recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : pay   27

Refusing the Adjunct Route | HASTAC
"Today, English is much more than writing--it is integrated communications, technology, social networking, gamification, and integrated hybrid/online/and face to face learning management and course design. The lines between journalism and communication and English are blurred. Digital Media is something I do, and I do it well. History isn't just the study of dead people doing stuff--it is also using big data for predictive analysis of future trends, providing research for global temperature studies, digitizing historical maps, and analyzing political movements. Art is science redefined as data becomes understandable through visualizations, infographics, and stunning graphics. We see art in video games, movies, and in and on every object we could imagine. It has become a complete integration in our lives. Music is psychology and business and technology all wrapped into a tune--and its popularity and spread has never been greater.

So, perhaps the death of humanities has been announced too soon. As I sit here, I wonder who will teach the students the skills they need to succeed in this new entrepreneurial world of technology without the humanities. I wonder where advertising and business will get their content and their digital storytelling. I wonder who will write the background music for their next big technology conference, and I muse about who will keep track of all that is happening so that we don't have to reinvent the wheel every five years.

But even as many of those in Humanities are grasping the brass ring of innovation in Digital Media, pulling in grants, research funds, and renown--we are thrown into the street. The professors who were accountable to the college, who the students could count on for referrals and advice, and mentorship are being let go and replaced by part-timers who are underpaid and who owe no allegiance to the college. Who could blame them for doing as little as possible--when most are paid less than $2,000 to teach a class for 15 weeks (In case you are keeping track, that averages out to about $134 a week for a class that includes three hours of teaching and seven hours of prep each week. That means they are making about $13 an hour with a Ph.D.).

So, I will do my best to keep from taking one of those jobs. Not only is it an insult to me, and my talent, education, and experience, but if I take an adjunct position now because there are no full-time jobs--I will only exacerbate the situation.

So, join me. Keep the humanities professional, and the jobs full-time by refusing to take an adjunct position. Instead get jobs as writers, journalists, marketing professionals, and social media specialists. If you have to, get a job doing something completely unrelated to the humanities, but keep writing and creating in your own space and on your own time. This is the only way we will force the hand of the universities and, of course, increase our worth in the workplace so that we won't be willing to come back for a paltry sum.

We need to stand together. We need to starve the colleges of their cheap labor. We need to succeed in other professions. Then, and only then, will we save humanities."
humanities  adjuncts  2015  michellekassorla  communication  english  technology  socialmedia  socialnetworking  journalism  music  art  digitalmedia  digitalhumanities  pay  labor  work  academia  highered  highereducation 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Startups and Self-Loathing at the 8th Annual Crunchies Awards | Re/code
"Outside, Stewart Butterfield, the co-founder of Slack and an award winner that evening, was having a cigarette. He said the Valley loved satire because it cuts to the core of the issue: Much of the work and money in the startup industry is absurd. It’s almost disturbing. Satire is a way to cope.

“Everyone here must know that everyone is making too much money, and that’s why we love satire,” he said. “If anyone is honest with themselves, they must think that the reward is disproportionate to the work.”"
stewartbutterfield  technology  startups  money  economics  inequality  work  pay  income  crunchies  2015 
february 2015 by robertogreco
How much are words worth? - scottcarney.com
"After ten minutes listing the average number of features in each magazine multiplied by the number of issues annually we had a number: 800. On average these stories would run at about 3000 words and pay $1.50 per word. It was only a ball-park estimate of the overall freelance writing market cap. But it was also a rather depressing one. Let me put this in bold so it stands out on the page.



The total market for long form journalism in major magazines in America is approximately $3.6 million. To put it another way: the collective body of writers earned less than Butch Jones, a relatively unknown college football coach, earned in a single year.


$3.6 million. That’s it. And the math gets even more depressing. If we assume that writers should earn the average middle class salary of $50,000 a year, then there’s only enough money in that pot to keep 72 writers fully employed. And, of course, those writers would have to pen approximately 11 well thought out and investigated features per year–something that both my friend and I knew was almost impossible.


Now, it could be that our estimate was a little low. But even if you double it–a number that is almost certainly far and above the size of the actual feature market, then we are collectively still barely scraping above $7 million paid out by magazines in word rates every year. According to Small Business Chronicle, the overall magazine publishing industry generates a total revenue of $35-40 billion a year. While that number includes lots of publications that are not in our sample, it does give at least some sense OF how small a slice of the pie writers actually earn.



Another way to figure out what the total publishing industry is worth is to check out the advertising rates that mainstream magazines publish on their websites. Take Wired, for example – not to pick on them, but because they are a representative of the some of the best journalism that exists in the country today. According to its media kit, a single page of advertising sells for $141,680. (And that’s not even the top of the market. A full page ad in GQ sells for more than $180,000). Multiply that by the number of full page ads in a single issue of Wired (about 30) and you get about $4.6 million in gross revenues per issue of the magazine.



Think about that for a second. A single issue of one major American magazine generates more gross revenue than what the entire magazine industry pays out in word rates over an entire year. If you figure that Wired spends about $30,000 on words in any given issue then a little more back of the envelope math says that words account for only 0.6% of the magazine’s revenue.



As a writer, this state of affairs horrifies me. I feel strongly that writers contribute more than just 0.6% of value to the overall magazine industry. Yes, magazines have a host of expenses–printing, distributing, editing, fact checking, office overhead and marketing all have a cost. But there is also something deeply sick in how little writers’ work is actually valued by the industry."
journalism  writing  pay  compensation  media  magazines  longform  2014  scottcarney  publishing  2015 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Robert Reich (Work and Worth)
"What someone is paid has little or no relationship to what their work is worth to society.

Does anyone seriously believe hedge-fund mogul Steven A. Cohen is worth the $2.3 billion he raked in last year, despite being slapped with a $1.8 billion fine after his firm pleaded guilty to insider trading?

On the other hand, what’s the worth to society of social workers who put in long and difficult hours dealing with patients suffering from mental illness or substance abuse? Probably higher than their average pay of $18.14 an hour, which translates into less than $38,000 a year.

How much does society gain from personal-care aides who assist the elderly, convalescents, and persons with disabilities? Likely more than their average pay of $9.67 an hour, or just over $20,000 a year.

What’s the social worth of hospital orderlies who feed, bathe, dress, and move patients, and empty their ben pans? Surely higher than their median wage of $11.63 an hour, or $24,190 a year.

Or of child care workers, who get $10.33 an hour, $21.490 a year? And preschool teachers, who earn $13.26 an hour, $27,570 a year?

Yet what would the rest of us do without these dedicated people?

Or consider kindergarten teachers, who make an average of $53,590 a year.

Before you conclude that’s generous, consider that a good kindergarten teacher is worth his or her weight in gold, almost.

One study found that children with outstanding kindergarten teachers are more likely to go to college and less likely to become single parents than a random set of children similar to them in every way other than being assigned a superb teacher.

And what of writers, actors, painters, and poets? Only a tiny fraction ever become rich and famous. Most barely make enough to live on (many don’t, and are forced to take paying jobs to pursue their art). But society is surely all the richer for their efforts.

At the other extreme are hedge-fund and private-equity managers, investment bankers, corporate lawyers, management consultants, high-frequency traders, and top Washington lobbyists.

They’re getting paid vast sums for their labors. Yet it seems doubtful that society is really that much better off because of what they do.

I don’t mean to sound unduly harsh, but I’ve never heard of a hedge-fund manager whose jobs entails attending to basic human needs (unless you consider having more money as basic human need) or enriching our culture (except through the myriad novels, exposes, and movies made about greedy hedge-fund managers and investment bankers).

They don’t even build the economy.

Most financiers, corporate lawyers, lobbyists, and management consultants are competing with other financiers, lawyers, lobbyists, and management consultants in zero-sum games that take money out of one set of pockets and put it into another.

They’re paid gigantic amounts because winning these games can generate far bigger sums, while losing them can be extremely costly.

It’s said that by moving money to where it can make more money, these games make the economy more efficient.

In fact, the games amount to a mammoth waste of societal resources.

They demand ever more cunning innovations but they create no social value. High-frequency traders who win by a thousandth of a second can reap a fortune, but society as a whole is no better off.

Meanwhile, the games consume the energies of loads of talented people who might otherwise be making real contributions to society — if not by tending to human needs or enriching our culture then by curing diseases or devising new technological breakthroughs, or helping solve some of our most intractable social problems.

Graduates of Ivy League universities are more likely to enter finance and consulting than any other career.

For example, in 2010 (the most recent date for which we have data) close to 36 percent of Princeton graduates went into finance (down from the pre-financial crisis high of 46 percent in 2006). Add in management consulting, and it was close to 60 percent.

The hefty endowments of such elite institutions are swollen with tax-subsidized donations from wealthy alumni, many of whom are seeking to guarantee their own kids’ admissions so they too can become enormously rich financiers and management consultants.

But I can think of a better way for taxpayers to subsidize occupations with more social merit: Forgive the student debts of graduates who choose social work, child care, elder care, nursing, and teaching."
2014  robertreich  worlk  labor  inequality  incomeinequality  income  pay  economics  productivity  wages  capitalism  purpose  value  money 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Who Pays Artists?
"Making a living as an artist can be hard.

You never know how much to ask for. Discussions about money are taboo because we pretend that passion and creativity alone should pay the bills. Some of the best events have “no budget”, and sometimes only the worst events can make a career as an artist look painfully sustainable. Let’s help each other sort through some of the confusion, and develop an ongoing dialogue about how artists make money."
art  money  pay  artists 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Why salaries shouldn't be secret - Vox
"One of the problems is that virtually everybody in corporate America — from senior management all the way down to entry-level employees — has internalized the primacy of capital over labor. There’s an unspoken assumption that any given person should be paid the minimum amount necessary to prevent that person from leaving. The simplest way to calculate that amount is to simply see what the employee could earn elsewhere, and pay ever so slightly more than that. If a company pays a lot more than the employee could earn elsewhere, then the excess is considered to be wasted, on the grounds that you could get the same employee, performing the same work, for less money.

How is it that most Americans still believe in this way of looking at pay, even as we reach the 100th anniversary of Henry Ford’s efficiency wages? Ford was the first — but by no means the last — businessman to notice that if you pay well above market rates, you get loyal, hard-working employees who rarely leave. Many contemporary companies have followed suit, from Goldman Sachs to Google to Bloomberg: a well-paid workforce is a happy workforce, which can build a truly world-beating company.

Such companies are, sadly, still rare, however. That’s bad for employees — and it’s bad for the economy as a whole. We need wages to go up: they’ve been stagnant, for the bottom 90% of the population, for some 35 years now. We also need employee turnover to go down: employees become more valuable, in general, the longer they stay with a company — and it takes a long time, and a lot of human resources, to train a new employee up to the point at which they really understand how their new employer works.

There are two things I look for, then, in any company. The first is high entry-level wages. They’re a sign that a company values all of its employees highly; that it likes to be able to pick anybody it wants to join its team; and that it considers new employees to be a long-term investment, rather than a short-term source of cheap labor."



"If you work for a company where everybody knows what everybody else is earning, then it’s going to be very easy to see what’s going on. You’ll see who the stars are, you’ll see what kind of skills and talent the company rewards, and you’ll see whether this is the kind of place where you fit in. You’ll also see whether men get paid more than women, whether managers are generally overpaid, and whether behavior like threatening to quit is rewarded with big raises. What’s more, because management knows that everybody else will see such things, they’ll be much less likely to do the kind of secret deals which are all too common in most companies today."
salaries  pay  employment  administration  management  leadership  2014  felixsalmon  compensation  transparency 
may 2014 by robertogreco
As Inequality Grows, Swiss To Vote On Curbing Executive Pay : Parallels : NPR
"Switzerland may be known for watches, wealth and secretive bank accounts, but increasingly people believe that not everyone is reaping their share of the country's economic well-being.

So on Sunday, the Swiss will vote on a referendum that would limit a CEO's pay to 12 times that of the company's lowest-paid worker.

The youth wing of the Social Democratic Party collected the 100,000 signatures necessary to turn the measure, known as the 1:12 initiative, into a national referendum.

David Roth, head of the party's youth wing, says that 25 years ago Swiss CEOs made six times more than the average worker; today, they earn more than 40 times as much. Roth says in a country of 8 million, 400,000 workers don't make enough to live on.

"I think we have to change something, because otherwise we'll go in a direction like the USA did in the last decade where people get homeless, for example, and other people had millions of dollars," he says. "It's a big problem if you have such inequality in a rich country."

To become law, the initiative needs to win a majority in the country's 26 cantons and among the total population.

"There is indeed a growing movement to at least rein in to some degree — there is a growing disgust, I think, with some of the excesses of corporate executive pay," says Jordan Davis, a reporter for Swiss public radio.

He says the opposition has been pouring money into a counter-campaign in the waning days.

"A lot of the posters you're seeing these days are from the business lobby, where they have these slogans saying it's a fake good idea, saying ... it sounds like a good idea to limit corporate salaries but indeed it's going to be actually terrible for the economy, it's going to force companies to leave and move to other countries," Davis says. "And so they're using, critics have said, scare tactics to get people to reject it."

Mood Across Europe

Anger at high corporate executive pay is flaring up elsewhere in Europe, including Spain.

In France, President Francois Hollande, on the campaign trail last year, promised to bring down the salaries of CEOs heading companies where the French state has a majority stake.

Effective last month, CEOs of French state firms cannot make more than 20 times what the lowest-paid employee earns. Their salaries are capped at around $600,000.

The opposition leader in France, Jean Francois Cope, scoffed at the measure, calling it ostentatious morality.

"How is lowering the salary of the head of the railroad going to change anything?" he said. "If you really want justice, then the average French worker should be earning more."

The latest polls show the Swiss salary measure has only about 36 percent support ahead of Sunday's vote, but proponents say don't count it out.

In March, Switzerland approved a referendum giving company shareholders a direct say in executive pay. That passed amid public anger over a proposed $78 million payout to a former executive of Swiss drug company Novartis."
switzerland  pay  income  incomeinequality  inequality  policy  executivepay  2013  europe  politics  economics 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Mobile Factory With Hope for a Better Life – Mexico City Journal - NYTimes.com
"Textiles had once been a hobby — she used to collect huipiles, the traditional woven tunics of Mexico and Central America — but when she decided to become an artist in 2006, she returned to cloth and sewing. Her work now involves a mixture of textiles and technology. Many of her pieces involve sewn images with circuits that let users push buttons for sounds or displays of light.

Completed works from the mobile maquiladora project, for example, will create the whine of an ambulance siren."
textiles  2012  amormuñoz  mexico  df  mexicodf  economics  minimumwage  pay  labor  maquiladoras  mobilemaquiladora  art  technology  society  activism  mexicocity 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Teacher Layoffs Go Hollywood: Zooey Deschanel's 'New Girl' Character to Be Pink Slipped - Education - GOOD
"Given that 46 percent of teachers leave the profession within five years, it would be pretty realistic to see Jess doing what so many other former educators have done: deciding that she's had enough of the relatively low pay, poor working conditions, and being treated unprofessionally. In the meantime, perhaps we'll see her making ends meet like other laid off educators with a job bagging groceries at Trader Joe's. "
teachers  pay  education  policy  via:lukeneff  television  zooeydeschanel  tv  newgirl  pinkslips  2012  economics 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Clive Thompson on the Problem With Online Ads | Wired Magazine | Wired.com
"Here’s how to make some money: Start a social networking service that runs on phones. Include tight, granular privacy controls, and charge $1 a month for it. Carve out a mere 1 percent of Facebook’s user base and you’ll still be making millions a month.

I predict that in 2050, we’ll look back at the first 20 years of the web and shake our heads. The craptacular design! The hallucinogenic business models! The privacy nightmares! All because entrepreneurs convinced themselves that they couldn’t do what inventors have done for centuries: Charge people a fair price for things they want."

[See laso http://powazek.com/posts/3024 AND http://blog.pinboard.in/2011/12/don_t_be_a_free_user/ ]
del.icio.us  facebook  payment  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  pay  web  online  onlineads  clivethompson  2012  maciejceglowski  pinboard  businessmodel  advertising  maciejcegłowski 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Decline of the Professional – Implications for the Future of Money | OnTheSpiral
"”Professional” in one word says:<br />
<br />
• I do this for money, not for personal gratification.<br />
• There is no grey area between my personal and professional roles.<br />
• When operating in my professional role I get paid.<br />
• When operating in my personal role I don’t talk about work.<br />
• To do so would undermine my ability to get paid.<br />
• I have obligation to my firm and family to bring home the bacon.<br />
• Anyone who doesn’t maintain the same distinction is unprofessional.<br />
<br />
Of course, every one of the assertions above is now losing relevance.  Most importantly we now expect more from our work than money…we now seek to develop careers around our passions, or at least to structure our work environments in order to encourage engagement. As the amount of intrinsically motivated economic activity grows the justifications for commercial payment becomes less clear…"
professionalism  change  careers  passion  pay  wages  economics  motivation  obligation  meaning  purpose  2011 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Uncovered Gem: Steve Jobs on Paul Rand | Brain Pickings
"I asked him if he would come up with a few options. And he said, ‘No, I will solve your problem for you, and you will pay me. And you don’t have to use the solution — if you want options, go talk to other people. But I’ll solve your problem for you the best way I know how, and you use it or not, that’s up to you — you’re the client — but you pay me.’"<br />
<br />
"He’s a very deep, thoughtful person who’s tried to express in every part of his life what his principles are. And you don’t meet so many people like that today."
art  design  stevejobs  paulrand  problemsolving  clients  work  pay  trust  glvo  howwework 
july 2011 by robertogreco
One in five new teachers to change fields — Keskisuomalainen
[Obviously not a perfect translation from Google] "One in five newly graduated teachers to change the field a few years after graduation. The main causes of the exchange are poor pay, job demands and job burnout. Restless children and parents need more and more distressed.

Teachers' identity work of the examiner Cathy Stenberg, teachers do not know enough about him. S identity should be better taken into account in teacher education.

Thus avoiding the burnout that some teachers face in a few weeks. Tiredness also prevents the teacher's role clarification.

The school is social media, multiculturalism and children's leisure activities contribute to a windy spot. Stenberg believes that the school's role should be defined as new.

He winds would also teaching principles. The 1990s, teaching methods are already outdated."
finland  education  via:cervus  burnout  teaching  schools  maybethegrassisnotgreen  policy  work  pay  salaries  attrition  parents  children  realities 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Teacher Pay Around the World - NYTimes.com
"American teachers spend on average 1,080 hours teaching each year. Across the O.E.C.D., the average is 794 hours on primary education, 709 hours on lower secondary education, and 653 hours on upper secondary education general programs."<br />
<br />
"In the United States, a teacher with 15 years of experience makes a salary that is 96 percent of the country’s gross domestic product per capita. Across the O.E.C.D., a teacher of equivalent experience makes 117 percent of G.D.P. per capita. At the high end of the scale, in Korea, the average teacher at this level makes a full 221 percent of the country’s G.D.P. per capita."
teaching  teachers  comparison  us  pay  salaries  workday  hours  via:grahamje  2009  international 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Why I Never Let Employees Negotiate a Raise, Corporate Culture Article - Inc. Article
"Because salary information is viewed as particularly sensitive, employers often go to great lengths to keep it under wraps. Some companies even make it a fireable offense for employees to compare salaries...trouble with keeping salaries a secret is that it's usually used as a way to avoid paying people fairly...not good for employees -- or the company. When my partner & I started Fog Creek, we knew that we wanted to create a pay scale that was objective & transparent. As I researched different systems, I found a lot of employers tried to strike a balance between having a formulaic salary scale & one that was looser by setting a series of salary "ranges" for employees at every level of the organization...felt unfair to me. I wanted Fog Creek to have a salary scale that was as objective as possible...manager would have absolutely no leeway when it came to setting a salary. & there would be only one salary per level."
joelspolsky  fogcreek  management  administration  hiring  pay  salaries  business  money  employment  compensation 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Baumol's cost disease (aka Baumol Effect) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"involves a rise of salaries in jobs that have experienced no increase of labor productivity in response to rising salaries in other jobs which did ...goes against theory in classical economics that wages are always closely tied to labor productivity changes...rise of wages in jobs w/out productivity gains is caused by necessity to compete for employees w/ jobs that did...& hence can naturally pay higher salaries...In range of businesses...car manufacturing & retail, workers are continually more productive due to tech innovations to tools & equipment. In contrast, in some labor-intensive sectors that rely heavily on human interaction or activities...nursing, education, performing arts there is little/no growth in productivity over time...total factor productivity treatment is not available to performing arts sector, because consumable good is labor itself...increases in price of performing arts has been offset by increases in standard of living & entertainment spending by consumers."
productivity  performingarts  work  economics  wages  pay  labor  entertainment  services  manufacturing  via:migurski 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Education Next - For Public School Teachers, Evidence Supports Eliminating Pay for Credentials in Favor of Increasing Starting Salaries and Rewarding Performance Improvements
"Districts should employ an evidence-based salary schedule similar to the salary practices found in professions such as medicine and law, says Vigdor. “Doctors and lawyers reap the full rewards of competence in their profession within 10 years of entrance. Teachers must wait three times that long, even though evidence suggests that they become fully competent in their profession just as quickly,” he points out." see also: http://www.hoover.org/publications/ednext/27100089.html
teaching  schools  pay  policy  salaries  administration  leadership  management 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: The Phrase that Pays
"I'm reading a lot about paying and firing teachers like professionals, but what's often going unsaid is at the same time the trendlines run strongly against teachers being treated like professionals in their practice. In short, it is a lousy deal to be held accountable for student achievement if you have no rights to determine what you teach, how you teach it, what the disciplinary policies are in your school, what the schedule looks like, what resources are allocated to your classroom, etc., etc., etc. What is a professional teacher supposed to do when he is mandated to begin using a curriculum which he believes will result in lower scores for his kids and lower pay for himself? What is he supposed to do after the first year he loses his bonus because of it?"
teaching  schools  policy  pay  control  autonomy  professionals  professionalism  education  meritpay 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Connect the Dots - Practical Theory
"Class size, teacher load, lack of collegiality, lack of support, the sheer massive effort that excellence in the profession takes, day in and day out... all those loom much larger in the minds of the people I know who have left the profession."
teacherexodus  teaching  schools  compensation  work  careers  comingcrisis  education  us  pay  administration  management  learning 
may 2008 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » If Wit And Policy Were One And The Same
see comments reacing to this quote from an article in the Boston Globe: "It's almost as though it makes sense to align compensation with system goals or something…but we know that's crazy talk…"
compensation  teaching  administration  leadership  management  careers  pay  money  schools  education  learning  danmeyer 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Teaching in the 408: The Ledge
"profession incentivizes mediocrity...professional stagnation...leaving...mythical path out of classroom....You want to be pushed and challenged, and when you rise to the challenge you want to receive some form of acknowledgement"
education  learning  meritocracy  mediocrity  teaching  work  cv  administration  management  performance  pay  schools  culture  gamechanging  policy 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Artichoke: Bonking the principal and other "nondiscussables"
"instead of trying to imagine “our dream school” and making suggestions on “creating a sustainable learning community” I am going to propose we talk frankly about favouritism, incompetence, inequitable pay, rivalry, competition, backstabbing and bonking for management units - the “nondiscussables” – the things that make us unhappy about school, the things that mean we will never be a community."
change  education  organizations  community  schools  teaching  administration  management  work  relationships  artichokeblog  pamhook  favoritism  incompetence  officepolitics  inequity  pay 
february 2007 by robertogreco
Meaningless masters at Joanne Jacobs
"Teachers earn more money if they complete a master’s degree, yet there’s no evidence they teach any better."
teaching  effectiveness  pay  masters  education  certification  salaries  work  economics  politics 
january 2007 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read