recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : phd   12

Academia’s 1 Percent | Vitae
"A more useful indicator of whether your doctoral program is a pathway to employment lies in whom the department hires. Because chances are, you will see the same few institutional names again and again. During my own time in graduate school, my department hired several faculty members, all with different specialties and skills, all with one thing in common: Harvard, Harvard, Harvard, Harvard.

The evidence is not only anecdotal. A recent study by Aaron Clauset, Samuel Arbesman, and Daniel B. Larremore shows that “a quarter of all universities account for 71 to 86 percent of all tenure-track faculty in the U.S. and Canada in these three fields. Just 18 elite universities produce half of all computer science professors, 16 schools produce half of all business professors, and eight schools account for half of all history professors.” This study follows the discovery by political scientist Robert Oprisko that more than half of political-science professorships were filled by applicants from only 11 universities.

What that means is something every Ph.D. from a less-prestigious institution knows all too well: No amount of publishing, teaching excellence, or grants can compensate for an affiliation that is less than favorable in the eyes of a search committee. The fate of aspiring professors is sealed not with job applications but with graduate-school applications. Institutional affiliation has come to function like inherited wealth. Those who have it operate in a different market, more immune from the dark trends – unemployment, adjunctification – that dog their less-prestigious peers."



"Rather than go to an expensive, elite program, a fiscally responsible student might be inclined to select a solid program with good funding in a cheap city. But academia was not designed for the fiscally responsible: It was designed for those for whom money is a nonissue. Academia’s currency is prestige, but prestige is always backed up by money, whether the expenditure for life in a costly city, the expectation of unpaid or underpaid labor, or research trips assumed to be paid out-of-pocket.

As university infrastructure grows more elaborate and US News and World Report rankings become increasingly valued, elite colleges often appear less concerned with providing an education than selling a lifestyle. Whereas students have often chosen a college believing that its reputation would enhance their own, colleges now solicit wealthy students believing that the students’ prestige will enhance the college. The same is true of faculty. As Clauset and his Slate co-writer Joel Warner note, “For a university, the easiest way to burnish your reputation is to hire graduates from top schools, thereby importing a bit of what made these institutions elite in the first place.”

Where does this leave the majority of Ph.D.’s who are not affiliated with the small group of approved institutions?

Last week, adjuncts across the country staged a walkout to protest poor pay and working conditions. Adjuncting itself is a product of an academe that operates on an almost Calvinist faith in its 1 percent: Adjuncts are viewed as “tainted” by their own job experience, and their low status regarded as “proof” that they never deserved a tenure-track position. Though graduates of elite universities were certainly among the striking adjuncts – the academic job market is bad enough that even the Ivy League is not entirely immune – most adjuncts tend to come from less prestigious institutions, with their contingent positions a seeming punishment for failing to start out right.

No one’s career should end at its beginning. But for thousands of Ph.D. students, that is exactly what is happening. The candor of studies like Clauset’s and Oprisko’s should be applauded. It is only in recognizing institutional bias -- and exploring the issues of class that surround it -- that hiring can be made more equitable."
academia  education  jobs  phd  sarahkendzior  aaronclauset  samuelarbesman  daniellarremore  robertoprisko  inequality  greatrecession  elitism  glosedsystems  employment  highered  highereducation  adjunctification 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Low-residency MFA & PhD Photography, Painting, Performance, New Media, Fine & Visual Arts
"Transart Institute offers an international low-residency MFA and a practice-based PhD program for working artists in a highly individualized format. The innovative MFA program consists of three intensive summer residencies with lectures, workshops, critiques, seminars, performances and exhibitions in Europe and two fall or spring residencies in New York. In the four semesters between residencies, students create their own course of study realizing individual art and research projects with the support of faculty and self-chosen artist mentors wherever they work and live. The MPhil/PhD is a three to four year full time degree program with an average work commitment of 30 hours per week. The Degree is only offered for practice-based research (creative work) accompanied by a written thesis that contextualizes the work."
transartinstitute  transart  self-directedlearning  phd  nyc  berlin  credentialing  unschooling  glvo  lowresidency  altgdp  education  art  mfa  low-residency 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Critical Technology: Networked and Open also means Collaborative
"This is what the Networked & Open PhD (NOPhD) is all about. It is about working w/ others in an open & collaborative way so everyone deepens their knowledge on a shared subject domain. The great part would be if everyone who is in the collaborative cohort aspired to develop a PhD level of knowing w/in the subject they share a passion. Due to the networked (& collaborative) aspect of NOPhD I believe a number of people in the cohort need to make it to PhD depth of knowing, otherwise it couldn't be considered networked. So I have faith & begin to encourage (& hopefully inspire) people around me (virtually & otherwise) who are interested in this pursuit of developing a deeper knowing of Folk Music & Dance. & those interested in pedagogy, technology & life-long learning; for I will be drawing on these skills & knowledge as I build upon this anchor subject.

So what exactly does this look like?…why don't I describe my week & how certain events fit into the networked & collaborative"
learning  phd  openphd  nophd  education  alternative  highereducation  networked  networking  open  openlearning  collaboration  collaborative 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Doctoral degrees: The disposable academic: Why doing a PhD is often a waste of time | The Economist
"Many of those who embark on a PhD are the smartest in their class and will have been the best at everything they have done. They will have amassed awards and prizes. As this year’s new crop of graduate students bounce into their research, few will be willing to accept that the system they are entering could be designed for the benefit of others, that even hard work and brilliance may well not be enough to succeed, and that they would be better off doing something else. They might use their research skills to look harder at the lot of the disposable academic. Someone should write a thesis about that." [via: http://ayjay.tumblr.com/post/2375320461/many-of-those-who-embark-on-a-phd-are-the-smartest ]
graduateschool  education  academia  labor  economics  phd  competition 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Leigh Blackall: How and why I'll do a PhD
"I will (and have already) publicly declared my commitment to understanding and attempting to apply the apparent rigor, depth and discipline required for recognition as a Doctor of Philosophy, but will do so informally. That is, without enrolling or submitting to an institution, faculty, discipline area or assigned supervisors. Instead, I will direct myself, using online social networks, professional contacts, all workshop and seminar opportunities that present themselves, and family and fiends to test my ideas, check the quality of my work, and help build its worthiness in line with the criteria I aim to discover. Through open documentation of our dialog, this network will play the role, and reflect an equivalence of traditional PhD supervisors. When I feel confident that I understand and have met the requirements of the PhD, I will submit a summative body of work to an assessing organisation, if there is one willing to play this role, and await their verdict."
leighblackall  phd  autodidacts  research  informal  highered  learning  education  highereducation  gradschool  alternative  openeducation 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Relevant History: Journeyman again
"In 1997, after leaving academia for a job in the corporate world, I wrote the first version of this essay, and argued that the life of the mind could be pursued as effectively and happily outside the academy as inside. Others have since made the same discoveries and similar arguments; all challenge the traditional views of scholarly life, and the comfortable provincialism of academic culture. The world of learning is a big place; the number of worlds that will find good uses for young scholars is far larger than you think; and the limits your advisors think you live under don't really exist. It's time to find out how to live differently."
alexsoojung-kimpang  humanities  philosophy  academia  jobs  academics  gradschool  phd  highered  writing  life  learning  gamechanging 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The Big Lie About the 'Life of the Mind' - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"Some professors tell students to go to graduate school "only if you can't imagine doing anything else." But they usually are saying that to students who have been inside an educational institution for their entire lives. They simply do not know what else is out there. They know how to navigate school, and they think they know what it is like to be a professor.
thomasbenton  education  gradschool  economics  academia  humanities  criticism  jobs  commentary  highered  phd  admissions  advice  universities  money 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Graduate School in the Humanities: Just Don't Go - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"most prospective graduate students have given little thought to what will happen to them after they complete their doctorates...assume that everyone finds a decent position somewhere, even if it's "only" at a community college (expressed with a shudder). Besides, the completion of graduate school seems impossibly far away, so their concerns are mostly focused on the present...It's hard to tell young people that universities recognize that their idealism & energy — & lack of information — are an exploitable resource. For universities, the impact of graduate programs on the lives of those students is an acceptable externality, like dumping toxins into a river. If you cannot find a tenure-track position, your university will no longer court you; it will pretend you do not exist and will act as if your unemployability is entirely your fault. It will make you feel ashamed, & you will probably just disappear, convinced it's right rather than that the game was rigged from the beginning."
education  gradschool  humanities  academia  capitalism  advice  tips  phd  teaching  future  academics  jobs  reality  graduateschool  learning  unschooling  deschooling  society  hierarchy  exploitation  universities  colleges  thomasbenton 
january 2010 by robertogreco
PhD: to what end? ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"The authors argue that philosophy grads from Canadian universities are at a disadvantage in landing tenure-track jobs. I never did finish my PhD in philosophy, but I spent five years pursuing it. One of the things that led me to move on to other things after I had written my dissertation proposal was the evident fact that people (and especially men) with the degrees simply weren't being hired; some very very good people were simply being shuffled through the system as sessionals and the rest just disappeared. "There is a deep incoherence here," write Groarke and Fenske. If a department considers a Canadian PhD a liability, how can it, in good conscience, busy itself producing more Canadian PhDs?" Of course, I did value my studies in philosophy (they prepared me for my current work). I just came to (deeply) mistrust the academic system that ostensibly offered me the education."
education  phd  stephendownes  markets  economics  employment  careers  philosophy  academia 
november 2009 by robertogreco
The importance of stupidity in scientific research -- Schwartz 121 (11): 1771 -- Journal of Cell Science
"Productive stupidity means being ignorant by choice. Focusing on important questions puts us in the awkward position of being ignorant. One of the beautiful things about science is that it allows us to bumble along, getting it wrong time after time, and feel perfectly fine as long as we learn something each time. No doubt, this can be difficult for students who are accustomed to getting the answers right. No doubt, reasonable levels of confidence and emotional resilience help, but I think scientific education might do more to ease what is a very big transition: from learning what other people once discovered to making your own discoveries. The more comfortable we become with being stupid, the deeper we will wade into the unknown and the more likely we are to make big discoveries."
science  methodology  agnotology  education  learning  academia  thinking  research  skills  creativity  philosophy  motivation  gradschool  phd  via:migurski 
march 2009 by robertogreco
You're Not Fooling Anyone - Chronicle.com
"Holden Caulfield hunted phonies few blocks from here, but times have changed. Now the phonies — or people who think they are — hunt themselves....Columbia University held a well-attended workshop for young academics who feel like frauds."
academia  class  scholarship  stress  consciousness  success  education  failure  fraud  mfa  people  psychology  phd  society  impostorsyndrome  impostorphenomenon 
november 2007 by robertogreco
How Educated Must an Artist Be? - ChronicleReview.com
"Pushing artists toward doctoral programs fundamentally changes their focus and goals. The Ph.D. says to the university, "I am committing myself to aca-deme," whereas the M.F.A. primarily reflects a commitment to developing one's skills as an artist."
academia  universities  art  mfa  education  phd 
november 2007 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read