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robertogreco : pandemic   4

Finally on the same side — Board Games — Medium
"Board games don’t traditionally foster teamwork . From the cutthroat capitalism of Monopoly to the one-upmanship of Catan’s “longest road,” the tabletop is a battleground where friends become rivals and parents bankrupt their children. This has always felt a little off to me. We’re a social species… why do our games always pit us against each other?

It may be that we simply need something to challenge us, something as dynamic and unpredictable as a human being. Until recently, tabletop games had nothing like an AI opponent, and so you were forced to choose between a dull puzzle like Solitaire or a combative, winner-take-all game like Risk.

In the 1980s, a few cooperative games started to change this formula. In Scotland Yard, a hack was introduced that finally allowed players to work as a team: one person would play as the elusive “Mr. X”, an enemy with his own agenda and rules,while everyone else ganged up to destroy him.

It’s Mr. X (foreground) vs. every detective in London in Scotland Yard (1983)
The idea had promise, and led to other great “all against one” games of this era such as Fury of Dracula and Arkham Horror. These are all great fun, particularly if you have a friend who enjoys playing the asshole. But they still divide players; they aren’t fully cooperative.

This all changed in 2010 when Matt Leacock introduced a “virus” mechanic in his game Pandemic. The virus is your collective opponent: like an AI algorithm from a video game, it’s just a set of rules, but it’s simple enough that your teammates can run the program themselves."
boardgames  games  gaming  2014  patrickewing  cooperative  cooperativegames  collaboration  monopoly  pandemic  competition  settlersofcatan  risk 
february 2014 by robertogreco
The American Crawl : “Pandemic Right Here! Got That Pandemic!”
"A board game that relies on collaboration amongst players instead of competition, Pandemic finds players racing around the globe treating infections and feverishly trying to discover the cure before another epidemic wrecks havoc on the globe. In effect, the players are working together to beat the game; either we all win or – as was most oft the case for us – we all lose.

A game that can be played by anyone, we found ourselves deliberating every action and discussing (or arguing) strategy. We were metacognitive in our decision making process. We highlighted what failed in past games (deciding to ignore the wildfire-like spread of disease in Asia, for instance was a particularly terrible strategy) and relied on our various locations, cards, and other game attributes to eventually beat the game."
pandemic  boardgames  games  play  collaboration  anterogarcia  2009  strategy  classideas 
october 2011 by robertogreco
An Epidemic of Fear: How Panicked Parents Skipping Shots Endangers Us All | Magazine
"Ah, risk. It is the idea that fuels the anti-vaccine movement — that parents should be allowed to opt out, because it is their right to evaluate risk for their own children. It is also the idea that underlies the CDC’s vaccination schedule — that the risk to public health is too great to allow individuals, one by one, to make decisions that will impact their communities. (The concept of herd immunity is key here: It holds that, in diseases passed from person to person, it is more difficult to maintain a chain of infection when large numbers of a population are immune.)"

[more at: http://kottke.org/09/10/killer-vaccines-and-the-killers-who-kill-with-them ]
culture  children  healthcare  publichealth  pandemic  drugs  politics  autism  conspiracy  safety  medicine  fear  reading  health  parenting  science  vaccinations  vaccines  antivax  epidemics 
october 2009 by robertogreco

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