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robertogreco : popart   4

Black Mountain College: "The Grass-Roots of Democracy" - Open Source with Christopher Lydon
"Our guest, the literary historian Louis Menand, explains that B.M.C. was a philosophical experiment intent on putting the progressive philosopher John Dewey‘s ideas to work in higher education. The college curriculum was unbelievably permissive — but it did ask that students undertake their own formation as citizens of the world by means of creative expression, and hard work, in a community of likeminded people.

The college may not have lived up to its utopian self-image — the scene was frequently riven by interpersonal conflict — but it did serve as a stage-set to some of modern culture’s most interesting personalities and partnerships."
bmc  blackmountaincollege  rutherickson  louismenand  teddreier  theodoredreier  sebastiansmee  taylordavis  williamdavis  2016  robertcreeley  jacoblawrence  josefalbers  robertrauschenberg  annialbers  davidtudor  franzkline  mercecunningham  johncage  charlesolson  buckminsterfuller  johndewey  democracy  art  music  film  poetry  cytwombly  bauhaus  experientiallearning  howwelearn  education  johnandrewrice  unschooling  deschooling  schools  schooling  learning  howelearn  howweteach  pedagogy  christopherlydon  abstractexpressionism  popart  jacksonpollock  arthistory  history  arts  purpose  lcproject  openstudioproject  leapbeforeyoulook  canon  discovery  conflict  artists  happenings  openness  rural  community  highered  highereducation  curriculum  willemdekooning  small  control  conversation  interdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  mitmedialab  medialab  chaos  utopia  dicklyons  artschools  davidbowie  experimentation  exploration  humanity  humanism  humility  politics 
october 2018 by robertogreco
The Artist Is Present: Williams Chechet Utilizes Pop Art To Remind You To Know Your History
"Meet the Nigerian multi-hyphenate creative whose work speaks for itself—check it out with OkayAfrica.
Williams Chechet is a multi-talented pop artist, graphic designer, illustrator and muralist who's one to watch. The Nigerian creative is influenced by his culture, history, afrofuturism, afrobeats and hip hop—and this screams at you when looking at his body of explosive work.

He seamlessly speaks through his vibrant visuals. Chechet's past work and due props include a series centered around leaders in Nigeria, a renowned celebration of heritage called We are the North on Northern Nigeria, a CNN Africa feature, a mural for Hard Rock Cafe Lagos, live art on MTV Base, album covers for M.I., Jesse Jagz, Ice Prince, clothing with Pop Caven and an American streetwear brand we can't disclose just yet. More recently, he's collaborated with Cameroonian pop artist Fred Ebami on an icon series."
art  nigeria  williamchechet  2018  popart 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Not Nothing: Selected Writings by Ray Johnson 1954-1994: Elizabeth Zuba, Kevin Killian, Ray Johnson: 9781938221040: Amazon.com: Books
"When Ray Johnson famously committed suicide by swimming out to sea in 1995, he left behind a conflicted legacy. Johnson was a pioneer of Pop, Conceptual and Mail art, yet the artist refuted all of these terms. He was an increasingly reclusive figure who, to paraphrase writer William S. Wilson, "made art that was not about social comment but of sociability," exploring new interfaces between his work and its audiences (and collaborators). His methods were temporal as much as they were spatial - lacking finality, Johnson's practice embraced contingency and process over a finished product. These strategies resist the exhibition form, and one can see how the intimacy and transportability of the book might offer the perfect platform for his often diaristic work. This year Siglio Press has brought together over 200 selected letters and writings - most of them unpublished - for Not Nothing: Selected Writings by Ray Johnson, 1954-1994 and re-published The Paper Snake by Ray Johnson, an artist's book from 1965. Designed by Dick Higgins and envisaged as an experimental solution to compiling and exhibiting Johnson's works, The Paper Snake offers a selection of elliptical poetry, drawings, collages and rubbings. With introductory essays, and designed with an attuned sensitivity to the original material, the two new publications will introduce a new generation to the restless work of Ray Johnson.(George Vasey Kaleidescope Magazine 2014-06-12)

[Above passage references The Paper Snake: http://www.amazon.com/Ray-Johnson-The-Paper-Snake/dp/1938221036/ ]

Not Nothing is a display of ashes. It is made for looking but, because of its reformulation of the social into a tangible maze, I prefer to torch and snort it. An experimental privacy manifesto invading my nasal passages. The documents it contains corrode things out of things-items more perverse than the baloney out of the sandwich, chomping out the meat upon which our artistic economy sustains itself. A cauterized performance of the direct mail campaign that weighs against our rabidly luxe social field. Corresponding fishing hole gradually dried up. No more nose bleeds. (Trisha Low BOMB 2014-06-01)"

[NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/11/books/not-nothing-tries-to-capture-the-artist-ray-johnson.html ]

[See also:
http://kaleidoscope-press.com/2014/06/readray-johnsons-bookspublished-by-siglio-press/
http://sigliopress.com/book/not-nothing/
http://sigliopress.com/book/the-paper-snake/ ]
rayjohnson  books  art  glvo  sociability  social  georgevasey  socialcommentary  unfinished  collaboration  audience  audiences  audiencesofone  mailart  process  cv  popart  conceptualart  correspondence 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Date Farmers: Desert Detritus Becomes Chicano Pop Art | Riverside | Artbound | KCET
"The duo Armando Lerma and Carlos Ramirez grew up in Indio, a small town in the Sonoran Desert, near the desert void where General Patton once practiced tank maneuvers for North African battles of WWII. Lerma and Ramirez have deep roots in the region. Lerma's father owned a date farm, and Ramirez once worked there as a picker. Ramirez's mother collaborated with civil rights leader Cesar Chavez. But it wasn't until the late 1990s, that the artists met at a gallery show in the Coachella Valley and began sharing the influences that they amassed from their life experiences. They were Chicano, but also American. They lived alongside Native Americans and Mexican nationals, but travelled back and forth from the multicultural mélange of Los Angeles. Their works became records of this polymorphous identity--their transitive life existing in a liminal reality between cultures--collecting multicultural ephemera and detritus, and combining it into playful sculptural assemblage pieces."

[The Date Farmers website: http://thedatefarmers.com/ ]
datefarmers  art  artists  indio  riverside  carlosramirez  armandolerma  chicano  popart  murals  muralists  streetart  coachellavalley  acegallery  california  video 
may 2013 by robertogreco

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