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robertogreco : packing   9

'Red 2,' spies and tourism - Grantland
"For a large portion of the American/Western/advanced-industrial film audience, travel might be the activity in which geopolitics most noticeably intrudes on their lives — in the inconvenience of borders, passports, languages, currencies, customs. But none of that fazes the spy. He either circumvents restrictions entirely or he comes equipped with the tools he needs to pass through them. He doesn’t wait in line unless he’s in disguise.

What’s the first thing the spy does after arriving in a new city? You and I haul our bags to the hotel and stand shifting our weight while a bored clerk pecks at a keyboard; the spy is led briskly to an all-white room where he’s left alone with a safety deposit box. Inside the box: multiple passports, a wad of cash in different currencies, a gun with a silencer, an envelope with the name of a contact — everything he needs to navigate his new surroundings. If we see his hotel, it’s luxurious. If we see him on a plane, he’s either flying it himself or it’s a private jet. We are repeatedly shown — more often, or at least more indelibly, than in the books some of these stories are based on — that the elements of travel we ourselves find exhausting and stressful have been magically made easy for the spy.3 The spy never worries about not understanding a language; whatever it is, he already speaks it, and fluently, with no trace of an accent. Instead of sitting around in train stations and dealing with subway platforms, something he’ll do only if it’s part of a chase, the spy procures a car (who knows how) or a helicopter, or a speedboat, or whatever vehicle he needs, which he always knows how to operate expertly, even if it’s a Soviet tank. And you’d better believe he knows his way around at 100 miles an hour — he’ll take shortcuts the locals haven’t discovered yet. None of your panicked on-the-fly deciphering of Parisian road signs in your rented Renault Twingo.

When you and I pack for a trip, we’re so preemptively defeated by the thought of weather and strange places that we take crushable hats and wicking layers and comfort-fit pants with legs that zip off at the knee. The spy, whether he’s stylish like Bond or casual like Jason Bourne, never looks like he’s traveling. But rain or shine, he always has just the right outfit. That may be why, whereas we stick to tourist areas and look in a guidebook to figure out where to have dinner, the spy can go anywhere he wants. He strolls into the classiest and most dangerous bars, the finest and grimiest restaurants, the ritziest and seediest casinos."

[via: http://m1k3y.tumblr.com/post/56774272295/for-a-large-portion-of-the ]
travel  packing  spies  film  geopolitics  2013  cities  borders  border  passports  language  jamesbond  red2  spymovies 
july 2013 by robertogreco
This photograph | Soulellis
"I leave in a few days to do a public book project in a small town in northern Iceland. And for the last few months, I’ve been thinking about what to bring. The artist’s residency sent tips about bringing supplies, and friends have suggested various things, like picking a few significant tools or objects and shipping them beforehand, so that they’re waiting for me when I arrive.

Just in the last week, I decided that I should bring almost nothing. Whatever I’m going to make will come from the place, and I’m going to leave the work there. So it just makes sense that everything should happen there, during my eleven-week stay. I’ll bring a computer and camera and my clothes, of course, but if I need supplies, I’ll find them. I’m going to spend a few days in Reykjavik, where there’s a good art supply store, before driving north. But mostly, I want to use found materials, on-site in and around Skagaströnd. I don’t want to predetermine what process or form the work will take until I’m there, reacting to places and people.

I’m just going to show up.

But I am going to bring one thing. This one photograph. Here’s how I got the photograph.



So I’ll take the photo back to Iceland. I don’t know what I’ll do with it. I consider it a collaborative prompt. A chain reaction. David was in a specific place, and took a photo, marking himself in that place. He sent it to Taeyoon, who sent it to me, and now I’m taking it back to that place, completing some kind of loop (but setting other loops in motion, of course).

A chance encounter between three artists, connected by a photograph, in three places, in two countries, via mail and twitter and mail and flying and driving. It contains a world of information. The way Taeyoon folded the photograph. The numbers, the roads, the colors, placenames on a map.

So I’ll take the photo back to Iceland and see what happens."
paulsoulellis  packing  travel  making  art  networks  connectedness  geography  place  photography  mapping  local  2013  iceland  taeyoonchoi  davidhorvitz  location  looping  flip-flop 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Don’t Do What I Do | Seth W.
"You can prepare, fill your head with knowledge, listen to podcasts, buy a lightweight and foldable jacket and $250 pants, and email other people who’ve done the same thing, but really you just need to set off on your own. You need to make your own mistakes, because they’re yours. You’ll learn all the lessons you need to learn.

Am I telling you to trust a complete stranger with ALL your stuff? No.

I’m telling you to go make your own advenutres. Stop waiting for permission, stop waiting for the right circumstances, stop waiting, stop waiting, stop… waiting."

See also: http://sethw.com/about-seth-werkheiser/

"In August of 2010 I ditched my stuff and started traveling full-time while working remotely…

Since then: traveled from Brooklyn, NY to New Orleans, LA, over to Austin, TX and as far west as Albuquerque, NM. Visiting 12 cities in 14 days was fun, too, when I traveled by bike and train from Miami, FL to Portland, ME.

I carry everything I own in a bag (currently a Chrome Yalta)."
sethwerkheiser  experience  preparation  deschooling  unschooling  learning  yearoff2  exploration  trust  justdo  waiting  cv  travel  adventure  2012  bikes  biking  possessions  minimalism  yearoff  wandering  packing 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Rands In Repose: A Bag of Holding
"When I stand up to go somewhere, the routine is precise. Right pocket, wallet. Left pocket, iPhone. Keys in hand, grab my bag and go. It’s this sort of workflow precision that allows me to stay cool when the unexpected occurs. My inner dialog during the situation is, Well, see, I’ve got my shit together, so even though this unpredictable thing is going down, I’m doing my part to support predictability.

Whether it’s a wallet or a bag, its design needs to encourage and support my irrational worldview that with the proper level of organization those disasters, large and small, are all manageable."
preparedness  tombihn  packing  howto  via:rushtheiceberg  organization  wallets  backpacks  cv  travel  bags 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Twitter / @robinsloan: @stirman underwear = jeans ...
stirman [Jason Stirman]: Packing for trip. Industry standard is underwear = 1.5x per day, but jeans = 1x per 3.5 days, right?<br />
<br />
robinsloan: @stirman underwear = jeans × π
humor  packing  robinsloan  ratios  math  calculation  classtrips 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Future Perfect » Travel Discipline
"A week of international travel on 18 litres capacity, with room to spare.

Packing discipline frees the mind, body and soul."
packing  travel  janchipchase  simplicity 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Stevedore - Wikipedia
"Stevedore, dockworker, docker, dock labourer and longshoreman can have various waterfront-related meanings concerning loading and unloading ships, according to place and country.

The word stevedore originated in Portugal or Spain, and entered the English language through its use by sailors. It started as a phonetic spelling of estivador (Portuguese) or estibador (Spanish), meaning a man who stuffs, here in the sense of a man who loads ships, which was the original meaning of stevedore; compare Latin stīpāre meaning to stuff, as in to fill with stuffing. … Stevedore has also become common as an appellation for a person who is over-muscular or foulmouthed."

[Follow-up to: http://www.waywordradio.org/spendthrift-snollygosters/ ]
stevedore  etymology  words  dockworkers  longshoremen  spanish  portuguese  estibador  estivador  packing  loading  foulmouthed  over-musculat  language  english 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Leisure and Business Travel Packing List - Travel Light with One Bag!
"overpacking tops the list of biggest travel mistakes...this Web site, offering exhaustive detail on the art and science of travelling light, going pretty much anywhere, for an indefinite length of time, with nothing more than a single (carryon-sized) bag
travel  howto  packing  tips  reference  productivity  efficiency  minimalism 
may 2008 by robertogreco
How to Pack Everything You Own in One Bag : NPR
"But one packing expert says it is possible to put your belongings in a single piece of luggage. Doug Dyment, whose Web site onebag.com is devoted to the art of traveling light, says the key is to make a list in advance of what to pack and stick with it.
travel  howto  packing  tips  reference  productivity  efficiency  minimalism 
may 2008 by robertogreco

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