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michaelharriot on Twitter: "Thread: Today I learned the interesting story of Abaco, the island in the Bahamas hit hardest by hurricane Dorian." / Twitter
“Thread: Today I learned the interesting story of Abaco, the island in the Bahamas hit hardest by hurricane Dorian.

After the Revolutionary War, many of the white people who were loyal to Britain moved to the Bahamas, which was largely empty. A lot of those people brought their enslaved Africans with them.

But harsh conditions made many of the white people leave. Then, in 1807, Britain abolished the slave trade. Many of those freed Africans who were liberated on the open seas went to the Bahamas as free people.

When the US basically bought Florida from Spain, thousands of enslaved Africans and Black Seminoles said “fuck this” and escaped to the Bahamas.

So many ran to freedom that the US government had to build a lighthouse in Cape Florida in 1825.

In 1834, Britain freed all the slaves in its territories and shit really got crazy.

See, the Bahamas were a regular stop in the Atlantic. Plus, shipwrecked US vessels also ended up there.

For years, when ships would pull up in the Bahamas (I think that’s the nautical term) Bahamians would tell the captains:

“Umm, I don’t know if you heard but we don’t play that slave shit over here. Y’all can ride out but you gotta leave the Africans here. They’re free now.

“Now we can handle this like gentlemen, or we can get into some Gangsta shit.”

Well this was a problem because slavery was legal in the US.

Despite what history whitewashers would have you believe about that freedom@and liberty bullshit, we were one of the last countries in North America to abolish the practice

So word started getting around plantations about the Bahamas.

Then, in 1840, the Hermosa, a US slave ship headed from Richmond going to New Orleans, wrecked in Abaco.

Well, the Captain tried to explain that slavery was legal in the US, so technically these enslaved people were cargo. But the Bahamians wasn’t having that shit. They FORCIBLY FREED the entire ship and was like:

“Now runtelldat.”

Of course, these dumb white folks actually ran and told that. The US government got involved but something else happened.

Enslaved Africans on plantations started hearing about that shit, too!

(Yes, shit’s about to get good)

This is the part of our history that is rarely told:

In 1840, a black man named Madison Washington escaped slavery and made it to Canada. But Madison decided to return for his wife. (Of course he got caught) he was taken to Va, put on a ship and shipped to La.

So Madison was on this slave ship, the Creole, with 143 Africans and 17 white people who had ONE GUN!

Dassit!

Y’all know shit was about to pop off.

As soon as one of the crewmen lifted the grate to where they were holding Madison and his crew, they pounced.

They killed one of the slave traders immediately (you gotta show muhfuckas you mean business). The wypipo didn’t even get a chance to fire their lil’ gun

First they tried to force the Creole’s captain to take them back to Africa, but the captain was like:

“Y’all got some Africa gas money?” Plus, without Google Maps, they’d probably have to print out directions from Mapquest and the ship’s printer was out of ink or something

Then one of the revolters said: “Aye Madison, did you hear that story about the Hermosa in the Bahamas? Maybe we should see what they’re talking about.”

*Not a literal translation

So Madison and the slave rebellers get to the Bahamas and a bunch of black soldiers come on board.

The captain tells the soldiers that the people were his property but the Bahamians attorney general was like: “y’all can go. You’re free now.”

And the enslaved Africans were like: “Go where? Man, we’re a thousand miles from home! We’re on the goddamned ocean! Aside from what’s on this ship, we ain’t even got no food.”

And the Bahamian attorney general was like: “Y’all straight. Just go look outside.”

So they go above deck and look out on the ocean and witness something astonishing:

The slave ship was surrounded by a “fleet” of tiny little boats manned by local Bahamians ready to take the revolters to freedom.

They would be free forever.

But the Bahamians atty. gen. held 17 of the men responsible for the white dude’s death on the boat. It became an international incident. The US even tried to organize an attack to REENSLAVE THE SLAVES, but a Bahamian was looking out and warned them that white people were coming

When the people in the US heard about the revolt, they were OUTRAGED. They demanded a trial. The British agreed. But the Bahamians were like: “Well we don’t have an extradition treaty with those filthy slave traders, so the trial will have to be in the Bahamas.

Now they couldn’t be tried for murder because the British had already ruled that enslaved people could do whatever they deemed necessary to get free. So the Bahamians tried the Creole 17 for piracy.

The court ruled, in essence, this:

“How you gon’ charge them with pirating their own bodies? GTFOHWTBS Cased dismissed!”

*again, not a literal translation

Less than a year later, the Creole would sail no more after it wrecked again…

In a hurricane.

All told, 128 enslaved Africans aboard the Creole were freed

They will teach you about slave revolts by Denmark Vessey, Nat Turner and John Brown.

But this is the story of Abaco, The Bahamas and what is called:

The most successful slave revolt in US history“
bahamas  abaco  michaelharriot  history  slavery  freedom  race  piracy  pirates  slavetrade  safehavens  liberation  revolt  rebellion 
6 days ago by robertogreco
Digital Manifesto Archive
"This collection aggregates manifestos concerned with making as a subpractice of the digital humanities."



"This archive is an academic resource dedicated to aggregating and cataloging manifestos that fall under two basic criteria. 1) The Digital Manifesto Archive features manifestos that focus on the political and cultural dimensions of digital life. 2) The Digital Manifesto Archive features manifestos that are written, or are primarily disseminated, online.

The manifesto genre is, by definition, timely and politically focused. Further, it is a primary site of political, cultural, and social experimentation in our contemporary world. Manifestos that are created and disseminated online further this experimental ethos by fundamentally expanding the character and scope of the genre.

Each category listed on the archive is loosely organized by theme, political affiliation, and (if applicable) time period. While the political movements and affiliations of the manifestos archived in each category are not universal, each category does try to capture a broad spectrum of political moods and actions with regard to its topic.

This site is meant to preserve manifestos for future research and teaching. The opinions expressed by each author are their own.

This archive was created by Matt Applegate. Our database and website was created by Graham Higgins (gwhigs). It is maintained by Matt Applegate and Yu Yin (Izzy) To
You can contact us at digitalmanifestoarchive@gmail.com.

This project is open source. You can see gwhigs' work for the site here: Digital Manifesto Archive @ Github.com"
manifestos  digital  digitalhumanities  archives  making  mattapplegate  yuyin  designfiction  criticalmaking  engineering  capitalism  feminism  hacking  hacktivism  digitalmarkets  digitaldiaspora  internetofthings  iot  cyberpunk  mediaecology  media  publishing  socialmedia  twitter  ethics  digitalculture  piracy  design  bigdata  transhumanism  utopianism  criticaltheory  mediaarchaeology  opensource  openaccess  technofeminism  gaming  digitalaesthetics  digitaljournalism  journalism  aesthetics  online  internet  web  technocracy  archaeology  education  afrofuturism  digitalart  art  blogging  sopa  aaronswartz  pipa  anarchism  anarchy 
february 2016 by robertogreco
A Pirate’s Life for Me: Education as Common Good — Medium
"There is an ancient English practice of ‘beating the bounds’ — an annual festival that was held around this time each spring. People of the parish marched around the commons — the land they worked together — and trampled down any fences that had been put up to try to make land private. The commons was where the community had shared rights. It was where the parish planted and literally grew together. It was ‘the theatre within which the life of the community was enacted’ — and if there is a better definition of what a school is then I’d love to hear it.

As land enclosures accelerated through the 17th and 18th centuries this ritual of ‘beating the bounds’ took on an explosively political edge, and was seen as an act of piracy. I would argue that one of the reasons that pirates have been rising up again because that stage upon which our communities traditionally grow has continued to be so narrowed and reduced, as the spaces and arts that we used to share together have been enclosed for profit."



"In a political climate where all we hear is economic growth, in an educational climate where all we hear is the international rat race, it is a virtuous act of piracy to focus students on well-being and happiness rather than putting them through the mincer simply to improve our league table standing.

To encourage students to genuinely think beyond the raw economics is to encourage them to break down the enclosures of a consumer-capitalist worldview and see that life and childhood is a much much wider ocean.

Our schools should be that ‘theatre within which the life of the community is enacted’ — or, to turn that round, our schools should be theatres where the community learns to enact and embody life. Too often that life is narrowed ‘work hard to get the grades to get the degree to get the job to be wealthy.’ And if that’s what we teach in our communities, that’s what our communities can only become.

We need to encourage that spirit of radical self-determination, that desire for the common good, that worldview that values the arts and drama and classics and philosophy not for what they might eventually earn for us, but because they enrich our communities in ways that Gove will never see.

We need, in short, to act to protect childhood. To protect play. To protect time to kick a ball and do nothing."



"Pirates in literature and film are not just about swashbuckling thieves. They are about emancipation, about challenging the current order of things, rebelling against the Empire — not in order to destroy it — but to renew it.

And this is why this pirate archetype should be at the centre of what we do in education.

Not that everyone should be wearing stupid pirate costumes. But that every child coming to school should be encouraged to explore the commons of knowledge — not for some future financial gain, but just because.

And in a world where education has been turned into a commodity, a means of accessing wealth, it is an act of piracy for teachers to suggest that a different world is possible.

But, moreover, we should be encouraging these acts of piracy from students themselves.

Like Malala, like Wendy, like Luke, like Henry Hill the book pirate, they should be encouraged to play these roles and, in doing so, begin to individuate healthily and slay the structures that block them from full human becoming.

They might be girls challenging everyday sexism, boys challenging homophobia, students campaigning against rigid curricula and the elitism of the cabinet.

Whoever they are, we should be supporting them, creating theatres within which the sorts of communities we want to exist in are modelled.
Classroom as TAZ

During the Golden Age of piracy, pirate communes sprung up along the Moroccan and Caribbean coasts. In a laced-up world, these were places of extraordinary freedom and subversive liberty.

The authorities would hear of these places and send ships to shut them down. But, as one Admiral said at the time, it was ‘like sending a cow after a hare.’

These communities of pirates and freed slaves would spring up, dazzle and disappear. Leaving those who experienced them wondering what in heaven just happened.

They have since been described by historians as ‘Temporary Autonomous Zones’ — or TAZs.

They are a space liberated, for a short time only, and presenting a new form of being, ‘an intensification of everyday life, life’s penetration by the Marvellous’ as one writer put it.

That is what each classroom should be, what each lesson should aim at: a liberated space, penetrated by something marvellous, springing up and disappearing before Ofsted can crush it…

It is in these liberated spaces that education, true education, will happen."

[See also: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:7161b69fef5d ]
kesterbrewin  education  pirates  piracy  commons  learning  schooling  unschooling  responsibility  howweteach  howwelearn  community  lcproject  openstudioproject  life  living  cv  peterpan  history  lukesywalker  starwars  patriarchy  liberation  anarchism  anarchy  temporaryautonomouszones  thomasjefferson  malalayousafzaiis  jollyroger  pisa  schools  2014  marcusredicker  henryhill  publishing  benjaminfranklin  knowledge  copyright 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Pirates and Prodigals on Vimeo
"A conversation between Kester Brewin, Peter Rollins, and Barry Taylor on the tragedy of the pirate and prodigal son archetypes and what this means for the future church. The discussion drew from ideas presented in Kester Brewin’s latest book, Mutiny! Why We Love Pirates, and How They Can Save Us.

The Berry Center for Lifelong Learning and The Inititive for the Church and Contemprary Culture, Fuller Theologcial Seminary

Wednesday, October 24, 2012"
pirates  theology  christianity  religion  belief  2012  radicaltheology  kesterbrewin  peterrollins  barrytaylor  courage  brokenness  honesty  responsibility  otherness  humanism  empathy  perspective  understanding  life  living  death  piracy  slavery  freedom  autonomy  independence  god  liberation  prodigalson  unbelief  decay  zombies 
october 2014 by robertogreco
▶ Mutiny! What our love of pirates tells us about renewing the commons: Kester Brewin at TEDxExeter - YouTube
"Kester Brewin teaches mathematics in South East London and is also a freelance writer, poet and consultant for BBC education. He writes regularly on education and technology for the national educational press, and has published a number of highly acclaimed books on the philosophy of religion.

His latest book Mutiny! Why We Love Pirates and How They Can Save Us is a groundbreaking re-examination of the culture of piracy, which seeks to understand our continued fascination with these characters whose skull and crossed bones motif appears on everything from baby-bottles to skateboards, yet are still pursued and condemned worldwide for theft and exploitation. Drawing on pirates from history, film and literature, Kester's work explores how our relationship to 'the commons' is central to an improved environmental, political and cultural consciousness, and also tries to work out why his son has been invited to countless pirate parties, but none (yet) with an aggravated robbery theme. His poetry has appeared in magazines around the world and he is currently preparing his debut novel for publication."

[See also: http://www.kesterbrewin.com/pirates/

Free online version
https://medium.com/mutiny-by-kester-brewin

Amazon (Kindle version)
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B008A5FVMY/

"What is it with pirates?

From Somali fishermen to DVD hawkers to childrens parties, pirates surround us and their ‘Jolly Roger’ motif can be found on everything from skateboards to baby-grows. Yet the original pirates were mutineers, rebelling against the brutal and violent oppression of the princes and merchants who enslaved them.

How has their fight become ours?

In this highly original and ground-breaking book, Kester Brewin fuses history, philosophy and sociology to explore the place of piracy in history and culture, and, calling on Blackbeard, Luke Skywalker, Peter Pan and Odysseus, chases pirates through literature and film into the deepest realms of personal development, art, economics and belief."

https://vimeo.com/52473140

"Pirates and Prodigals
A conversation between Kester Brewin, Peter Rollins, and Barry Taylor on the tragedy of the pirate and prodigal son archetypes and what this means for the future church. The discussion drew from ideas presented in Kester Brewin’s latest book, Mutiny! Why We Love Pirates, and How They Can Save Us.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012
Fuller Theologcial Seminary"]

[More here, specific to education: https://medium.com/@kesterbrewin/a-pirates-life-for-me-education-as-common-good-7f8349267fe1 ]
kesterbrewin  pirates  history  2013  piracy  anarchism  economics  politics  capitalism  blackbeard  oppression  democracy  collectivism  philosphy  sociology  freedom  sharing  distribution  bbc  publishing  music  learning  copyright  privategain  commons  ip  knowlege  privatization  books 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Information Consumerism: The Price of Hypocrisy - Überwachung - FAZ
"In as much as the Snowden affair has forced us to confront these issues, it’s been a good thing for democracy. Let’s face it: most of us would rather not think about the ethical implications of smart toothbrushes or the hypocrisy involved in Western rhetoric towards Iran or the genuflection that more and more European leaders show in front of Silicon Valley and its awful, brain-damaging language, the Siliconese. The least we can do is to acknowledge that the crisis is much deeper and that it stems from intellectual causes as much as from legal ones. Information consumerism, like its older sibling energy consumerism, is a much more dangerous threat to democracy than the NSA."
edwardsnowden  2013  evgenymorozov  ethics  technology  nsa  informationconsumerism  consumerism  hypocrisy  piracy  politics  morality  economics  civics  citizenship  markets  capitalism  law  legal  internetofthings  internet  web  freedom  iot 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Gimme the Loot | Jacobin
"Pirate ships were different – they were under democratic worker control. Captains weren’t absolute rulers, but elected leaders who commanded only during battle. Day-to-day operations were handled democratically by the entire crew. Loot was divided equally and immediately, and pirates ate – and drank – better than their law-abiding contemporaries. This was the major reason pirates were feared: it was easy to convince exploited sailors to join up with them. And join up they did.

Pirate crews were a polyglot, multiracial multitude…"

"This is the fundamental difference between capitalists and pirates. Capitalists accumulate. Pirates archive. A capitalist wants profit from the sale of every commodity and will enforce scarcity to get it. Pirates work to create vast common spaces, amassing huge troves of content, much of it too obscure to be of much use to very many people. Piracy destroys exchange value, and pays little heed to use value."
mpaa  filesharing  pirateparty  google  kimdotcom  software  markets  archiving  2012  megaupload  anonymous  piracy  pirates  capitalism 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Welcome aboard! | Pirate university
"The Pirate University is a site specially build to allow students who don't have access to up-to-date academic resources (publications) to ask students who have, to help them out."
inequality  learning  access  opencourse  copyright  openaccess  pirateuniversity  piracy  education  journals 
june 2012 by robertogreco
The Piracy Threshold - Matt Gemmell
The majority of people have a basic desire to be honest - and I mean actually honest, rather than some limited definition based strictly on the law. People will go to reasonable lengths to be honest. It makes us feel good about ourselves, and it confers a certain immunity from legal problems.

But then you fuck us. First you fuck us with exorbitant pricing. Then you fuck us with inconvenience by not making your content universally available when we want it. Then you fuck us by treating every paying customer like a criminal.
drm  piracy  via:tealtan  honesty  convenience  inconvenience  mattgemmell 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Right versus pragmatic – Marco.org
"They never tried that. They just kept posting more signs, because they were convinced that they were right.

This pattern is common. We often try to fight problems by yelling at them instead of accepting the reality of what people do, from controversial national legislation to passive-aggressive office signs. Such efforts usually fail, often with a lot of collateral damage, much like Prohibition and the ongoing “war” on “drugs”.

And, more recently (and with much less human damage), media piracy.

Big media publishers think they’re right to keep fighting piracy at any cost because they think it’s costing them a lot of potential sales.

It is, but not as many as they think, and not for the reasons they think…

Relying solely on yelling about what’s right isn’t a pragmatic approach for the media industry to take. And it’s not working."
tv  television  embargo  prohibition  rightandwrong  beingright  pragmatism  behavior  2012  marcoarment  oatmeal  gameofthrones  psychology  piracy 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Don't Make Me Steal
"1. Pricing: In general I want the pricing model to be simple & transparent. I don't mind a slight difference in pricing between movies with regard to the age of the movie.
* Rentals should not exceed 1/3 of the cinema price.
* Purchases should not exceed the cinema price.
* Monthly flat rate prices should not exceed 3 visits to the cinema.
* TV shows should cost 1/3 the price of movies.
* Payments are for the content, not bandwidth.

2. Languages
* I can obtain the audio in every language produced for the content.
* After purchasing a movie, all the languages are available.
* Fans are legally allowed to create and share subtitles for any content.

3. Convenience
* The content I paid for is instantly available.
* Content is delivered without ads, or disrupting infringement warnings.
* I can find movies or TV shows by year, director, language, country, genre, iMDB ID, etc.
4. Choice And Release Dates
* The release date is global. There are no limits regarding the country I live in…"
media  consumption  2012  manifesto  cinema  campaign  piracy  downloads  film  movies  copyright  manifestos 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Rhizome | 5 Million Dollars 1 Terabyte (2011) - Manuel Palou
"5 Million Dollars 1 Terrabyte (2011) is a sculpture consisting of a 1 TB Black External Hard Drive containing $5,000,000 worth of illegally downloaded files. A full list of the files with clickable download links can be found here: http://www.art404.com/5million1terrabyte.pdf "
art  piracy  sculpture  readymade  copyright  2011 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Twitter / @Timothy Burke: "Interdisciplinarity" see ...
[A thread on Twitter about interdisciplinarity…]

"Interdisciplinarity" seems so formal, like a treaty organization. I like the version that's about smuggling stuff across borders. [http://twitter.com/swarthmoreburke/status/63037778606292992 ]

@swarthmoreburke @publichistorian "Idea Smuggler". Love it. [http://twitter.com/navalang/status/63039078488211456 ]

@swarthmoreburke @navalang @publichistorian Cross-disciplinary. Anti-disciplinary. Black-market scholarship. [http://twitter.com/tcarmody/status/63041041145663488 ]

@tcarmody @swarthmoreburke @navalang @publichistorian Bricolage. [http://twitter.com/ayjay/status/63042045635334144 ]

[Additional, unassembled thoughts: discipline tunneling, cross-pollination, kludge, bilge, edupunk, thought trafficking, pirates, buccaneer scholar, clandestine, etc.]
interdisciplinary  interdisciplinarity  crossdisciplinary  ideasmuggling  crosspollination  bricolage  antidisciplinary  black-marketscholarship  pirates  piracy  cv  academia  academics  timcarmody  alanjacobs  navneetalang  suzannefischer 
april 2011 by robertogreco
KIBU-WAMP Designer Challenge 2011! | Kitchen Budapest
"What alternative roles might designers take and what new strategies and ideas might the ‘design community‘ employ in response to these challenges?

What happens when we move from severing corporate interests to the interests of the community?

How can new tools and resources of rapid prototyping, digital and bio hacking, and DIY culture as a whole be used to create new economies?

What services might we design if our constraints move from concerns about legal implications to personal ethical considerations?

If instead of designing for the free market, what if we designed for the street, or black market?"
design  piracy  workshops  kitchenbudapest  via:javierarbona  community  rapidprototyping  diy  economics  blackmarkets  freemarkets 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Some notes on the iPad | varnelis.net [notes/quotes from David Smith]
"My work revolves around reading & since I commute & travel it's difficult not to have texts with me. … A tablet full of PDFs struck me as a good replacement for the books in my library that don't have high-resolution imagery. Moreover … [it] strikes me as a better way to go paperless in the classroom … & it's no longer a physical artifact between my students and myself. My initial impression is that this will be a tremendous success for me." + others' intended use; the future of books, book piracy. "Having easily searchable text will transform scholarship. Reading scholarly books cover to cover may become as odd as listening to albums cover to cover." "All that said (and I thought I'd mention that all this was written on an iPad that I am using a bluetooth keyboard with), I can't deny that the iPad makes me feel like it's 2010, just as using a DVD for the first time in bed on my laptop in 2001 (and yes, it WAS 2001: A Space Odyssey) made me feel like it was 2001."
ipad  classrooms  books  publishing  piracy  reading  teaching  ebooks  classroom 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Second Degree Murder and Six Other Crimes Cheaper than Pirating Music - Piracy - Gizmodo
"I'm outraged that the Obama administration is supporting the RIAA on the case against Jammie Thomas, a single mother of four who has to pay them $1.92 million for downloading songs. That's more expensive than murder & 6 other crimes: • Child abduction: $25,000 & up to 3 years in prison, which can be accounted as $50,233/year (median household income in 2007). Total: $175,699. • Steal the CDs: total of $275,000, $52,500 fine for the CDs. • Steal a lawnmower from your neighbour: $375,000. • Burn someone's house while playing The Doors: $375,000. • Stalk a Gizmodo editor: Class 4 felony...just $175,000. • Start a dogfighting ring: $50,000. • Murder someone on 2nd degree, Class 1 felony: $778,495 = $25,000 fine & 4-15 years in prison. Heck, you can do all these crimes & the total amount will be only $2.2 million. Of course, you can't really quantify years spent in prison using dollars, but I don't care. The case of Jammie—and many like hers—is still absolutely outrageous."
riaa  music  crime  politics  law  wtf  piracy 
august 2009 by robertogreco
…My heart’s in Accra » Fun and games with human misery
"For me, either the suspiciously accurate novel or the eminently readable comic go a long way in turning a distant – though critical – concern into a real, tangible problem. It makes me wish that more journalists and activists would look for creative ways to tell these stories and make them more real to readers."
education  learning  comics  games  gaming  simulations  science  politics  piracy  africa  ethanzuckerman  tcsnmy 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Why TV Lost
"[1] the Internet is an open platform... [2] Moore's Law, which has worked its usual magic on Internet bandwidth... [3] piracy. Users prefer it not just because it's free, but because it's more convenient." ... "After decades of running an IV drip right into their audience, people in the entertainment business had understandably come to think of them as rather passive. They thought they'd be able to dictate the way shows reached audiences. But they underestimated the force of their desire to connect with one another."
internet  web  online  paulgraham  broadcast  tv  television  technology  convergence  bittorrent  distribution  piracy  kindle  facebook  media  information  future 
march 2009 by robertogreco
xkcd - A Webcomic - Steal This Comic
"Thinking of buying from audible.com or iTunes? Remember, if you pirate something, it's yours for life. You can take it anywhere and it will always work. But if you buy DRM-locked media, and you ever switch operating systems or new technology comes along, your collection could be lost. And if you try to keep it, you'll be a criminal (DMCA 1201). So remember: if you want a collection you can count on, PIRATE IT. Hey, you'll be a criminal either way."
humor  piracy  dmca  drm  pirates  webcomics  xkcd  comics  law  flowchart 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Why people pirate games
"The gaming, music, & movie industry would do well to take note of key sentence: "Anything that made purchasing & starting to play difficult - like copy protection, DRM, 2-step online purchasing routines - anything at all standing between impulse to play & playing in game itself was seen as legitimate signal to take free route." Last week, I tried to buy an episode of a TV show from iTunes Store. It didn't work and there was no error message. Thinking the download had corrupted something, I tried again and the same problem occurred. (learned later that I needed to upgrade Quicktime) Because I just wanted to watch the show and not deal with Apple's issues, I spend 2 minutes online, found it somewhere for free & watched the stolen version instead. I felt OK about it because I'd already paid for the real thing *twice*, but in the future, I'll be a little wary purchasing TV shows from iTunes & maybe go the easier route first."
games  drm  piracy  kottke  music  movies  film  gaming  videogames  kevinkelly 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Hypertext - The wide world of the web | Chicago Tribune | Blog
"We have the capacity to surveil and control adolescents ion a way we’ve never done before. We chase them indoors and then we tell them that all the virtual places they might gather, we need to surveil them because of the ever-present threat of pedophiles and because of the ever-present need to market to them. We've really hemmed in adolescence in a way we never have before."
corydoctorow  littlebrother  surveillance  privacy  children  adolescence  youth  freedom  childhood  society  parenting  interviews  books  opensource  security  boingboing  sciencefiction  design  obsolescence  apple  technology  creativecommons  blogging  writing  copyright  piracy  law  generations  optimism  rss  rfid  making  hacking  diy  internet 
august 2008 by robertogreco
The Pirate's Dilemma
"The Pirate’s Dilemma tells the story of how youth culture drives innovation and is changing the way the world works. It offers understanding and insight for a time when piracy is just another business model, the remix is our most powerful marketing too
books  classideas  informationliteracy  copyright  patents  creativity  innovation  business  politics  piracy  culture  drm  consumption  competition  freeconomics  filesharing  p2p  marketing  technology 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Cato Unbound » Blog Archive » The Future of Copyright - "Every broken regulation brings a cry for at least one new regulation even more sweepingly worded than the last."
"Copyright law in the 21st century tends to be less concerned about concrete cases of infringement, and more about criminalizing entire technologies because of their potential uses...undermines the freedom of choice...chilling effects on innovation"
copyright  technology  regulation  law  ip  politics  policy  legal  filesharing  privacy  property  government  piratebay  bittorrent  piracy 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Laser Printers Found Guilty of "Making Available" Crimes | Electronic Frontier Foundation
"DMCA takedown notices should be viewed skeptically...Colleges and universities should pay close attention to the findings, given that students often face harsh penalties from their institutions if they are hit with a DMCA notice."
eff  dmca  law  legal  filesharing  bittorrent  software  piracy  copyright 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Confessions of an Aca/Fan: "What is Remix Culture?": An Interview with Total Recut's Owen Gallagher (Part One) [part 2: http://henryjenkins.org/2008/06/interview_with_total_recuts_ow.html]
"No matter how far back you go in the origin of a piece of work, you will find ... idea was built on or inspired by the work of someone else before it. I consider remixed videos to be original works. The finished piece is more than the sum of its parts"
via:preoccupations  henryjenkins  youtube  copyright  digitalculture  fairuse  originality  remix  art  creativity  piracy  dj  music  media  video 
june 2008 by robertogreco
TeacherTube - How to create a great PowerPoint without breaking the law.
"A presentation from the eTech Ohio 2008 conference. The topics of the presentation are copyright law and how to create a great PowerPoint presentation."
copyright  design  flickr  legal  piracy  powerpoint  presentations  howto  law  tutorial  education  teaching 
april 2008 by robertogreco
hyperpeople » Blog Archive » Unevenly Distributed:Production Models for the 21st Century
"Sharing is an essential quality of all of the media this fifteen year-old has ever known. In his eyes, if it can’t be shared, a piece of media loses most of its value. If it can’t be forwarded along, it’s broken."
bittorrent  distribution  film  video  media  music  p2p  piratebay  napster  internet  web  online  history  sharing  piracy  future  television  tv  movies  youtube  gnutella  cds  dvds  copying  copyright  broadcast  abundance  newmedia  production  society  cinema  computers 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Seth's Blog: How much for digital?
"So, why try to mimic the current model when it comes to pricing if the costs are mostly gone?"
apple  business  film  books  piracy  video  digital  sethgodin 
january 2008 by robertogreco
The Pirate’s Dilemma | TorrentFreak
"what pirates are actually doing is highlighting a better way for us to do things; they find gaps outside the market – and better ways for society to operate"
bittorrent  collaboration  piracy  copyright  law  technology  p2p  economics  business 
january 2008 by robertogreco
$40K to fill an iPod? One third of PCs use LimeWire instead (Updated)
"Between LimeWire and Bittorrent, the ongoing and extremely widespread popularity of P2P as a media delivery vehicle suggest that music prices remain stuck at too high a level while the capacity of portable media players continues to balloon."
ipod  filesharing  music  media  economics  distribution  piracy  limewire  itunes  money  pricing  via:preoccupations  internet  p2p 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Freedom to Tinker
"The focus is on issues related to legal regulation of technology, and especially on legal attempts to restrict the right of technologists and citizens to tinker with technological devices. But we reserve the right to write about anything that strikes our
activism  tinkering  technology  opensource  open  legal  law  homebrew  engineering  ethics  encryption  modding  mobile  commons  censorship  anarchy  software  making  make  hacking  hardware  piracy  policy  politics  regulation  security  society  patents  copyright  anarchism 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Infringement Nation: we are all mega-crooks - Boing Boing
"By the end of the day, John has infringed the copyrights of twenty emails, three legal articles, an architectural rendering, a poem, five photographs, an animated character, a musical composition, a painting, and fifty notes and drawings."
copyright  law  legal  piracy  property  ip  creativity  innovation  technology  rights 
november 2007 by robertogreco
The Piracy Paradox: Financial Page: The New Yorker
"But we should be skeptical of claims that tougher laws are necessarily better laws. Sometimes imitation isn’t just the sincerest form of flattery. It’s also the most productive."
apparel  business  capitalism  competition  consumerism  copyright  culture  design  fashion  innovation  law  legal  patents  piracy  retail  trends  economics 
november 2007 by robertogreco
TED | Talks | Larry Lessig: How creativity is being strangled by the law (video)
"brings together John Philip Sousa, celestial copyrights, and the “ASCAP cartel” to build a case for creative freedom...pins down key shortcomings of our dusty, pre-digital intellectual property laws...reveals how bad laws beget bad code"
larrylessig  readwriteweb  children  capitalism  cc  commons  copyright  creativity  culture  democracy  freedom  learning  law  legal  property  ip  rights  technology  society  piracy  opensource  music  media  ted  activism  meaning  mashup  remix  content  communication  digital  commonsense  writing  film  video  computers  economics  politics  marketing 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Malacca Strait Pirates - Article Text, page 1 - National Geographic Magazine
"Modern pirates have long plagued Southeast Asia’s Strait of Malacca, robbing sailors, kidnapping crews, and stealing entire ships."
piracy  pirates  images  photography  oceans  crime  culture  shipping  ships  transportation  asia  international 
november 2007 by robertogreco
How the World Works: Globalization, Globalization Blogs - Salon.com
"Someone, somewhere, I thought, must have written the definitive article on how new business models for pop music are being forged in Japan. But it's probably in Japanese. All I could find was a growing anxiety, on the part of the creators and distributor
entertainment  japan  japanese  media  music  culture  anime  manga  marketing  global  globalization  internet  online  youtube  piracy  copyright 
october 2007 by robertogreco
The Pirate's Dilemma
"companies and organizations are now struggling with a new dilemma in increasing numbers. As piracy continues to change the way we all use information, how should we respond? Do we fight pirates, or do we learn from them? Should piracy be treated as a pro
culture  economics  future  piracy  ip  innovation  creativity  books  products  design 
october 2007 by robertogreco
The Pirate Hunters
"Though buccaneering is back with a vengeance, stepped-up law enforcement and high-tech tools are helping protect shipping on the high seas"
pirates  africa  security  shipping  technology  law  enforcement  piracy 
july 2007 by robertogreco

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