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robertogreco : paulrand   8

An Anatomy of Uncriticism: What happens to design when we’re afraid to take on our sacred cows?
"three categories of popular practice that seem largely uncriticized…living legends…too good to be criticized: the power of intentions…the power of happy.

In a recent talk at AIGA Chicago, Alice Twemlow, the chair of the design-
criticism M.F.A. program at the School of Visual Arts (where I also teach), argued that criticism does the most good when it moves from talking about design to talking about society and the world…

Should critics be silenced by economic success? By the limits of their own geography and experience? If they were, design could turn into an online popularity contest, about nothing more than what gets the most retweets…

…if criticism is to be constructive, it has to take on the Apples, not Snow White as represented by an apple with a bite out of it."
massimovignelli  miltonglaser  seymourchwast  oxo  stevejobs  urbanized  objectified  paulrand  linkbait  brucenussbaum  designimperialism  humanitariandesign  garyhustwit  highline  chipkidd  yvesbehar  gracebonney  designsponge  tinarotheisenberg  dezeen  alicetwemlow  2012  getcritical  examinedlife  swissmiss  designobserver  design  criticism  alexandralange 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Erika Hall's answer to What books would be most useful in a Humanities Starter Pack targeted at a technically minded audience? - Quora
"Remember also that such a pack would have to be small enough not to scare geeks away (or be graded somehow)…"

Erika Hall: "Nichomachean Ethics - Aristotle (350 BCE), Guns, Germs, and Steel - Jared Diamond (1997), The Age of Reason - Thomas Paine (1794), Paul Rand: Conversations with Students - Michael Kroeger (Conversations took place in 1995, book published in 2008), Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus - Mary Shelley (1818), Søren Kierkegaard's In Vino Veritas"
maryshelley  kierkegaard  paulrand  aristotle  jareddiamond  booklists  books  erikahall  2011  humanities 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Paul Rand + Steve Jobs — Imprint-The Online Community for Graphic Designers
"Below is a scan of the NeXT logo book (which Jobs loved so much, he reprinted it and gave it out as a keepsake/textbook). The pages are scanned as it appears in an original French-bound copy, although the color gray is not faithful to the original.  Also, here is a 1993 video interview between Jobs and Alan Pottasch about Rand."
design  stevejobs  paulrand  logos  next  apple  history  graphicarts  glvo 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Uncovered Gem: Steve Jobs on Paul Rand | Brain Pickings
"I asked him if he would come up with a few options. And he said, ‘No, I will solve your problem for you, and you will pay me. And you don’t have to use the solution — if you want options, go talk to other people. But I’ll solve your problem for you the best way I know how, and you use it or not, that’s up to you — you’re the client — but you pay me.’"<br />
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"He’s a very deep, thoughtful person who’s tried to express in every part of his life what his principles are. And you don’t meet so many people like that today."
art  design  stevejobs  paulrand  problemsolving  clients  work  pay  trust  glvo  howwework 
july 2011 by robertogreco
How Print Design is the Future of Interaction - Mike Kruzeniski
"Products like Flipboard are attractive because they are consciously and carefully designed to highlight the content, instead of crowding the experience with UI tools. The design of these experiences is being driven by new thinking in interaction design, where visual design is central to the experience, rather than painted on at the end. Once the traditional elements of UI are torn away, designers can concentrate their efforts on working iwth the content that remains. And it ends up looking a lot like Print. If we pull Visual Design to the front of the product creation process, we can break free of the bad design habits that surround us. As Interaction Designers we can stop polishing our icons, and focus on communicating the content inside, clearly and with style. The rewards are simple: more beautiful products that are easier to use, and beautifully branded experiences with more room for self-expression."

[Now here: http://kruzeniski.com/2011/how-print-design-is-the-future-of-interaction/ ]
2011  mikekruzeniski  technology  digital  print  design  content  undesign  overdesign  history  interaction  interface  experience  ui  flipboard  printdesign  adamgreenfield  typography  pacing  instapaper  iconography  imagery  objectivity  markboulton  berg  berglondon  vannevarbush  paulrand  andreiherasimchuk 
may 2011 by robertogreco
electronic computation is invisible: maeda at RISD (tecznotes) {best to read the whole thing, and also the Natalia Ilyin post]
"…post about Maeda’s difficulties at RISD is interesting, but I was particularly struck by broader resonance of this:

"The Medialab is much more random than that. This may help to illuminate why John’s approach is so alien to traditional art students. Paul Rand seems to think it’s John’s engineering background which interferes with his leadership ability at RISD, but I think it’s actually scarier. John’s approach is hands off & experimental. Anything goes. Confusing & startling people is valorized…

…NONE of these artists have managed to broach the basic limitation that electronic computation is invisible. All techno artwork thus far relies on impenetrable microchips which require observer/participants to form abstractions in order to appreciate them. Look how hard it is to teach art students to program…

…once you go back in time & look at a Maeda or PLW project & realize you can’t run their code anymore, the collapsing of reality can be devastating."
johnmaeda  michalmigurski  risd  2011  handsoff  leadership  management  disconnect  medialab  mit  engineering  confusion  experimentation  paulrand  computers  computation  art  electroniccomputation  invisibility  reality  collapsingofreality  administration  learning  change  abstraction  inpenetrability  technology  mitmedialab 
april 2011 by robertogreco

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