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What It Takes to Put Your Phone Away | The New Yorker
"During the first few days of my Internet decluttering, I found myself compulsively checking my unchanged in-box and already-read text messages, and scanning the same headlines over and over—attempting, as if bewitched, to see new information there. I took my dog out for longer walks, initially trying to use them for some productive purpose: spying on neighbors, planning my week. Soon I acquiesced to a dull, pleasant blankness. One afternoon, I draped myself on my couch and felt an influx of mental silence that was both disturbing and hallucinatorily pleasurable. I didn’t want to learn how to fix or build anything, or start a book club. I wanted to experience myself as soft and loose and purposeless, three qualities that, in my adulthood, have always seemed economically risky.

“Nothing is harder to do than nothing,” Jenny Odell writes, in her new book, “How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy” (Melville House). Odell, a multidisciplinary artist who teaches at Stanford, is perhaps best known for a pamphlet called “There’s No Such Thing as a Free Watch,” which she put together while in residence at the Museum of Capitalism, in Oakland. Odell investigated the origins of a blandly stylish watch that was being offered for free (plus shipping) on Instagram, and found a mirrored fun house of digital storefronts that looked as though they had been generated by algorithm. The retailers advertised themselves as brands that had physical origins in glitzy Miami Beach or hip San Francisco but were, in fact, placeless nodes in a vast web of scammy global wholesalers, behind which a human presence could hardly be discerned.

Like Newport, Odell thinks that we should spend less time on the Internet. Unlike him, she wants readers to question the very idea of productivity. Life is “more than an instrument and therefore something that cannot be optimized,” she writes. To find the physical world sufficiently absorbing, to conceive of the self as something that “exceeds algorithmic description”—these are not only “ends in and of themselves, but inalienable rights belonging to anyone lucky enough to be alive.” Odell details, with earnest wonder, moments in her life when she was reoriented toward these values. After the 2016 election, she began feeding peanuts to two crows on her balcony, and found comfort in the fact that “these essentially wild animals recognized me, that I had some place in their universe.” She also developed a fascination, via Google Maps, with the creek behind her old kindergarten, and she went to see it with a friend. She followed the creek bed, which, she learned, runs beneath Cupertino’s shopping centers and Apple’s headquarters. The creek became a reminder that under the “streamlined world of products, results, experiences, reviews” there is a “giant rock whose other lifeforms operate according to an ancient, oozing, almost chthonic logic.”

Odell elegantly aligns the crisis in our natural world and the crisis in our minds: what has happened to the natural world is happening to us, she contends, and it’s happening on the same soon-to-be-irreparable scale. She sees “little difference between habitat restoration in the traditional sense and restoring habitats for human thought”; both are endangered by “the logic of capitalist productivity.” She believes that, by constantly disclosing our needs and desires to tech companies that sift through our selfhood in search of profit opportunities, we are neglecting, even losing, our mysterious, murky depths—the parts of us that don’t serve an ulterior purpose but exist merely to exist. The “best, most alive parts” of ourselves are being “paved over by a ruthless logic of use.”

“Digital Minimalism” and “How to Do Nothing” could both be categorized as highbrow how-to—an artist and a computer scientist, both of them in their thirties, wrestling with the same timely prompt. (At one point, Odell writes, she thought of her book as activism disguised as self-help.) Rather than a philosophy of technology use, Odell offers a philosophy of modern life, which she calls “manifest dismantling,” and which she intends as the opposite of Manifest Destiny. It involves rejecting the sort of progress that centers on isolated striving, and emphasizing, instead, caregiving, maintenance, and the interdependence of things. Odell grew up in the Bay Area, and her work is full of unabashed hippie moments that might provoke cynicism. But, for me—and, I suspect, for others who have come of age alongside the Internet and have coped with the pace and the precariousness of contemporary living with a mixture of ambient fatalism and flares of impetuous tenderness—she struck a hopeful nerve of possibility that I hadn’t felt in a long time.

Odell writes about the first electronic bulletin-board system, which was set up, in Berkeley, in 1972, as a “communal memory bank.” She contrasts it with Nextdoor, a notoriously paranoid neighborhood-based social platform that was recently valued at $1.5 billion, inferring that the profit motive had perverted what can be a healthy civic impulse. Newport, who does not have any social-media accounts of his own, generally treats social media’s current profit model as an unfortunate inevitability. Odell believes that there is another way. She cites, for example, the indie platform Mastodon, which is crowdfunded and decentralized. (It is made up of independently operated nodes, called “instances,” on which users can post short messages, or “toots.”) To make money from something—a forest, a sense of self—is often to destroy it. Odell brings up a famous redwood in Oakland called Old Survivor, which is estimated to be almost five hundred years old. Unlike all the other trees of its kind in the area, it was never cut down, because it was runty and twisted and situated on a rocky slope; it appeared unprofitable to loggers. The tree, she writes, is an image of “resistance-in-place,” of something that has escaped capitalist appropriation. As Odell sees it, the only way forward is to be like Old Survivor. We have to be able to do nothing—to merely bear witness, to stay in place, to create shelter for one another—to endure."



"My Newport-inspired Internet cleanse happened to coincide with a handful of other events that made me feel raw and unmanageable. It was the end of winter, with its sudden thaws and strange fluctuations—the type of weather where a day of sunshine feels like a stranger being kind to you when you cry. I had just finished writing a book that had involved going through a lot of my past. The hours per day that I had spent converting my experience into something of professional and financial value were now empty, and I was cognizant of how little time I had spent caring for the people and things around me. I began thinking about my selfhood as a meadow of wildflowers that had been paved over by the Internet. I started frantically buying houseplants.

I also found myself feeling more grateful for my phone than ever. I had become more conscious of why I use technology, and how it meets my needs, as Newport recommended. It’s not nothing that I can text my friends whenever I think about them, or get on Viber and talk to my grandmother in the Philippines, or sit on the B54 bus and distract myself from the standstill traffic by looking up the Fermi paradox and listening to any A Tribe Called Quest song that I want to hear. All these capacities still feel like the stuff of science fiction, and none of them involve Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook. It occurred to me that two of the most straightforwardly beloved digital technologies—podcasts and group texts—push against the attention economy’s worst characteristics. Podcasts often demand sustained listening, across hours and weeks, to a few human voices. Group texts are effectively the last noncommercialized social spaces on many millennials’ phones.

On the first day of April, I took stock of my digital experiment. I had not become a different, better person. I had not acquired any high-value leisure activities. But I had felt a sort of persistent ache and wonder that pulled me back to a year that I spent in the Peace Corps, wandering in the dust at the foot of sky-high birch trees, terrified and thrilled at the sensation of being unknowable, mysterious to myself, unseen. I watered my plants, and I loosened my StayFocusd settings, back to forty-five daily minutes. I considered my Freedom parameters, which I had already learned to break, and let them be."
jiatolentino  2019  internet  attention  jennyodell  capitalism  work  busyness  resistance  socialmedia  instagram  twitter  facebook  infooverload  performance  web  online  nature  nextdoor  advertising  thoreau  philosophy  care  caring  maintenance  silence  happiness  anxiety  leisurearts  artleisure  commodification  technology  selfhood  identity  sms  texting  viber  podcasts  grouptexts  digitalminimalism  refusal  calnewport  mobile  phones  smartphones  screentime  ralphwaldoemerson  separatism  interdependence 
24 days ago by robertogreco
‎The War on Cars on Apple Podcasts
"The War on Cars brings you news and commentary on the latest developments in the worldwide fight to undo a century's worth of damage wrought by the automobile and to make cities better. Hosted by Doug Gordon, Sarah Goodyear and Aaron Naparstek and produced by Curtis Fox. Music by Nathaniel Goodyear."
cars  podcasts  transportation  cities  urban  urbanism  douggordon  sarahgoodyear  aaronnaparstek  curtisfox 
5 weeks ago by robertogreco
Should This Exist?
"It's the question of our times: How is technology impacting our humanity? Coming February 21, 2019, Should This Exist? invites the creators of radical new technologies to set aside their business plan, and think through the human side: What is the invention’s greatest promise? And what could possibly go wrong? Show host Caterina Fake (Partner, Yes VC; Cofounder Flickr) is a celebrated tech pioneer and one of Silicon Valley’s most eloquent commentators on technology and the human condition. Joined by a roster of all-star expert guests who have a knack for looking around corners, Caterina drops listeners into the minds of today’s ingenious entrepreneurs and guides them through the journey of foreseeing what their technology might do to us, and for us. Should This Exist? is a WaitWhat original series in partnership with Quartz."
caterinafake  podcasts  technology  2019 
12 weeks ago by robertogreco
The WALKING podcast by Jon Mooallem on Apple Podcasts
"Come along as acclaimed journalist and author Jon Mooallem takes a walk through tranquil woodlands of the Pacific Northwest. No talking; just walking. Ambient. Pleasing. Unusual."



"Customer Reviews

Sooooo Soooooothing...
by Christopher Gronlund
Because I'm a tech writer by trade, and because I don't commute to work, I really don't have the ability to listen to many podcasts. Talking does not work well with writing, and evenings are spent with my wife, or doing the writing I prefer doing.

But ambient footfalls out on a walk? Yes! Not only can I listen to this while working...the pacing of the steps slogging along probably improved productivity. Bonus: I'm sure I'll relisten to episodes when I need to block out the world and get things done.

Finally
by Code Name Dazzle
The walking podcast I've been waiting for!

Slug Murder Truthers
by Ryan Nickum
The pitter patter of host Jon’s feet upon the soft Pacific Northwest soil is a soothing sound... that is until about 6:09 into episode 1, when the host can clearly be heard stepping on a banana slug. At first I thought that squishing sound might be mud, which is common to the area, but immediately after one can clearly hear his pace quicken and his breathing increase, as he hurries away from the horror he’s caused."
sound  walking  pacificnorthwest  jonmooallem  podcasts  ambient 
january 2019 by robertogreco
The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected | WIRED
"THE FUTURE BOOK was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.

Prognostications about how technology would affect the form of paper books have been with us for centuries. Each new medium was poised to deform or murder the book: newspapers, photography, radio, movies, television, videogames, the internet.

Some viewed the intersection of books and technology more positively: In 1945, Vannevar Bush wrote in The Atlantic: “Wholly new forms of encyclopedias will appear, ready made with a mesh of associative trails running through them, ready to be dropped into the memex and there amplified.”

Researcher Alan Kay created a cardboard prototype of a tablet-like device in 1968. He called it the "Dynabook," saying, “We created a new kind of medium for boosting human thought, for amplifying human intellectual endeavor. We thought it could be as significant as Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press 500 years ago.”

In the 1990s, Future Bookism hit a kind of beautiful fever pitch. We were so close. Brown University professor Robert Coover, in a 1992 New York Times op-ed titled “The End of Books,” wrote of the future of writing: “Fluidity, contingency, indeterminacy, plurality, discontinuity are the hypertext buzzwords of the day, and they seem to be fast becoming principles, in the same way that relativity not so long ago displaced the falling apple.” And then, more broadly: “The print medium is a doomed and outdated technology, a mere curiosity of bygone days destined soon to be consigned forever to those dusty unattended museums we now call libraries.”

Normal books? Bo-ring. Future Books? Awesome—indeterminate—and we were almost there! The Voyager Company built its "expanded books" platform on Hypercard, launching with three titles at MacWorld 1992. Microsoft launched Encarta on CD-ROM.

But … by the mid-2000s, there still were no real digital books. The Rocket eBook was too little, too early. Sony launched the eink-based Librie platform in 2004 to little uptake. Interactive CD-ROMs had dropped off the map. We had Wikipedia, blogs, and the internet, but the mythological Future Book—some electric slab that would somehow both be like and not like the quartos of yore—had yet to materialize. Peter Meirs, head of technology at Time, hedged his bets perfectly, proclaiming: “Ultimately, there will be some sort of device!”

And then there was. Several devices, actually. The iPhone launched in June 2007, the Kindle that November. Then, in 2010, the iPad arrived. High-resolution screens were suddenly in everyone’s hands and bags. And for a brief moment during the early 2010s, it seemed like it might finally be here: the glorious Future Book."



"Yet here’s the surprise: We were looking for the Future Book in the wrong place. It’s not the form, necessarily, that needed to evolve—I think we can agree that, in an age of infinite distraction, one of the strongest assets of a “book” as a book is its singular, sustained, distraction-free, blissfully immutable voice. Instead, technology changed everything that enables a book, fomenting a quiet revolution. Funding, printing, fulfillment, community-building—everything leading up to and supporting a book has shifted meaningfully, even if the containers haven’t. Perhaps the form and interactivity of what we consider a “standard book” will change in the future, as screens become as cheap and durable as paper. But the books made today, held in our hands, digital or print, are Future Books, unfuturistic and inert may they seem."

[sections on self-publishing, crowdfunding, email newsletters, social media, audiobooks and podcasts, etc.]



"It turns out smartphones aren’t the best digital book reading devices (too many seductions, real-time travesties, notifications just behind the words), but they make excellent audiobook players, stowed away in pockets while commuting. Top-tier podcasts like Serial, S-Town, and Homecoming have normalized listening to audio or (nonfiction) booklike productions on smartphones."



"Last August, a box arrived on my doorstep that seemed to embody the apotheosis of contemporary publishing. The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition was published via a crowdfunding campaign. The edition includes a book of images, three records, and a small poster packaged in an exquisite box set with supplementary online material. When I held it, I didn’t think about how futuristic it felt, nor did I lament the lack of digital paper or interactivity. I thought: What a strange miracle to be able to publish an object like this today. Something independently produced, complex and beautiful, with foil stamping and thick pages, full-color, in multiple volumes, made into a box set, with an accompanying record and other shimmering artifacts, for a weirdly niche audience, funded by geeks like me who are turned on by the romance of space.

We have arrived to the once imagined Future Book in piecemeal truths.

Moving images were often espoused to be a core part of our Future Book. While rarely found inside of an iBooks or Kindle book, they are here. If you want to learn the ukulele, you don’t search Amazon for a Kindle how-to book, you go to YouTube and binge on hours of lessons, stopping when you need to, rewinding as necessary, learning at your own pace.

Vannevar Bush's “Memex” essentially described Wikipedia built into a desk.

The "Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy" in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is an iPhone.

In The Book of Sand, Borges wrote of an infinite book: "It was then that the stranger told me: 'Study the page well. You will never see it again.'" Describing in many ways what it feels like to browse the internet or peek at Twitter.

Our Future Book is composed of email, tweets, YouTube videos, mailing lists, crowdfunding campaigns, PDF to .mobi converters, Amazon warehouses, and a surge of hyper-affordable offset printers in places like Hong Kong.

For a “book” is just the endpoint of a latticework of complex infrastructure, made increasingly accessible. Even if the endpoint stays stubbornly the same—either as an unchanging Kindle edition or simple paperback—the universe that produces, breathes life into, and supports books is changing in positive, inclusive ways, year by year. The Future Book is here and continues to evolve. You’re holding it. It’s exciting. It’s boring. It’s more important than it has ever been.

But temper some of those flight-of-fancy expectations. In many ways, it’s still a potato."
craigmod  ebooks  reading  howweread  2018  kindle  eink  print  publishing  selfpublishing  blurb  lulu  amazon  ibooks  apple  digital  bookfuturism  hypertext  hypercard  history  vannevarbush  borges  twitter  animation  video  newsletters  email  pdf  mobi  epub  infrastructure  systems  economics  goldenrecord  voyager  audio  audiobooks  smarthphones  connectivity  ereaders  podcasts  socialmedia  kevinkelly  benthompson  robinsloan  mailchimp  timbuktulabs  elenafavilli  francescacavallo  jackcheng  funding  kickstarter  crowdfunding  blogs  blogging  wikipedia  internet  web  online  writing  howwewrite  self-publishing  youtube 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Contra* podcast — Mapping Access
"a podcast about disability, design justice, and the lifeworld. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and Google Play, or play from our website."

[See also:
https://www.mapping-access.com/podcast/2018/12/29/episode-1-contra-design-with-sara-hendren

"In this first episode of the podcast, we talk to design researcher Sara Hendren, who teaches at Olin College of Engineering, about disability, critical design, and poetic creation.

Show notes and transcription

++++

Themes:

Critical Design

Theory of critical design revised by disability

Writing as/part of critical design

Disability politics in relation to design

Translational work and science communication; critical design as a “friendly Trojan horse”

Things as an index of ideas

STEAM, knowledge, and power

Links:

Sara Hendren (https://sarahendren.com)

Abler blog (https://ablersite.org/)

Adaptation and Ability Lab (http://aplusa.org/)

Wendy Jacob and Temple Grandin, Squeeze Chair (https://patient-innovation.com/post/1047?language=en)

Sketch Model project at Olin College (http://www.olin.edu/collaborate/sketch-model/)

Ivan Illich, Tools for Conviviality (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/253076.Tools_for_Conviviality)

Karen Barad, Meeting the Universe Halfway (https://www.dukeupress.edu/Meeting-the-Universe-Halfway/)

Aimi Hamraie, Building Access: Universal Design and the Politics of Disability (https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/building-access)

++++

Introduction Description:

The podcast introductory segment is composed to evoke friction. It begins with sounds of a wheelchair rhythmically banging down metal steps, the putter of an elevator arriving at a person’s level, and an elevator voice saying “Floor two, Floor three.” Voices begin to define Contra*. Layered voices say “Contra is friction…Contra is…Contra is nuanced…Contra is transgressive…Contra is good trouble…Contra is collaborative…Contra is a podcast!…Contra is a space for thinking about design critically…Contra is subversive…Contra is texture…”

An electric guitar plays a single note to blend out the sound.

The rhythmic beat of an electronic drum begins and fades into the podcast introduction.

++++

Episode Introduction:

Welcome to Contra*: the podcast about disability, design justice, and the lifeworld. This show is about the politics of accessible and critical design—broadly conceived—and how accessibility can be more than just functional or assistive. It can be conceptual, artful, and world-changing.

I’m your host, Aimi Hamraie .  I am a professor at Vanderbilt University, a designer and design researcher, and the director of the Critical Design Lab, a multi-institution collaborative focused on disability, technology, and critical theory.  Members of the lab collaborate on a number of projects focused on hacking ableism, speaking back to inaccessible public infrastructures, and redesigning the methods of participatory design—all using a disability culture framework. This podcast provides a window into the kinds of discussions we have within the lab, as well as the conversations we are hoping to put into motion. So in coming episodes, you’ll also hear from myself and the other designers and researchers in the lab, and we encourage you to get in touch with us via our website, www.mapping-access.com or on Twitter at @criticaldesignl

In this first episode of the podcast, we talk to design researcher Sara Hendren, who teaches at Olin College of Engineering, about disability, critical design, and poetic creation.

Sara and I talk about her work in the fields of critical design and assistive technology, including how she came to this work, how she is thinking about strategy and practice, and also her current work on bridging the humanities with STEM education."]
accessibility  disability  aimihamraie  ableism  podcasts  disabilitystudies  criticaldesign  olincollege  assistivetechnology  technology  poeticcreation  creativity  sarahendren  ivanillich  toolsforconviviality  wendyjacob  templegrandin  stem  knowledge  power  karenbarad  adaptation  materialculture  socialimagination  art  design  thinking  inclusivity  capitalism  howwewrite  howwethink  making  communication  academia  scholarship  ethics  politics  difference  jargon  language 
january 2019 by robertogreco
LA Podcast by LA Podcast on Apple Podcasts
"A news podcast for people who live in Los Angeles. Hosted by Hayes Davenport, Scott Frazier, and Alissa Walker."

[See also: https://lapodcast.simplecast.fm/ ]
podcasts  losangeles  hayesdavenport  scottfrazier  alissaalker 
september 2018 by robertogreco
South of Fletcher Podcast – Clockshop
"This podcast explores the past, present and potential of the Bowtie parcel. Once one of Southern California’s most important rail yards, this site will soon become the next urban California State Park, joining a patchwork of other river-adjacent green spaces that are shaping the course of LA River revitalization. Through personal interviews with people who have worked, lived and otherwise made their marks at this post-industrial site, Fonografia Collective explores some of LA’s biggest challenges, and speculates about what change at this site might mean for the rest of the city.

Subscribe to Clockshop’s iTunes channel to automatically receive new episodes when they become available.

Written and co-produced by Ruxandra Guidi
Edited by Ibby Caputo
Music by Luis Guerra"

[See also: https://clockshop.org/project/bowtie-aa/south-of-fletcher/

South of Fletcher: Stories from the Bowtie
Fonografia Collective, 2018

South of Fletcher: Stories from the Bowtie is a multi-platform storytelling project by Fonografia Collective, produced by Clockshop.

Once one of Southern California’s most important rail yards, the Bowtie is now an open site overlooking a lush stretch of the Glendale Narrows, where plants sprout up from building remains, and migratory birds glide gently across the nearby river’s surface. California State Parks purchased this plot of land in 2003, and Clockshop has been producing programming at the site since 2014. But outside of these official uses, the Bowtie has a life, and a dedicated following, of its own.

Ruxandra Guidi and Bear Guerra of Fonografia Collective have been working at the Bowtie for the past year, talking to people who frequent the site, and learning more about its historic, present day, and potential uses. Through their research, they’ve uncovered that some of Los Angeles’s biggest issues — the housing crisis, lack of open space, effects of climate change, and forces of urban development — come to a head at this unique piece of land next to the LA River. South of Fletcher: Stories from the Bowtie will present their findings through a podcast series, three public discussions, and a photography exhibition.

In partnership with Oxy Arts, major themes from this project will be woven into Occidental College’s CORE Program for incoming freshmen, complementing the South of Fletcher photo exhibition that will take place at Occidental’s Weingart Gallery September 13 – November 4.

Our biweekly South of Fletcher podcast launches September 10."]
ruxandrguidi  bearguerra  losangeles  podcasts  fonografiacollective  2018  losangelesriver  lariver  bowtie  clockshop  photography  srg  photojournalism 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Surprisingly Problematic
"Generation X is back to whine about their lost youth and the movies they loved in the 80s that turn out to be surprisingly problematic by today's standards."
genx  generationx  film  problematic  podcasts  movies 
august 2018 by robertogreco
RWM - RWM
"RWM is a nonprofit online radio project for popular education.

We have done everything in our power to identify the copyright owners of the works we present. Any and all accidental errors and omissions that RWM is notified of in writing will be corrected as soon as possible. For a list of authors, see the details of each program.

Available under a Creative Commons license the following contents.

Part of our programme is possible through Re-Imagine Europe, a four-year project presented by ten cultural organisations from across Europe, funded by Creative Europe.

Re-Imagine Europe is initiated by Sonic Acts (NL) and coordinated by Paradiso (NL) in collaboration with Elevate Festival (AT), Lighthouse (UK), Ina GRM (FR), Student Centre Zagreb / Izlog Festival (HR), Landmark / Bergen Kunsthall (NO), A4 (SK), SPEKTRUM (DE) and Ràdio Web MACBA (ES).

Online interview on the project.
[http://www.perfomap.de/map3/kapitel4/ramos ]

Follow us on Twitter @Radio_Web_MACBA

Contact us: rwm(at)macba.cat"



"sonia: Magnitude that expresses the level of sonorous sensation produced by an intense sound.

The RWM emits SON[I]A, its first program, since May 2 2006.

SON[I]A aims to be an alternative way to receive the information produced during Museum activities; audio information brought to us by characters who take part in activities in and around the MACBA.

This series is produced by: Dolores Acebal, David Armengol, Bani Brusadin, Lúa Coderch, André Chêdas, Lucrecia Dalt, Ricardo Duque, Sonia Fernández Pan, Jaume Ferrete, Antonio Gagliano, Carlos Gómez, Roc Jiménez de Cisneros, Raül Hinojosa, Arnau Horta, Yolanda Jolis, Sònia López, Lluís Nacenta, Enric Puig Punyet, Quim Pujol, Mario Quelart, Anna Ramos and Matías Rossi."



"RWM es un proyecto de radio online con vocación divulgativa y sin ánimo de lucro.

Se han hecho todas las gestiones para identificar a los propietarios de los derechos de autor. Cualquier error u omisión accidental tendrá que ser notificado por escrito a RWM y será corregido en la medida de lo posible. Para consultar el listado de autores, ver detalle de cada programa.

Disponible bajo licencia Creative Commons Creative Commons los contenidos enlazados aquí.

Parte de nuestra programación es posible a través de Re-Imagine Europe, un proyecto de cuatro años que agrupa diez organizaciones culturales europeas, financiado por Creative Europe.

Re-Imagine Europe ha sido iniciado por Sonic Acts (NL) y coordinado a través de Paradiso (NL) en colaboración con Elevate Festival (AT), Lighthouse (UK), Ina GRM (FR), Student Centre Zagreb / Izlog Festival (HR), Landmark / Bergen Kunsthall (NO), A4 (SK), SPEKTRUM (DE) y Ràdio Web MACBA (ES).

Entrevista online sobre las líneas discursivas del proyecto.

Síguenos en Twitter @Radio_Web_MACBA

Contacto: rwm(at)macba.cat"



"sonía: Magnitud que expresa el nivel de sensación sonora producida por un sonido de intensidad.

SON[I]A fue el primer programa de la plataforma RWM y se emite desde el 2 de mayo de 2006.

El SON[I]A se presenta como una alternativa de consumo de la información que produce la actividad del Museo, aprovechando sinergias que se generan a partir de la presencia de personajes, actividades y sonidos que transcurren por el MACBA.

Esta serie está producida por: Dolores Acebal, David Armengol, Bani Brusadin, André Chêdas, Lúa Coderch, Lucrecia Dalt, Ricardo Duque, Sonia Fernández Pan, Jaume Ferrete, Antonio Gagliano, Carlos Gómez, Roc Jiménez de Cisneros, Raül Hinojosa, Arnau Horta, Yolanda Jolis, Sònia López, Lluís Nacenta, Enric Puig Punyet, Quim Pujol, Mario Quelart, Anna Ramos y Matías Rossi."



[via: https://twitter.com/Radio_Web_MACBA/status/1014437790359138304

"🔊 Most listened podcast this June 🔊
1/ @Jenn1fer_A https://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/jennifer-lucy-allan/capsula
2/ PROBES by Chris Cutler https://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag
3/ Griselda Pollock https://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/griselda-pollock-main/capsula
4/ Domènec https://rwm.macba.cat/es/sonia/domenec-main/capsula
5/ val flores https://rwm.macba.cat/es/sonia/val-flores-main/capsula "]
audio  podcasts  tolisten  sound  sounds  rwm  macba  barcelona  radio 
july 2018 by robertogreco
RWM - SON[I]A: #261 Jennifer Lucy Allan 01.06.2018 (46' 34'')
"#261
Jennifer Lucy Allan
01.06.2018 (46' 34'')

This podcast is part of Re-Imagine Europe, co-funded by the Creative Europe programme of the European Union.

Sound production commissioned to Tiago Pina. Editing by Matias Rossi.

The foghorn is a sonic marker used in conditions of low visibility to alert vessels of hidden navigational hazards. Part of the coastal landscape since its invention in the nineteenth century, foghorns became obsolete with the rise of automatic alert systems or simpler devices such as compressed air horns.

In 2013, the British writer and research Jennifer Lucy Allan, co-director of the record label Arc Light Editions, covered a performance of the 'Foghorn Requiem', a composition that marks the passing of the foghorn from the British coastal landscape. In her review she wrote: 'The foghorn symbolises the sound of industry, the hollering of an age of engines, machines and power, and also a sound that is intensely nostalgic. It suggests loneliness and isolation, but is simultaneously a wordless reassurance to those out at sea that there’s a human presence nearby.' The experience made such a strong impression on her that she ended up dedicating her doctoral thesis to researching the social and cultural history of foghorns, 'a sound that’s lost and not lost at the same time.'

In this podcast we talk to Jennifer Lucy Allan about metereology and aurality, about volumes, distance and communities, about sounds disconnected from their function, holes in YouTube and holes in official archives, and amateur archivists. And about the making of sensory records before the end of the twentieth century and how this archival memory can be interpreted.

Timeline
02:35 A 100-120 decibel steam powered horn on a coastline: how did that happen?
05:02 “Foghorn Requiem”, a starting point
08:45 A massive sound
13:32 Holes in official archives
21:01 Archivists: the invisible heroes
23:10 How it got foggy: the fallibility of archives, memory and sound
26:40 An individual character for every foghorn
28:28 Types of foghorns
30:26 A sound disconnected from its function
34:17 A sound that is lost and not lost at the same time
37:22 Meteorology and aurality
39:23 Music and foghorns: Ingram Marshall’s 'Fog Tropes'
40:39 Music and foghorns: Alvin Curran’s 'Maritime Rites'
43:34 Sensory experiences, language and documentation"
sound  audio  foghorns  podcasts  jenniferlucyallan  music  shipping  uk  aurality  2018  rwm 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Austin Kleon on Twitter: "I think a lot about how the phone call — hearing the sound of a real human voice — is becoming a more intimate, meaningful option in the face of 24/7 text/image connection… https://t.co/dDx24gJ62v"
"I think a lot about how the phone call — hearing the sound of a real human voice — is becoming a more intimate, meaningful option in the face of 24/7 text/image connection

There’s a really interesting part of @dada_drummer’s THE NEW ANALOG, where he talks about how different phone calls became when they went digital — background noise was reduced, and so the sense of distance https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1620971976/

He points out that the iPhone has 3 microphones, but they're not used to capture extra sound, they're for noise-cancelling — they're used to isolate signal from noise [image]

On the iPhone, “*what* is being said is very clear — but *how* the message is delivered is lost. Is the voice loud or soft? Are we being addressed intimately or publicly? Can we hear hints of other meanings in the speaker’s voice, or does the delivery match the words exactly?”

There’s a “cell yell” that @dada_drummer points out: when we're out in the world on the phone, we tend towards shouting — even though we can be clearly heard in a noisy environ thanks to noise cancellation — b/c the phone doesn't feed our voice back to us, so we can’t regulate it

"essay idea: how the rise of podcasts corresponds to the decline of (personal) phone calls for millennials"
[https://twitter.com/popespeed/status/971940280709603328 ]

This is an interesting point. When I do podcast interviews, I have an extremely good USB mic and headphones to monitor my voice, so I can move closer to the mic, speak softer,

Maybe people like podcasts so much because they replicate more of what a real world or analog telephone conversation sounds like? Something to ponder!

Oh, I’m reminded now: @cordjefferson told a beautiful story at @PopUpMag about a voicemail message his mother left him, and how it changed the way he thought about phone calls. (I don’t think it exists online, or I’d link to it.)"
austinkleon  audio  microphones  mobile  phones  telephones  intimacy  voice  sound  recording  noise  noisecancellation  analog  conversation  phonecalls  humans  connection  2018  digital  iphone  podcasts 
april 2018 by robertogreco
ALOUD | Los Angeles Public Library
"These podcasts are recorded live in Los Angeles Central Library's Mark Taper Auditorium as part of the award-winning ALOUD at Central Library speaker series presented by the Library Foundation of Los Angeles. ALOUD podcasts are updated on a weekly basis. Initial funding for ALOUD podcasts was made possible by Arent Fox LLP."
podcasts  tolisten  losangeles  lapl 
december 2017 by robertogreco
East Bay Yesterday by East Bay Yesterday on Apple Podcasts
"East Bay history podcast that gathers, shares & celebrate stories from Oakland, Berkeley, Richmond and other towns throughout Alameda and Contra Costa Counties."
eastbay  bayarea  oakland  berkeley  richmond  alameda  contracosta  podcasts  history 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Scene on Radio – A Podcast from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University
"Scene on Radio is a podcast that asks, How’s it going out there? And leaves the studio to find out, capturing the sounds of life happening and telling stories that explore human experience and American society.

Produced and hosted by John Biewen, Scene on Radio comes from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University (CDS). It features a mix of Biewen’s work for CDS, new and old, and some of the best audio works produced by students in the Center’s undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education courses."

[via: "Episode 33: Made in America (Seeing White, Part 3)"
http://podcast.cdsporch.org/episode-33-made-in-america-seeing-white-part-3/

"Chattel slavery in the United States, with its distinctive – and strikingly cruel – laws and structures, took shape over many decades in colonial America. The innovations that built American slavery are inseparable from the construction of Whiteness as we know it today. By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika."

via: "Also, the Duke University podcast series Seeing White is incredible. I learned so much from the handful of episodes I've listened to so far."
https://tinyletter.com/jomc/letters/lovely-as-a-slender-little-poisonous-mushroom ]

[See also:
"Episode 31: Turning the Lens (Seeing White, Part 1)"
http://podcast.cdsporch.org/episode-31-turning-the-lens-seeing-white-part-1/

"Events of the past few years have turned a challenging spotlight on White people, and Whiteness, in the United States. An introduction to our series exploring what it means to be White. By John Biewen, with special guest Chenjerai Kumanyika."]



"Episode 32: How Race Was Made (Seeing White, Part 2)"
http://podcast.cdsporch.org/episode-32-how-race-was-made-seeing-white-part-2/

"For much of human history, people viewed themselves as members of tribes or nations but had no notion of “race.” Today, science deems race biologically meaningless. Who invented race as we know it, and why? By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika."

[many more parts in the series]
srg  documentary  podcasts  whiteness  race  us  racism  history  2017  johnbiewen 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Ear Hustle
"The podcast is a partnership between Earlonne Woods and Antwan Williams, currently incarcerated at San Quentin State Prison, and Nigel Poor, a Bay Area artist. The team works in San Quentin’s media lab to produce stories that are sometimes difficult, often funny and always honest, offering a nuanced view of people living within the American prison system."
podcasts  sanquentin  prison  earlonnewoods  antwanwilliams  nigelpoor  incarceration  tolisten 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Delete Your Account Podcast
"Delete Your Account is a new podcast hosted by journalist Roqayah Chamseddine and her plucky sidekick Kumars Salehi. Every week they will talk about important stories from the worlds of politics and pop culture, both on and off-line, in a way that will never bore you. They’re radical leftists, but not that kind. The other kind. The fun kind."

[See also: https://www.patreon.com/deleteyouraccount
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/delete-your-account/id1121355704

"Delete Your Account is a new podcast hosted by journalist Roqayah Chamseddine and her plucky sidekick Kumars Salehi. Every week we will talk about important stories from the worlds of politics and pop culture, both on and off-line, in a way that will never bore you."]
podcasts  roqayahchamseddine  kumarssalehi  politics  culture  left  radicalism  radicalleft 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Radio Atlantic - The Atlantic
"We're living in historic times. Who better than a 160-year-old magazine to help you make sense of them? Each week, The Atlantic's top editors—Jeffrey Goldberg, editor in chief; Matt Thompson, deputy editor; and Alex Wagner, contributing editor and CBS anchor—sit down with leading voices to explore what's happening in the world, how things became the way they are, and where they're going next. Take a listen to our trailer for a sneak preview:"
mattthompson  alexagner  jeffreygoldberg  podcasts  radio  politics  currentevents 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Raw Material: A Podcast from SFMOMA · SFMOMA
"Raw Material is an arts and culture podcast from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Each season we partner with a different “podcaster-in-residence” to explore modern and contemporary art through a new lens. Along the way we bring you voices of artists and thinkers from around the globe who offer surprising perspectives on the world through their work."

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BWM_6Xng0Ol/

"Really loved being a part of this. One of my most personal interviews. Many thanks to Geraldine Ah-Sue and @sfmoma's podcast #RawMaterial, for having me. 🙏🏿 You can listen to the episode online at SoundCloud and/or from the SFMoMA "Raw Material" website."

See also:
https://soundcloud.com/rawmaterialpodcast

Manifest Episode 4: The Mind
https://soundcloud.com/rawmaterialpodcast/manifest-episode-4-the-mind
"Art is an exercise in perspective. This episode highlights works that invite new ways of seeing. Artists reflect on how they see themselves, how others see them, and how to look at the world through performance, portraiture, and abstract painting."

"More on Episode 4: The Mind"
https://www.sfmoma.org/theme/manifest-episode-4/ ]
sfmoma  podcasts  art  artists  classideas  toyinojihodutola 
july 2017 by robertogreco
The subscription paradox - Six Colors
"When Todd Vaziri recently updated his chart of the length of John Gruber’s The Talk Show—which prompted me to update my chart of The Incomparable’s length—I’ve been reminded of something I learned from my days in the magazine industry. As P.T. Barnum (presumably) said, “Leave them wanting more.”

This isn’t showbiz claptrap—it’s a real effect. What makes someone a happy magazine subscriber, newsletter reader, or television viewer is the feeling that you’re consuming all of something you enjoy. You get to the end and still wish there were more, making you anticipate the next installment.

There are two danger zones. The first is if people just don’t like what you’re making. That’s an obvious one. If they’re not buying what you’re selling, you’ll lose them as a customer, and rightly so.

But then there’s another, less obvious danger zone: People who like your stuff but just can’t finish it all. You’d think that this shouldn’t matter, that if you only ever consume half of everything but enjoy it all, that should be good enough. But it’s not. Most people hate feeling that they’re not using everything they’re paying for. (I know the feeling, at least when it comes to Dropbox storage.)

I’ve had this described to me as “The New Yorker Problem.” People who enjoy reading The New Yorker still cancel their subscriptions, because they’ve got a few issues piled up. When we were designing the digital edition of PCWorld magazine after the print edition shut down, we spent a lot of time debating what the ideal magazine length should be. We could’ve put all the stuff we were generating on the web in there, making it seem like a great value… but it would’ve resulted in enormous issues that few, if any, readers could get through.

I’ve had the same experience with newsletters I’ve subscribed to on the Internet. I get a few daily newsletters, and I like them, but the fact that I just can’t find the time to read every one of them makes me frustrated. Yes, it would literally make me a happier subscriber if they gave me less of what I’m paying for. Any more and it might be the straw that broke the camel’s back.

This may not be entirely logical, but I believe it’s true. And that’s one of the reasons I’ve tried to bend the average run time of The Incomparable, which was at one point threatening to break 90 minutes, back toward an hour. Of course, some people would love it if we’d do two hours every week—but I feel like we’d be risking overstaying our welcome if we did that. I don’t want episodes to pile up. If you get many episodes behind on a podcast, unsubscribing starts to seem like a logical next step.

It’s something for all of us who create things on the Internet to keep in mind: People have a near-infinite supply of content at their disposal now. We should be respectful of their time and always leave them wanting more. There is such a thing as “too much of a good thing.”"
subscriptions  2017  brevity  attention  newsletters  jasonsnell  thenewyorker  longform  podcasts  time  completion  finishing  guilt 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Airbrushing Shittown | Hazlitt
"S-Town isn’t fiction—we can probably assume that the facts, as we are given them, are “accurate.” But mere accuracy doesn’t make it journalism: the private details of private lives have no clear public interest, and Brian Reed never seriously argues that they do. It’s creative non-fiction, then, a category whose very name is composed out of negations: not fiction, but not non-fiction, either; true, but created. And so the fact that he never finds anything—that nothing happened—is what he finds at the end of his investigation, the discovery that the very opposite of something happened. He finds that something didn’t happen, in a half-dozen different ways, and that it didn’t happen for everyone in a variety of fascinating ways: the murder, the gold, and the conspiracy of silence… He finds none of it, only the story of how he set out to look. And then out of this series of negations, he wraps it all up, neatly, so that we can all go home, entertained.

By the end of the podcast, you come to realize that the monologue that opened it—a monologue about clocks and how they are reconstructed—is really about Brian Reed’s own process, about reconstructing a life. “Sometimes entire portions of the original clockwork are missing,” he says, “but you can’t know for sure because there are rarely diagrams of what the clock is supposed to look like. A clock that old doesn’t come with a manual.” John B. McLemore is the clock, and the testimony Reed has gathered, over long years of work, are the “witness marks” a clock-restorer uses to guide their way, “impressions and outlines and discolorations, left inside the clock, of pieces that might’ve once been there.”

“Fixing an old clock can be maddening,” Reed says. “You’re constantly wondering if you’ve just spent hours going down a path that will likely take you nowhere, and all you’ve got are these vague witness marks which might not even mean what you think they mean. So, at every moment along the way you have to decide if you’re wasting your time or not.”

Reed did not waste his time; S-Town was a smash from the start, a career-making triumph. But in their original function, clocks are not made for entertainment. Clocks are tools that make social life possible. A clock makes time, and organizes it, and time is, ultimately, a social medium: we use it to coordinate with others and to communicate; a sense of shared time helps us meet each other and find each other and arrange the stories that we tell about each other—it allows us to take our turns speaking and listening, and it allows us to put things into their proper perspective. Without clocks—or without some sense of shared time, however constructed—society, as we know it, would not be possible.

John lived in his own time zone, literally: as Reed mentions, John B. McLemore’s house did not observe daylight saving time, so depending on the season, the time at his house might be an hour different than the surrounding area. It’s a good reflection of his relation to his world, his insistent eccentricity reflected in his own, personal, zone of time. It’s a good joke, a playful irony, even a self-consciously Faulknerian expression of being southern, a quiet little rebellion against unification under the guise of turning back the clock. It’s also totally ridiculous, which John surely understood: since all time is social, the idea of having your own time zone is absurd, only meaningful in the irony of its meaninglessness.

Moreover, for all his scrupulous attention to reconstructing the original function of a clock, the irony of clock restoration is that John didn’t repair clocks for their original function. His clocks were repaired to be old, to be antiques: the point of “restoring” them was not simply to make them work—that’s easy enough to do—but to make them work exactly as they once did. That’s why John hand-ground a gathering pallet from scratch. “They aren’t trying to simply make the clock work again,” Reed says of the fraternity of horologists. “Their goal is to preserve and reconstruct the original craftsmanship as much as possible.” Recovering and replicating the inspiration of the original clockmaker makes them valuable enough to sell, but it’s the sale that matters.

After all, clock restoration serves no useful function in a world where we all have clocks on our phones (the same phones we might use to listen to a podcast). In a world where networked clocks are everywhere, an antique clock is so big, heavy, and fragile that it isn’t useful in that sense. Instead, an antique clock’s eccentricity becomes valuable because of how odd it is, how particular, and how much work goes into restoring it. When people pay for a restored antique, they are paying for an incredibly laborious lack of useful value: so much work went into making them work again, but because that work is totally superfluous and unnecessary, it is thus, perversely, worth paying for.

If an old clock is valuable because of the perfectly recovered eccentricity of its original intention, the same could be said about John B. McLemore’s own perverse life, and for that matter, this podcast. So much work went into making it, but what, after everything, is this podcast actually for?

When John B. McLemore heard the earliest draft of Reed’s program, the story of the murder of that didn’t happen, his reaction was disappointment: “I can’t believe how much you’ve worked on this son of a bitch and at the same time,” he sighed, “my god.” Reed wanted him to be relieved, to be happy about the work, and is audibly upset that he isn’t. Perhaps John B. was in a bad mood, even a depressive episode; perhaps that was why he wasn’t sufficiently appreciative. Perhaps his original fit of enthusiasm for activist journalism had long passed—it had, after all, been years since he originally contacted Reed—and he had a different perspective on the story Brian Reed was telling. When Reed observes that “I am not saving the world over here,” John’s retort that “You are definitely not saving the world!” is delivered with a peculiar, bitter intensity, the laugh of someone who once thought it was possible, perhaps, but no longer does. What’s the point of all that work if it can’t save the world?

John B. isn’t cruel, though: “I think you’ve done pretty goddamned good,” he says, finally. And he’s absolutely right—one can only admire how well Brian Reed reconstructed his clock. But what is the point of it? What does it do?

I am writing this and you are reading it because we are sharing a moment: we have all listened to this podcast, the timepiece that Brian Reed built to bring us together. But what do we do with this unity? Across the seven hours of Reed’s production, we are told a story in which we all can understand each other, talk to each other, and hear each other: we can unite in admiration for John B., for the genius that was born to Mary Grace, for his voice, and for the power of storytelling. We can hear his voice and be united in our appreciation for his existence. Is this what we need now? Does it tell us our time? Does it bring us together? Does it help us understand what it means to have Donald Trump as president, and Jefferson Beauregard Sessions as the most powerful cop in the land? Or is it simply a nostalgic exercise in anachronism, like a perfectly restored antique? Is it something we value because it does something, or because it feels old and authentic?

I don’t know. In the end, all it offers is questions."
aaronbady  s-town  storytelling  horology  clocks  purpose  journalism  podcasts  nostalgia  brianreed  johnbmclemore  restoration  accuracy  entertainment  process  criticism 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Latino USA
"Our Mission
Futuro Media creates multimedia content for and about the new American mainstream in the service of empowering people to navigate the complexities of an increasingly diverse and connected world.

Who We Are
The Futuro Media Group is an independent nonprofit organization producing multimedia journalism that explores and gives a critical voice to the diversity of the American experience. Based in Harlem and founded in 2010 by award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa, Futuro Media is committed to telling stories often overlooked by mainstream media. Futuro Media produces Latino USA, NPR’s only national Latino news and cultural weekly radio program, currently celebrating its 20th anniversary at its new hour-long format. Futuro Media also produces America By The Numbers with Maria Hinojosa a new half-hour television series for PBS that examines how America’s growing multicultural population is influencing every aspect of contemporary life."
podcasts  radio  mariahinojosa 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Daughter – A podcast series dedicated to sharing the untold stories of my mother, who also happens to have been a refugee, a child bride, a prison escapee, and my everything.
"A podcast series dedicated to sharing the untold stories of my mother, who also happens to have been a refugee, a child bride, a prison escapee, and my everything."

"Hi, I’m Bhan and I’m an independent podcast producer who is passionate about sharing the stories of marginalized groups. Daughter, is a series that is dedicated to sharing the untold stories of my mother. A South Sudanese woman who was unfortunately forced to become a child bride, a prisoner, and a refugee all before she turned 21 years old.

The story of my mother and I is one that uniquely situates the mother-daughter dynamic against the backdrop of our social positions while at the same time highlights the importance of voice and representation in our collective history.

This project is my attempt at adding my mother, and the stories of so many, into the chronicles of history where they belong. But it’s also a project that highlights the dynamic of two different cultures colliding as a result of the mother-daughter relationship.

You can follow this journey with me on:
Twitter & Instagram @daughterpodcast "
podcasts  tolisten  refugees  sudan  southsudan 
april 2017 by robertogreco
But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids | Vermont Public Radio
"But Why is a show led by you, kids! You ask the questions and we find the answers. It’s a big interesting world out there.

On But Why, we tackle topics large and small, about nature, words, even the end of the world.

Have a question?

Send it to us! Adults, use your smartphone's memo function or an audio app to record your kid's question (get up nice and close so we can hear). Be sure to include: your child's first name, age and town. And then email the audio file to questions@butwhykids.org.

But Why is hosted and produced by Jane Lindholm with help from producer Melody Bodette."
podcasts  via:ablerism  kis  children  sfsh 
april 2017 by robertogreco
Bay Curious | KQED News
"A podcast exploring the Bay Area one question at a time"

"00:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.
KQED’s new podcast, Bay Curious, gets to the bottom of the mysteries — both profound and peculiar — that give the Bay Area its unique identity. And we’ll do it with your help! You ask the questions. You decide what Bay Curious investigates. And you join us on the journey to find the answers"
bayarea  sanfrancisco  classideas  podcasts 
april 2017 by robertogreco
Upstream | Free Listening on SoundCloud
"Challenging traditional assumptions and making conventional economists a little uneasy, Upstream is a bold new podcast that invites you to unlearn everything you know about economics and to embark on a journey to explore the stories of the visionaries and global leaders on the frontiers of alternative paradigms."

[See also:

"UNLEARN EVERYTHING you thought you knew about ECONOMICS

Here at Upstream, we look at economics a bit differently. Forget everything you associate with ECON 101: all the jargon about supply and demand, the mathematics, the indecipherable theories. Of course, there's a place for all that stuff. But this isn't it. Upstream is a show about economics that tells the stories of how we live and relate to each other - socially, culturally, politically, psychologically. We don't take our current capitalist system as a given. We don't assume that we are all self-interested, rational consumers. We're not interested in business as usual. What we are interested in is telling the stories of the people, places, and ideas that bring us closer to a new way of living in the world. We do that through our audio documentary series, our interviews, and workshops.

"

http://www.upstreampodcast.org/

https://twitter.com/upstreampodcast
https://www.instagram.com/upstreampodcast/ ]
podcasts  tolisten  economics  solidarity  delladuncan  robertraymond  markphillips  lauriewolf  jacobrask 
february 2017 by robertogreco
Welcome to Horizon Line, A Podcast About Adventure | Atlas Obscura
"In the first episode of Horizon Line, we tell the harrowing story of a man who tried to sail across the Arctic in a hot air balloon."
podcasts  adventure  atlasobscura 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Tell Me Something I Don't Know by The New York Times on iTunes
"Join host Stephen J. Dubner of “Freakonomics Radio” and three celebrity panelists as they invite contestants on stage to tell us something we don’t know. It could be a fascinating fact, a historical wrinkle, a new line of research — anything, really, long as it’s interesting, useful and true (or at least true-ish). There’s a real-time human fact-checker on hand to filter out the bull. The panel — an eclectic mix of comedians, brainiacs, and other high achievers — will poke and prod the contestants and ultimately choose a winner. Like the “Freakonomics” podcast and books, “Tell Me Something I Don’t Know” is still journalism, still factual — but disguised in the most entertaining, unexpected and occasionally ridiculous conversation you’re likely to hear. Produced in partnership with The New York Times."
podcasts  nytimes  stephendubner 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Hack Circus by Leila Johnston on iTunes
[also here: http://directory.libsyn.com/shows/view/id/hackcircus
https://www.ivoox.com/en/podcast-hack-circus_sq_f1209333_1.html ]

"Hack Circus is a weekly podcast analysing the art and craft of creativity. hackcircuspodcast.com This podcast goes behind the scenes with individuals who lead extraordinary creative lives. Whether you're a professional creative or just looking for inspiration from highly creative minds, you should enjoy the insights of the guests on our show each week. If you enjoy the show, please give it a rating and/or a review, and don't forget to subscribe! The show is hosted by artist, writer and publisher Leila Johnston. Find out more about her on her website finalbullet.com "
hackcircus  podcasts  creativity  leilajohnston 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Sources & Methods
"Sources & Methods is a podcast hosted by Alex Strick and Matt Trevithick in which interesting people doing interesting things get to talk about the what, how and why of what they do.

A new episode is recorded every two weeks.

About Alex.

A graduate of the School of Oriental and African Studies (BA Arabic and Persian), Alex Strick van Linschoten successfully defended his PhD in 2016 at the War Studies Department of King’s College London on the identity of the Taliban movement as expressed through their own writings and statements pre-2001. He has also worked as co-editor of a book written by former Taliban envoy to Pakistan, Mullah Abdul Salam Zaeef, published by Hurst and Columbia University Press to critical acclaim in winter 2010; a history of the relationship between the Taliban and al-Qaeda entitled An Enemy We Created: The Myth of the Taliban – Al-Qaeda Merger, 1970-2010; and a volume of poetry written by Taliban members, published by Hurst (UK) entitled Poetry of the Taliban. He is currently working on a large project dealing with archival primary sources by the Afghan Taliban. He has worked as a freelance journalist from Afghanistan, Syria, Lebanon and Somalia. He speaks Arabic, Dutch, Farsi, Pashtu and German and can get by in French.

About Matt.

Matt currently lives in Turkey. Previously, he spent four years working as the Director of Communications at the American University of Afghanistan after working at the American University of Iraq. He is also the co-author of An Undesirable Element: An Afghan Memoir, about the life of Afghanistan's first post-Taliban Minister of Higher Education with a foreword written by US Ambassador Ryan Crocker.

Before going overseas, he worked as a writer and researcher at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington, DC for Rock The Casbah: Rage and Rebellion Across the Muslim World by Robin Wright, which won an Overseas Press Club award for Best Non-Fiction Title in 2012, as well as at Georgetown University’s Center for Contemporary Arab Studies. His work has been featured in The Atlantic, Foreign Policy Magazine, the Wall St. Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, and The Chronicle of Higher Education. He speaks Dari and can get by in Russian and Arabic, and has lived and traveled across the Middle East, Central Asia, and Africa, including Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, and Mali. He holds a BA from Boston University, has a silver medal from the 2008 Head of the Charles Regatta, and has coached the Iraqi and Afghan national rowing teams. "
podcasts  alexstrick  matttrevithick  via:debcha 
september 2016 by robertogreco
The Alien Adventures of Finn Caspian – A Sci-Fi Podcast for Kids. Like Scooby-Doo, but in Space.
"He can’t sleep, he can’t shake the feeling someone is following him, and he can’t stop the monsters who show up to smash his cake. In other words, it’s turning out to be more exciting than he expected. That’s all in the first few episodes of this serialized, sci-fi podcast for kids. Finn, his friends and their pet robots aboard the Famous Marlowe 280 Interplanetary Exploratory Space Station discover uncharted planets, help aliens in far-off galaxies, and take tips from listeners back on Earth as they try to solve the universe’s great mysteries."

[via: https://twitter.com/complexfields/status/768816506910244865 ]

[See also: https://twitter.com/FinnCaspian ]
podcasts  kids  children  classideas 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Podcast – Akilah S. Richards
"A biweekly podcast that aims to centralize black and brown people’s voices and experiences in discussions about unconventional parenting. With a particular interest in the self-directed education (aka unschooling) movement, Akilah S. Richards and special guest co-hosts will discuss the fears and the fares (costs) of raising liberated children of color in a world that tends to diminish, dehumanize, and disappear them. Using storytelling, interviews, commentary, and open conversation, Fare of the Free Child will explore the radical idea that people of color and the children they love can simply be themselves together."

[on SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/radicalselfie/sets/fare-of-the-free-child
on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/fare-of-the-free-child/id1138611256

"A podcast for Black and Brown parents who practice alternative parenting options to the traditional education model that is school. Options like unschooling, worldschooling, roadschooling, slowschooling, eclectic homeschooling, and the myriad other ways that we and our children embrace curiosity-driven, lifelong learning.

The purpose of Fare of the Free Child is to help me amplify the underrepresented voices and unique concerns of people of color looking for real viable options to the oppressive systems that our children are expected to live and learn within."]

[See also: https://medium.com/@radicalselfie/how-learning-happens-in-unschooling-5dc0d7fa0a99#.7k0td4qnn ]
podcasts  unschooling  education  parenting  akilahrichards  children  race  poc  alternative  deschooling  learning  self-directedlearning  self-directed  freedom 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Radiolab Presents: More Perfect | WNYC
"How does an elite group of nine people shape everything from marriage and money, to safety and sex for an entire nation? Radiolab's first ever spin-off series, More Perfect, dives into the rarefied world of the Supreme Court to explain how cases deliberated inside hallowed halls affect lives far away from the bench. Produced by WNYC Studios."
radiolab  podcasts  history  scotus  supremecourt  us  law 
july 2016 by robertogreco
PodOmatic | Best Free Podcasts: Techlandia 97 - Unschooling w/ @rogre
"A chat with Roberto Greco about unschooling and other topics. Rob just finished up the year teaching at Hillbrook School in Los Gatos. He has a great take on how learners should learn, and uses this philosophy by unschooling with his own children. Austin Kleon was mentioning Rob on Twitter, so we are hoping that one of my heroes will listen to this episode. Crossing fingers!"
unschooling  cv  podcasts  teaching  davidtheriault  jonsamuelson  2016  ego  amyfadeji  bmc  blackmountincollege  leapbeforeyoulook  edg  srg  glvo  schools  education  progressive  blackmountaincollege 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Song Exploder
"Song Exploder is a podcast where musicians take apart their songs, and piece by piece, tell the story of how they were made. Each episode is produced and edited by host and creator Hrishikesh Hirway in Los Angeles. Using the isolated, individual tracks from a recording, Hrishikesh asks artists to delve into the specific decisions that went into creating their work. Hrishikesh edits the interviews, removing his side of the conversation and condensing the story to be tightly focused on how the artists brought their songs to life. Past guests include Björk, U2, Iggy Pop, and Carly Rae Jepsen, among many others. In 2016 the Sydney Opera House hosted Song Exploder as an artist-in-residence. The show has been featured at the Sundance Film Festival and SXSW.

Song Exploder is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX, a curated network of extraordinary, story-driven shows. Learn more at radiotopia.fm.

Some press for the show:

“Song Exploder is probably the best use of the podcast format ever.” — Vulture

“It is possibly the most perfect podcast, really.” — Quartz

“You’ll never listen to their music the same way again.” — Entertainment Weekly

“Everything a podcast should be…this is mandatory listening for music fans.” — The AV Club

[links to more with the following]

– Vice
– Spin
– The Guardian
– The AV Club
– The Atlantic
– LA Weekly (Best of Los Angeles, 2015)

Song Exploder is on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. For booking Song Exploder live events, please contact Andrew Morgan at Billions.

You can send a message using the form below, or via email. I’m not currently looking for song submissions for the show. Thanks!"
podcasts  music  audio  art  hrishikeshhirway 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Gimlet Media | » Reply All
[via: https://twitter.com/asimone/status/755183937777864704 ]

"Reply All is a show about the internet, hosted by PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman. The show launched in 2014. We publish new episodes on Wednesday nights.

Our show is downloaded around 2 million times per month. If you are new to the show, you can start from the beginning, or try a few of these episodes which we like a lot. Here are some nice things people have said about us:

“It’s an amazing show. The entire staff’s secret favorite show … not even secret actually.”
-Jad Abumrad, Radiolab

“Despite the name, Reply All isn’t a podcast about technology — it’s a podcast that tells gorgeous, painfully human stories that happen to have bits of technology sprinkled in.”
-Nick Quah, Vulture

“The best podcast on the internet, simply put. Reply All is the child of two geniuses, PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman”
-Slate France

“Reply All claims to be a show about the Internet, but regular listeners know that’s just a ruse. ”
-The Atlantic"
podcasts  internet  web  via:asimone  tolisten  pjvogt  alexgoldman  phibennin  timhoward  sruthipinnamaneni  chloeprasinos 
july 2016 by robertogreco
MIRACLE NUTRITION with Hearty White
[See also: http://www.wfmu.org/playlists/HA ]

[via: "my kids enjoy listening to @HeartyWhite with me!multigenerational exhortations, southern inspirational dada"
https://twitter.com/complexfields/status/755197692662341632

"the recent circus train episode had my guys on the floor."
https://twitter.com/complexfields/status/755198907886338048 ]
radio  podcasts  children  kids  sfsh  classideas  heartywhite  wfmu 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Tinybop Loves: Radiolab | Tinybop
"Radiolab asks great questions. Each show explores a single idea through story, interview, and inquiry. The lushly produced hour is usually split into three acts that explore the idea from unique angles to try to get to the center of the question being asked. The episodes can be heard on public radio, as a podcast, and through an app. But perhaps the best experience of Radiolab is via the show’s website which—in addition to the shows—houses a blog, videos, and other stories that supplement each episode.

While Radiolab is not specifically geared towards children, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better way to introduce kids to big ideas. Some episodes will not be appropriate for children, but those that are —about zoos, the gut, cities, or time—will be richly rewarding for young curious listeners. We like to play Radiolab shows during long car rides. Almost invariably the kids will tune in and start asking questions."
radio  radiolab  podcasts  children  kids  tinybop  raulgutierrez  science 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Brains On
[See also: https://tinybop.com/loves/sites/brains-on

"We’re big fans of podcasts at Tinybop HQ. I’ve whiled away entire days and hours in the car listening to This American Life, Serial, The Mystery Show, Invisibilia, and RadioLab. But it’s surprisingly hard to find great podcasts that are made for kids. Thankfully, there's Brains On! Narrated by kids and adults, each episode dives into something kids wonder about: why and how do jellyfish sting? How can you control your dreams? How does GPS know where you are?

Brains On! boasts that it’s "serious about being curious." And it is! The episodes aren’t dumbed down — the science and the language used to talk about it rises to kids’ intelligence. Kids questions are answered by experts on the topic — astronauts, scientists, and sometimes kids themselves. As a bonus, there’s a good sprinkling of kid humor throughout. Plus, many of the episodes are excellent companions to our Explorer’s Library apps."]

[via: http://mentalfloss.com/article/68193/pod-city-14-podcasts-your-kids-will-and-wont-drive-you-nuts ]
radio  podcasts  children  science  kids 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Tumble Science Podcast for Kids
"Tumble is a science podcast for kids, to be enjoyed by the entire family. We tell stories about science discoveries, with the help of scientists! Join Lindsay and Marshall as they ask questions, share mysteries, and share what science is all about."

[via: http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2016/03/where-are-all-the-kidcasts/476157/ ]
podcasts  children  science  kids 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Short & Curly
[See also: http://www.abc.net.au/abc3/shortandcurly/

"So what is Short & Curly?
Only the best ethics podcast made for kids - ever!

A whole new season of Short & Curly has landed, with another batch of fun and tricky questions like:

• Is Professor Dumbledore from Harry Potter as great as he seems?
• Should we eat our pets?
• Are some lies actually okay?

Perfect for your next family car trip or to listen to by yourself.

Want to hear it right now? Of course you do! "]

[via: http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2016/03/where-are-all-the-kidcasts/476157/ ]
kids  podcasts  ethics  children  sfsh  classideas 
july 2016 by robertogreco
The Radio Adventures of Eleanor Amplified : NPR
"Buckle up! Your car is headed for... adventure! Eleanor Amplified is a radio adventure series for the whole family. Listen together as world-famous radio reporter Eleanor foils devious plots, outwits crafty villains, and goes after The Big Story. Eleanor's pursuit of truth takes her into orbit, out to sea, through a scary jungle and even to the halls of Congress! Like all the public media shows you love, Eleanor Amplified is entertaining and informative. Eleanor defends the very values you expect from high-quality journalism. The importance of access to information. Being inclusive of different points of view. Telling the truth, and more. Eleanor will spark laughter and conversation the whole family will enjoy, while preparing kids to appreciate journalism and make smart media choices in the future."

[See also: http://whyy.org/cms/eleanoramplified ]
podcasts  kids  children  npr  whyy  sfsh  medialiteracy  jounalism  truth  classideas 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Phone Stories – Pop-Up Magazine
"Every other Sunday, Pop-Up Magazine will release a new, very short story for a specific moment of your life. When you’re making coffee. Or when you’re looking up into the night sky. Or when you’re waiting in a line."
phonestories  pop-upmagazine  stories  audio  classideas  podcasts  writing 
june 2016 by robertogreco
The World in Words | Public Radio International
"A podcast about languages and the people who speak them"
language  languages  blogs  theworld  words  podcasts 
april 2016 by robertogreco
The amplification of audio storytelling » Nieman Journalism Lab
“What are the stories that are going to break through the noise? Which topics would inspire engagement and build community?”



"In 2016, we should expect to see — or perhaps it’s hear — more podcasts as more newsrooms find success with audio content.

The popularity of Serial has proven that, in the age of video, there is indeed an appetite for nonfiction audio storytelling.

This year, be on the lookout for more viral audio that focuses on interesting sound produced for social web, like NPR’s clips of an erupting volcano or inside a hurricane; investigative pieces, like the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’s seven-part podcast about a 40-year murder mystery; and cultural conversations, like BuzzFeed’s Another Round.

Whether they’re short takes or longform, podcasts’ growth will be fueled by their capacity to create personal, intimate, enlightening, captivating experiences for listeners. Powerful podcasts amplify unique narratives and diverse voices. They also attract new followers — a boon to any media outlet.

As newsrooms seek to integrate podcasting into their editorial strategy in 2016, consider the following:

• What are the stories that are going to break through the noise?
• Which topics would inspire engagement and build community?
• What tools and training will you need to produce stellar audio?
• How can you fit into your audience’s on-the-go, on-demand lifestyles?"
miralowe  2015  journalism  audio  storytelling  podcasts  buzzfeed 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Friendshipping!
"Join Jenn & Trin of Cards Against Humanity in a discussion about friendship, particularly between women. We take audience questions and do our best to answer the tricky stuff, like how do I stop feeling jealous of my more successful friends? What if I have a crush on my BFF? Should I ask my friend why she unfollowed me on Twitter?"
podcasts  tolisten  friendship  relationships 
december 2015 by robertogreco
It's Now Incredibly Easy to Host your Podcast on SoundCloud
"SoundCloud has been home to plenty of podcasts for a while, but it’s now making it easy for creators to run their RSS feeds straight from the service.

From today, SoundCloud Podcasts is coming out of beta – over 15,000 podcasts took part – and opening up to anyone with an account. To start a podcast, all you need to do is hit the ‘Permissions’ tab and select ‘Include in RSS feed.’

All of your tracks will be included in your RSS feed if they’re made public. SoundCloud also has embeddable players to make promoting your podcast easy.

Its “timed comments” feature, which allows visitors to add their thoughts to specific moments of a track will also appeal to a lot of podcasters.

We’re developing ideas for a TNW podcast. Let us know in the comments whether you’d listen and what you’d like it to feature."
soundcloud  podcasting  podcasts  tools  onlinetoolkit  2015 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Real Education Podcast’s stream on SoundCloud - Hear the world’s sounds
"What does it mean to get a “real education”—one that prepares you for the most important parts of life, instead of just academic achievement? In this podcast, Blake Boles interviews the founders of innovative camps, schools, learning centers, and other educational alternatives, as well as authors, parents, and young adults. Topics include self-directed learning, leadership, 21st-century skills, entrepreneurship, college, unschooling, school reform, motivation, and parenting.

For more episodes, to become a patron of the show, or to leave a comment, visit: www.blakeboles.com/podcast "

["Carsie Blanton, a singer-songwriter, blogger, and lifelong unschooler (carsieblanton.com), talks with host Blake Boles about making a living as a musician, the virtues and drawbacks of college, and lessons that unschooling taught her about building a career."
https://soundcloud.com/blakebo/carsie-blanton-on-unschooling

"Kenneth Danford, executive director and co-founder of North Star: Self-Directed Learning for Teens (northstarteens.org), talks with host Blake Boles about supporting teenagers who don’t like school, what “self-directed learning” means, the value of dropping out of junior high, nature versus nurture, parenting, and the challenge of funding a small alternative education organization."
https://soundcloud.com/blakebo/kenneth-danford-on-thriving-without-school

"Will Richardson, author of “Why School?” (willrichardson.com), talks with host Blake Boles about information abundance, Minecraft, helping young people harness technology intelligently, why students should be allowed to use cell phones during tests, and how teachers and schools can adapt to the Internet era."
https://soundcloud.com/blakebo/will-richardson-on-learning-in-the-internet-era ]
blakeboles  unschooling  podcasts  interviews  deschooling  education  carsieblanton  kennethdanford  northstar  lcproject  openstudioproject  parenting  schools  schooling  learning  howwelearn  alternative  willrichardson  edg  srg  glvo  self-directedlearning  self-directed  realeducation 
march 2015 by robertogreco
The Arcade | Hazlitt
[via answers to:

“Recommend me a podcast! Rules: (1) can’t be produced by NPR; (2) can’t be friends talking about pop culture.”
https://twitter.com/vruba/status/572061215326781440

and

“Some podcasts I already like:

– @Hazlitt
– @metis_in_space
– @gininnovation
– @DeadAuthorPod
– Radio New Zealand
– 12 Byzantine Rulers”
https://twitter.com/vruba/status/572064446761156610

Other answers included:

Welcome to Night Vale
In Our Time**
Gastropod** (@Gastropodcast + http://gastropod.com)
Criminal (http://thisiscriminal.com)
The Arcade by Hazlitt (http://penguinrandomhouse.ca/hazlitt/arcade) **
all of Radiotopia
BBC Digital Human
The Bugle**
Hardcore History (@HardcoreHistory)
N of Us
History of Rome**
spycast
Fugitive Waves
Astronomy Cast
BBC From Our Own Correspondent
Benjamin Walker's Theory of Everything
The Truth
Judge John Hodgeman
Risk
Fatman on Batman
Radio Diaries
http://newbooksnetwork.com

**multiple mentions ]
podcasts  tolisten  postcastrecs  charlieloyd 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Hearing Is Believing - NYTimes.com
"The aural/oral revolution won’t mean the end of the book any more than the e-book did. Besides, the “non-text-based” work of literature has a long tradition. “In the history of mankind, words were heard before they were seen,” wrote Albert B. Lord, the author of “The Singer of Tales,” a classic work of scholarship that traced oral literature from Homer through “Beowulf” and the tales, still recited today, of Balkan poets capable of reciting thousands of lines of verse by heart.

Progress doesn’t always mean going forward."
audio  books  ebooks  audiobooks  podcasts  progress  aural  oral  orality  text  literature  oraltradition  2015  jamesatlas 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Risk, Reward, and Digital Writing - Hybrid Pedagogy
"Digital writing is political because in every pixel, every DNA-like strand of code, we are placing ourselves into the public. Even if we are not writing for a wide audience, even if we make no plans to disseminate our work, the craft of writing now takes place within other people’s software, in other people’s houses. This page the borrowed sheets. Me the writer a couch surfer.

Owning our own homes in the digital requires an expertise that this writer does not have. I don’t own my own server, I haven’t learned to code, I haven’t designed my own interfaces, my own web site, nor even my own font. I must content myself to rent, to squat, or to ride the rails. But in this I find a certain freedom, a resistance in the willy-nilly. I cannot build my own home in the digital, but I can mark my territory.

In November, Hybrid Pedagogy — along with the UW-Madison Division of Continuing Studies — will once again host Digital Writing Month, a 30-day writing challenge that asks participants to create works of text, image/video, and sound. The form these works take, and what they say, do, expose, problematize, or solve, is entirely up to the author(s) and artist(s) who join the fray. The work should be challenging, inventive, and should give the digital writer a chance to do something they’ve always wanted to do.

Here, in this piece, I am offering an additional challenge: to make the act of digital writing truly political. To rouse and incite, to question and provoke, to mark our territories on the spaces delimited by their designers. By creating, hack; by writing, rebel. We must make the sites of our work little bitty Bastilles, our tweets and Vines and sound clips tiny marches on Versailles. Imagine a blog that flies the Jolly Roger, a podcast that bows to no one, a Vimeo channel that riots and runs amok. These are the ways the insurgence begins.

In this, I recognize I speak of rebellion playfully, when in truth most revolutions are terrible, bloody affairs. That playfulness, though, is the invitation. We are creating a revolution of digital handicraft, of makers and shakers. We shall not throw our bodies upon the machines, but we shall throw our words there — and our images — and our voices. The approach may look joyous and celebratory, and the fervor may delight and inspire, and the result will have meaning.

Hybrid Pedagogy has been accused of being Pollyanna, our work too blithe and easy, our seriousness not nearly serious enough. Our editors on the tenure track have been reminded to publish with traditional journals, lest their academic work wither under the glare of rigor and double-blind peer review. But there is nothing casual about Hybrid Pedagogy, just as there is nothing casual about any other digital work. What digital work does is change the landscape of all work. When we write in the digital, our words behave differently; when we broadcast our ideas, the reception re-broadcasts and re-purposes those ideas. Digital publishing, digital writing, digital humanities, digital literacy, digital citizenship — these are not terms à la mode, but rather they are new components of very real human communities, very real human craft. We may approach them with equal part suspicion and exaltation, but approach them we must.

Insisting on such requires a certain risk, especially in academia. We must be prepared to look back in the faces of those who think our digital work lacks merit and tell them otherwise. And we must do so to the ends of our wits.

To change the perception that the digital is not as consequential as work in traditional media we must participate in it. We must put our best work there, and eschew the paper-bound, readerless journals that grow mold in library basements. We must reinhabit libraries, as sites for conference and debate, crafting and creation, community and not simply curation. We must likewise redefine what matters, what has impact factor, and grow the traditional so it’s not so obsolete. We must show up in digital places in throngs and masses. No algorithms will change unless we move against them. The LMS will not die its death until we put it in the ground. Our work in the digital will not begin if we never recognize that it is work that must begin.

Digital Writing Month, and digital writing at any time, is never frivolous. In doing things differently, we sow difference. “Essays quake and tremble at the digital,” I said. “They weep in awe and fascination. And they throw themselves into the abyss … Digital writing is a rebellion. An uprising against our sense and sensibility. Différance.” By refusing to do what’s expected, we frame a space of new expectations, new possibilities. When we recognize the oppression of autocorrect, the hegemony of the algorithm, the charade of rigor, we light the fires of revolution. And though they may glow softly at first, enough of them gathered together will burn down towers."
seanmichaelmorris  2014  writing  digitalwriting  communication  pirates  squatting  hobos  nomads  digitalnomads  adomainofone'sown  blogs  blogging  googledocs  renting  creation  conversation  vine  twitter  photography  podcasts  lms  revolution  academia  participatory  participation  howwewrite  digiwrimo  culturecreation 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Discover The Road — Join a Community of People Who Wonder...
"Hi, my name is Kirk Wheeler. Discover the road is about finding a path in the chaos and learning what it means to live an authentic life. You can learn more about my reasons for starting this journey here: The First Step.

I don’t have all of the answers, but I believe that together we can learn how to ask better questions. An ongoing list of ideas on how to do just that can be found at the Rules of the Road."



"Question everything. … Do not let perfect be the enemy of good. … There is no failure, only feedback."



"Question everything. … Make progress. … Embrace the journey."

[See also: https://soundcloud.com/discovertheroad
http://www.discovertheroad.com/podcasts ]

[Listened to this one "On Chaos, Zen, Love and How To Remain Loyal To The Mystery" (several of the tags used for this bookmark are for that specific podcast:
https://soundcloud.com/discovertheroad/episode-10-stuart-davis-on-chaos-zen-love-and-how-to-remain-loyal-to-the-mystery
http://www.discovertheroad.com/podcast/stuart-davis ]
via:ablaze  interviews  creativity  podcasts  life  spirituality  kirkwheeler  impermanence  death  questioning  stuarddavis  meditation  well-being  living  chaos  balance  multitasking  messiness  resilience  presence  sleep  self-knowledge  uncertainty  progress  questioneverything  skepticism  change 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Warren Ellis » spektrmodule
"If you don’t know what you’re looking at: SPEKTRMODULE is a podcast of haunted, ambient and sleepy music I compile for my own amusement."

[via: https://twitter.com/debcha/status/430470298203590657 ]
sound  ambient  warrenellis  spektmodule  podcasts  buddhamachine  music 
february 2014 by robertogreco
You Are Boring — The Magazine
"Everything was going great until you showed up. You see me across the crowded room, make your way over, and start talking at me. And you don’t stop.

You are a Democrat, an outspoken atheist, and a foodie. You like to say “Science!” in a weird, self-congratulatory way. You wear jeans during the day, and fancy jeans at night. You listen to music featuring wispy lady vocals and electronic bloop-bloops.

You really like coffee, except for Starbucks, which is the worst. No wait—Coke is the worst! Unless it’s Mexican Coke, in which case it’s the best.

Pixar. Kitty cats. Uniqlo. Bourbon. Steel-cut oats. Comic books. Obama. Fancy burgers.

You listen to the same five podcasts and read the same seven blogs as all your pals. You stay up late on Twitter making hashtagged jokes about the event that everyone has decided will be the event about which everyone jokes today. You love to send withering @ messages to people like Rush Limbaugh—of course, those notes are not meant for their ostensible recipients, but for your friends, who will chuckle and retweet your savage wit.

You are boring. So, so boring.

Don’t take it too hard. We’re all boring. At best, we’re recovering bores. Each day offers a hundred ways for us to bore the crap out of the folks with whom we live, work, and drink. And on the Internet, you’re able to bore thousands of people at once.1

A few years ago, I had a job that involved listening to a ton of podcasts. It’s possible that I’ve heard more podcasts than anyone else—I listened to at least a little bit of tens of thousands of shows. Of course, the vast majority were so bad I’d often wish microphones could be sold only to licensed users. But I did learn how to tell very quickly whether someone was interesting or not.

The people who were interesting told good stories. They were also inquisitive: willing to work to expand their social and intellectual range. Most important, interesting people were also the best listeners. They knew when to ask questions. This was the set of people whose shows I would subscribe to, whose writing I would seek out, and whose friendship I would crave. In other words, those people were the opposite of boring.

Here are the three things they taught me.

Listen, then ask a question
I call it Amtrak Smoking Car Syndrome (because I am old, used to smoke, thought that trains were the best way to get around the country, and don’t really understand what a syndrome is). I’d be down in the smoking car, listening to two people have a conversation that went like this:

Stranger #1: Thing about my life.
Stranger #2: Thing about my life that is somewhat related to what you just said.
Stranger #1: Thing about my life that is somewhat related to what you just said.
Stranger #2: Thing about my life…

Next stop: Boringsville, Population: 2. There’s no better way to be seen as a blowhard than to constantly blow, hard. Instead, give a conversation some air. Really listen. Ask questions; the person you’re speaking with will respect your inquisitiveness and become more interested in the exchange. “Asking questions makes people feel valued,” said former Virgin America VP Porter Gale, “and they transfer that value over to liking you more.”

Watch an old episode of The Dick Cavett Show. Cavett is an engaged listener, very much part of the conversation, but he also allows his partner to talk as well. He’s not afraid to ask questions that reveal his ignorance, but it’s also clear he’s no dummy.2

Online, put this technique to use by pausing before you post. Why are you adding that link to Facebook? Will it be valuable to the many people who will see it? Or are you just flashing a Prius-shaped gang sign to your pals? If it’s the latter, keep it to yourself.

Tell a story
Shitty pictures of your food are all over the Internet. Sites like Instagram are loaded with photo after photo of lumpy goo. What you’re trying to share is the joy you feel when the waiter delivers that beautifully plated pork chop. But your photo doesn’t tell the story of that experience. Your photo rips away the delicious smell, the beautiful room, the anticipation of eating, and the presence of people you love.

Instead, think of your photo as a story. When people tell stories, they think about how to communicate the entirety of their experience to someone else. They set the stage, introduce characters, and give us a reason to care. Of course, that’s hard to do in a single photo, but if you think in terms of story, could you find a better way to communicate your experience? How about a picture of the menu, or of your smiling dinner companions? Anything’s better than the greasy puddles you have decided any human with access to the Internet should be able to see.

Expand your circles
Several years ago, my wife and I went on a long trip. We had saved a little money, and the places we were staying were cheap, so we could afford private rooms in every city but one. Guess where we made the most friends? In Budapest, where we were jammed into a big room with a bunch of folks, we were forced into situations we never would have sought out. I wouldn’t have met Goran, the Marilyn Manson superfan who was fleeing the NATO bombing of Belgrade on a fake Portuguese visa. Or Kurt, the Dutch hippie who let us crash on his floor in Amsterdam. Stepping out of your social comfort zone can be painful, but it’s one of the most rewarding things you can do.3

As you widen your social circle, work on your intellectual one as well. Expose yourself to new writers. Hit the Random Article button on Wikipedia. Investigate the bromides your friends chuck around Twitter like frisbees.

When you expand your social and intellectual range, you become more interesting. You’re able to make connections that others don’t see. You’re like a hunter, bringing a fresh supply of ideas and stories back to share with your friends.

The Big Bore lurks inside us all. It’s dying to be set loose to lecture on Quentin Tarantino or what makes good ice cream. Fight it! Fight the urge to speak without listening, to tell a bad story, to stay inside your comfortable nest of back-patting pals. As you move away from boring, you will never be bored."
interestingness  interestedness  listening  scottsimpson  2012  uniqueness  hivemind  echochambers  noise  howtolisten  howto  storytelling  cv  homogeneity  diversity  exploration  interviewing  instagram  twitter  blogs  blogging  podcasts  dickcavett  boringness  interested 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Dr. Jeannette Wing | Jon Udell's Interviews with Innovators
"For Interviews with Innovators, Jon Udell speaks with Jeannette Wing, a Carnegie Mellon computer scientists who coined the term computational thinking. Her idea is that ways of thinking and problem-solving that involve algorithms and data structures and levels of abstraction and refactoring aren't just for computer scientists, they're really for everybody."
podcasts  tolisten  jeannettewing  computationalthinking  problemsolving  algorithms  datastructures  2007  abstraction  refactoring  compsci  thinking 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Radio Ambulante
"Radio Ambulante es un programa de radio que cuenta historias latinoamericanas provenientes de todos los países de habla hispana, incluyendo Estados Unidos. Buscamos llevar la estética de la buena crónica de prensa escrita a la radio.

Nuestro podcast pronto podrá escucharse en nuestra web o descargarse a través de iTunes desde cualquier parte del mundo.

Además, estamos creando alianzas con emisoras de Latinoamérica y Estados Unidos, para así alcanzar una audiencia de habla hispana en todo el continente.

Una de nuestras metas es formar una comunidad de cronistas de radio en distintos países, aprovechando los avances tecnológicos para producir, distribuir e intercambiar historias."

[via http://99percentinvisible.org/post/43419720763/episode-73-the-zanzibar-and-other-building-poems

"Our reporter this week is Daniel Alarcón, host and executive producer of Radio Ambulante, a new podcast which has been called “This American Life en Español” (though some stories are in English)." ]
podcasts  spanish  radio  radioambulante  tolisten 
february 2013 by robertogreco
99% Invisible • Episode 70- The Great Red Car Conspiracy
"When Eric Molinsky lived in Los Angeles, he kept hearing this story about a bygone transportation system called the Red Car. The Red Car, he was told, had been this amazing network of streetcars that connected the city—until a car company bought it, dismantled it, and forced a dependency on freeways.

If this sounds familiar, it might be because it was the evil scheme revealed at the end of the Robert Zemeckis’s 1988 movie, Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

But like most legends, the one that Eric heard about the Red Car is not entirely accurate. It’s true that Los Angeles did have an extensive mass transit system called the Red Car, which at one time ran on 1,100 miles of track—about 25 percent more more track mileage than New York City has today, a century later.  

But the Red Car wasn’t the victim of a conspiracy. The Red Car was the conspiracy. 

Our reporter Eric Molinsky spoke with historian Bill Friedricks, who says that to understand the Red Car, you first need to know about Henry Huntington, one of the major power brokers of Los Angeles. If you’ve ever heard of Huntington Beach, Huntington Park, or the Huntington Library, this is that Huntington."

[On Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/roman-mars/70-the-great-red-car ]
losangeles  history  redcar  redcarconspiracy  conspiracy  2013  podcasts  transportation  ericmolinsky  billfriedricks  henryhuntington  whoframedrogerrabbit?  robertzemeckis 
february 2013 by robertogreco
The Organist
"The Organist is a monthly experimental arts-and-culture program produced and distributed by KCRW. The editors of the award-winning monthly magazine the Believer, published in San Francisco by McSweeney’s, produce ten annual episodes of the podcast, which includes reported stories, interviews, comic radio drama, reviews, and more. The scope of the podcast reflects that of the print edition: its contributors take a thoughtful approach to pop culture, along with an irreverent attitude toward the highbrow. From philosophy to daytime TV, from poetry to martial arts, the show scrutinizes and interrogates the world with an affectionate and rigorous intelligence. Pieces from the podcast grow out of stories in the magazine, and vice versa. Weaving together the voices of its contributors, which include the brightest talents in literature and the arts, the Organist is an elegant, impressionistic, funny, and sharp cultural magazine that itself becomes an object of inquiry, discussion, and wonder."
theorganist  thebeliever  kcrw  mcsweenys  literature  poetry  film  music  culture  podcasts  via:maxfenton  interviews  stories  storytelling  arts 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Episode One: Little Language Machine | The Organist
"Welcome to Episode one of the Organist, wherein:

• the short-story master George Saunders talks about how riffing as a teenage benchwarmer led to the richly imagined voices of his fiction;
• Parks and Recreation‘s Nick Offerman explains the tortured etymology of the word “podcast” (it’s a conflation of the words paw and broadcast — a radio show with claws);
• critic Greil Marcus considers a reissue of the first Bikini Kill EP and a new novel by Percival Everett;
• Amber Scorah tells the story of her defection from the Jehovah’s Witnesses while working as a missionary in Shanghai;
• Pitchfork editor Brandon Stosuy presents five five-word record reviews of excellent new guitar rock;
• the electronic duo Matmos takes a song from their new album apart, piece by piece, revealing its brilliant, pulsating innards;
• a new(ish) film casts a shotgun microphone as its protagonist;
• And more!
• Actually, not much more. That’s more or less everything."

[See also the bonus material: http://www.theorganist.org/uncategorized/episode-one-web-extras-page/ ]
via:maxfenton  podcasts  georgesaunders  2013  nickofferman  grilmarcus  amberscorah  brandonstosuy  matmos  music  film  percivaleverett  theorganist 
february 2013 by robertogreco
About Us | Generation Anthropocene
"History is accelerating. Global population has crossed seven billion, the planet’s temperature continues its abrupt rise, and scientists warn we are in the midst of a new mass extinction.  Transformations this enormous are rare in earth’s 4.6 billion year history and humankind’s planetary impact is geologic in scale. We have caused a new geologic age, and it has a name: The Anthropocene.

In addition to our extensive physical and chemical influences on our planet, the Anthropocene has come to symbolize a cultural shift. The concept has spread from academic circles to popular media and we at Generation Anthropocene want to cast our butterfly net as wide as possible to capture the conversations about this new age.  We seek out cross-generational stories from our changing environmental and cultural landscapes, discussing all things Anthropocene with thought-leaders like geologists and historians, ecologists and philosophers. We’re grappling with our realization that we’re a geologic force and confronting the new reality with investigative storytelling.

We hope you enjoy the podcast and continue the story of our evolving planet with those around you."
anthropocene  podcasts  stanford  generationanthropocene  geology  earth  humans  via:greerjacob 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Strangers - KCRW
"Since the beginning of time, strangers and strange places have given rise to our wildest dreams and our deepest fears — and to the greatest stories on earth. These days, as we fly around the world, or the Internet, we come into contact with a hundredfold more strangers than our grandparents did. This series from KCRW's Independent Producer Project is the about the strangers we meet, the strangers we become, and the "strangeness" we might overcome when we find ways to connect in the modern world. It's about travelers, seekers, dreamers, lovers and warriors. It's about fateful moments, bad dates, long lost friends, life-saving kindnesses, and those frightful moments when we discover that we aren't even who we thought we were.

Strangers is hosted and produced by Peabody Award-winning producer and director, Lea Thau. The musical supervisor is Myke Dodge Weiskopf."
storytelling  tolisten  dating  travel  fear  kindness  podcasts  kcrw  stangers  leathau 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Welcome to Destination DIY
"Destination DIY is an independently produced public radio show and podcast bringing you stories about all kinds of creativity.

Taking the DIY lens beyond home improvement and crafts, we explore all kinds of ways people are working with limited resources to create rather than consume the world around them. Destination DIY blends recorded field sound, in-studio interviews and personal narration to create an arc that takes listeners on a journey and brings them back inspired.

*Host, creator & producer Julie Sabatier*

In addition to hosting and producing Destination DIY, Julie has produced quality radio for outlets such as Oregon Public Broadcasting, Pacifica and American Public Media. In her brief stint as a print reporter, her work was published regularly in Willamette Week, Just Out and the Portland Sentinel."
destinationdiy  edg  srg  glvo  creativity  sustainability  audio  opb  juliesabatier  podcasts  radio  diy 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Lectures - MFA Art Criticism & Writing - Download free content from School Of Visual Arts on iTunes
"The MFA program in Art Criticism & Writing is one of the only graduate writing programs in the world that focuses specifically on criticism. This program is not involved in “discourse production” or the prevarications of curatorial rhetoric, but rather in the practice of criticism writ large, aspiring to literature."
artwriting  writing  itunes  audio  artcriticism  art  podcasts  sva 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Frank Delaney's Re: Joyce - Download free podcast episodes by Frank Delaney on iTunes.
"ReJOYCE! To commemorate James Joyce's mighty novel, Ulysses, we're launching a podcast. Every week you'll find a five-minute mini-essay from me designed to take you through the novel that's on every list of the greatest books ever written. And as Ulysses runs to some 375,000 words, and I mean to go through it sentence by sentence if I have to, in order to convey the full brilliance of this novel - and the enjoyment to be had from it - I'll be podcasting for some time to come! It's such an absorbing book, it's got diamond mines of references, it's so compassionate, so tender, so moving, so funny - and most of us never know that, because most of us have long been daunted by it. No need to be afraid any more - that is, if you make a habit of listening to these podcasts."
ulysses  jamesjoyce  literature  podcasts  frankdelaney  via:irasocol 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Audioboo [Similar to SoundCloud]
"We are a mobile & web platform that effortlessly allows you to record and upload audio for your friends, family or the rest of the world to hear."
web  mobile  music  audio  onlinetoolkit  podcasting  podcasts  classideas  via:cervus 
july 2011 by robertogreco
RSA Events: Audio - Download free podcast episodes by RSA on iTunes.
"Enjoy audio and video from RSA's free public events programme, which addresses relevant issues from the fields of science and technology, design and the arts, economics, politics and international affairs. Our speakers include internationally renowned writers, academics, business leaders, social innovators, politicians and policymakers exploring the biggest challenges facing society today."
rsa  audio  podcasts  free  policy  society  innovation  economics 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Instacast for iPhone - Enjoy your Podcasts - Vemedio
"Instant access to podcast subscriptions, stream or download episodes wirelessly, follow show notes and enjoy audio and video podcasts on-the-go."
podcasts  iphone  ios  applications  instacast  via:rushtheiceberg 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Podcast: Empathy, mutual aid and the anarchist prince
"Peter Kropotkin was one of the greatest thinkers of the nineteenth century, who managed to multi-task as a Russian prince, renowned geographer and revolutionary anarchist. In this interview with Phonic FM, a wonderful community radio station based in Exeter, I discuss how Kropotkin’s ideas about ‘mutual aid’ relate to my own work on empathy, and why Kropotkin is a prophet for the art of living in the twenty-first century. The interview lasts around 50 minutes."
peterkropotkin  empathy  anarchism  romankrznaric  outrospection  mutualaid  history  2011  podcasts  tolisten  philosophy  science  politics  peacebuilding  ethics  interviews  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  society  policy  law  cognitiveempathy  affectiveempathy  perspective  understanding  radicalsocialchange  socialchange  conversation  learning  crosspollination  crossdisciplinary  strangers  conversationmeals  interdisciplinary  facilitating  connectivism  connections  generalists  cooperation  cooperativegroups 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The David Foster Wallace Audio Project
"This collection of David Foster Wallace MP3's was lovingly collected by Ryan Walsh in early 2009. Included herein are many, many files under the following category headings:
davidfosterwallace  mp3  podcasts  literature  interviews  audio  books  culture 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Bill Moyers Journal . Podcasts | PBS
"Bill Moyers Journal offers several podcasts that let you listen or watch the JOURNAL when you want, how you want."
billmoyers  podcasts  pbs  news 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Lit to Go: MP3 Stories and Poems - Lit2Go is a free online collection of stories and poems in Mp3 (audiobook) format.
"Download the files to your Mp3 player and listen on the go, Listen to the Mp3 files on your computer, View the text on a webpage and read along as you listen, Print out the stories and poems to make your own book"
via:cburell  audiobooks  literature  mp3  free  books  storytelling  podcasts  audio  elementary  elearning  education  ebooks  stories  poetry  poems 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Welcome to the Course! « Blogs, Wikis, and New Media
"This course is designed to help you understand and effectively use a variety of “web 2.0″ technologies including blogs, RSS, wikis, social bookmarking tools, photo sharing tools, mapping tools, audio and video podcasts, and screencasts."
web2.0  e-learning  elearning  onlinetoolkit  bookmarks  tutorials  courses  curriculum  edtech  education  wikis  training  podcasts  podcasting  socialsoftware  howto 
june 2008 by robertogreco
100s of Podcasts That Will Make You Smarter: Our Recession Special | Open Culture
"cultural and educational podcasts that will make you smarter. We guarantee that. And the best part is that they’re completely free — perfect for a recession. We’ve lost count of how many podcasts we have listed here. But it’s over a thousand. Exp
distancelearning  education  elearning  podcasts  science  travel  technology  art  culture  language  news  free  law  business 
march 2008 by robertogreco
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