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robertogreco : pennsylvania   7

The "Quaker Comet" Was the Greatest Abolitionist You've Never Heard Of | History | Smithsonian
“Overlooked by historians, Benjamin Lay was one of the nation’s first radicals to argue for an end to slavery”

[via this thread:
https://twitter.com/zunguzungu/status/1163480162874249218

“Quakers were active abolitionists in Pennsylvania when a lot of the “founders” weren’t born yet
one of these days i will write about how nearly every “modern” criticism of the founders on race and slavery was levied against them at the time by contemporaries on both sides of the atlantic
https://twitter.com/jbouie/status/1163425126685249537

"Lay announced in a booming voice that God Almighty respects all peoples equally, rich and poor, men and women, white and black alike. He said that slave keeping was the greatest sin in the world and asked, How can a people who profess the golden rule keep slaves?"

"He then threw off his great coat, revealing the military garb, the book and the blade." https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/quaker-comet-greatest-abolitionist-never-heard-180964401/

"He pulled out the sword, raised the book above his head, and plunged the sword through it. People gasped as the red liquid gushed down his arm; women swooned. To the shock of all, he spattered “blood” on the slave keepers."

John Woolman in 1757, when Alexander Hamilton was an infant:
http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/6538/

John Woolman: "There is great odds in regard to us on what principles we act"

(sunglasses descend from ceiling)

In 1688: "There is a saying, that we shall doe to all men like as we will be done ourselves; making no difference of what generation, descent or colour they are. And those who steal or robb men, and those who buy or purchase them, are they not all alike?"
https://www.loc.gov/resource/rbpe.14000200/?st=text

(It’s generally known that the new nation’s capital was built in Virginia/Maryland to keep the slave states happy. But one reason they moved it AWAY FROM PHILADELPHIA is that the Quakers kept making local laws to harass slaveholders, which many of the founders were. )

What those Quakers show us is that it was never ignorance or an inability to think otherwise that made pro-slavery arguments persuasive. There was never a time when slavery was unquestioned. The founders chose a side in an argument.

(I’m sure it’s complicated, and don’t know nearly enough, but one reason Quakers turned against slavery WAY earlier than basically all other white people has to be that their meetings were non-hierarchical. You could just stand up and say "you know what? slavery is fucked up")"]
benjaminlay  abolitionism  us  history  slavery  2017  1738  quakers  pennsylvania  antislavery 
4 weeks ago by robertogreco
A World Without People - The Atlantic
"For a number of reasons, natural and human, people have evacuated or otherwise abandoned many places around the world—large and small, old and new. Gathering images of deserted areas into a single photo essay, one can get a sense of what the world might look like if humans were to suddenly vanish from the planet. Collected here are recent scenes from abandoned construction projects, industrial disaster zones, blighted urban neighborhoods, towns where residents left to escape violence or natural disasters, derelict Olympic venues, ghost towns, and more."
landscape  photography  apocalypse  worldwithoutus  multispecies  riodejaneiro  brasil  brazil  us  nola  neworleans  alabama  germany  belarus  italy  italia  abandonment  china  bankok  thailand  decay  shengshan  athens  greece  lackawanna  pennsylvania  tianjin  russia  cyprus  nicosia  indonesia  maine  syria  namibia  drc  fukushima  congo  philippines  havana  cuba  vallejo  paris  libya  wales  england 
may 2017 by robertogreco
How to Destroy a Public-School System | The Nation
"In fact, the basic structure of school financing in Philadelphia is rigged to benefit these privately managed companies. Public-school money follows students when they move to charter schools, but the public schools’ costs do not fall by the same amount. For example, if 100 students leave a district-run school at a cost of $8,596 per head (the district’s per-pupil expenditure minus certain administrative costs), that school’s cost for paying teachers, staff and building expenses doesn’t actually decline by that amount. It has been estimated that partly because of these costs, each student who enrolls in a charter school costs the district as much as $7,000."



"For privatization-minded reformers, the creative destruction unleashed by Corbett’s budget cuts presented an opportunity to implement a new round of privately managed restructuring. In May 2013, just before the School Reform Commission approved what Philadelphians called the “doomsday budget,” Teach for America founder Wendy Kopp—an icon of the self-described reform movement—tweeted: “In Philadelphia today, so much more to be done, but I can’t get over the progress in this city’s schools in the last decade!”

Wealthy donors and local and national foundations poured funding into a new reform-movement infrastructure to back the growth of nonprofit charters, which had continued their rapid expansion even as the for-profit experiment collapsed. The Philadelphia School Partnership (PSP), founded in 2010, quickly grew into the city’s most powerful pro-charter and anti-union organization, thanks to a $15 million grant from the local William Penn Foundation—the same entity that had funded the “Blueprint for Transformation” plan.

“Change is the only option,” declared Mark Gleason, the PSP’s chief executive, in testimony before state legislators in 2013. “We may not fully know which changes will make the most difference, which will transform outcomes for poor and minority students. But we have some good clues—we even have some proof points right here in Philadelphia—and we know the status quo is most definitely not working for disadvantaged students. The debate we should be having is about which changes are worth trying—not about saving a failed system.”

The new reform groups built ties with a pre-existing conservative network in the state, including pro-school- voucher groups like the Students First PAC, a wealthy political-action committee funded by the libertarian managers of a suburban Philadelphia investment firm.

StudentsFirst, a separate group led at the time by former Washington, DC, schools superintendent Michelle Rhee, also founded a state chapter. PennCAN, the state affiliate of the national group 50CAN, was launched in the PSP’s office. The Gates Foundation, a major backer of reform projects nationwide, funded the creation of a quasi-governmental body staffed by the PSP, the Great Schools Compact, dedicated to promoting its vision for change. It is, Gleason said earlier this year, a matter of “dumping the losers” to “create a higher bar for what we expect of our schools.” But the process of judging winners and losers amid wrenching austerity cuts has proved highly controversial. The Renaissance schools run by Mastery have demonstrated strong test-score gains. Even so, the district-run Promise Academies showed the same encouraging results—until their budgets were gutted."



"It’s what scholars have bluntly called an apartheid system: wealthy districts spend more on wealthy students, and poor districts struggle to spend less on the poor students who need the most. According to state data from 2012–13, Philadelphia spent $13,077 per pupil, while Abington spent $15,148—on students in much less need of intensive services and support. Wealthy Lower Merion spent $22,962 per pupil."
philadelphia  inequality  2014  schools  education  educationalapartheid  apartheid  funding  pennsylvania  via:audreywatters  charterschools 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Dear Gov. Corbett – How Many Kids Must Die? | Practical Theory
"You aren’t allowed to be surprised by this.

And while the nursing services have gotten worse in the current budget crisis, this is a long-standing problem for Philadelphia District schools for a long time. Our city schools have been under-resourced for years, which makes the current crisis all the more painful.

The arterial road you see in that map is City Line Avenue. It is, quite literally, the city line of Philadelphia. Above Philadelphia is Lower Merion School District. One of its two high schools is Harriton HS. Harriton HS has 1188 kids and four full-time nurses. Science Leadership Academy has 490 kids, and we have a nurse two days a week. This year, the average per pupil expenditure in Philadelphia hovers just under $10,000 per child while Lower Merion is able to spend over $25,000 per child. The way we fund schools in this state is criminal, and it has to change.

You aren’t allowed to be surprised by this.

The way we fund schools in Pennsylvania quite possibly cost Laporshia Massey her life, and yet Governor Corbett is holding up $45 million dollars of state money until he gets the work rule concessions he wants from the teachers’ union. $45 million dollars translates into 400 more professional employees (teachers, counselors and nurses) to work with our kids. When schools have no counselors, when schools don’t have full-time nurses, that is the equivalent of blackmail.

And it has cost at least one young woman – Laporshia Massey - her life. I wonder if Governor Corbett even knows that she died.

You aren’t allowed to be surprised by this. But you better be outraged by it."
2013  philadelphia  schools  policy  pennsylvania  inequality  funding  chrislehmann  realestate 
may 2014 by robertogreco
The Saxifrage School - Higher Ed Innovation Laboratory
"The Saxifrage School is a higher education laboratory working to lower costs, re-think the campus, and reconcile disciplines."

"While we continue our work as a laboratory for new ideas, we are dreaming big about the future. This video describes our early concept for founding a full-fledged college here in Pittsburgh."

"At the core of the Saxifrage School model is our nomadic campus. We're re-thinking the traditional campus model to better serve students, the economy, and our neighborhoods."

"Deconstructing higher education is a large and complex undertaking, but we have a great sense of urgency for our work. Here are a few of the reasons why we are working to change the future of higher education."

"Extending the liberal arts to include technical skills, the academic philosophy of The Saxifrage School is centered on productive inquiry. Our goal is to educate the full person by reuniting the making of things and the judging of ideas into one educative process that closely attends to the real problems of today’s world. We strive to reconcile theory and practice and preserve their integrity by valuing the creative utility of each. The Saxifrage School will host a tight academic community that weaves into local organizations, creating a dynamic resource network that will serve students and neighbors alike. Graduates of the Saxifrage School will leave as seasoned thinkers, skilled producers, engaged citizens, and capable agents of change."

[Video: https://vimeo.com/34760137 ]
[Blog: http://saxifrageschool.tumblr.com/ ]
[Via: http://saxifrageschool.tumblr.com/post/31061581933/deep-springs-college-and-the-liberal-arts-ideal via Randall Szott ]
saxifrage  pittsburgh  pennsylvania  education  highereducation  cityasclassroom  learning  schools  spanish  lcproject  well-being  purpose  liberalarts  via:randallszott  local  nomadiccampus  highered  deepspringscollege 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Mildred's Lane
"…a rustic, 96-acre site deep in the woods of rural northeastern Pennsylvania, in the upper Delaware River Valley, which borders New York state. It is an ongoing collaboration between J. Morgan Puett, Mark Dion, their son Grey Rabbit Puett, and their friends and colleagues. It is a home and an experiment in living. Mildred’s Lane attempts to coevolve a rigorous pedagogical strategy, where a working-living-researching environment has been developed to foster engagement with every aspect of life.

The entire site has become a living museum, or rather – a new contemporary art complex(ity). It is now important to sidestep the debates around what is art ( or design, architecture and fashion) in order to activate these turbulent multiplicities. It is more a question of praxis and action, is it in an institution? Storefront? A gallery? Deep in the woods? At Home?

The Mildred’s Lane site is a home where the Artist/Practitioner, the Student and the Institution have collapsed…"
deschooling  unschooling  storefronts  galleries  life  worklive  pedagogy  mildred'slane  greyrabbitpuett  markdion  jmorganpuett  glvo  pennsylvania  via:salrandolph  lcproject  leisurearts  art  creativity  livework  howwework  workstyles  education  alternative  alternativeeducation  altgdp  artleisure 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Mr. Mayor | GOOD
"If it sounds like Fetterman and his neighbors are throwing a lot of stuff on the wall to see what sticks, they are. “One of Braddock’s best assets is that it’s so far gone, it invites people to try different things,” he says. “We’re freed up from worrying about whether they will work—some will, some won’t.” ... Fetterman is looking for people willing to help make Braddock truly revolutionary. “We’re recycling an entire town, so we appeal to those who want to walk the walk, as opposed to feeling good about giving up bottled water and composting watermelon rinds,” he says. “If you’re really serious, come out here.”"

[See also:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/01/us/01braddock.html?pagewanted=all
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/jul/15/us-mayor-postcode-tattoo
http://poptech.org/popcasts/john_fetterman_reviving_braddock
https://vimeo.com/13212499
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qSIRqpc0V0

later
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/13/magazine/13Fetterman-t.html ]
economics  cities  sustainability  braddock  johnfetterman  pennsylvania 
july 2009 by robertogreco

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