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robertogreco : payment   14

Selling on the slider — The Message — Medium
"The slider is a hot piece of technology that will play a central role in the future of prices.

The slider need not be cold, and it need not be rational.

It’s not economic efficiency that moves the slider, but emotion.

And for my money, this is the most interesting checkout screen on the whole internet.

[image]

That’s what you see when you’re about to buy a Humble Bundle. There’s a lot going on there, so let me just break it down quickly. The Humble Bundle is a popular product with roots in indie video games that’s expanded into music, movies, books, and more. The deal goes like this:

You, the potential customer, are presented with a bundle of merchandise. Maybe it’s a dozen video games; maybe a truckload of digital comics.
You decide what price you’d like to pay for all of it together. It can be as little as one penny! (This is section 1 in the screenshot above.)
You also decide how that price should be apportioned, splitting it between the content makers, a set of related charities, and the company Humble Bundle, Inc. (This is section 2 above.)

There are some nuances. Most bundles include extra content that you only receive if you meet a certain minimum payment — $10, perhaps. More interestingly, bundles almost always offer extra content that you receive only if you exceed the current average payment — an incentive that, of course, has the effect of slowly raising that average over time.

Honestly, it feels less like a checkout screen and more like a video game.

Humble Bundle’s sliders are the most elaborate you’ll find anywhere, but the basic element is all over the place."



"The slider is a natural fit when you’re buying something from a specific individual, possibly someone known to you or whose work you’ve long admired. It acts as an affinity-meter through which you can convert surplus units of love and gratitude into cold, hard dollars.

But there’s more to the slider, particularly in Humble Bundle’s implementation. It has to do with communication.

The information content of most payments is one bit: either you agree to the asking price and make the purchase, or you don’t. When a payment goes through a slider, that information content increases. When it goes through an interface like Humble Bundle’s… well, I mean, look at this!"
robinsloan  ixd  interactiondesign  pricing  2014  sliders  money  economics  humblebunndle  payment  internet  interface  web  online 
october 2014 by robertogreco
TRANSACTIONS
"Silent scribes record your debt. Nothing passes from hand to hand except the goods you receive, or the services you hire. All of the information necessary for the settlement of your debt is recorded at the same time as the transaction, along with notations about your identity, your past transactions, your social status. Multiple accounting devices exist. Ledgers circulate freely and are convertible, negotiable, can be signed over to others in exchange for other goods and services. There is no coin, no paper money, but rather an infinite chain of receipts in a variety of material formats.

This describes not the future, but the past: the ancient world before the rise of coinage, when money was a unit of account, not a tangible object, and clay tokens, pebbles, string and cuneiform tablets recorded debits and credits.

Instead of coins or paper circulating in exchange as tokens or representations of value, that first era of cashlessness captured in centralized records the transactional information of a multitude of participants and formed the basis for entire systems of exchange. How might we begin to understand the coming era, not as the end of cash so much as the return of cashlessness? How might this attention to the longue durée of transactions reframe our understanding of payments’ materialization? And how might a historically and ethnographically nuanced understanding of payments in practice focus our attention on the material forms of debt and transactional data past, present, and future?

TRANSACTIONS: A Payments Archive aims to open a conversation among curators, academics, payments industry professionals, numismatists, collectors and others about the great human transactional archive. In the process, we seek to expand that archive, to allow more things into it, to question its boundaries, and to reflect on the immaterial and material, ephemeral and durable, worthless and valuable qualities of those things.

Museums have long been repositories for the stuff of money: metal tokens, paper notes, shells, bars, plastic cards, a variety of tangible media of exchange, payment, and value storage. How might we reconstitute a material history of money, debt, payments, and transactional records across the institutional contexts and collections architectures that often leave these artifacts scattered and disconnected? And what of non-physical forms of money, from ancient accounting to contemporary cashlessness? What of the ephemera of transactions, the ledgers and receipts that were themselves frequently transformed into instruments and indexes of credit and tokens of value?

Shifts in the form of money and payment pose a challenge to curation, but also re-open the old question of the nature of money itself. There is also an urgency to this project: Artifacts from the early days of electronic transactions are in landfills, not museums. The preservation and curation of computers and data storage devices is still nascent. That of, say, the paper warning bulletins issued by the early card networks, or the records flowing through the Automated Clearing House—not to mention the diversity and abundance of records-keeping tools and technologies by everyday people around the world—is nonexistent.

TRANSACTIONS aims to provoke conversation by juxtaposing artifacts from across the history of payments and to raise awareness of the history and future of money, payment and transactional records and data. "
artifacts  money  exchange  transactions  anthropology  currency  payment  archives  tokens  objects  history 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Free is not for Nothing. — Medium
"If you’ve never experienced it, “free” just seems like a lower number on a slider that has “half-price” in the middle. But free is not a number.

If you paid for your education, you’re likely to understand education in transactional terms. In straightforward economic terms, it means that if you charge some money, you can have some stuff. With more money comes more stuff, higher quality stuff.

But “free” is something different than “less.” And free is not less than cheap. It’s something else entirely.

Instead of education, try thinking about love. There are people who pay for love. Some pay a lot, some pay a little. But let’s be honest: everyone knows that the moment you start paying anything, it’s not just love plus money. It’s something else entirely, and the problems in paying aren’t solved by paying less than others."



"What our experiences often have in common is this: for many of us, Cooper wasn’t even the cheapest way to go to school. And it certainly didn’t offer the best facilities, campus, labs, studios, athletics, or dorm life. It was always about immense sacrifices.

So the question is: why did we go? We went not because of the financial value of free — that is, zero tuition — but rather, because of the academic value of free.

Free for everyone meant that the students who were there were beholden to nothing (nothing!) except their passion, talent, hard work, and brilliance. This unique, very particular sensibility — that, more than any other thing they could build, hire or install — this was the experience of the institution."



"Because “free” affects far more than than a fiscal bottom line. It affects the intentions, behavior, ambition, and performance of everyone in the system. In other words, it determines the academic quality."



"Remaining free is what will allow Cooper Union’s shortcomings to remain what they were for us: a source of pride, of worthy sacrifice, a reason to fight, and strive, and someday, to give back.

Academic quality is a framing, a mindset, for the best students and for the best faculty, all of whom have choices about where to settle down. They won’t come to Cooper because it’s cheaper. They went there because it was free. We were seeking an exceptional environment. Genuinely exceptional. Cooper Union was exceptional.

It came to the edge through mismanagement and misconduct. And now, I fear, misunderstanding. Most anyone who experienced it knows that the tuition-free education was the source of academic excellence, not the threat to it."



"Attending a free school of sacrifices taught me something about what free meant. Building a half-price school of sacrifices is to succumb to the culture of Cubic Zirconium and Corinthian Leather. It’s fool’s gold. Ghetto scrip. It’s not for real, and it’s not for good."

[Felix Salmon after the vote: "The Shame of Cooper Union" http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2014/01/11/the-shame-of-cooper-union/ ]
kevinslavin  cooperunion  free  love  money  education  academics  struggle  effort  meaning  sacrifice  lean  2014  highered  highereducation  tuition  transactions  payment 
january 2014 by robertogreco
The Spectacle of Paying – Future of Money
"With e-money, money becomes intangible. The »spectacle of paying« illustrates the idea of  visible gestures as a means of transferring and exchanging money face to face. The initial idea was to create  a  stringent system of specific gestures — each gesture equals a certain amount of money such as notes and coins.

The system of conducting in music has no absolute rules on how to conduct correctly, therefore a wide variety of different conducting styles exist. This inspired to think of a more flexible application where there are no set rules."
money  payment  2012  gunnargreen  design  currency  gestures  coins  exchange 
january 2013 by robertogreco
gilest.org: In defence of Flickr
"Flickr costs money, which makes it less fashionable than sites that claim to offer more for nothing. But to me, Flickr is the better choice. It has never stopped being awesome. Long may its awesomeness continue."
flickr  photography  photos  yahoo  marissamayer  gilesturnbull  2012  via:Preoccupations  payment 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Clive Thompson on the Problem With Online Ads | Wired Magazine | Wired.com
"Here’s how to make some money: Start a social networking service that runs on phones. Include tight, granular privacy controls, and charge $1 a month for it. Carve out a mere 1 percent of Facebook’s user base and you’ll still be making millions a month.

I predict that in 2050, we’ll look back at the first 20 years of the web and shake our heads. The craptacular design! The hallucinogenic business models! The privacy nightmares! All because entrepreneurs convinced themselves that they couldn’t do what inventors have done for centuries: Charge people a fair price for things they want."

[See laso http://powazek.com/posts/3024 AND http://blog.pinboard.in/2011/12/don_t_be_a_free_user/ ]
del.icio.us  facebook  payment  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  pay  web  online  onlineads  clivethompson  2012  maciejceglowski  pinboard  businessmodel  advertising  maciejcegłowski 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Scott Simpson, on the complexity of riding the bus - kung fu grippe
"SCOTT: I don’t know what to do. How much is it gonna cost? Am I gonna need exact change? Can I pay by credit card? Do I wave something at the driver? Do I get a discount? Am I allowed to ride the bus?

ADAM: You do. You wave something at the driver. Who happens to be magnetic."
buses  masstransit  complicatedtransactions  newbs  busriding  payment  paymentsystems  publictransit  thisiswhatcarsdotous  scottsimpson  urbancomputing 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Square
"In February 2009, Jim McKelvey wasn’t able to sell a piece of his glass art because he couldn’t accept a credit card as payment. Even though a majority of payments has moved to plastic cards, accepting payments from cards is still difficult, requiring long applications, expensive hardware, and an overly complex experience. Square was born a few days later right next to the old San Francisco US Mint.

Today the Square team is focused on bringing immediacy, transparency, and approachability to the world of payments: an inherently social interaction each of us participates in daily. We’re starting with a limited beta and rolling out to everyone in early 2010."
android  iphone  ipad  payment  processing  creditcards  credit  ecommerce  commerce  glvo  applications  business  mobile  money  design  services  retail  twitter  technology  tools  ios 
may 2010 by robertogreco
State of the Internet Operating System Part Two: Handicapping the Internet Platform Wars - O'Reilly Radar
"This post provides a conceptual framework for thinking about the strategic and tactical landscape ahead. Once you understand that we're building an Internet Operating System, that some players have most of the pieces assembled, while others are just getting started, that some have a plausible shot at a "go it alone" strategy while others are going to have to partner, you can begin to see the possibilities for future alliances, mergers and acquisitions, and the technologies that each player has to acquire in order to strengthen their hand.

I'll hope in future to provide a more thorough drill-down into the strengths and weaknesses of each player. But for now, here's a summary chart that highlights some of the key components, and where I believe each of the major players is strongest.

[chart here]

The most significant takeaway is that the column marked "other" represents the richest set of capabilities. And that gives me hope."
amazon  facebook  google  twitter  apple  microsoft  yahoo  future  cloudcomputing  cloud  timoreilly  web  payment  infrastructure  mediaaccess  media  monetization  location  maps  mapping  claendars  scheduling  communication  chat  email  voice  video  speechrecognition  imagerecognition  mobile  iphone  nexusone  internet  browsers  safari  chrome  books  music  itunes  photography  content  advertising  ads  storage  computing  computation  hosting  browser 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Square Turns Your iPad Into A Cash Register
"As a general-purpose tablet, the iPad can be many things to many people: an ebook reader, a wireless TV, a touchscreen videogame console. But to store owners and business people it can also be a cash register, with the right app, of course. Jack Dorsey’s Square, which was initially developed for the iPhone, now has an iPad app as well"
ipad  applications  ecommerce  payment  money  retail 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Providence in the FAIL of a Sparrow « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"Nevertheless, sooner or later it’s all but inevitable that someone’s going to pull this concept off. I think that someone should be careful what it is that they’re asking for, because they - and we - just might get it."
adamgreenfield  interactiondesign  experience  motorola  shopping  rfid  retail  payment  mobile  design 
june 2008 by robertogreco
chris woebken I selected projects - a new relationship to e-money
"I designed devices for different spending behaviors, imagining new parasitical services sitting on top of bank accounts that create feedback mechanisms and a new relationship to our bank-account as an extension of ourselves. I am interested in exploring
currency  via:adamgreenfield  money  transit  transport  urbancomputing  design  rfid  datamining  economics  ecosystems  future  payment 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Mobile boom, computer doom - Mobiles & Handhelds - Connectivity - Technology
"Accessing the internet has become so fast and easy with Japan's mobile phones that many young people have forsaken computers."
mobile  phones  computer  texting  sms  technology  japan  youth  internet  web  access  online  browser  payment  browsers 
april 2007 by robertogreco
Touch
"Touch is a research project looking at the intersections between the digital and the physical. Its aim is to explore and develop new uses for RFID, NFC and mobile technology in areas such as retail, public services, social and personal communication."
interactive  interaction  innovation  ideas  design  touch  internet  research  RFID  social  technology  ubicomp  blogs  mobile  phones  tangible  nfc  nearfield  ubiquitous  ui  user  wireless  gps  gui  haptic  everyware  payment  pervasive  infodesign  bluetooth  mobility  locative  tracking 
september 2006 by robertogreco

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