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Soulellis: Artistic Practice in 24-Hour Light Rhode Island...
"Artistic Practice in 24-Hour Light
Rhode Island School of Design
Reykjavík, Iceland
14 June – 4 July 2017

Artistic Practice in 24-Hour Light is a course for 13 students in Reykjavík, Iceland. The three-week program is modeled as an artists’ residency and collaborative creative practice, culminating in a public happening. Students will develop their own work, with guidance and support from the instructors and visiting artists. We begin with a series of open prompts, developed as a collaborative teaching tool with Sal Randolph, to bring city/landscape/place into the studio. The course encourages seeing, writing, thinking, and making, towards the development of a new work (or a small body of work).

Continuous solstice light and a vibrant artists’ community will be the context for on-site experimental making, engaging with public, and performing publishing. Our studio will be located at Iceland Academy of the Arts. This intensive course investigates new ways to make poetic work in response to place, using wild terrain, white nights, public space, the street, studio practice, the internet, and one of the world’s oldest continuously functioning democracies as our studio at large. 

With visits to Hveragerði, Snæfellsnes, Vatnasafn, and Hvalfjörður. 

The program concludes with a performative event, to be staged at Mengi on our final night.   

With guidance from Bryndís Ragnarsdóttir, DIspersed Holdings (Sal Randolph & David Richardson), guest artists, and writers. 

[via: "trying to run it like an artists' residency, with guidance but lots of freedom."
https://www.instagram.com/p/BVpR3HCnIbO/
2017  paulsoulellis  iceland  risf  reykjavík  art  design  residencies  openstudioproject  lcproject  classideas  salrandolph  happenings  creativity  writing  travel  collaboration  making  workinginpublic  thinking  poetry  artbooks  aritistsbooks 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Web-to-print-to-street
"1
An experiment in making public by Paul Soulellis
OPEN SET Summer Design School
V2 INSTITUTE FOR THE UNSTABLE MEDIA
3 AUG 2016 10–18

When considering the future of publishing, why not look to the street? Tracing the act of “making public” in physical space is a trajectory that stretches back as far as urbanity itself. Spoken, written and visual language evolved in spaces of assembly and commercial activity, and flourished along trade routes; the distribution of media is intimately tangled up with the history of built environments and the movement of people, goods and services. And it’s this connection between the physical body and the circulation of information that bears examining: since material now flows along immaterial networks, might we look to the artist performing in public as a new site, or perhaps a re-siting, of publishing activity?

Let’s re-visit the street as a modality for making public. If we define publishing as the filtering and amplification of material, then public space is an obvious place to find this activity, bound up in material and performative notions. The urban street is a market of materialities: a mesh of connected systems, infrastructure, and networks. Like the internet, the public street is an open, flowing landscape where extreme conditions of chance and restriction exist in constant negotiation. These distinctions between physical and immaterial space, once easy, now break down in the street, where every citizen is a node on the network.

“Web-to-print-to-street” is a one-day workshop where we will take an inventory of possible moves in the street, from posting to stacking to dropping to hand delivery. Publishing is performed continuously on social media, so as material boundaries blur and blend, let’s consider the literal translation of network culture into physical space as an acta diurna (a daily act). Our site is the city of Rotterdam and we have countless publics available to us. For a few hours, we’ll examine our own networks and feeds for worthy material, considering the effects of selection and printing on the value of our work. We will experiment with simple moves that “de-amplify” our content, moving it from fast social media to slower rooms of sociability. Our goal is discovery: what kinds of publics and performative techniques are possible? What are new strategies for slowing down attention in the physical encounter?

READINGS

Workshop PDF
Michael Warner, “Publics and Counterpublics,” 2002.
Annette Gilbert (ed.), Publishing as Artistic Practice, Sternberg Press, 2016.
Susan Stallman, “The Ethos of the Edition: The Stacks of Felix Gonzalez-Torres,” Arts Magazine 66, 1991.
Michael Bhaskar, The Content Machine: Towards a Theory of Publishing from the Printing Press to the Digital Network. New York: Anthem Press, 2013.
Seth Price, “Dispersion,” 2002.
Paul Soulellis, “Performing Publishing: Infrathin Tales from the Printed Web,” 2015.

2
REFERENCES

Post
Jenny Holzer
Norman B. Colp
Stephanie Syjuco
Brian William Green
Julia Weist
Drop
Flugblätter (flying leaves)
Aram Bartholl Dead Drops
Sal Randolph’s Free Words
Anastasia Kubrak
Little Free Library
Stack
Edson Chagas / Tankboys
Felix Gonzalez-Torres
Perform
Town crier
David Horvitz pickpockets an art fair
Weymouths
Anouk Kruithof’s Pixel Stress
Facebook Live Map

3
WORKSHOP

10–11:15 Introduction and discussion
11:15–12:15 Filtering
12:15–13:30 Break
13:30–14:30 Production (Print! Assemble!)
14:30–17 Amplification! Make public.
17–18 Share, celebrate, publish."
paulsoulellis  design  publishing  public  makingpublic  printedweb  papernet  social  sociability  sharing  classideas  jennyholzer  juliaweist  salrandolph  deaddrops  arambartholl  anastasiakubrak  littlefreelibrary  towncrier  davidhorvitz  weymouths  anoukkruithof  pixelstress  facebooklivemap  edsonchagas  tankboys  normancolp  stephaniesyjuco  brianwilliamgreen  michaelwarner  annettegilbert  susanstallman  michaelbhaskar  sethprice 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Portlander on Vimeo
"Portlander is a site-specific publication produced from a one-month residency in a public library on the Isle of Portland, England in June 2014. The 64-page print-on-demand newspaper contains photography, oral histories, text fragments, found material and other ephemera collected during chance encounters and connections with various members of the Portland communities. 3,000 copies of Portlander were printed and distributed throughout Portland for the b-side arts festival in September 2014. Funded by Arts Council England."

[See also: http://soulellis.com/2014/08/the-last-day-of-august/
http://soulellis.com/2014/06/on-portland/ ]
paulsoulellis  artbooks  books  publication  newspapers  photography  place  2014  portlander  portland  england  print  projectideas  classideas  srg  artistsbooks 
september 2014 by robertogreco
DE$IGN | Soulellis
"I’ve been thinking a lot about value and values.

Design Humility and Counterpractice were first attempts to build a conversation around the value of design and our values as designers. They’re highly personal accounts where I try to articulate my own struggle with the dominant paradigm in design culture today, which I characterize as —

speed
the relentlessness of branding
the spirit of the sell
the focus on product
the focus on perfection

and they include some techniques of resistance that I’ve explored in my recent work, like —

thingness
longevity
slowness (patience)
chance (nature, humility, serendipity)
giving away (generosity echo)

I’ve been calling them techniques, but they’re really more like values, available to any designer or artist. Work produced with these criteria runs cross-grain to the belief that we must produce instantly, broadcast widely and perform perfectly.

Hence, counterpractice. Cross-grain to common assumptions. Questioning.

And as I consider my options (what to do next), I’m seriously contemplating going back to this counterpractice talk as a place to reboot. Could these be seen as principles — as a platform for a new kind of design studio?

I’m not sure. Counterpractice probably need further translation. An idea like ”slowness” certainly won’t resonate for many, outside of an art context. And how does a love for print-on-demand and the web fit in here? Perhaps it’s more about “variable speed” and the “balanced interface” rather than slow vs fast. Slow and fast. Modulated experience. The beauty of a printed book is that it can be scanned quickly or savored forever. These aren’t accidental qualities; they’re built into the design.

[image by John Maeda: "DE$IGN"]

I’m thinking about all of this right now as I re-launch Soulellis Studio as Counterpractice. But if there’s anything that most characterizes my reluctance to get back to client-based work, it’s DE$IGN.

John Maeda, who departed RISD in December, where I am currently teaching, recently delivered a 4-minute TED talk, where he made this statement:

“From Design to DE$IGN.”

He expands that statement with a visual wordmark that is itself designed. What does it mean? I haven’t seen the talk yet so I can only presume, out of context. These articles and Maeda’s blog post at Design and Venture begin to get at it.

Maeda’s three principles for using design in business as stated in the WSJ article are fine. But they don’t need a logo. Designing DE$IGN is a misleading gesture; it’s token branding to sell an idea (in four minutes—the fast read). So what’s the idea behind this visual equation? As a logo, it says so many things:

All caps: DE$IGN is BIG.
It’s not £ or ¥ or 元: DE$IGN is American.
Dollar sign: DE$IGN is money.

DE$IGN is Big American Money.

and in the context of a four-minute TED talk…

DE$IGN is speed (four minutes!)
DE$IGN is the spirit of selling (selling an idea on a stage to a TED audience)
DE$IGN is Helvetica Neue Ultra Light and a soft gradient (Apple)
DE$IGN is a neatly resolved and sellable word-idea. It’s a branded product (and it’s perfect).

In other words, DE$IGN is Silicon Valley. DE$IGN is the perfect embodiment of start-up culture and the ultimate tech dream. Of course it is — this is Maeda’s audience, and it’s his new position. It works within the closed-off reality of $2 billion acquisitions, IPOs, 600-person design teams and Next Big Thing thinking. It’s a crass, aggressive statement that resonates perfectly for its audience.

[Image of stenciled "CAPITALISM IS THE CRI$IS"]

DE$IGN makes me uneasy. The post-OWS dollar sign is loaded with negative associations. It’s a quick trick that borrows from the speed-read language of texting (lol) to turn design into something unsustainable, inward-looking and out-of-touch. But what bothers me most is that it comes from one of our design leaders, someone I follow and respect. Am I missing something?

I can’t help but think of Milton Glaser’s 1977 I<3NY logo here.

[Milton Glaser I<3NY]

Glaser uses a similar trick, but to different effect. By inserting a heart symbol into a plain typographic treatment, he too transformed something ordinary (referencing the typewriter) into a strong visual message. Glaser’s logo says that “heart is at the center of NYC” (and it suggests that love and soul and passion are there too). Or “my love for NYC is authentic” (it comes from the heart). It gives us permission to play with all kinds of associations and visual translations: my heart is in NYC, I am NYC, NYC is the heart of America, the heart of the world, etc. .

Glaser’s mark is old-school, east coast and expansive; it symbolizes ideas and feelings that can be characterized as full and overflowing. And human (the heart). It’s personal (“I”), but all about business: his client was a bankrupt city in crisis, eager to attract tourists against all odds.

Maeda’s mark is new money, west coast and exclusive. It was created for and presented to a small club of privileged innovators who are focused on creating new ways to generate wealth ($) by selling more product.

Clever design tricks aside, here’s my question, which I seem to have been asking for a few years now. Is design humility possible today? Can we build a relevant design practice that produces meaningful, rich work — in a business context — without playing to visions of excess?

I honestly don’t know. I’m grappling with this. I’m not naive and I don’t want to paint myself into a corner. I’d like to think that there’s room to resist DE$IGN. I do this as an artist making books and as an experimental publisher (even Library of the Printed Web is a kind of resistance). But what kind of design practice comes out of this? Certainly one that’s different from the kind of business I built with Soulellis Studio."
paulsoulellis  2014  conterpractice  design  humility  capitalism  resistance  branding  speed  slow  consumerism  sales  salesmanship  perfection  wabi-sabi  thingness  longevity  slowness  patience  nature  chance  serendipity  generosity  potlatch  johnmaeda  questioning  process  approach  philosophy  art  print  balance  thisandthat  modulation  selling  ted  tedtalks  apple  siliconvalley  startups  culture  technology  technosolutionsism  crisis  miltonglaser  1977  love 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Stetson | Soulellis
"Stetson is an experiment in geo-historical typography. The single-weight face is drawn from a very small sample of 19th century hand-drawn letterforms, found within an old photograph in a shed in Weymouth, Massachusetts. The sample, “E. H. Stetson and Co.,” is surrounded by a display of shoes. Not far from where the photograph was found is the actual Stetson Shoe Co. factory building, which operated in Weymouth from 1885 until 1973.

Stetson Shoe Co. is an indelible part of Weymouth’s history, having employed most of the community throughout much of the 20th century. Shoe manufacturing was an important source of socio-economic strength and pride for the town. The significance of Stetson is firmly embedded in the identity and language of Weymouth, even as its relevance vanishes. Its meaning today is ghost-like and elusive; it haunts photos, stories and family histories.

The Stetson typeface is in a kind of spatio-temporal duet with its own history: it locates itself within the original photograph (late 19th-century New England), as well as in the shed on January 11, 2012. The letterforms vibrate in time and space.

Stetson was created for Weymouths, a 12-volume book project commissioned by the 2012 b-side Arts Festival in Weymouth, England (part of the Maritime Mix / London2012 Cultural Olympiad by the Sea). Production by Thomas Jockin.

Stetson is available here for free download under an SIL Open Font License / Version 1.1 [FAQ].

Download Stetson PDF Specimen
Download Stetson OpenType Font [OTF]"
typography  typefaces  fonts  stetson  paulsoulellis 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Print-on-demand | Experimental Book
"I know a few of you are thinking about print-on-demand (POD) for the photobook project. POD is fast and cheap and has totally changed the nature of self-publishing. It’s quite good for some things, and not so great for others.

A few reasons to use POD:

— easy, quick mock-up of an idea, even if you plan to produce it in another way;
— cost: some formats allow you to print a book for under $10;
— with very low up-front costs, you can produce a few machine-made, perfect-bound books with a more commercial feel;
— your books can be purchased through a digital storefront;
— if you plan on producing 1–100 books——more than that and it makes sense to look at other formats;
— if you plan to make changes to your book and you’re unsure how many to print;
— to have access to formats that are not typically available outside of a commercial context (newsprint, magazine).

A few reasons not to use POD:

— you give up control of some aspects of the production of your work;
— frequent printing/binding errors (printer will usually offer a credit);
— you’re limited by the specs of the POD printer (size, finish, paper);
— not cost-efficient for producing more than a few books (especially if over 100);
— cost (you’re bound by the printer’s set pricing).

Popular POD printers:

— Blurb.com
— many soft- and hardcover book formats
— special finishes specifically for photobooks (much more $)
— magazine format (including printing on inside front and back covers)—I can show you a sample of this if you’re interested
— digital storefront
— upload PDF via website

Lulu.com
— many soft- and hardcover book formats
— digital storefront
— upload PDF via website

Newspaperclub.com
— various newsprint formats
— free shipping to most places
— scheduled printing 2x per week
— upload PDF via website

Espresso Book Machine (various locations)
— lower quality
— b/w interiors / color covers
— very fast (sometimes on-the-spot)
— physical, walk-in locations only

Magcloud.com
— magazine format from HP

I’ve had mostly good experiences with Blurb, Lulu, Espresso and Newspaperclub, but I’ve never used Magcloud."

[via this thread: https://twitter.com/rogre/status/405790451791175680

@soulellis What do you use for digital printing on demand? Lulu? Blurb? Other?

@rogre all of the above plus @newspaperclub. but for 530 [http://soulellis.com/projects/530-2/ ] I found a digital printer in Reykjavík, who was able to print 50 books only.

@soulellis @newspaperclub Thank you.

@soulellis Any preference or noticeable differences between Lulu and Blurb?

@rogre Blurb good for magazine format and photobooks, Lulu good for thick text-based pubs. Also --> http://experimentalbook.wordpress.com/2013/10/17/print-on-demand/

@soulellis Perfect. Thanks so much. ]
books  publishing  paulsoulellis  printondemand  lulu  magcloud  espressobookmachine  newspaperclub  blurb  printondemnad  printing  selfpublishing  ondemand  self-publishing  epublishing  digitalpublishing 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Slow reading. | Soulellis
Weymouths Volume 7 is a journey, a zoom, a reaching back. A dig, a reveal.

This is where I encounter the visible remains of another society. Below the surface, here’s the evidence of worship, ritual, architecture — structures that pre-date our sense of real (embedded within the identity of the place, but “beyond the map”). Volume 7 is about the “Roman works and fortifications with which the neighbourhood abounds,” upon Jordan Hill, just outside Weymouth, England. In 1844 the Ashmolean Society detailed the discovery of the remains, and published the notes at Oxford in 1854.
“The most remarkable discoveries made by Mr. Medhurst in 1843, and visited in October last by Dr. Buckland and Mr. Conybeare, were the foundations of a temple on the summit of Jordan Hill, and of a villa, a quarter of a mile distant, between this hill and the village of Preston.
“Dr. Buckland conjectures that this building may have been a temple of Esculapius, which received the votive offerings of the Roman families and invalids who visited Weymouth for sea-bathing and for health.”


As the 19th-century text travels into the foundations (details of bird skeletons, human bones, seeds, coins and ashes), I zoom into my photograph of the temple foundation taken at Jordan Hill on 6 March 2012. I go deeper into the surface and the photograph reveals a single color, like a flatlining of historical narrative. Perhaps this is a way to escape the figurative. By the end of the 112-page book, my documentation of Roman remains floats around a single pixel of color, like some suggestion of another reality. I can’t think of a more authentic way to look.

In Volume 10 I discovered that I can slow down the read by devoting an entire page to a single word. A single paragraph spread over 59 pages. Reading at a different scale, to expose other structures over time, like erosion.

Here is slow reading, again — this time, a single sentence on each spread. This is how reading can be like zooming. This is how reading can be more like digging. Slow reading leads to open reading.
2012  paulsoulellis  slow  slowreading  reading  books  weymouths  pace  pacing 
november 2013 by robertogreco
good reading on the train to white plains this morning. printing/multiples/publishing. for the students today -- and realizing that 'experimental book studio' should be called experimental publishing studio next time I teach it. | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"good reading on the train to white plains this morning. printing/multiples/publishing. for the students today -- and realizing that 'experimental book studio' should be called experimental publishing studio next time I teach it."

[This book: http://www.amazon.com/Print-Out-20-Years/dp/0870708252/

"Over the past two decades, the art world has broadened its geographic reach and opened itself to new continents, allowing for a significant cross-pollination of post-conceptual strategies and vernacular modes. Printed materials, in both innovative and traditional forms, have played a key role in this exchange of ideas and sources. This catalogue, published in conjunction with an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, examines the evolution of artistic practices related to printmaking, from the resurgence of traditional printing techniques--often used alongside digital technologies--to the worldwide proliferation of self-published artist's books and ephemera. Print/Out features focused sections on ten artists and publishers--Ai Weiwei, Edition Jacob Samuel, Ellen Gallagher, Martin Kippenberger, Lucy McKenzie, Aleksandra Mir, museum in progress, Robert Rauschenberg, Superflex and Rirkrit Tiravanija--as well as rich illustrations of additional printed projects from the last 20 years by major artists such as Trisha Donnelly, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Thomas Schütte and Kelley Walker. An introductory essay by Christophe Cherix, Chief Curator of Prints and Illustrated Books at the Museum, offers an overview of this period with particular attention to new directions and strategies within an expanded field of printmaking." ]
paulsoulellis  2013  books  publishing  experimentalbooks  experimentalpublishing  printing  papernet  toread 
november 2013 by robertogreco
The Generosity Echo
"Like many designers today, I spend a great deal of time in the cloud—connecting with friends and followers on Twitter and other social media platforms. These tools are important; they allow us to amplify our work and broadcast to a larger design community with incredible speed and ease. And I’ve come to rely on my network as a kind of support, generously encouraging me with valuable feedback, or even friction.

But do these tools actually let us engage in deeper conversations around our work? While I treasure the constant connection to the crowd, I find it difficult to slow down for more focused inter­actions unless I’m physically present. For me, the opportunity to go further in a discussion around my work—to explore, to learn, to grow—best occurs when it can mediate both digital and physi­cal worlds.

So I decided to take my work outside. Not just out into the ele­ments, but beyond many of my normal boundaries as a designer. Frustrated with my own addiction to the screen and propelled by my need for richer connections, I stepped outside the studio, curious to discover new kinds of encounters.



By the end of the project, I had received several gifts in return: books, notes, original artwork, countless stories and powerful memories that will stay with me forever. I continue to be inspired by all of the encounters. The community that formed around my books was small but seemed expansive in its ability to generate new meaning. In each connection, regardless of what was exchanged, my audience countered the books with their own sense of the meaningful, and passed it on. Sometimes, the shared action touched one or two people; other times, it expanded and bounced around town. I called it the generosity echo.

Weymouths was an experiment in orchestrated serendipity and small-batch community-building. It’s not exactly a sustainable model; we can’t give everything away. But try it for yourself, at any scale: see what happens when you let go of some of your work—and your assumptions. By stepping outside and returning to the face-to-face—and confronting the fear of an unknown audience—you may rediscover the power of real-time conversa­tion. Sometimes the only thing that separates your work from an engaged community is being present."
generosity  gifts  gifteconomy  paulsoulellis  2013  books  projectideas  community  openstudioproject  slow  small  vulnerability  art 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Experimental Book | Purchase College VDE4600
"Experimental Book traces the development of the artist’s book through the twentieth-century and beyond. This interdisciplinary Art + Design studio course asks highly motivated students to consider the future of the book and expand the boundaries of the traditional codex through provocative studio exercises and projects.

The class will benefit from critical readings, site visits to important book collections, notable guest critics and a collaborative, hands-on studio atmosphere.

Students will help shape the book’s radical trajectory into the twenty-first century by producing their own book works. Of particular interest will be the physicality of the book as it evolves in the digital space, including print-on-demand, book scanning, book videos and book-in-browsers.

Working with noted artist and creative director Paul Soulellis, the studio will engage in thematic exercises to explore narrative structure, form, chance, word and image, digital vs. print technologies, photography, typography and production, as well as audience and performance.

Each student will develop a final book project and participate in a collaboratively-designed studio exhibition."

[Readings: http://experimentalbook.wordpress.com/readings/ ]

[See also: http://soulellis.com/2013/10/any-answer-is-as-good-as-any-other-answer/ ]
bookmaking  books  paulsoulellis  2013  classideas  projectideas  experimental  syllabus  booklists  syllabi 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Non-fiction fantasy | Soulellis
"I’m at the backpacker’s café in Akureyri and I’m thinking about the book, taking shape. It’s just a matter of days until I send it to the printer in Reykjavík.

I worry about how it’ll be received. That it might be seen as a superficial view of the place. That my outsider’s coated view could offend people who live here. This tiny town is hard. Guarded, deliberate, private, protective, proud. Even in such a closed place, I’ve been welcomed by some and I’ve discovered beautiful characters, and they appear in the work.

I guess another way to say it is this way: that I feel vulnerable, creating a work in public like this. On-site, on-demand, in full view. Maybe it makes the work stronger. It certainly makes it much more of an event for me. The book as performative output.

Then again, my goal has never been to paint a portrait of this place. I would never dare to call this a representation of Skagaströnd. The work stands on its own and draws from my encounters. It’s a private, subjective take (how could it not be).

Could I call it a non-fiction fantasy?

The process that developed here builds on Weymouths, but this project is threaded with chance operations in a bigger way. My 39 chapters (I’ve been calling them movements) were mixed by chance to create a score that I’m using to design the book. Every step of the design of the book has been with this score at my side.

Chance feels important here. I described it to Emy like this: chance is my intern. I’m using it in the background like a loaded character. It’s a way to pair, juxtapose, determine. My hope is that it opens up the surface, that the images and texts can go beyond the smallness of fixed appearance."
paulsoulellis  iceland  skagaströnd  2013  books  nonfiction  fantasy  chance  found  workinginpublic 
august 2013 by robertogreco
This photograph | Soulellis
"I leave in a few days to do a public book project in a small town in northern Iceland. And for the last few months, I’ve been thinking about what to bring. The artist’s residency sent tips about bringing supplies, and friends have suggested various things, like picking a few significant tools or objects and shipping them beforehand, so that they’re waiting for me when I arrive.

Just in the last week, I decided that I should bring almost nothing. Whatever I’m going to make will come from the place, and I’m going to leave the work there. So it just makes sense that everything should happen there, during my eleven-week stay. I’ll bring a computer and camera and my clothes, of course, but if I need supplies, I’ll find them. I’m going to spend a few days in Reykjavik, where there’s a good art supply store, before driving north. But mostly, I want to use found materials, on-site in and around Skagaströnd. I don’t want to predetermine what process or form the work will take until I’m there, reacting to places and people.

I’m just going to show up.

But I am going to bring one thing. This one photograph. Here’s how I got the photograph.



So I’ll take the photo back to Iceland. I don’t know what I’ll do with it. I consider it a collaborative prompt. A chain reaction. David was in a specific place, and took a photo, marking himself in that place. He sent it to Taeyoon, who sent it to me, and now I’m taking it back to that place, completing some kind of loop (but setting other loops in motion, of course).

A chance encounter between three artists, connected by a photograph, in three places, in two countries, via mail and twitter and mail and flying and driving. It contains a world of information. The way Taeyoon folded the photograph. The numbers, the roads, the colors, placenames on a map.

So I’ll take the photo back to Iceland and see what happens."
paulsoulellis  packing  travel  making  art  networks  connectedness  geography  place  photography  mapping  local  2013  iceland  taeyoonchoi  davidhorvitz  location  looping  flip-flop 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Library of the Printed Web
"Library of the Printed Web is a collection of works by artists who use screen capture, image grab, site scrape and search query to create printed matter from content found on the web. LotPW includes self-published artists’ books, photo books, texts and other print works gathered around the casual concept of “search, compile and publish.”

Artists featured in LotPW drive through vast landscapes of data to collect and transform digital information, visual and otherwise, into analog experience; every work in the collection is a printed expression of search engine pattern discovery. Many of the works in LotPW share common production and publishing techniques (e.g., print-on-demand), even as the content itself varies widely.

I’ve assembled this set of materials because I see evidence of a strong, emerging web-to-print-based artistic practice based on the search engine and other algorithmic operations; as this view matures, the inventory of LotPW may grow to reflect new concepts and methodologies.

Rather than draw boundaries or define a new aesthetic with LotPW, I posit this presentation of printed artifacts as a reference tool for studying shifting relationships between the web (as culture), the artist (as archivist) and print publishing (as a new/old self-serve schema for expressing the archive).

Library of the Printed Web exists both as a physical collection of book works and as an online representation of these works. The permanent collection is based in Long Island City, NY and includes one copy of each item in the inventory, except where noted. LotPW will launch as a table-top presentation at Theorizing the Web, CUNY Graduate Center, 1–2 March 2013.

To suggest a title or artist to be included in Library of the Printed Web, or for any other inquiries, contact Paul Soulellis."
art  library  libraries  books  papernet  2012  libraryoftheprintedweb  googlebooks  LotPW  paulsoulellis  screencapture  digital  search  flip-flop 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Soulellis - Eco and Boff—a riff.
"Leonardo Boff: The dead is only invisible, not absent. [http://twitter.com/leonardoboff_/status/195369054926675969 ] There is a great spiritual void in humankind. A good theologian has to go through the temptation of atheism. What would happen to sailors and astronauts without the stars to guide them and give them courage for the journey? I live in utopia, like stars…we never reach the stars, but what would happen to our nights if they didn’t have stars? Paulo Freire, who was also one of the founders of liberation theology, noted that the poor must be the agent of his/her own liberation. We don’t want a theology of development; we want a theology of liberation. A good theologian has to go through the temptation of atheism. The challenge will be to learn to divide the few resources we’ll have fairly, so this community of peoples will have enough to survive. One day we’ll all be socialists, not because of ideology, but because of statistics…we do not have another earth, ours is a small planet with limited resources. To live together with all our differences in a ‘communal house’ with scarce resources, for that’s all we will have. One day we will have an earthly democracy, a planetary democracy where human beings will have to learn to survive together. Humankind is headed for great suffering, one that will cause us to change and learn… As Hegel argues, ‘we learn from history that we do not learn from history;’ and I say that we learn not from history but from suffering…

Umberto Eco: I do not want to draw a hard and fast line between those who believe in a transcendent God and those who do not believe in any supra-individual principle. [http://twitter.com/umbertoeco_/status/195953965035302912 ] Remember, Spinoza’s great book was called Ethics and opened with a definition of God as cause of Itself. This Spinozian divinity, as we well know, is neither transcendent nor personal; and yet even from the idea of a great and unique cosmic Substance into which we shall one day be reabsorbed, there can emerge a vision of tolerance and benevolence precisely because we all have an interest in the equilibrium and harmony of this unique Substance. We share this interest because we think this Substance must, in some way, be enriched or deformed by what we have done over the millennia. What I would hazard (not as a metaphysical hypothesis, but as a timid concession to the hope that never abandons us) is that even from this point of view you can postulate once more the problem of some kind of life after death…Who knows if death, rather than an implosion, might not be an explosion, a re-formation somewhere in the vortices of the universe, of the software (which others call the soul) which we fashion in the course of our lives, and which is made up of memories and personal remorse (and therefore incurable suffering), or of a sense of peace at duty fulfilled—and love."
life  substance  spirituality  leonardoboff  spinoza  umbertoeco  development  utopia  liberation  atheism  communalism  theologyofliberation  theology  paulofreire  environment  socialism  2012  paulsoulellis 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Scan/flip/spread | Soulellis
"How we author, design and publish language-based communications is undergoing a radical shape-shift. The acceleration of the book (as commodity, technological device, art object) has entered a new stage of evolution in our trajectory towards constant presence and the post-human, and reading—the eye-brain processing of written culture—has much to lose, and gain, in the transformation.

What legacy of the book do we wish to bequeath to the future?

What is the futurestory of the book?

Several attributes of reading that are about to be lost, perhaps only temporarily (patina, olfactory, nostalgic), have opened up deep space for others (gestural, social, access, speed). And even more are on the way, as we prepare for the near-future absorption of the screen into the body (Google Glasses)…

…I propose a series of printed book experiments on the occasion of MutaMorphosis: Tribute to Uncertainty. These are actions of resistance—strategies for countering our growing need to read in haste. Three concepts will direct us to a poetic, if analog, investigation of book/time and the fast/slow speed of reading: scan, flip and spread. Working with found texts, public domain works, bot-generated ephemera and other digital artifacts, a printed book or short series of books that encourages and/or discourages slow reading will be produced as a limited print-on-demand edition for the MutaMorphosis conference (via Espresso Book Machine or other inexpensive digital-to-paper solution). The books will be distributed to all conference participants for discussion (panel, artist’s presentation or otherwise, TBD).

Scan/Flip/Spread puts forward the idea of the fast(er) book (print-on-demand) and braises it with the slow read. The investigation will explore the interface of the printed book—page-to-language ratio, typographic depth and density, page-turn-time, frame, weight, read rhythm, chance, flip speed and other formal aspects of the page; as well as content—questions of narrative, sense, curation and image/word play. Our goal, as a group, will be to create a space to embrace and counter the technologies of automation that are transforming language, visual culture, the page and reading—through the printed book object."
paulvirilio  design  longform  automation  dromosphere  printondemand  mutamorphosis  uncertainty  spread  flip  scan  future  ebooks  bookfuturism  googleglass  speed  access  socialreading  gestures  nostalgia  smell  patina  reading  publishing  books  2012  paulsoulellis  slowreading  slow  selfpublishing  self-publishing 
september 2012 by robertogreco

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