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Print Simulator - Ink Shift – RISOTTO
"The print simulator is a quick and easy way to experiment with your artwork!

See how your print will look on our variety of papers, switch ink colours at the click of a button and learn the foundations of artwork layering and preparation.

There are 2 modes to play with..."

[via: https://are.na/block/2018171
https://are.na/benjamin-hickethier/riso-1498024805 ]
print  papernet  printing  simulations  risograph 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Bindery.js · Introduction
"Bindery.js is a library for designing printable books with HTML and CSS.

At its simplest, Bindery flows content over multiple pages. From there, the designer can create running headers, spreads, footnotes, tables of contents, indexes, and more. Bindery also provides print options like bleed, crop marks, and booklet ordering.

Web designers can think about books as an extension of responsive design, and print designers can express layouts programmatically, without the need for InDesign."

[via: "Print Are.na with Bindery.js"
https://are.na/clement-valla/print-are-na-with-bindery-js

"Make books from Are.na Channels with Bindery.js. You can format the books using CSS!

It currently works pretty well, but we'd be happy to get some help cleaning up the css a little."]
html  css  publishing  re.na  pdf  bindery.js  papernet  print 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Zines are the future of media
"My favorite Nieman Lab prediction for journalism in 2018 (including this one I wrote myself [http://www.niemanlab.org/2017/12/watch-out-for-spotify/ ]) is Kawandeep Virdee’s “Zines Had It Right All Along.” [http://www.niemanlab.org/2017/12/zines-had-it-right-all-along/ ]

His actual prediction is that in 2018, digital media “will reflect more qualities that make print great.” Virdee distills a shortlist of qualities of zines and quarterly mags that he thinks are portable to digital:

• Quarterlies are a pleasure to read with a variety in layout and pacing
• They’re beautiful to hold.
• They’re less frequent, and much better.
• Even the ads are well-crafted, and trusted.
• Zines have an enormous variety.
• They’re experimental and diverse.
• This gives them a freshness and surprise.
• They’re anti-formalist; they’re relatable.

“Most sites look the same,” Virdee writes. “It can be weird and wonderful.”

The positive example he gives isn’t a text feature, but the NYT video series “Internetting with Amanda Hess.” It’s an odd choice because digital video hasn’t had much of a problem picking up on a zine aesthetic or giving us that level of freshness and surprise; it’s digital text that’s been approaching conformity.

It’s also weird that Virdee works product at Medium, which is one of the sites that, despite or maybe because of its initial splash, is kind of the poster child for the current design consensus on the web. If Virdee is making the case that Medium (and other sites) should look a lot less like Medium, that would be the most exciting thing that Medium has done in a couple of years.

The other point I’d add is that zines and quarterlies look the way they do and feel the way they feel not because of a certain design aesthetic they share, or a design consensus they break from, but because of how they’re run, who owns them, and why they’re published. They look different because they are different. So maybe we need to look at the whole package and create an… oh, I don’t know, what’s the phrase I need… an “indie web”?"
timcarmody  kawandeepvirdee  zines  publishing  blogs  blogging  digital  publications  2017  2018  quarterlies  classideas  cv  conformity  medium  media  predictions  design  originality  weirdness  aesthetics  freshness  internet  amandahess  web  online  graphicdesign  layout  webdesign  indie  indieweb  diversity  anti-formalism  relatability  surprise  variety  craft  pacing  howwewrite  howweread  print  papernet 
december 2017 by robertogreco
GitHub - infovore/pinboard-bookmachine: Generate paperbacks from your Pinboard links
"Bookmachine takes your Pinboard links and makes paperback books of them: one 6"x9" book a year."
pinboard  tomarmitage  via:caseygollan  ruby  books  papernet 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Web-to-print-to-street
"1
An experiment in making public by Paul Soulellis
OPEN SET Summer Design School
V2 INSTITUTE FOR THE UNSTABLE MEDIA
3 AUG 2016 10–18

When considering the future of publishing, why not look to the street? Tracing the act of “making public” in physical space is a trajectory that stretches back as far as urbanity itself. Spoken, written and visual language evolved in spaces of assembly and commercial activity, and flourished along trade routes; the distribution of media is intimately tangled up with the history of built environments and the movement of people, goods and services. And it’s this connection between the physical body and the circulation of information that bears examining: since material now flows along immaterial networks, might we look to the artist performing in public as a new site, or perhaps a re-siting, of publishing activity?

Let’s re-visit the street as a modality for making public. If we define publishing as the filtering and amplification of material, then public space is an obvious place to find this activity, bound up in material and performative notions. The urban street is a market of materialities: a mesh of connected systems, infrastructure, and networks. Like the internet, the public street is an open, flowing landscape where extreme conditions of chance and restriction exist in constant negotiation. These distinctions between physical and immaterial space, once easy, now break down in the street, where every citizen is a node on the network.

“Web-to-print-to-street” is a one-day workshop where we will take an inventory of possible moves in the street, from posting to stacking to dropping to hand delivery. Publishing is performed continuously on social media, so as material boundaries blur and blend, let’s consider the literal translation of network culture into physical space as an acta diurna (a daily act). Our site is the city of Rotterdam and we have countless publics available to us. For a few hours, we’ll examine our own networks and feeds for worthy material, considering the effects of selection and printing on the value of our work. We will experiment with simple moves that “de-amplify” our content, moving it from fast social media to slower rooms of sociability. Our goal is discovery: what kinds of publics and performative techniques are possible? What are new strategies for slowing down attention in the physical encounter?

READINGS

Workshop PDF
Michael Warner, “Publics and Counterpublics,” 2002.
Annette Gilbert (ed.), Publishing as Artistic Practice, Sternberg Press, 2016.
Susan Stallman, “The Ethos of the Edition: The Stacks of Felix Gonzalez-Torres,” Arts Magazine 66, 1991.
Michael Bhaskar, The Content Machine: Towards a Theory of Publishing from the Printing Press to the Digital Network. New York: Anthem Press, 2013.
Seth Price, “Dispersion,” 2002.
Paul Soulellis, “Performing Publishing: Infrathin Tales from the Printed Web,” 2015.

2
REFERENCES

Post
Jenny Holzer
Norman B. Colp
Stephanie Syjuco
Brian William Green
Julia Weist
Drop
Flugblätter (flying leaves)
Aram Bartholl Dead Drops
Sal Randolph’s Free Words
Anastasia Kubrak
Little Free Library
Stack
Edson Chagas / Tankboys
Felix Gonzalez-Torres
Perform
Town crier
David Horvitz pickpockets an art fair
Weymouths
Anouk Kruithof’s Pixel Stress
Facebook Live Map

3
WORKSHOP

10–11:15 Introduction and discussion
11:15–12:15 Filtering
12:15–13:30 Break
13:30–14:30 Production (Print! Assemble!)
14:30–17 Amplification! Make public.
17–18 Share, celebrate, publish."
paulsoulellis  design  publishing  public  makingpublic  printedweb  papernet  social  sociability  sharing  classideas  jennyholzer  juliaweist  salrandolph  deaddrops  arambartholl  anastasiakubrak  littlefreelibrary  towncrier  davidhorvitz  weymouths  anoukkruithof  pixelstress  facebooklivemap  edsonchagas  tankboys  normancolp  stephaniesyjuco  brianwilliamgreen  michaelwarner  annettegilbert  susanstallman  michaelbhaskar  sethprice 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Códice Boturini o Tira de la Peregrinación, edición digital - YouTube
"El INAH presenta en versión digital el manuscrito original del siglo XVI.

Esta edición combina la tecnología digital con los procesos de producción artesanal para permitir un acercamiento inédito a uno de los documentos fundacionales de la historia de México.

Te invitamos a conocer el proceso de elaboración del papel amate que artesanos de la comunidad de San Pablito Pahuatlán, Puebla, realizan para la versión facsimilar de este códice.

Así como el proceso de planeación de este proyecto de innovación, que tiene como resultado una aplicación digital desarrollada para iPad y iPhone, que en los próximos días estará disponible en una versión web y para dispositivos Android. En todos los casos de manera gratuita."
papernet  books  bookmaking  digital  paper  papelamate  puebla  mexico  papermaking  2015  glvo  classideas  sanpablitopahuatlán 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Batia Suter
"Swiss-born, Amsterdam-based artist Batia Suter (b. 1967) studied at the art academies of Zuerich and Arnhem (NL), and was also trained at the Werkplaats Typografie. Suter produces monumental prints of digitally manipulated images for specific locations, and works on photo-animations, image sequences and collages, often using found pictures. In 2007 she published the voluminous book Parallel Encyclopedia (Roma Publication 100) containing a composition of images taken from books she has collected along the years. Her second book Surface Series (Roma Publication 160), published in 2011, is an evocative montage of found images exploring the diverse resonances of geological landscape and visual surface. The underlying themes of Batia Suter's practice are the 'iconification' and 'immunogenicity' of images, and the circumstances by which they become charged with new associative values. Her work intuitively situates old images in new contexts to provoke surprising reactions and significative possibilities. By this method, and with an attuned sensitivity to hidden harmonies and expressive accidents, Suter thus generates hypnagogic spaces where pictures can communicate by their own logic, in a force field of imaginative metamorphosis."
batiasuter  art  artists  photography  books  artbooks  print  papernet  images  imagery  artistsbooks 
june 2014 by robertogreco
ANALOG MEMORY DESK - Kirsten Camara
"A desk to record all the small items you write down once, but intend to forget tomorrow.

I've come to realize that I'm somewhat obsessed with how we remember the past. This is the latest installment in that series and a more serious attempt at furniture making. There are a hundreds of little things that we don't try to remember every year or even every week. Does the sum of all these tiny parts produce a new narrative on our lives?

1,100 yards of paper will record the lists, the phones numbers you call once, the pixel size of that box on that website, the street name of that business, and the long division you try to remember.

Made out of hard maple, butcher paper and a glass panel."

[via: http://mmodulus.tumblr.com/post/79548996003/analog-memory-desk-una-mesa-para-recordar-todos ]
furniture  wood  memory  design  desks  paper  papernet 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Frankenfont | Fathom
"An edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein laid out using characters and glyphs from PDF documents obtained through internet searches. The incomplete fonts found in the PDFs were reassembled into the text of Frankenstein based on their frequency of use. The most common characters are employed at the beginning of the book, and the text devolves into less common, more grotesque shapes and forms toward the end.

The beginning of the book is comprised largely of Arial, Helvetica, and the occasional Times New Roman. As you might expect, these are by far the most common fonts used in documents.

By page 46 and 47, things have progressed to a lot of Arial Bold and Times Italic.

In the 200s, commonly used script fonts, as well as much more obscure faces are beginning to appear.

As we reach the end, the book has devolved significantly: non-Roman fonts, highly specialized typefaces, and even pictogram fonts abound.

Process. For each of the 5,483 unique words in the book, we ran a search (using the Yahoo! Search API) that was filtered to just PDF files. We downloaded the top 10 to 15 hits for each word, producing 64,076 PDF files (some were no longer available, others were duplicates). Inside these PDFs were 347,565 subsetted fonts.From those fonts, 55,382 unique glyph shapes were used to fill the 342,889 individual letters found in the Frankenstein text.

PDF Fonts. This project started because of a fascination with the way that PDF files contain incomplete versions of fonts. The shape data is high enough quality to reproduce the original document, however only the necessary characters (and little of the font’s “metrics” that are used for proper typographic layout) are included in the PDF. This prevents others from extracting the fonts to be used for practical purposes, but creates an opportunity for a curious Victor Frankenstein who wants to use these incomplete pieces to create something entirely different."
books  ebooks  fonts  frankenstein  pdf  glyphs  characters  internet  search  maryshelly  frankenfont  srg  benfry  2011  papernet 
january 2014 by robertogreco
What a dodo might teach us about books / Snarkmarket
"We seem to be living in a perpetual age of the death throes of The Book. 1 There are too many pieces to count that insist that the book is dead or (despite all odds) is thriving, that paper books are different/better/worse than electronic books, that game apps will save books, blah blah blah. We seem to rehash the same surface-level observations over and over again. As my friend Alan Jacobs wondered, “Why do people still write as though they’re the first ones to think about the difference between e-books and codices?” I’ll spare you my thoughts on the subject, since I’ll only gripe about how people misunderstand the complexities of books, whether on a print or a digital platform, and who wants to read more griping?

If you want to think about these questions through experiencing them, let’s look instead at some books that live on the boundary between print and electronic. The obvious starting place is Amaranth Borsuk and Brad Bouse’s Between Page and Screen (Siglio Press, 2012): it exists in a codex form that can be held in your hand but to read it, you’ll need a computer. The pages of the book are black-and-white geometric shapes that are referred to as markers or hieroglyphs or sigils. The shapes aren’t legible as words to the human eye; hold them up to your webcam, however, and the book’s website will show back to you the poem floating above the page."



"There are other books that take the graphic approach to the question of where the boundary is between print and electronic. Silvio Lorusso and Sebastian Schmieg’s 56 Broken Kindle Screens: Photographed E Ink, Collected Online, Printed On Demand (2012) consists of 56 images of broken Kindle screens found on Flickr and then reproduced in a print-on-demand paperback. The images can be gorgeous, and I love both the way it turns broken objects into art and the layers of mediation, moving from e-ink to pixel to paper, that goes into producing it. And my scholar’s heart loves that at the back of the book are credits for each image.



There’s also the more straightforward projects of printing out the web. Rob Matthews, in 2012, printed out 0.01% of Wikipedia as a 5000-page, 1’7” tall book (XKCD, by the way, has worked out how many printers it would take to print out the entire English-language Wikipedia). There’s the ongoing Printing out the Internet (“A crowdsourced project to literally print out the entire internet.”), which doesn’t seem as clever to me as it does to its creators, although it’s apparently somehow intended to memorialize Aaron Swartz. If that’s not enough, the Library of the Printed Web displays the terrifying number of projects devoted to variations of this enterprise. It makes me weary just thinking about it. I do love The Art of Google Books, however, and if its creator, Krissy Wilson, does end up making a book from the Tumblr (as she suggests she’s interested in doing), I’d buy it in a heartbeat.

My favorite book for thinking about technologies and obsolescence is A Dodo at Oxford: The Unreliable Account of a Student and His Pet Dodo (Oxgarth Press, 2010). This book, edited by Philip Atkins and Michael Johnson, purports to be a facsimile edition of a 1695 printed diary of an student at Oxford who owned a dodo. Atkins and Johnson tell the story of finding the book in an Oxfam, searching for more information about it, and finally editing it for us today. The bulk of the volume is their facsimile replication of the diary with their annotations in the margin explaining various historical facts and oddities; there are also a series of appendices explaining early modern printing, including the use of the long-s, ligatures, and signature marks.



Perhaps the main thing to remember as the fruitless debate circles and circles is that any opposition between print and digital is, today, ridiculous. You might think you’re reading a paper book, but it was, I promise you, produced through digital means. The person who wrote it is overwhelmingly likely to have used a computer to do so, it was edited and typeset using software, its distribution is enabled and tracked with databases, and it is reviewed and discussed in both electronic and physical spaces that are enabled by technology. 3

It’s not a black-and-white world out there. Our methods of producing and consuming books will continue to be as multiply shaded as our reactions to them has always been. So here’s to reading instead of fretting!"
snarkmarket  books  ebooks  sarahwerner  howweread  2014  software  digiital  digitaldualism  alanjacobs  print  papernet  reading 
january 2014 by robertogreco
good reading on the train to white plains this morning. printing/multiples/publishing. for the students today -- and realizing that 'experimental book studio' should be called experimental publishing studio next time I teach it. | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"good reading on the train to white plains this morning. printing/multiples/publishing. for the students today -- and realizing that 'experimental book studio' should be called experimental publishing studio next time I teach it."

[This book: http://www.amazon.com/Print-Out-20-Years/dp/0870708252/

"Over the past two decades, the art world has broadened its geographic reach and opened itself to new continents, allowing for a significant cross-pollination of post-conceptual strategies and vernacular modes. Printed materials, in both innovative and traditional forms, have played a key role in this exchange of ideas and sources. This catalogue, published in conjunction with an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, examines the evolution of artistic practices related to printmaking, from the resurgence of traditional printing techniques--often used alongside digital technologies--to the worldwide proliferation of self-published artist's books and ephemera. Print/Out features focused sections on ten artists and publishers--Ai Weiwei, Edition Jacob Samuel, Ellen Gallagher, Martin Kippenberger, Lucy McKenzie, Aleksandra Mir, museum in progress, Robert Rauschenberg, Superflex and Rirkrit Tiravanija--as well as rich illustrations of additional printed projects from the last 20 years by major artists such as Trisha Donnelly, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Thomas Schütte and Kelley Walker. An introductory essay by Christophe Cherix, Chief Curator of Prints and Illustrated Books at the Museum, offers an overview of this period with particular attention to new directions and strategies within an expanded field of printmaking." ]
paulsoulellis  2013  books  publishing  experimentalbooks  experimentalpublishing  printing  papernet  toread 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Library of the Printed Web
"Library of the Printed Web is a collection of works by artists who use screen capture, image grab, site scrape and search query to create printed matter from content found on the web. LotPW includes self-published artists’ books, photo books, texts and other print works gathered around the casual concept of “search, compile and publish.”

Artists featured in LotPW drive through vast landscapes of data to collect and transform digital information, visual and otherwise, into analog experience; every work in the collection is a printed expression of search engine pattern discovery. Many of the works in LotPW share common production and publishing techniques (e.g., print-on-demand), even as the content itself varies widely.

I’ve assembled this set of materials because I see evidence of a strong, emerging web-to-print-based artistic practice based on the search engine and other algorithmic operations; as this view matures, the inventory of LotPW may grow to reflect new concepts and methodologies.

Rather than draw boundaries or define a new aesthetic with LotPW, I posit this presentation of printed artifacts as a reference tool for studying shifting relationships between the web (as culture), the artist (as archivist) and print publishing (as a new/old self-serve schema for expressing the archive).

Library of the Printed Web exists both as a physical collection of book works and as an online representation of these works. The permanent collection is based in Long Island City, NY and includes one copy of each item in the inventory, except where noted. LotPW will launch as a table-top presentation at Theorizing the Web, CUNY Graduate Center, 1–2 March 2013.

To suggest a title or artist to be included in Library of the Printed Web, or for any other inquiries, contact Paul Soulellis."
art  library  libraries  books  papernet  2012  libraryoftheprintedweb  googlebooks  LotPW  paulsoulellis  screencapture  digital  search  flip-flop 
february 2013 by robertogreco
The Present Group
"The Present Group is an arts based think tank and creative studio whose projects focus on leveraging new technologies in support of the arts and finding new ways to fund and distribute artists projects."
art  technology  glvo  thinktank  funding  distribution  webhosting  hosting  thepresentgroup  ebooks  tumblr  printing  print  papernet 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Evernote & Moleskine Merge Paper & Pixels in "Smart Notebook"
"Evernote signed a treaty with Moleskine Friday at the Evernote Trunk Conference, formally declaring a truce in its war on paper. It announced the Evernote Smart Notebook from Moleskine, along with a new version of Evernote for iOS that will bridge the gap that's familiar to anyone with an urgent need to capture ideas.

Despite Evernote’s efforts to move people to go paperless, Moleskine’s fancy journals are still a booming business. But according to the presentation at the Evernote Trunk Conference, 60% of Moleskine owners also use digital notes. While Evernote has long had optical character recognition built in, so stored photos of printed text are searchable on your computers, there’s still a big divide between our hand-written and digital outboard brains.

Today’s update to Evernote for iOS adds a new mode called Page Camera, which is optimized for bringing handwritten pages into Evernote. It fixes the contrast and shadows, so the handwriting is more visibile…"

[More from Evernote: http://blog.evernote.com/2012/08/24/the-new-evernote-smart-notebook-by-moleskine/ ]
2012  handwriting  notebooks  smartnotebooks  ocr  scanning  papernet  paper  notetaking  moleskine  evernote  johnmitchell 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Brendan Dawes - The Happiness Machine
"The Happiness Machine is an Internet connected printer that prints random happy thoughts by random people from across the web; press the big black button and the Happiness Machine prints a thought from someone who mentioned the word happy.

Though The Happiness Machine uses content from We Feel Fine, the printer is completely agnostic to the data it prints; the logic is all done on the server so I can easily change what type of data comes back. It could easily be train times, news headlines or your day's appointments – the printer doesn't care – it's dumb. It just prints what comes back.

I still believe paper has advantages from time to time as a content delivery mechanism over all the screens that now pervade our lives; you can tear it off, put it in your wallet/purse, scribble on it or give it someone else without worrying whether it works with their OS. And it doesn't need a power source for display."
wefeelfine  happinessmachine  printing  printers  2012  happiness  brendandawes  papernet  paper 
august 2012 by robertogreco
THE STATE
"THE STATE is a print journal and sociohistorical forum. It investigates the space between print and audio-visual experiences and their transition to mediated online forms; transgressive cultural criticism and the sensuous architecture of this “printernet.”"
transmedia  criticism  culture  art  architecture  papernet  printernet  audiovisual  newmedia  thestate  post-digital 
june 2012 by robertogreco
notes on "the berg cloud little printer alternative"
"But then I remembered I already own a thermal printer. A cheap one that prints labels. So I researched a little more and figured out how one could have their own thermal printer to hack away on:

1. Buy a Dymo LabelWriter.
2. Buy this continuous thermal paper.
3. Use the Dymo JavaScript SDK.

Not as cute as the Little Printer, but appears to do the printing part of the equation. Mine prints pretty detailed stamps, so I think it should handle graphics like the ones that were in the demo. I haven’t gotten my hands on the continuous thermal paper yet, so I can’t say if the SDK will give as much control over printing, but it seems like a fun project if you’re looking for one."
printing  papernet  projectideas  glvo  edg  srg  tomake  2011  littleprinter  andretorrez 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Mapvelopes
"Mapvelopes is a 'map envelope' generator, inspired by the 'Google Envelopes' concept by Rahul Mahtani & Yofred Moik, showcased on the Yanko Design blog. Mapvelopes lets you create your own real-life versions of these envelopes, for any from and to address you wish.

To use it, simply enter the source and destination addresses below, and select the type of envelope you want to use. A PDF will be generated and returned to you, suitable for printing directly onto the envelope!

If there's a land route between your source and destination addresses, the route will be printed on the returned map envelope. If there's no route, or we don't have enough routing quota left for the day, an envelope with the start and end markers but no route will be returned."
maps  envelopes  stationery  web  papernet  printing  googlemaps 
december 2011 by robertogreco
russell davies: again with the post digital
"And then, this morning, when struggling to think of a good ending to this, I heard a brilliant talk by George Dyson – describing the early history of computing unearthed from correspondence between Turing and Von Neumann. And I thought I heard him cite this quote from Turing. I wasn’t quite fast enough with my pen to be 100% sure and I can’t find it on Google, but I think this is what he said. And, if it is, it’s exactly what I mean and we can leave it at that. What I think he said is this: “being digital should be more interesting than just being electronic”. I’m sure that meant something slightly different in the middle of the last century but the words are useful and simple now, they’ll do for me as a tiny rallying cry; being digital should be more interesting than just being electronic."
russelldavies  2011  alanturing  georgedyson  andyhuntington  papernet  internetofthings  brucesterling  mattjones  screenfatigue  newspaperclub  boredom  materials  physical  digital  embodiment  embodieddata  spimes  post-digital  iot 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Tweetghetto Poster — Create Your Own — Better Nouveau
Pick a #hashtag or @username that's close to your heart and let Tweetghetto create the perfect poster for you. See tweets become print and make their dwelling among us.

Tweetghetto is a time capsule for your digital world. It frames the fragments, showcases what stirs you up, and creates life-bits that bridge the gap between virtual and physical memory.
twitter  webapp  posters  papernet  fun  todo.it  tweetghetto 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Christian Groß — SMS to Paper Airplanes
"Purpose, I tried to visualize the text message communication between my girlfriend and myself. Since we are in a long distance relationship and living in two different countries text messages are often the easiest way to communicate. The challenge was to find a medium, which is variable and able to visualize the information of the text messages, but at the same time allows to keep the content private. For me the paper airplane was the perfect image for this scenario, because the text messages as well as travelling by plane are the most common ways for us to cover the distance.

The text messages were filtered and analyzed using PROCESSING. The sender was encoded by the direction of the paper airplane, the length of the message with its size and the amount of positive emotional words with the amounts of folds. Additionally the paper airplanes were divided in two types depending on the length of their text…"
art  sms  craft  paper  papernet  via:russelldavies  airplanes  paperairplanes  visualization  christiangross  christianGroß  texting  communication  planes  making  classideas 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Create your Tweetbook with Bookapp
"Archive your Twitter feed into a beautifully printed and bound book or keep it in PDF form."
papernet  printondemand  twitter  books  printing  tweetbook  bookapp  selfpublishing  self-publishing 
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Mixbook: A Print-on-Demand Compilation of Web Content
"Its 254 pages contain 29 articles I bookmarked over the past year, as well as a brief introduction I wrote, making 30 entries total. It also includes many improvements that I wish I could have made to the 2009 version, like a table of contents, better image quality, much better typography, and a very nice detail suggested by Mark—tinyurl's for each article (much easier for readers to type in). I also am pleased with the cover, which I created by scanning in my idea book—the composition book I use every day (see image below). Of course, I had to clean it up considerably as mine is getting pretty beat up.

At some point I realized that "mixbook" is the perfect word to describe what this is. I used to make mixtapes for friends in middle school and high school, and would spend tons of time hand-making covers and liner notes. I loved the idea of making each tape a unique object. Making books like this is similar."

[via: http://booktwo.org/notebook/items-received-by-post/ ]

[See also other volumes:
https://www.newfangled.com/a_year_of_ideas_volume_1
https://www.newfangled.com/a_year_of_ideas_volume_3
https://www.newfangled.com/a_year_of_ideas_volume_4 ]
mixbooks  papernet  instapaper  ebooks  books  paper  print  publishing  christopherbutler  2011  longreads  lulu  mixtapes 
july 2011 by robertogreco
undef | receipt-racer
"RECEIPT RACER: a microproject by undef and Joshua Noble

The receipt racer combines different in and output devices into a complete game. It was made during the "Let's feed the future workshop", organized by creativeapplications.net as a part of the OFFF Festival in Barcelona on June 8th 2011.

The game is played on a receipt printer, a common device you can see at every convenient store. It prints those papers you usually find crumbled up in your pockets, just to throw them away. It is a thermal printer using heat to darken the paper. This eliminates any slowdowns in printing lots of black. A roll can be ordered online and costs around 80 cents."
design  art  games  humor  videogames  papernet  make  receiptracer  gaming 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Instaprint - A location based photo booth for Instagram
"Instagram has brought the nostalgia of old Polaroid prints back to modern day, but deep down we all still miss the uniqueness of those square little photos you'd hold comfortably in your hand. So, we made Instaprint.

Each Instaprint box is set with its location or a specific hashtag. Any Instagram tagged with that location or hashtag will pop out of the Instaprint box, giving you a modern day photo booth.

To stay true to the old days, Instaprint uses a new printing technology developed by Zink. Similar to how instant film once worked, the color for the prints comes from the paper itself. No ink necessary."
photography  instagram  photobooth  polaroid  papernet  via:russelldavies  printing  print  location  location-based 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Book creator - Wikipedia
"With the book creator you can create a book containing wiki pages of your choice. You can export the book in different formats (for example PDF or ODF) or order a printed copy."
via:preoccupations  wikipedia  papernet  books  pdf 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Print Stuff
"You are looking at my printer sending out stuff picked by some people on the internet. You can do that too, just fill in the form and click «Print». This stuff I'm collecting will eventually become a book."
print  web  design  online  papernet  classideas 
january 2011 by robertogreco
2010 End-of-the-Year Card
"The 2010 card is a personalized “physical mashup” that combines maps, photos, and business information.

The front panel of the card is a laser-cut map of the streets around the recipient's address. Underneath is an interesting photograph that was taken around the same area. The envelope features a map of local businesses along with their Yelp ratings."
flickr  maps  paper  papernet  2010  mapping  personalization  photography  business  yelp 
december 2010 by robertogreco
John Kestner : Supermechanical objects : Tableau physical email
"Remember when we made a connection by handing someone a photo? As our social circle spreads across a wider geographic area, we look for ways to share experiences. Technology has reconnected us to some extent, but we fiddle with too many cables and menus, and those individual connections get drowned out.

Tableau acts as a bridge between users of physical and digital media, taking the best parts of both. It's a nightstand that quietly drops photos it sees on its Twitter feed into its drawer, for the owner to discover. Images of things placed in the drawer are posted to its account as well.

Tableau is an anti-computer experience. A softly glowing knob that almost imperceptibly shifts color invites interaction without demanding it. The trappings of electronics are removed except for a vestigial cable knob for the paper tray. The nightstand drawer becomes a natural interface to a complex computing task, which now fits into the flow of life."
furniture  design  email  inspiration  twitter  papernet  printing  slow  post-digital 
december 2010 by robertogreco
I Wish This Was
"New Orleans is full of vacant storefronts and people who need things. These stickers are an easy tool to voice what you want where you want it. Fill them out and put them on abandoned buildings and beyond.

These stickers are custom vinyl and can be easily removed without damaging property. They're free and can be found in corner stores, cafes, bookstores, bars, hair salons, and other places around New Orleans. See select photos here and share more on Flickr (tag your photos "iwishthiswas") or email photos or locations.

This project was created by local designer Candy Chang and launched with exhibit Ethnographic Terminalia at DuMois Gallery. Come to the opening Nov 19 or visit the show until Dec 3 2010 for good times and free stickers."
candychang  crowdsourcing  stickers  urbanism  neworleans  location  labels  papernet  city  nola  activism  iwishthiswas  via:migurski  cities  classideas  civics  potential 
november 2010 by robertogreco
The Snailr Project
"One journey of almost 7000 miles, six new cities, eight trains, fifteen days, and every vignette, observation and fractured bitty-bit of the travelogue broken up and sent as status messages the old way. By postcard. To a bunch of random people who asked for one. Because travelling slowly is nice. And so is leaving a trail to see where we have been."
papernet  travel  snailr  slow  slowtravel  postcards  glvo  amtrak  trains  us  sanfrancisco  losangeles  seattle  memphis  neworleans  chicago  portland  nola 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Seed Booklet : handbuilt
"This small book introduces the story & philosophy of a charter school dedicated to children of immigrant native families. It is designed with a combination of sacred imagery, hand-drawing, and computer generated diagrams. For this extremely low budget book we used newsprint paper and basic black and white printing."
lcproject  schools  printing  handbuilt  design  graphics  papernet  schooldesign  losangeles  learning  education 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Media Surfaces: The Journey – Blog – BERG
"These little inventions have hopefully got you to your train (Arthur, remember?) on time, and in a more of a relaxed state of mind…

In one of our concept sketches below we’re exploring that first case – could your ticket be the missing jigsaw piece to the reservation stub?

A bit Willy Wonka magic ticket!…

We know that we’re going to be passing certain places at certain times, to some accuracy, during our journey.

The burgeoning amount of geo-located data about our environment means we could look to provide snippets from Wikipedia perhaps, with timings based on how they intersect with your predicted journey time – alerting you to interesting sights just as they pass by your window.

These tiny, personalised, collectable paper-spimes provide a kind of papernet augmented-reality – giving a routine journey an extra layer of wonder and interest."
berg  berglondon  papernet  paper  trains  augmentedreality  2010  displays  everyware  spimes  design  information  future  ubicomp  mediasurfaces  dentsu  transport  surfaces  mattwebb  timoarnall  jackschulze  ar 
november 2010 by robertogreco
editions_volumiques
"What's a book to become in the 21st century post internet and network media revolution? In particular with video games, interactivity sheds a new light as to what the potential of a story can be, and what the role of the reader is. How does one introduce the connected and computational user experience of digital media into the paper book, to actualize it, widen its scope, and engage the reader in new ways?

We do not consider the e-book as the replacement of the paper book, but we wish to enrich the tangible, emotional and intimate connection that paper brings, with all the new dimensions of the digital world. Each of our projects explores a different face of this union of paper and computation.

Bertrand Duplat & Étienne Mineur"

[via: http://www.architectradure.com/2010/06/17/magic-books/] [see also: http://www.my-os.net/blog/index.php?2010/05/27/1489-les-editions-volumiques-se-devoilent ]
iphone  mobile  paper  augmentedreality  books  games  interactive  papernet  applications  bertrandduplat  étiennemineur  editionsvolumiques  ios  ar 
july 2010 by robertogreco
russell davies: cognitive surplus - blog all dog-eared pages
"[we] assume there's continuum of reward for tasks. Or that it's additive. If we'll do Task A for free because it interests us, we'll do more if offered money. Not necessarily true. & adding money to mix profoundly changes our feelings about task...I suspect 'creating something personal, even of moderate quality' & letting people share it is going to be one of business models of next century. & one of social movements...even more interesting if we can squeeze convenience & scale of internet into other places…what you need to do - satisfy desire for autonomy, competence, generosity & sharing. Flickr does that…The easiest way to misunderstand Twitter & Facebook...take them as single type of network. Because there are celebrities on Twitter, w/ 100s of 1000s of followers, people assume that's what it's for...broadcast, celebrity, mass audience tool...[but] it's also small, personal, intimate one...I wonder...Whether public & personal existing w/in same channel/tool is sustainable"
russelldavies  2010  books  clayshirky  culture  design  technology  socialmedia  creativity  creation  papernet  networks  diy  make  cognitivesurplus  twitter  facebook  public  personal  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  rewards  tcsnmy  stickybits 
june 2010 by robertogreco
PRE/POST Editions
"We’re in the pre- era of publishing and media. Some consider it the era of pre- digital dominance or pre- death of printed matter. Others hear the talk of change, clutch their hardcovers and shrug it off as a bunch of hype: the pre- not worth worrying about it era. Whatever we consider this pre- era to be, it’s undeniably post- many things that defined publishing until about ten years ago. It’s post- having to bend to big distributors. It’s post- ignoring the screen as a viable reading space. And we’re rapidly closing in on post- printing mass-market throwaway books (they’ll work great digitally)."

[via: http://blog.frankchimero.com/post/641095000/what-is-the-future-of-print-design-how-will-the ]
post-digital  postprint  print  ebooks  craigmod  books  media  maps  tokyo  publishing  change  papernet  objects 
june 2010 by robertogreco
russell davies: what I meant to say at lift - part one - sharing, physicality, mixtapes and newspapers
"And that made me wonder if that's why people are liking Newspaper Club so much? Are we getting close to some sweet spot where you get the satisfactions of sharing a physical thing but with the convenience of sharing information. Is that what you can get when you add Digital Sharing Technologies to Physical Manifesting Technologies? We're not there yet. We're probably only at Sharing Goods like Sharing Services but even that seems like a step forward. Maybe that's why making your own book feels so right, maybe that's where we need to go next with DataDecs, maybe that's what Shapeways and Ponoko will enable, but I think there's something in this."
russelldavies  clayshirky  newspapers  sharing  music  socialmedia  tangible  technology  papernet  books  behavior  community  culture  post-digital  minimalism  information  mixtapes  ponoko  datadecs  shapeways  digital  satisfaction  services  goods  newspaperclub 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Paper-Based Visualization Competition: The Winner and More - information aesthetics
"The "jury", who were Nicholas O'Leary and infosthetics, have chosen the winner of the paper-based visualization competition. First of all, a great thank you for all those who have submitted their entries! It is amazing to see the amount of creativity, time and effort has been put into each single submission.

Petals [charlenelam.com] by Charlene Lam merged the qualities of beauty, originality, and usability the best. As an independent object, it looks clean and sophisticated. The curves give it a real organic feel whilst the relation between daylight hours is clear. It is also definitely something that can be picked up and examined for a closer look. The price, the book Tactile: High Touch Visuals will be on its way soon.

Check out all the other entries below. Let us know what you think about the entries, and having competitions on infosthetics in general."
paper  papercraft  infodesign  infographics  informationdesign  inspiration  visualization  craft  data  design  mapping  maps  2009  informationaesthetics  papernet 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Make Your Own Moleskine-Like-Notebook
"Your very own Moleskine-like-notebook/journal/sketchbook. The one we'll be making is 3.5 x 5.5 x .5 inches. I use this size because it fits nicely into my back or front pants pocket. Strangely enough it is also the same size as the Moleskine notebook. For the pages we'll be using 20# bond paper (the same paper you use in your copier and inkjet printer). As you might have noticed in the dimensions, the notebook is a half-inch thick. This gives you 192 single pages of writing/sketching/painting fun. For the cover we'll use vinyl Naugahyde (that's what I use but feel free to use whatever you have on hand). After we're through I'll offer a list of enhancements and alternative ways to make your notebook/journal/sketchbook to meet your individual needs.

Don't be put off by the many steps involved. This really is a simple project using common materials and tools. Almost anyone can do it."
via:migurski  art  book  bookbinding  moleskine  notebooks  howto  gtd  lifehacks  tutorial  tutorials  make  books  crafts  design  diy  papercraft  papernet  paper  projects  srg  glvo  tcsnmy 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Introducing Upload from Flickr | MagCloud
"MagCloud’s new “Upload from Flickr” feature lets you easily turn your Flickr photo sets into a magazine without the need to use a design program or upload a PDF file.

All you have to do is create a set in Flickr and authorize MagCloud to connect to your Flickr account. MagCloud will import the photos and lay them out automatically. In just minutes, you'll have a photo magazine all your own!

The new "Upload from Flickr" feature is a fun and fast way to turn wedding photos, family vacation pictures, your kid's little league action shots, your professional portfolio images and more into a high-quality printed keepsake magazine.

To give it a try, just create an issue and choose the "Upload from Flickr" option."
flickr  papernet  paper  magazines  print  publishing  photos  tools  photography  tcsnmy  classideas 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Bing - New Bing Maps Application: Destination Maps - Bing Maps Blog - Bing Community
"Need to give people directions to your house, business or party (yeah, baby!). Use the Destination Maps application just specify a place (such as Club XS in Las Vegas); set the area of interest by dragging the sides of the on-map square to include all the areas people are coming from; then give the map a title. You can select multiple map styles such as Sketchy, European, American or Treasure (a la pirate! – featured). Very reminiscent of the Line Drive maps from my Vicinity days...only way fricking cooler!"
maps  mapping  bing  tcsnmy  directions  geo  piratemaps  papernet  mashups 
january 2010 by robertogreco
russell davies: outbreaks of futurosity
"What's particularly impressive is the client's willingness to deal with chaos, mess and risk. It's one thing to embrace the messiness of the web when that's the only place it lives - on a screen. It's another thing to commit yourself to printing thousands of copies of 'who knows what', sticking your logo on it and distributing it to your most important audience members. But that's exactly what we/they are going to have to get used to doing."
russelldavies  future  newmedia  schulzeandwebb  transmedia  planning  media  print  papernet  risk  risktaking  messiness  chaos  tcsnmy  gamechanging  berg  berglondon 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Pulse Laser: Maps as service design: The Incidental
"From the early brainstorms we came up with idea of a system for collecting the thoughts, recommendations, pirate maps and sketches of the attendees to republish & redistribute the next day in a printed, pocketable pamphlet, which, would build up over the four days of the event to be a unique palimpsest of the place and people’s interactions with it, in it. ... One thing that’s very interesting to us that is using this rapidly-produced thing then becomes a ’social object’: creating conversations, collecting scribbles, instigating adventures – which then get collected & redistributed. As author/seer Warren Ellis points out, paper is ideal material for this: “…cheap. Portable. Biodegradable/timebound/already rotting. Suggestion of a v0.9 object. More likely to be on a desk or in a pocket or bag or on a pub table than to be shelved. More likely to be passed around.” ...The Incidental is feedback loop made out of paper & human interactions - timebound, situated and circulating in a place."

[more here: http://magicalnihilism.com/2009/04/22/a-palimpsest-for-a-place/ ]
papernet  schulzeandwebb  mattjones  theincidental  maps  post-digital  paper  newmedia  print  servicedesign  papercamp  mapping  interactive  berg  berglondon 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Pulse Laser: The New Negroponte Switch
"…is the title of a talk I gave at Frontiers of Interaction V in Rome yesterday, primarily about the territory of “the Internet of Things” moving from one of academic and technological investigation to one of commercial design practice, and what that might mean for designers working therein."
mattjones  papernet  schulzeandwebb  design  servces  spimes  brucesterling  nicholasnegroponte  services  physical  thingfrastructure  tangible  intangible  russelldavies  attentionanchors  data  berg  berglondon  post-digital 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Walking Papers [more here: http://mike.teczno.com/notes/walking-papers-lives.html]
"Print maps, draw on them, scan them back in and help OpenStreetMap improve its coverage of local points of interests and street detail. Make A Print: OpenStreetMap is a wiki-style map of the world that anyone can edit. In some places, participants are creating the first freely-available maps by GPS survey. In other places, such as the United States, basic roads exist, but lack local detail: locations of traffic signals, ATMs, cafés, schools, parks, and shops. What such partially-mapped places need is not more GPS traces, but additional knowledge about what exists on and around the street. Paper Walking is made to help you easily create printed maps, mark them with things you know, and then share that knowledge with OpenStreetMap."
openstreetmap  papernet  stamendesign  walking  maps  mapping  crowdsourcing  paper  neocartography  cartography  michalmigurski  osm 
june 2009 by robertogreco
collision detection: James Bridle publishes two years of his tweets in a hardcover book
"If you’ve used Twitter for any length of time, eventually it probably occurs to you: Hmmm, this lifestream is a pretty weird record of my life, isn’t it? A zillion little things that happen to you, random stray thoughts, links of things you were looking at: A pointillist memoir, as it were. Every tiny piece seems daft or meaningless, but — as I’ve written in my articles about Twitter/Facebook before — when you add them all up you get a curiously rich sense of someone’s existence.

So I was tickled to see that James Bridle has taken this conceit to the extreme — by publising two years worth of his tweets as a hardcover book. He hoovered them out of Twitter using a custom script, designed it nicely, and sent it to Lulu.com to be printed up! As he notes:"
books  twitter  clivethompson  memory  publishing  microblogging  papernet  lulu 
march 2009 by robertogreco
zinepal.com
"Use zinepal.com to create your own magazines or zines for short. Select content from your favorite blogs, websites or RSS feeds and put it in your zine. zinepal.com creates an online version and a printable PDF. Then you print it and read it in your favorite coffee shop, e-mail it to your friends or just let them subscribe to your online zine feed."
zines  unbook  via:russelldavies  print  pdf  publishing  magazines  papernet 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Warren Ellis » Dubplates, Battle Weapons, Unbooks And Ebooks
"The thing that caught my eye about the Unbook was the idea of accepting a book as a version: an evolving beast that spits out periodic iterations of itself before crawling away to mutate some more. And it occurred to me today that that actually ties into the idea of the Battle Weapon — the 12-inch released to test new experiments in music (more commonly known as dubplates these days).

(See also "short fiction as the club scene," short/flash fiction as the dubplate)
Paid-PDF as a Battle Weapon? A v0.9 release of a book or collection of ideas? Not quite the "electronic Advance Reading Copy" that people like Baen release in digital formats, maybe — but it could be. It could also be much more beta than that. Novelettes and bags-of-notes. Who knows? Let it mutate."

[See also: http://www.warrenellis.com/?p=7029 AND http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2009/03/hack-the-book.html ]
warrenellis  unbook  writing  publishing  ebooks  papernet  future  books  ideas 
march 2009 by robertogreco
russell davies: unnotebook
"As I mentioned before, I've been messing about with an 'un' version of a notebook. I've always wanted a notebook that did two things: 1. Helped you take notes in the most efficient manner. I'm not quite sure what that efficient manner might be though, so the first book allowed me with different styles: 2. The second thing I wanted a notebook that would provide entertainment for those moments when the meeting is clearly a dead loss. So above is a template for making a crossword:"
russelldavies  notebooks  unnotebook  paper  papernet  diy  productivity  srg 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Of books and unbooks « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"To my mind, anyway, the unbook is a container for long-form ideas appropriate to an internetworked age. By building on some admittedly dorky but highly useful tropes of software, mostly having to do with version control, open-endedness and an explicit role for the “user” community, the notion allows such works to usefully harness the dynamic and responsive nature of discourse on the Web, while preserving coherence, authorial voice and intent."
adamgreenfield  books  unbook  ebooks  collaboration  publishing  writing  community  papernet  freeculture  technology  unfinished 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Chris Heathcote: anti-mega: pirates and scalpels
"These are the maps I create daily. They’re pirate maps – simple maps that have just the information I need to get somewhere. I’ve learnt that what’s most important for me are roads and roadnames. Often I’ll be using these with google maps on my phone – matching the flashing blue dot and roads with the map. Actually – I’ve very forgetful, and I’ll leave them in the hotel. Luckily, as I’ve said before, the learning is in the making."
chrisheathcote  papercamp  piratemaps  papernet  hacking  mapping  maps  mapmaking  cartography  travel  geolocation  guidebooks  books  cv  learning  wayfaring  orientation  making  diy 
january 2009 by robertogreco
russell davies: analogue natives
"So much joyful digital stuff is only a pleasure because it's hugely convenient; quick, free, indoors, no heavy lifting. That's enabled lovely little thoughts to get out there. But as 'digital natives' get more interested in the real world; embedding in it, augmenting it, connecting it, weaponising it, arduinoing it, printing it out, then those thoughts/things need to get better. And we might all need to acquire some analogue native skills."
russelldavies  analog  printing  making  arduino  spimes  technology  papernet  hardware  digital 
december 2008 by robertogreco
PaperCamp « Magical Nihilism
"Following Josh’s Paperbit’s work, Aaron’s Papernet thinking and Dave’s investigations of the changing form of books, we came up with a nascent plan for a PaperCamp - a weekend of hacking paper and it’s new possibiities. I scrawled some ideas.
* Way-new printing
* Protospimes
* Ingestion/Digestion/Representation
* Bionic sketching
* Folding/structure
* Paper’s children
As per usual, I don’t really know what any of these mean exactly. It was kind of automatic writing.
But.
It does feel like there’s something here, and I’m really intrigued at what might happen at a papercamp(s).
Who’s with me?"
paper  papernet  mattjones  books  design  innovation  future  hacking  make  papercamp 
november 2008 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] The hills are alive with the sound of shadows
"It's (always been) clear that a four-page pocketMMap doesn't work but it's equally clear that any collection of personal or shared history will eventually grow beyond the upper limits of a single sheet of paper. So what to do? One idea I'd like to play around with is clustering the list of points by some measure of proximity — say by distance or mapping lat/long to a corresponding WOE neighbourhood ID — and then generating a smaller, shorter pocketMMap for each. That probably makes for more individual sheets to fold but also defers doing so until it's actually necessary and in the end, better maps to the way that we hold the overlapping facets and stories of a place in our mind."
maps  mapping  floding  paper  papernet  pocketmod  tcsnmy  make  classideas  turkishmaps  pocketphone  pocketmaps  montreal  guidebooks  sharedhistory 
november 2008 by robertogreco
¡Mapa Gigante!
"¡Mapa Gigante! is a web site that lets you make high resolution GIANT MAPS!"
via:rodcorp  maps  google  printing  googlemaps  mapping  papernet 
july 2008 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] What if web pages “foxed” like paper?: The Shape of Content
"even if you used a tool like del.icio.us maps to find something you might use separate application to actually make yourself a pirate map...Imagine being able to link to completely different pirate map tool by passing location's latitude & longitude"
maps  papernet  mapping  piratemaps  api 
march 2008 by robertogreco
aaronland.info - papernet
"If we imagine human language and computers as two equal and opposing forms of magic — never able to fully understand one another — then papernet can be seen as a bridge, and the papernet as the API, between the two"
paper  web  tangible  maps  mapping  digital  human  online  internet  things  artifacts  touch  papernet 
february 2008 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] What if web pages “foxed” like paper?
"I love slippy maps as much as the next person but...I have a paper fetish...I mean, I hate the Internet. At least the web. And probably electricity...still worming my way through the boring details that grow like barnacles on the side of the Papernet."
maps  mashup  paper  python  design  papernet  mapping  slippymaps 
february 2008 by robertogreco

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