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robertogreco : pokémon   17

Ooblets
"A game about farming, creatures, and adventure"



"WHAT IS OOBLETS????? YOU MIGHT ASK

Ooblets is a currently-in-development creature collection and farming game. It’s sort of like Harvest Moon meets Pokémon meets Animal Crossing meets the weird awkward people we are.

More of your questions might be answered on the FAQ page.

EXPOSITION

As Essie, the noseless protagonist, you’re making a fresh start in a new town. You’ve bought a little plot of land with the hopes of cultivating a farm and becoming a town-renowned ooblet trainer. What else do you need?

MECHANICS? OKAY.

Plant, water, and harvest crops, manage and expand your farm, collect all sorts of junk, make friends, and also make littler friends (ooblets).

Use the crops you grow to befriend, upgrade, and heal ooblets. Buy a little shop and sell your excess crops and junk to the townspeople.

Explore regions like the Mamoonia desert, the spooky Nullwhere, bustling Hubton, and more! Discover loads of ooblets and battle other trainers all over the place.

SOME FEATURES:

• Live a simple life working the land (and battling magical creatures)
• You get a little house you can decorate and expand
• Play at your own pace. Leave the stresses of city living behind you
• Take part in a bustling little town full of characters
• Open world exploring
• Visit a variety of regions (one will be under water I think!)
• Automate production with things like sprinklers
• Run a shop!
• Upgrade your dudes because I guess they’re not good enough for you
• Maybe you will get to name your dudes too?
• Join a Ooblet club. Feel wanted and appreciated. Distrust other clubs’ members.
• Befriend rare creatures. Look, that one’s wearing a little hat! Catch it!"

[See also:
https://twitter.com/nonplayercat
https://twitter.com/Ooblets ]
games  gaming  videogames  rebeccacordingley  adventure  farming  animalcrossing  harvestmoon  pokemon  pokémon  agriculture 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Should teachers care about Pokémon Go? | Playable
"We already hearing ‘news’ reports of Pokémon farming and exploitation, how much it costs to buy Pokéballs, people walking off cliffs, crashing cars etc., all things we didn’t hear about Ingress of course.People have asked me for ages why some games seem to ‘click’ with kids and can be useful in class – and some don’t. Right now the world works like this. It’s not what advertising says about a brand that makes it successful, it’s what people say about to each other. Pokémon Go! has relied on this network-effect to propel it to ‘craze’ level. Anyone who separates games and learning really knows little about either these days because the two things are inseparable in children’s media culture today. Minecraft has grown inside education networks because of the same (though tiny) network effect – and again, needs to do something ‘more’ if it is to be sustained. As I track what teachers talk about online (towards games and in a non-creepy way) – Minecraft (Education) has trended down since Pokémon Go!. One reason I think is because teachers are far more curious about ARG potential than virtual legos. What they are concerned about (and what to know about) is what games do this ‘fantasy-magic-learning-stuff’. My attitude is – lots of games – go and try some. But what is perhaps more helpful is to think about what kid want from playing a game – and playing one at school that’s not a crappy edumacated game – or we turn Pokémon Go into a lame class lesson – such as let’s have a debate – half the class is to argue for Pokémon Go and the other in Pokémon No. (My daughter came home with that one this week, every kid thought the teacher was reaching a bit)."



"Here are the four key things that research is telling us about MMOs, MMORPGs, Networked Gaming, MOBAs etc., and it’s all about humans making sense of their transmedia lives – though pleasurable leisure choices. It’s part of the social history of our time.

What are the key things teachers can observe and learn from this?

1. Multimodal connectedness is associated with bridging and bonding social capital
2. Playing with existing offline friends is associated with bonding social capital.
3. Playing with offline and online friends is associated with bridging social capital.
4. Multimodal connectedness moderated the relationships between co-players and social capital

What does the research say?

There’s a lot of research around these four things, but so far, when we need much more research about specific MOBAs (LoL, Overwatch etc) and ARGs (Pokémon Go, Ingress, Zombie Run etc. For example, what are children’s attitudes towards the frequency of playing ARGs and how do the interaction and experiences of play vary in group size, cultures, gender etc., But you might be surprised to find very little research is being done – or has been done outside of the ‘giants’ of gaming – Warcraft, Ultima, Doom etc., and this research is good ‘beachhead’ reading, but it hasn’t had a huge impact on what teachers believe about games in their classrooms. What teachers should try and bring to games in the classroom are objects which give them a clear(er) sense that what drives kids. This is not the

You might be surprised to find very little research is being or has been done outside of the ‘giants’ of gaming – Warcraft, Ultima, Doom etc., so far. While this research has developed a good ‘beachhead’ in video games, especially since 2001 – it hasn’t had a huge impact on what teachers believe about games in their classrooms. What teachers should try and bring to games in the classroom are objects which give them a clear(er) sense that what drives kids. This is not the

What teachers should try and bring to games in the classroom are objects which give them a clear(er) sense that what drives kids. This is not the material content or an ability to sandbox build castles. Seeing the child’s developmental curiosity and ability to experiment with these four things – alone and in groups is quite an experience.

Of course, this is just a theory (at best) and part of what I’m interested in.

Families who have high levels of multimodal connectedness and actively apply it to create bridging and bonding capital appear to have ‘the edge’ over parent’s who don’t. We are raising children who need to be confident and successful in these things – because human behaviour is changing with technology – and what we (as adults) are expected to do or not do with it and though it matters in life.

What does EdTech seem to think?

Sadly EdTech doesn’t see games as important as it could (as a public dialogue). EdTech relies on the network effect to popularise certain products and ignore others. It also uses it to make some people famous/important and others customers, clients and the object of their commentary. So for the most part, Pokémon Go! will not be placed on the high altar of importance – such as Google Classroom or Apple’s wadjamacallit. So this game may well come — and go. It is now competing with Microsoft Minecraft Eduction, which has a fairly established group of advocates and popular ideas. Let’s not forget, there is alway plenty of people competing for attention in EdTech — and the gamer ‘hackedu’ types are misfits sitting in the corner. But you never know, Sir Ken might visit a Pokéstop near you.

Summing up

So I hope teachers will give it some attention. Pokémon Go! (early levels) is super easy to try and learn from – but when it stops being ‘fun’ – quit – because quitting games can just as enlightening as playing them.

If nothing else, you’ve walked in the half-real world of video games and perhaps taken the dog for an unexpected walk, hatched a few eggs and maybe visited a different kind of gym."
dengroom  pokemon  pokémon  pokémongo  education  schools  teaching  howweteach  minecraft  minecraftedu  gamification  socialcapital  play  games  gaming  relationships  ingress  edtech  mmos  mmorpgs  mobas  networkedgaming  transmedia  media  args  pokemongo 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Werner Herzog on the future of film school, critical connectivity, and Pokémon Go | The Verge
"EY: Have you seen any changes or shifts in the work and in the submissions over the past seven years?

WH: There are always surprises. All of a sudden there is a film that is not really accomplished, but in the film there is a minute of utterly new unseen stuff that just makes you sit down and take a deep breath. Those are the [filmmakers] I would invite [to Rogue Film School], those who are not following on the trodden path. The MasterClass speaks to you in the same way. Find your own voice, do not just stupidly and blindly follow the so-called rules of storytelling in terms of screenplays, the three-act theory, all these things. Find your voice, find your own identity, don't be afraid just to step into it.

Because today it's fairly easy; you can make a film with a very high caliber camera that's not expensive anymore. You can record sound on your cell phone if you add a good microphone and you can edit your film on your laptop. In other words, you can make a feature film for $10,000 or under. And that's what I keep telling the students or those who watch the MasterClass: don't wait for the system to accept you. You create your own system, create your own [budget] and make your own first feature film or your first own documentary.

EY: More and more that DIY spirit is the dominant attitude of young filmmakers, especially those putting their work directly online. Do you think traditional film school will ever go extinct?

WH: No, unfortunately they are not going to go completely extinct; I wish they would. I wish everybody would come out of nowhere and be self-taught by life itself, by the world itself. No, [film school is] going to stay because there is a general demand for content, let's say, on television. And the film industry has some sort of a permanent demand for content. Let it be like that. I do not want to challenge it. But when you look into my MasterClass you better be out for something else."



"WH: No, you shouldn't watch it [the MasterClass] all at once. That would be completely mad. And be careful with the assignments, because sometimes I would say you do not need to follow them. Create your own assignments, be intelligent. Giving assignments, it reeks of high school and getting homework.

EY: Some people respond to that though, some people like that.

WH: Yes, but I always was reluctant to give any assignments. But it's fine. Let it be as it is. It's part of the format and it's part of the charm of it. When it comes to assignment I'm not the one who should be a high school principal.

EY: Right.

WH: I'd rather jump from Golden Gate Bridge if that happens.

EY: I asked about film school because I graduated from a film program less than a decade ago, and already many of the technical skills I learned are outdated. And it seems the things that remain are very personal lessons that usually don't come from the curriculum itself.

WH: Yeah, certain things you can neither learn in film school nor let's say the MasterClass nor in the Rogue Film School. It's just life, raw life as it is has to give you insight and has to allow you to make the right decisions and ask the right questions and gathering enough courage to do something."



"WH: If you are too much into the internet, yes, because it's a parallel surrogate life. It has nothing to do with the real world or examination of the real world, if you delegate too much to your cell phone and applications."



"WH: You see, I come from a world where you touch things, like a roll of celluloid. But I have to get better accustomed to the virtual world."



EY: Lo and Behold is officially being released in August, but in the meantime you've had the chance to screen it several times. What kinds of reactions have you gotten, especially from people who are perhaps more embedded in the "connected world" than you are?

WH: Well, everybody has been enthusiastic so far and the buzz is enormous. I never expected it, because in the beginning I was to do some YouTube tips on texting and driving. The financiers of the film, NETSCOUT, understood there was something much, much bigger and they supported me with that. The response has been totally unprecedented for me. What is also remarkable I get a lot of emails nowadays [from] 12, 14, 15-year-olds. And that's something really surprising because they speak a different language, the language of their age group. And yet [they are] making some very intelligent remarks."
wernerherzog  masterclass  education  filmmaking  2016  interviews  emilyyoshida  experience  unschooling  deschooling  internet  virtualreality  pokémongo  pokémon  pokemon  making  observation  roguefilmschool  diy  film  documentary  assignments  howweteach  howwelearn  learning  teaching  pokemongo  edg  srg  vr 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Pokémon as slavery - Kill Screen - Videogame Arts & Culture.
"It took 15 years for the Pokémon series to start looking inwardly at itself and question its own ethics. By then, it comprised videogames, anime, trading cards, toys, a whole damn franchise that might—it just might—have advocated slavery and/or animal blood sports. This isn't meant to be one of those "24 Facts That Will Ruin Your Childhood" type of articles but it might have the same effect if you haven't put any thought into the Pokémon series beyond whether to have your Rattata attack with a Tail Whip or a Bite."
games  gaming  videogames  edg  srg  slavery  pokemon  2015  chrispriestman  ethics  pokémon 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Videogames and the Spirit of Capitalism | Molleindustria
"We are only learning to speak of immeasurable qualities through videogames. It’s a slow and collective process of hacking accounting machines into expressive machines. Computer games need to learn from their non-digital counterparts to be loose interfaces between people. A new game aesthetic has to be explored: one that revels in problem-making over problem-solving, that celebrates paradoxes and ruptures, that doesn’t eschew broken and dysfunctional systems because the broken and dysfunctional systems governing our lives need to be unpacked and not idealized.

Strategies are to be discovered: poetic wrenches have to be thrown in the works; gears and valves have to grow hair, start pulsing and breathing; algorithms must learn to tell stories and scream in pain."

[direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/86738382 ]
videogames  gaming  paolopedercini  molleindustria  games  art  design  capitalism  economics  efficiency  control  rationalization  marxism  bureaucracy  consumption  commerce  standardization  socialnetworks  quantification  sybernetics  gamification  goals  society  taylorism  relationships  pokemon  facebook  farmville  zynga  management  power  labor  addiction  addictiveness  badges  behavior  measurement  commodification  rogercaillois  play  idleness  ludism  leisure  leisurearts  artleisure  maxweber  resistance  consciousness  storytelling  notgames  taleoftales  agency  proteus  richardhofmeier  cartlife  simulation  2014  douglaswilson  spaceteam  henrysmith  cooperativegames  collaborativegames  tamatipico  tuboflex  everydaythesamedream  unmanned  systemsthinking  human  humans  oligarchy  negativeexternalities  gamedesign  poetry  johannsebastianjoust  edg  srg  shrequest1  simulations  pokémon 
february 2014 by robertogreco
When cute graphics mask evil games - Den of Geek
"Animal Crossing’s society of doe-eyed, sweet-talking creatures masks the game’s horrifying agenda. It’s actually a simulation of capitalist oppression, first saddling the player with a crippling mortgage that grows as fast as they can pay it off, before luring them into a materialistic treadmill of drudgery and spending.

Before you know it, you’re in thrall to Tom Nook, the apparently benign shop owner who rules the state of Animal Crossing with an iron fist. As the game goes on, Nook’s megalomania grows, his initially tiny shop gradually increasing in size until it’s become a sprawling department store. At the same time, your home gradually swells from a tiny hovel to a palace, allowing you to fill your life with an ever greater accumulation of furniture, trinkets and other pointless tat."

[Also takes on Viva Piñata, Pimkin, Pokémon, and others.]
videogames  gaming  kawai  play  capitalism  animalcrossing  vivapiñata  pokemon  pokémon 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Portmanteau - Wikipedia [bookmark points to the Japanese section, but also see the "Portmanteau word/morph (linguistics)" section]
"There are many examples of borrowed word blends in Japanese. The word パソコン (pasokon?), meaning PC, as in personal computer, is not officially an English loan word. The word does not exist in English; however, it is a uniquely Japanese contraction of the English personal computer (パーソナル・コンピュータ, pāsonaru konpyūta?). Another example, Pokémon (ポケモン?), is a contracted form of the English words pocket (ポケット, poketto?) and monsters (モンスター, monsutā?).

Sometimes Japanese and English words are blended together. One very famous example, karaoke (カラオケ, karaoke?), is the blend of the Japanese word for empty (空っぽ, karappo?) and the English word orchestra (オーケストラ, ōkesutora?)."
japanese  words  language  portmanteau  classideas  wordplay  japan  pokemon  karaoke  linguistics  pokémon 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Raph’s Website » Games and the Creativity Crisis
"since around 1990, American kids have been getting measurably less creative. Alas, early in the article, we see games getting blamed...Is this in fact the case? After all, the rest of the article (and the rest of the research in the field) seems to suggest that handing students problems and obliging them to think about possible solutions, is a much better way to go than rote memorization. And that is what the best games do. But it is also definitely true that many games these days “come with the answers”...Personally, I have always found creativity to be all about juxtaposing concepts and ideas from different fields and places, making unexpected connections...it behooves us as game developers to at least attempt to make games that encourage creative thinking, if not out of some sense of civic or moral obligation, then as a way of “paying it forward” — something made us creative enough to make the games in the first place, so we shouldn’t hog all the fun."
children  seriousgames  creativity  development  games  gaming  gamedesign  education  trends  youth  tcsnmy  problemsolving  raphkoster  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crosspollination  innovation  learning  lcproject  glvo  pokemon  larp  imagination  pokémon 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Mimi Ito - Statics: New Media and Its Superpowers: Learning, Post Pokemon
"But I hope that I have managed to convince you that for those who are willing to experiment and to seize the opportunities that today's digital and networked world has to offer, there is tremendous opportunity to expand the learning potential for a new generation of kids. The technology itself has no power to transform learning. It is up to us to take that technology and do something new with it, something that doesn't just reproduce our tired old scripts that pits kids cultures in opposition with adult learning goals. These experiments and explorations won’t succeed, spread or scale without a dedicated network of educators, kids, and parents who are working together to build a new model for 21st century learning."

[see also: https://web.archive.org/web/20100712200702/http://annualconference.nais.org/FeatureSpeak/content.cfm?ItemNumber=153126&token=24294&userID=318570

"Peer-Based Learning in a Networked Age"
http://www.itofisher.com/mito/publications/peerbased_learn_2.html ]
mimiito  education  learning  play  research  literacy  kids  pokemon  2010  infomallearning  formallearning  schools  lcproject  ethnography  networks  children  games  pokémon 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The Phylomon Project
"Well 2010 is here, a.k.a. the International Year of Biodiversity, and to us at the SCQ, it means that we're finally ready to go ahead with our long awaited phylomon project. “What is this?” you ask? Well, it's an online initiative aimed at creating a Pokemon card type resource but with real creatures on display in full “character design” wonder. Not only that - but we plan to have the scientific community weigh in to determine the content on such cards (note that the cards above are only a mock-up of what that content might be), as well as folks who love gaming to try and design interesting ways to use the cards. Then to top it all off, members of the teacher community will participate to see whether these cards have educational merit. Best of all, the hope is that this will all occur in a non-commercial-open-access-open-source-because-basically-this-is-good-for-you-your-children-and-your-planet sort of way."
pokemon  taxonomy  pedagogy  education  children  teaching  science  games  animals  biology  memory  biodiversity  conservation  2010  gaming  cardgames  tcsnmy  opensource  creativecommons  kids  art  life  eowilson  publicservice  glvo  edg  srg  drawing  illustration  pokémon 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Early Learning Through Pokémon | Geekdad from Wired.com
"Much of geeky media is visually oriented but I can't really think of anything else that offers a multiple dimension (pictures, words, and numbers) to the experience. Being a book nut myself, I will say I feel a certain vindication when plain ol' print media wins out in this case. Any other geek entertainment with similar educational value out there?"
pokemon  children  learning  reading  numbers  math  statistics  parenting  pokémon 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Chile: It’s Sex, Not Politics | Newsweek Culture | Newsweek.com
"Pokemones are at once radical and inevitable. Radical because they are shocking Chilean society to its core. Inevitable because they are darlings of a booming neoliberal economy, which has provided them with all the material accoutrements necessary to be
chile  culture  society  youth  teens  wealth  consumerism  pokemon  pokémon 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Monitor | The battle for Wikipedia's soul | Economist.com
"The internet: The popular online encyclopedia, written by volunteer contributors, has unlimited space. So does it matter if it includes trivia?"
collaboration  wikipedia  culture  debate  encyclopedia  knowledge  internet  trivia  trends  publishing  politics  pokemon  pokémon 
march 2008 by robertogreco

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