art, advocacy, a button or a T-shirt, anything I do is available to you as always, for free. But I want it recognized that what I do is not ‘unemployment’, that I am a contributing and valuable member of society entitled to the benefits of society. I want to have the human dignity of societal approval and recognition. I want to be able to support myself and others in society without any of us becoming a product."
heathermarsh  economics  work  motivation  advocacy  consulting  crowdfunding  withholding  2013  labor  privacy  cv  freedom  livelihood  reputation  ideas  sharing  artleisure  artlabor  character  selfbranding  branding  democracy  consensus  hierarchy  horizontality  hierarchies  employment  unemployment  society  recognition  dignity  p2p  libertarianism  marxism  funding  via:caseygollan  leisurearts 
may 2013 by robertogreco
You Are the Network
"Seamless connectivity allows people to connect any supported device to the mesh and thus to the Internet with no effort or configuration. Install, done. No buttons, no pairing, no manual discoverability. Open Garden can use different physical ways to connect in general; today\'s version concentrates on Bluetooth. Bluetooth normally requires to manually put one of the devices into discoverable state, which only lasts a few minutes. We eliminated the need for this, saving battery, improving privacy, and, most importantly, allowing devices to connect with no user intervention. Devices learn about each other in a variety of ways instead of Bluetooth discovery, including through a cloud service and using local chatter.

An immediate future direction for us is multi-path access. Normally today, you access the Internet using only one path. For example, when your phone gets on Wi-Fi, it no longer uses its 4G connection; if you are in an area with multiple Wi-Fi hotspots, you only use one…"
osx  mac  windows  p2p  mobile  android  wireless  wifi  sharing  mesh  meshnetworks 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Hello Etsy Berlin - Douglas Rushkoff on Etsy - Livestream
"Everybody thinks that because they can blog, they should blog."

"Why do I want to scale? The only reason to scale is to get out of the business I'm in."

"What would you rather do? Would you rather do something or would you rather manage people who are doing that thing?"

"perverse corporate capitalism of the 1990's, the Jack Welch, General Electric, Harvard Business School model, which is get out of any productive industry and become more and more like a bank"

"What Jack Welch realized is that Marx was right…whoever is creating the actual value through their labor is the slave"

"what you want to do is get as far away from those guys as possible and get as close to the bank funding that activity as possible."
douglasrushkoff  economics  p2p  work  labor  2011  etsy  currency  slavery  jobs  corporatism  history  banking  finance  digital  exchange  internet  peertopeer  capitalism  karlmarx  meansofexchange  hierarchy  localcurrency  biases  doing  making  facebook  social  advertising  jackwelch  ge  generalelectric  sharing  scale  scaling  growth  business  entrepreneurship  self-employment  creativity  management  middlemanagement  middlemen  addedvalue  localcurrencies 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Why I do not want to work at Google
"I believe that warehouse-scale client-server computing will, in the end, undermine the kind of democratic freedom of communication that we need to deal with today’s global menaces. It’s more practical than peer-to-peer computing at the moment, but that pendulum has swung back & forth several times over the decades…The proper response to the current impracticality of decentralized computing is not to sigh and build centralized systems. The proper response is to build the systems to *make decentralized computing practical again*.

Google is not institutionally opposed to this; they’ve funded substantial and important work on it. Nevertheless, because of their overall orientation toward centralized solutions with undemocratically-imposed policies, I believe working there would be a further distraction from that goal. Worse, with every advance that companies like Google and Apple make, the higher is the bar that decentralized systems must leap to achieve real adoption."

[via: http://www.odonnellweb.com/2011/08/is-google-becoming-the-next-iteration-of-aol/ ]
internet  web  media  google  peertopeer  p2p  decentralization  democracy  freedom  computing  decentralizedcomputing  kragenjaviersitaker  email  gmail  spam  control  2011  google+ 
august 2011 by robertogreco
P2PU (beta) | Learning for everyone, by everyone, about almost anything
"LEARN ANYTHING WITH YOUR PEERS. IT'S ONLINE AND TOTALLY FREE.

At P2PU, people work together to learn a particular topic by completing tasks, assessing individual and group work, and providing constructive feedback."

"The Peer 2 Peer University is a grassroots open education project that organizes learning outside of institutional walls and gives learners recognition for their achievements. P2PU creates a model for lifelong learning alongside traditional formal higher education. Leveraging the internet and educational materials openly available online, P2PU enables high-quality low-cost education opportunities. P2PU - learning for everyone, by everyone about almost anything."
education  learning  p2p  p2pu  hourschool  teachstreet  schoolofeverything  universities  highereducation  highered  peertopeer  teaching  unschooling  learningnetworks  networkedlearning  networks  lcproject  online  constructivecriticism 
august 2011 by robertogreco
HourSchool
"Welcome to HourSchool! We make small informal classes happen. To request a new class just type it into the box below, or browse our existing classes."

"Traditional classrooms facilitate one-way knowledge transfer, where students passively consume. We believe learning should be social, where students learn from, and with, each other.
Everyone has knowledge to share and the ability to share it. HourSchool facilitates friend-led knowledge sharing, in a fun, easy, and social way. Learn from your friends, one hour at a time."

[via: http://roitsch.tumblr.com/post/7613397853/love-the-idea-of-hourschool-hourschool ]
austin  education  learning  cooperative  exchange  peertopeer  p2p  networks  social  hourschool  deschooling  learningexchange  unschooling  sharing  small  informal  schoolofeverything 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Vittana | Building a world where anyone can go to college
"1. Find a student: Search for and choose a student in the developing world you would like to lend money to. 2. Make a loan: Make a loan for as little as $25 to the student through our website. 100% of your funds are delivered to the student. 3. Student graduates: Using your loan, the student finishes college (or vocational school), gets a degree, and then gets a job. 4. You get paid back: When the student repays, Vittana repays you the full amount of your loan. Use the money to make another loan."
activism  banking  philanthropy  finance  community  crowdsourcing  development  nonprofit  microlending  microfinance  education  p2p  lending  nonprofits 
april 2010 by robertogreco
The unusual suspects of Manifesta: The Pirate Bay and David Adjaye - we make money not art
"His contribution to the Manifesta biennial is Europolis, a beautifully crafted glass and metal foil panel that raises questions such as 'What if Europe was condensed into one piece and combined as one cell? What would be left behind as residue?' Adjaye extracted information from the capital cities of the European Union and condensed it into a single entity. The sum of many European cities doesn't make a European city. These have not been planned; they have evolved over time, through history and war, development, destruction, mixing, migration and changing populations. Adjaye's work evokes the idea of the city as phenomenon. Its organic form contains all the information about those cities from which it is drawn: material texture, population, time, scale and occupation."
davidadjaye  design  wmmna  piratebay  copyright  p2p  art  architecture 
september 2008 by robertogreco
The Pirate's Dilemma
"The Pirate’s Dilemma tells the story of how youth culture drives innovation and is changing the way the world works. It offers understanding and insight for a time when piracy is just another business model, the remix is our most powerful marketing too
books  classideas  informationliteracy  copyright  patents  creativity  innovation  business  politics  piracy  culture  drm  consumption  competition  freeconomics  filesharing  p2p  marketing  technology 
july 2008 by robertogreco
iSlsk, Soulseek en tu iPhone / iPod Touch - FayerWayer
"Soulseek es un cliente P2P muy usado por los audiófilos que ha pasado sin pena ni gloria, lo que está muy bien por que ha estado alejado del radar acusete-super-mala-onda-nazi-dictador-te-odio de la RIAA."
soulseek  iphone  applications  software  filesharing  p2p  ios 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Software - Deusty Designs
"Mojo is music sharing done right. With just two clicks, you are ready to browse, select, and download music from other Mojo users."
itunes  music  mac  software  osx  sharing  p2p  filesharing  freeware 
march 2008 by robertogreco
ooVoo - Free Video Conferencing and Video Messaging
"ooVoo is the next evolution in online communication — a remarkably easy way to have a face-to-face video conversation with friends, family or colleagues, no matter where they are in the world."
business  chat  collaboration  p2p  phone  conferencing  skype  telephony  voip  free  freeware  windows  mac  osx  online 
february 2008 by robertogreco
How to Save the World: Breakthrough Business Ideas for 2008
"creating a new economy with no zero-value-added intermediaries; Projects, not Careers; constantly on the move, standing (working standing up), walking, running, fit; BarCamp; Knowing When Not to Use Experts"
future  business  p2p  markets  work  careers  administration  management  leadership  workplace  offices  generalists  experts  unconferences  deschooling  projects  lcproject  organizations 
february 2008 by robertogreco
hyperpeople » Blog Archive » Unevenly Distributed:Production Models for the 21st Century
"Sharing is an essential quality of all of the media this fifteen year-old has ever known. In his eyes, if it can’t be shared, a piece of media loses most of its value. If it can’t be forwarded along, it’s broken."
bittorrent  distribution  film  video  media  music  p2p  piratebay  napster  internet  web  online  history  sharing  piracy  future  television  tv  movies  youtube  gnutella  cds  dvds  copying  copyright  broadcast  abundance  newmedia  production  society  cinema  computers 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Why the Music Industry is Lying to You - ReadWriteWeb
1. Not all P2P downloading is illegal. 2. Do the numbers include fake MediaDefender files people are downloading? 3. Some people download solely to improve share ratio on BitTorrent sites. #4. People are obsessed with discographies
music  p2p  filesharing  copyright  statistics 
january 2008 by robertogreco
The Pirate’s Dilemma | TorrentFreak
"what pirates are actually doing is highlighting a better way for us to do things; they find gaps outside the market – and better ways for society to operate"
bittorrent  collaboration  piracy  copyright  law  technology  p2p  economics  business 
january 2008 by robertogreco
$40K to fill an iPod? One third of PCs use LimeWire instead (Updated)
"Between LimeWire and Bittorrent, the ongoing and extremely widespread popularity of P2P as a media delivery vehicle suggest that music prices remain stuck at too high a level while the capacity of portable media players continues to balloon."
ipod  filesharing  music  media  economics  distribution  piracy  limewire  itunes  money  pricing  via:preoccupations  internet  p2p 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Meraki Wireless Network | Affordable Internet Solution | Free WiFi
"Meraki’s mission is to bring affordable Internet access to the next billion people. Meraki’s new approach to wireless networking empowers individuals and groups to bring access to local communities, anywhere in the world."
access  wireless  wifi  mit  mobile  networking  p2p  gamechanging  future  free  collaboration  community  internet  technology  broadband  hardware  mesh 
november 2007 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Technology | File-sharers forced to play fair
"Researchers have found a way to enforce good manners on file-sharing networks by treating bandwidth as a currency."
filesharing  p2p  bittorrent  copyright  files  socialsoftware  social  accounting  bandwidth  technology  currencies  net  sharing  media 
october 2007 by robertogreco

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