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robertogreco : photos   15

The Post Flickr World – TroveBox | iterating toward openness
"Another of the fellows, Jaisen Mathai, is working on an open source photo management platform called TroveBox. [https://trovebox.com/ ] This really terrific looking photo management platform can use almost anything for its backend storage – including Amazon S3 and Dropbox. Given the way that the Googles and Yahoo!s of the world are behaving lately, I was extremely excited to see a high quality, open source front end set of photo management tools that lets me store photos where ever I want. I connected my account to S3 and imported all my photos in about 15 minutes (note: their automated Flickr importer requires a Pro subscription). Of course I could have imported my Flickr photos by hand for free, but I was more than happy to pay to get my 2000+ photos plus all their metadata moved in 15 minutes."
flickr  trovebox  jaisenmathai  davidwiley  onlinetoolkit  opensource  backup  photos  webtools  photography 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Chinese DIY Inventions - In Focus - The Atlantic
"One visible sign of China's recent economic growth is the rise in prominence of inventors and entrepreneurs. For years now, Chinese farmers, engineers, and businessmen have taken on ambitious do-it-yourself projects, constructing homemade submarines, helicopters, robots, safety equipment, weapons and much more. Some of the inventions are built out of passion, some with an eye toward profit, (some certainly safer than others), and a few have already led to sales for the inventors. Gathered here are recent photos of this DIY movement across China."
china  engineering  photos  photography  invention  inventions  robots  housing  arks  submarines  2013  vehicles  motorcycles  slides  houses  portability  mobility  nomads  disasters  airplanes  diy  making  makers  bikes  prosthetics  helicopters 
may 2013 by robertogreco
National Geographic Found
"FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.

We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location.

If you have insights to share about an image, please let us know.

This is just the beginning of a great adventure. We will be adding new voices, stories, and artifacts as we go. We look forward to sharing this experience with everyone, and hope you make FOUND your home for inspiration and wonder.


The FOUND Logo

The typeface used in the FOUND logo is Ludwig Light, designed by National Geographic cartographer Charles E. Riddiford in the 1930s and 40s. A humanist serif typeface, Ludwig’s calligraphic sensibilities offer a nod to the behind-the-scenes work of FOUND’s curators and editors. Its deep connection to National Geographic’s rich history make it a great choice for FOUND’s logo.

For more on National Geographic’s cartographic typefaces, read this piece by geographer Juan Valdes."
nationalgeographic  tumblr  archives  via:robinsloan  photography  history  photos  tumblrs 
april 2013 by robertogreco
ShoeBox for iPhone and Android | 1000memories
"Turn your phone into a photo scanner. Download for iPhone Download for Android

ShoeBox is the fastest way to scan old paper photos with your phone and share them with family and friends."
android  shoebox  photos  photography  archiving  scanners  scanning  applications  ios  iphone 
august 2012 by robertogreco
This is now!
"This is Now project is a visual composition which uses real-time updates from the ever popular Instagram application based on users geo-tag locations. The tool streams photos instantly as soon as they are uploaded on Instagram and captures a cities movement, in a fluid story. "
Instagram  photos  cities  real-time  geo  location  via:Preoccupations 
august 2012 by robertogreco
gilest.org: In defence of Flickr
"Flickr costs money, which makes it less fashionable than sites that claim to offer more for nothing. But to me, Flickr is the better choice. It has never stopped being awesome. Long may its awesomeness continue."
flickr  photography  photos  yahoo  marissamayer  gilesturnbull  2012  via:Preoccupations  payment 
july 2012 by robertogreco
My first Instagram Christmas, a nervous step away from Flickr « Rev Dan Catt's Blog
"Don’t get me wrong, I still enjoy Flickr. It makes me think about photography, inspires possible projects to play with, upload proper photos taken with my proper camera. But when there’s something happening (often involving the kids, a cat or a visual joke I know my friends will get) I find myself reaching for the iPhone and uploading to Instagram."

[Followed by: http://revdancatt.com/2012/01/05/instagram-and-flickr-the-one-where-i-refine-my-argument/ AND http://revdancatt.com/2012/01/06/flickr-instagram-the-social-graph-and-interface-effecting-behaviour/ ]

[More where those are from: http://revdancatt.com/category/flickr/ ]
photos  photography  2011  2012  flickr  Instagram  revdancatt 
april 2012 by robertogreco
flump - onairbustour - Simple Flickr image downloader - Project Hosting on Google Code
"flump is a simple application that allows your to download all of the public photos for a specific Flickr account."
flickr  tools  software  download  photos  backup  utilities 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Exchange, edit and publish intelligent stories: Storyplanet
"What if some tool would let you drag and drop you way to an awesome interactive story without touching a single line of code? And what if you could share photos, video and audio with the worlds best storytellers to get the pieces missing for your project? And in the end you should be able to spread the story all over the internet, and make money from advertising and licensing.<br />
<br />
And so they build Storyplanet."
webtools  online  multimedia  slideshow  journalism  audio  video  powerpoint  interactive  collaboration  collaborative  content  photos  storytelling  storyplanet  classideas  onlinetoolkit 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Introducing Upload from Flickr | MagCloud
"MagCloud’s new “Upload from Flickr” feature lets you easily turn your Flickr photo sets into a magazine without the need to use a design program or upload a PDF file.

All you have to do is create a set in Flickr and authorize MagCloud to connect to your Flickr account. MagCloud will import the photos and lay them out automatically. In just minutes, you'll have a photo magazine all your own!

The new "Upload from Flickr" feature is a fun and fast way to turn wedding photos, family vacation pictures, your kid's little league action shots, your professional portfolio images and more into a high-quality printed keepsake magazine.

To give it a try, just create an issue and choose the "Upload from Flickr" option."
flickr  papernet  paper  magazines  print  publishing  photos  tools  photography  tcsnmy  classideas 
april 2010 by robertogreco
blade runner in san francisco - a gallery on Flickr
"Blade Runner, set in Los Angeles, was inspired by Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, set in San Francisco.

Blade Runner famously overlays its future LA on recognizable landmarks: the elaborate Bradbury Building, the shiny 2nd Street Tunnel, the neo-Mayan Ennis-Brown House, Union Station, etc.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is less celebrated, but it's also fairly specific about its geography, mentioning Lombard, Mission Street, Geary, Sutter, the War Memorial Opera House, etc.

I recently re-read it and tried to imagine its San Francisco laid out over the one I know. This is a mix of imaginary locations for the book and movie. See also: The Philip K. Dick Walking Tour of San Francisco by John Gorenfeld."

[via: http://snarkmarket.com/2009/4155 ]
architecture  flickr  bladerunner  photography  scifi  photos  film  brittagustafson  losangeles  remix  remixing  locationscouting  space  sanfrancisco  galleries  narrative  fiction  geography  sciencefiction  remixculture 
november 2009 by robertogreco

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