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Black Twitter: American Twitter gets its new terms from Black Twitter — Quartz
"African American English may be America’s greatest source of linguistic creativity.

A new study, led by Jack Grieve, a professor of corpus linguistics at the University of Birmingham in the UK, analyzed nearly 1 billion tweets to find out how new terms emerge on the platform. By looking at words that go from total obscurity to mainstream usage on Twitter in a short period of time, the research can begin to answer questions like: Is one part of the country more linguistically creative than the others? And do new words spread from a geographical origin outward, or does the internet allow them to emerge everywhere, simultaneously?

To some extent, the answer to both questions is “yes,” as I have written previously. But the study points out the particular importance of one community on Twitter in particular, concluding, “African American English is the main source of lexical innovation on American Twitter.”

To get to that result, the authors extracted billions of words from tweets by users in the United States. They then identified the words that were very uncommon around October 2013, but had become widely used by November 2014. After getting rid of proper nouns and variations of the same term, they settled on 54 “emerging words,” including famo, tfw, yaas, and rekt.

Identifying those terms allowed the researchers to analyze out how new words spread. That pointed to five “common regional patterns” of lexical creation: the West Coast, centered around California; the Deep South, around Atlanta; the Northwest and New York; the Mid-Atlantic and DC; and the Gulf Coast, centered on New Orleans.

Of those five, the Deep South is exceptional in the way it brings about new terms. Usually, a term starts in a densely populated urban area, then spreads to urban areas in other parts of the country. In the case of the West Coast, for example, terms tend to start in Los Angeles and San Francisco, then make their way to Seattle, Portland, San Diego, Las Vegas, and Phoenix.

That doesn’t happen as much in the Deep South. There, the spread of creative new words appears to be driven more by culture than population density. Atlanta, the authors point out, is small relative to urban powerhouses like LA and New York. And terms that originate in the South do not spread by jumping to other cities; instead, they spread via areas with large black populations.

The map below shows the different regions the study uncovered; each county in the US is colored based on the pattern of spread it is most closely associated with. As you can see, the West Coast map shows several red hotspots well beyond California, popping up as far away as Seattle, Florida, and the Northeast. Several other maps look like that, too—the Northeast pattern has green splotches in Louisiana, the South, and Southern California; the Mid-Atlantic map shows deep purple in Chicago, Texas, and elsewhere. The Deep South, on the other hand, spreads straight out from the area around Atlanta, with only a very faint blue on top of San Francisco.

[maps]

That alone wouldn’t be enough to say that African American English is the “main source” of new terms on American Twitter. But the paper adds that three of the five patterns above seem to be “primarily associated with African American English.” That is to say, these patterns reflect the distribution of the black population in the US. Often, the study finds, the percentage of a county that is black appears to be more important than just the number of people living there in fueling linguistic creativity. In Georgia and North Carolina, for example, linguistically innovative areas “are not necessarily more populous but do generally contain higher percentages of African Americans.” This, they conclude, shows “the inordinate influence of African American English on Twitter.”

Many of the Black Twitter terms identified in the study will be familiar to any frequent Twitter user. Among the ones most associated with the Deep South region are famo (family and friends), fleek (on point), and baeless (single). But the fastest-emerging terms come from other places and cultures, too. Waifu, for example, a Japanese borrowing of the English word “wife,” is associated with the West Coast and anime."
blacktwitter  language  english  communication  invention  culture  2018  2013  nikhilsonnad  jackgrieve  linguistics  deepsouth  sandiego  portland  oregon  seattle  lasvegas  phoenix  westcoast  losangeles  sanfrancisco  california  atlanta  nyc  washingtondc  nola  neworleans  chicago 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Los Rakas
"The Grammy nominated group, Los Rakas was born in the youth centers of Oakland, CA in 2006.  This duo are of Panamanian descent and raised in both cultures.  They are the future of world music and have trendsetted their way into mainstream, touring nationwide and internationally.  Performing in both English and Spanish, their specialty is that they teach Spanish through their music- no more Rosetta Stone is needed!!  Los Rakas are known for rocking any party - from youth events to world wide festivals, they hype the crowd and get the party all the way live!   What is a Raka?  a person who is proud of who they are.   The Rakas are making sure that the voice of the pueblo is heard, their unique sound bridges cultures from all over the world.  Listen to them here, listen to them on the news, on the radio, the television, in movies, hear them in your favorite video game, read about them in the paper or online - AND be sure to catch them at a live show...  Raka Party..."

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHsncI2j2fk ]
losrakas  portland  bayarea  music  panamá 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Alder College – A Liberal Arts College in Portland, Oregon
[via: https://twitter.com/isomorphisms/status/933166282798784512
via: https://twitter.com/WDeresiewicz/status/785623854626385920 ]

"Alder is a new kind of college built on relationships, bringing the best of the liberal arts to a richly inclusive student body in the heart of Portland.

The health of our communities depends on dynamic thinkers who can approach complex systems with curiosity, creativity and nuance. In order to create a more equitable and inclusive future, we will also need leaders drawn from a wide range of backgrounds. Alder will be a two year liberal arts college for students who will become these thought leaders.

STUDENT SUCCESS BUILT ON RELATIONSHIPS
Alder will focus on the crucial first two years of college, offering a rigorous yet supportive academic environment, where full-time faculty teach a richly inclusive and deeply diverse student body recruited from the talent we know is right here in Oregon.

KEEPING IT LOCAL
Recruitment will be local (Portland metro area), and focus on building relationships with high school staff and teachers to identify students who would benefit most from an Alder education.

STUDENT COHORTS
Students take courses with the same cohort throughout their two years, giving them the time to develop relationships with peers and professors and create a vibrant, tight-knit intellectual community.

FACULTY TEAMS
Students spend two years with a core group of faculty who are engaged in collaborative pedagogy.

INTEGRATED CURRICULUM
Based on the success of learning communities, the two-year curriculum is integrated to encourage coherent cross-subject learning. Faculty collaboratively develop syllabi and scaffold assignments to build skills across disciplines and quarters.

EQUITY, DIVERSITY, INCLUSION
Learning increases when students interact with classmates from different backgrounds. Society benefits when a more diverse group of students pursues liberal arts education. Alder College will prioritize admitting and retaining a diverse student body through its recruitment practices.

AFTER ALDER
Whether students decide their next step means attending a four-year college or university, entering the workforce, or pursuing an alternative program of study, Alder College will provide them with the skills and knowledge to make informed decisions.

OUR STUDENTS, OUR CITY
We know that the best way to serve both our students and our city is by cultivating thick networks that encourage exploration and ongoing dialogue. By creating teams of community members and supporters, we will begin these conversations that will continue long after the first students walk through our doors.

COMMUNITY & STUDENT OUTREACH
Through strong connections with local organizations and high schools, Alder will work with teachers and mentors to identify students who would benefit from Alder’s rigorous yet supportive academic environment.

ARTS & CULTURE
The liberal arts are thriving all over the Portland area in theaters and galleries, at concerts and at book readings. Alder will tap into this rich artistic tapestry and show students that this is only the beginning of their intellectual engagement with the world.

BUSINESS & INDUSTRY
Alder will create an open dialogue with local business leaders to understand their workforce needs, help our students make informed career choices, and create a network that connects students with potential employers.

RETHINKING GENERAL EDUCATION
Alder will act as a lab school, sharing best practices with other institutions that may want to integrate elements of our work into their programs.

LOWER COSTS
“How much does it cost to educate a student?” Alder will constantly ask how a new kind of school might answer that question.

SCALABLE & REPLICABLE
Alder is an incubator, developing practices that can be shared and modified to benefit students in a number of settings."
colleges  universities  alternative  srg  oregon  portland  liberalarts  relationships  education  highered  highereducation  progressive  deepspringscollege  local 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Where is Gentrification Happening in Your City? | Data-Smart City Solutions
"Gentrification—demographic and physical changes in neighborhoods that bring in wealthier residents, greater investment, and more development—has become a buzzword in urban planning. As traditionally low-income neighborhoods across the U.S. gentrify, social justice advocates have become increasingly concerned about displacement, the dislocation of low-income residents due to prohibitive prices. As a result, policymakers and urban planners have begun to consider strategies to combat the byproducts of gentrification in recently-developed or developing neighborhoods, such as providing low-cost amenities and rent controlled or low-income housing.

The first step in addressing gentrification is understanding where it has happened and where it is likely to happen in the future. A number of cities have found mapping to be a powerful tool for observing gentrification trends, allowing them to intervene before low-income residents are seriously affected. Cities have created maps using data mostly from public sources both to better understand historical trends in gentrification and displacement and predict the next areas where low-income residents are likely to lose their homes. While each model is unique, all display methodologies that are applicable across cities. For a factor by factor overview of models in seven U.S. cities, see

Los Angeles i-Team’s Indices of Neighborhood Change and Displacement Pressure

Urban Displacement Project Los Angeles Map of Neighborhood Change

Portland’s Susceptibility to Gentrification Model

Seattle Displacement Risk Analysis

Boston’s Displacement-Risk Map

Urban Displacement Project San Francisco Bay Area Displacement Risk Analysis

The Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development’s Displacement Alert Project Map
Limitations

Appendix: Comparison of Models"
gentrification  displacement  demographics  maps  mapping  losangeles  sanfrancisco  bayarea  seattle  portland  oregon  boston  housing  2017  chrisbousquet 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Outlet
"Part illustration, part workshop, part retail, part library, ALL FUN. Promise. "

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/outletpdx/ ]
portland  oregon  lcproject  openstudioproject  libraries  workshops  studios  katebingaman-burt 
february 2017 by robertogreco
King Middle School
"King Middle School serves the most racially, ethnically, and economically diverse neighborhoods in the state of Maine. More than 120 of King's approximately 500 students speak 28 languages and come from 17 countries.

King Middle School is dedicated to the idea that we can create a school where all kids succeed at a high level. Our school wide model is Expeditionary Learning. Our students engage in eight to twelve week experiential learning expeditions. These expeditions are in-depth and interdisciplinary in nature and require students to engage in sophisticated research, use the community in authentic ways, and represent their knowledge with high quality products which are presented to legitimate audiences.

Students at King Middle School have been using their Natural Resources Council of Maine (NRCM) Grant on a project called “It’s for the Birds.” In order to better understand their local ecosystems and the problem of shrinking bird habitats, they have been observing local bird species as well as creating a set of species cards for the Audubon Society. Check out their progress below in a report from 7th Grade Science Teacher Ruth Maclean. Congratulations on a fantastic start to your project!

In the fall of 2014 the National Audubon Society published a report in which they listed 314 birds across the country that are endangered by human activity. The Maine Audubon Society has identified 84 birds from that list that are residents in Maine for at least part of each year. This fall in our expedition titled, “It’s for the Birds,” seven students at King Middle School created species cards on these birds that will educate the public about these birds and their needs. They learned about the connections between these birds and native insects and native plants with the goal of identifying areas in Portland where native plants can be introduced to help improve habitat for both the birds and the insects that they depend upon. Here are two examples of finished species cards. We put drawings created in art class on side 1 with a poem created in language arts class. On side 2 each student put facts learned in science, math, and social studies about the bird’s ecosystem relationships and ways for humans to help the bird. A full set of the species cards has been sent to Maine Audubon for use in their nature centers. Each student also did an adobe slide presentation on their work during phase one of the project. Here is a link to a student summary slideshow of her fall investigation into the life and needs of the ovenbird: https://slate.adobe.com/cp/te6gl/. In phase 2 of our expedition this spring, students will add native plant species to their own backyards and teach Portland residents how to garden for habitat. We are looking forward to learning how to germinate and cultivate native seeds."

[via: https://twitter.com/steelemaley/status/799713232403300353 ]
portland  maine  education  schools  middleschools  expeditionarylearning  sfsh  experientiallearning  learning  curriculum  science  interdisciplinary  nature  via:steelemaley  ecosystem  birds  publishing 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Oregon Black History Timeline - Audio Commentary - YouTube
"This is a 50 slide timeline and audio commentary created by Walidah Imarisha for a program called "Why Aren't There More Black People in Oregon?: A Hidden History," which looks at the history of race, identity and power in Oregon and the larger nation. Oregon has a history not only of Black exclusion and discrimination, but also of a vibrant Black culture that helped sustain many communities throughout the state—a history that is not taught in schools. Oregon as a state was explicitly founded on the idea of creating a white nationalist utopia, and in that way is a useful case study to see the mentality that nationally shaped the institutions that govern our lives."
walidahimarisha  oregon  portland  history  race  racism 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Which Is Worse: Shooting a Drone, or Being Surveilled by a Redditor? | Motherboard
"A resident of Portland, Oregon who calls himself “Drone Man” has spent the last few weeks using a drone to surveil what he believes is an illegal, boat-based bicycle theft ring.

Earlier this week, Drone Man says a person on one of the boats finally lost his cool and began firing a gun at his drone, in a story that highlights many of the legal issues concerning hobby drones.

Oregon’s mooring laws make it legal to live on a boat floating in Portland’s Willamette River, which has given the city a population of transient boaters who often call themselves pirates.

Not everyone is a fan of these people, however. Drone Man has been posting videos of their settlements online to “document environmental destruction.”
drones  pirates  quadcopters  surveillance  2016  portland  oregon  reddit 
june 2016 by robertogreco
60 Minutes to Escape | An Escape the Room Game in Portland, Oregon
"PORTLAND'S IMMERSIVE ESCAPE THE ROOM GAME
Discover the clues, solve the mysteries, and escape the room before time runs out, in this exciting real-life adventure.

ONE OF OUR AGENTS IS MISSING.
You and your friends, colleagues and family must use your wits to find him and make your escape!"
games  portland  oregon 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Independent Publishing Resource Center | Independent Publishing Resource Center
"IPRC’S Mission & Vision

The IPRC’s Mission is to facilitate creative expression, identity and community by providing individual access to tools and resources for creating independently published media and artwork.

About

Since its inception in 1998 the center has been dedicated to encouraging the growth of a visual and literary publishing community by offering a space to gather and exchange information and ideas, as well as to produce work.

We’ve empowered thousands of people to create and publish their own artwork, writing, zines, books, websites, comics and graphic novels.

In our 18 years of operation, we’ve provided artistic services to upwards of 27,000 Oregonians through membership, use of the Center, workshops and outreach programs. By gathering such diverse people under one roof, the IPRC nourishes an expansive and productive community. In fact the IPRC is at the very heart of Portland’s vibrant do-it-yourself (DIY) artistic and literary communities is a creative home for many local artists, and an incubator for the independent creative spirit that makes Portland unique.

We’ve helped community members find their artistic voices, especially disenfranchised youth (including GLBT, minority, at-risk, and homeless youth) whose lifestyles and experiences tend to be marginalized in the major media.

We’ve helped countless individuals to discover themselves through art, and to reach and inspire others in the community by publishing and sharing their work. We’re always looking for volunteers to help our outreach programs."

[via: http://theokbb.tumblr.com/post/136224475227/one-of-the-first-places-that-i-visited-when-i ]
portland  oregon  diy  books  publishing  zines  lcproject  openstudioproject  art  printing  iprc 
december 2015 by robertogreco
When It Comes to Tech Dystopia, Portlandia Is Better Than Black Mirror
"UK series Black Mirror is being lauded as the first show that really tells the truth about our dystopian tech destiny. But the best critique of technology in today's culture is not this science fiction import. For the most scathing commentary on the high-tech world we've designed for ourselves, you have to watch Portlandia.

The series' fifth season finished airing last week on IFC (full episodes are on YouTube), and I went down a P-hole, rewatching every episode all the way back to 2011. I expected to find some greater takeaway about artisanal culture or the evolution of urbanism. Or, like, raw food restaurant trends.

I was stunned when I realized that the series' greatest strength comes from its disturbingly on-point takedowns of technology, each delivered like a crisp smack of an iPad to the back of our Instagram-addled heads. So many anti-technology diatribes miss the mark because their authors are clearly late-adopting haters. But it's obvious that Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein are tech fans at heart.

It's easy to lose sight of the show's intelligent vision when 85 percent of the chatter about it revolves around the chirpy chorus "Put a bird on it." And yes, this not-so-alternate universe inhabited by bike messengers and coffee baristas focuses heavily on the handcrafted rejection of contemporary mainstream culture. Except that's also why the tech-focused sketches are so skewering: Even though the characters pride themselves on their pickling prowess and sustainable jewelry-making, they still can't bear to delete their Facebook accounts.

[video]

In fact, it's one particularly good sketch about leaving Facebook which launched my theory that Portlandia tackles these issues better than anyone else. In order to remove herself from the internet, Carrie goes to what looks like a bank branch to declare social media bankruptcy. When she goes to see Fred at a bar, he doesn't recognize her without an avatar to validate her existence. At the end, she is placed in a room with the handful of other people without online presences. It's hilarious, but it also confronts our deepest fears about being forgotten when we don't file a status update.

Each tech sketch serves as a kind of worst-case scenario for all the products and services that touch our lives. The owners of a feminist bookstore attempt to confront a negative Yelp reviewer in real life. A sharing economy startup implodes spectacularly. Patton Oswalt plays a man who becomes famous for his witty Evite responses. The city buys a 3D printer, as if this might be the answer to all civic problems—"Portland is finally a world-class city!"

[video]

But it's really the characters' relationships with television that highlight our most bizarre and hypocritical behavior with technology. "I don't have a TV" is the smug refrain uttered by more than one character, but binge-watching shows is a running theme. In season 2, characters played by Armisen and Brownstein alienate friends and lose jobs while watching all the episodes of Battlestar Galactica. Their lives fall apart in the quest for one more episode. Yet, you know, we don't watch TV.

Another sketch, "Spoiler Alert" is maybe one of the smartest pieces of TV-related satire in history, as four characters at a dinner party talk about how much they hate spoilers — and manage to reveal all the spoilers in the most talked-about shows.

[video]

Looking back at some of the older episodes, it's almost depressing how much Portlandia's plots have mirrored real life. In an attempt to avoid the questionable labor practices of foreign-made fashion, two characters hire local seamstresses to make their clothes by hand in their home, and in turn, end up transforming their own basement into a sweatshop. It's disarmingly poignant for a sketch comedy show—I found myself thinking for days about claims that Etsy sellers are essentially doing the same thing.

Like the way The Daily Show claims to cover fake news but really provides a maddeningly accurate evisceration of journalistic practices, Portlandia is purportedly about hipsters (I got almost all the way through the story without using that word) but it's really shining a light on the perplexing dilemmas that we all face when we choose to buy into the latest hype. Who hasn't had some version of this dramatic flashback montage like Carrie does when she drops her iPhone? It's all way too close to home.

[video]

And besides, isn't sketch comedy the most palatable way to examine the stranglehold these concepts have on our lives? You could watch a show like Black Mirror to fret about the way technology will ruin civilization in the future, or you could watch Portlandia to think about the way it's ruining us today—and laugh your ass off while you're at it."
alissawalker  portlandia  blackmirror  technology  dystopia  2015  humor  facebook  religion  media  attention  smartphones  socialmedia  3dprinting  portland  oregon 
march 2015 by robertogreco
A New Index to Measure Sprawl Gives High Marks to Los Angeles - CityLab
“L.A. is the least sprawling metro area in the country, according to this analysis, besting New York and San Francisco.”
losangeles  cities  urbanism  sprawl  sanfrancisco  nyc  2015  richardflorida  california  sandiego  honolulu  sanjose  santabarbara  seattle  portland  oregon 
february 2015 by robertogreco
DASH of PDX
"Your fully equipped commercial kitchen for hire

Dash is 550 sq ft commercial kitchen available for hire on an hourly or monthly basis. Our commissary style kitchen allows food creative's, bakers, chefs, butchers, cart owners, or anyone involved in a food start-up, to prep their wares in a well appointed new kitchen. Dash is also available for cooking classes, recipe development, pop-up and tasting events, or private dinner parties.

We are conveniently located at 5124 NE 42nd Ave Portland, OR 97218
and our second location at The Colony, 7525 N Richmond Ave Saint Johns, OR 97203
For rates, inquiries and an on-site tour please email: info@dashofpdx.com."
portland  oregon  openstudioproject  lcproject  kitchens  rentals  cooking 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Modest Mouse - Coyotes - YouTube
"Inspired by the true story of a coyote that rode Portland's MAX light rail train in 2002."
animals  coyotes  portland  oregon  2002  2015  music  modestmouse  publictransit 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Portlander on Vimeo
"Portlander is a site-specific publication produced from a one-month residency in a public library on the Isle of Portland, England in June 2014. The 64-page print-on-demand newspaper contains photography, oral histories, text fragments, found material and other ephemera collected during chance encounters and connections with various members of the Portland communities. 3,000 copies of Portlander were printed and distributed throughout Portland for the b-side arts festival in September 2014. Funded by Arts Council England."

[See also: http://soulellis.com/2014/08/the-last-day-of-august/
http://soulellis.com/2014/06/on-portland/ ]
paulsoulellis  artbooks  books  publication  newspapers  photography  place  2014  portlander  portland  england  print  projectideas  classideas  srg  artistsbooks 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Matt Hern: Vancouver: Spaces of Exclusion and Contestation - YouTube
"Matt Hern's presentation in Session 1, "Spaces of Exclusion and Contestation," in the symposium, "Planning the Vancouver Metropolitan Region: A Critical Perspective," presented by the UBC School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP), April 15-16, 2014."
matthern  urban  urbanism  2014  portland  oregon  vancouver  britishcolumbia  gentrification  exclusion  contestation  cities  communitygardens  bikelanes  displacement  communities  communityorganizing  purplethistle  groundswell  housing  capitalism  latecapitalism  predatorycapitalism  inequality  politics  policy  colonialism  dispossession  colonization  commons  occupation  density  urbanplanning  planning  solidarity  development  arrogance  difference  hospitality  generosity  friendship  activism 
september 2014 by robertogreco
#captureParklandia: A Dive into Social Media & Place-Based Digital Engagement | Art Museum Teaching
"#captureParklandia is the Portland Art Museum’s most recent dive into a large-scale social media project. Created in tandem with the special exhibition The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Gardens, Portland Parks and Recreation, and the Portland Parks Foundation, #captureParklandia is both an online and in-gallery experience. #captureParklandia’s pie-in-the-sky goal is to get Portlanders to play with the museum and connect in new ways.  Through this playful interaction, Portlanders will begin to think of PAM as their museum, not just a museum."

[See also: "Have museums always been “authoritative?”"
http://kovenjsmith.com/archives/1426

and "Parklandia: Stretching, Striving To What End?"
http://www.artsjournal.com/realcleararts/2014/07/parklandia-stretching-striving-to-what-end.html ]

[via: https://plus.google.com/u/0/112045150389781152468/posts/RJXhYxZshbK ]
portland  oregon  art  education  arteducation  museums  mikemurawski  krisinbayans  socialmedia  participatory  parklandia  captureparklandia  parks  engagement  audienceparticipation  2014  judithdobrzynski  instagram  hashtags  curation 
july 2014 by robertogreco
You Are Here
"You Are Here is a study of place.

Every day for the next year, we will make a map of a city in which we have lived.

Each of these maps will be an aggregation of thousands of microstories, tracing the narratives of our collective experience. We will make maps of the little things that make up life — from the trees we hug, to the places where we crashed our bikes, to the benches where we fell in love.

Over time, we will grow this to 100 different maps of 100 different cities, creating an atlas of human experience.

We hope that by showing these stories, we empower people to make their city — and therefore the world — a more beautiful place.

You Are Here is a project of the Social Computing Group at the MIT Media Lab."
place  microstories  maps  mapping  narrative  storytelling  humans  experience  classideas  us  losangeles  sanfrancisco  portland  oregon  boston  youarehere 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Thin Places, Where We Are Jolted Out of Old Ways of Seeing the World - NYTimes.com
"TRAVEL, like life, is best understood backward but must be experienced forward, to paraphrase Kierkegaard. After decades of wandering, only now does a pattern emerge. I’m drawn to places that beguile and inspire, sedate and stir, places where, for a few blissful moments I loosen my death grip on life, and can breathe again. It turns out these destinations have a name: thin places.

It is, admittedly, an odd term. One could be forgiven for thinking that thin places describe skinny nations (see Chile) or perhaps cities populated by thin people (see Los Angeles). No, thin places are much deeper than that. They are locales where the distance between heaven and earth collapses and we’re able to catch glimpses of the divine, or the transcendent or, as I like to think of it, the Infinite Whatever.

Travel to thin places does not necessarily lead to anything as grandiose as a “spiritual breakthrough,” whatever that means, but it does disorient. It confuses. We lose our bearings, and find new ones. Or not. Either way, we are jolted out of old ways of seeing the world, and therein lies the transformative magic of travel.

It’s not clear who first uttered the term “thin places,” but they almost certainly spoke with an Irish brogue. The ancient pagan Celts, and later, Christians, used the term to describe mesmerizing places like the wind-swept isle of Iona (now part of Scotland) or the rocky peaks of Croagh Patrick. Heaven and earth, the Celtic saying goes, are only three feet apart, but in thin places that distance is even shorter.

So what exactly makes a place thin? It’s easier to say what a thin place is not. A thin place is not necessarily a tranquil place, or a fun one, or even a beautiful one, though it may be all of those things too. Disney World is not a thin place. Nor is Cancún. Thin places relax us, yes, but they also transform us — or, more accurately, unmask us. In thin places, we become our more essential selves."



"Mircea Eliade, the religious scholar, would understand what I experienced in that Tokyo bar. Writing in his classic work “The Sacred and the Profane,” he observed that “some parts of space are qualitatively different from others.” An Apache proverb takes that idea a step further: “Wisdom sits in places.”

The question, of course, is which places? And how do we get there? You don’t plan a trip to a thin place; you stumble upon one. But there are steps you can take to increase the odds of an encounter with thinness. For starters, have no expectations. Nothing gets in the way of a genuine experience more than expectations, which explains why so many “spiritual journeys” disappoint. And don’t count on guidebooks — or even friends — to pinpoint your thin places. To some extent, thinness, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. Or, to put it another way: One person’s thin place is another’s thick one."



"Many thin places are wild, untamed, but cities can also be surprisingly thin. The world’s first urban centers, in Mesopotamia, were erected not as places of commerce or empire but, rather, so inhabitants could consort with the gods. What better place to marvel at the glory of God and his handiwork (via his subcontractors: us) than on the Bund in Shanghai, with the Jetsons-like skyscrapers towering above, or at Montmartre in Paris, with the city’s Gothic glory revealed below.

Bookstores are thin places, too, and, for me, none is thinner than Powell’s in Portland, Ore. Sure, there are grander bookstores, and older ones, but none quite possesses Powell’s mix of order and serendipity, especially in its used-book collection — Chekhov happily cohabitating with “Personal Finance for Dummies,” Balzac snuggling with Grisham.

Yet, ultimately, an inherent contradiction trips up any spiritual walkabout: The divine supposedly transcends time and space, yet we seek it in very specific places and at very specific times. If God (however defined) is everywhere and “everywhen,” as the Australian aboriginals put it so wonderfully, then why are some places thin and others not? Why isn’t the whole world thin?

Maybe it is but we’re too thick to recognize it. Maybe thin places offer glimpses not of heaven but of earth as it really is, unencumbered. Unmasked."

[See also (via litherland) http://jarrettfuller.tumblr.com/post/62312770603/making-thin-places-and-in-between-spaces ]
thinplaces  buddhism  spirituality  travel  2012  ericweiner  place  cathedrals  churches  nature  newdelhi  jerusalem  rumi  turkey  nepal  boudhanath  katmandu  shanghai  paris  montmartre  powell's  portland  oregon  bookstores  divine  god  nyc  istanbul  kongkong  airports  tokyo  japan 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Oregon College of Art and Craft
"Oregon College of Art and Craft (OCAC), a principal center for education, dialogue, and the mastery of contemporary Craft, is dedicated to excellence in teaching art through Craft. Founded in 1907 by Julia Hoffman as the Arts and Crafts Society to educate the public on the value of art and craft in daily life, OCAC today is committed to studio practice as making with materials in a sophisticated conceptual framework.

OCAC is a private, independent, non-profit college offering the Master of Fine Arts degree, the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, and two certificate programs in Craft, as well as continuing education for adults and classes and workshops for youth. An integral part of the Portland ethos of the hand-made and sustainable, the OCAC campus, nestled in the West Hills, features the new LEED Silver Jean Vollum Drawing, Painting and Photography and Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson Thesis Buildings as the result of a $14.7 million dollar capital and endowment campaign. For more than three decades, OCAC has attracted nationally and internationally recognized artists, makers and thinkers to Portland through the robust and diverse Artists-in–Residence program, annual lecture series, and Hoffman Gallery exhibitions."
oregon  portland  art  education  residencies  glvo  ocac  craft  crafts  arts 
august 2013 by robertogreco
East Of 82nd: A Closer Look At East Portland » News » OPB
"According to the U.S. Census, East Portland is the fastest growing part of the city. Many of the area’s youngest residents live there. Only a quarter of  the population lives in East Portland, but it’s home to 40 percent of the city’s children.

OPB’s radio series looks at the resources available for kids in East Portland. In our series, we take broader look at this community by highlighting the voices, places, and people who live East of 82nd Avenue. Read through many of the responses that came to us via OPB’s Public Insight Network, or share your own story on our tumblr page."
portland  eastportland  demographics  neighborhoods  poverty  inequality  oregon  opb 
june 2013 by robertogreco
The Guild
"In the beginning it was a welder, a wood buringin stove and fifteen hundred bucks.

FRANKLY, WE COULDN'T EVEN AFFORD A PROPER COMPUTER OR SAW. We picked up the phone and called everyone we knew and told them we could make stuff.

Some stuff turned into more stuff. More stuff turned into our first employee. Our first employee got a graphic novel book deal and left us which led us to our second employee. Don't worry Sarah, we still love you a ton and own all your books!

From there we have grown bit by painstaking bit. We work through the nights and ask the people who love us to understand that it won't always be like this. There are days we don't get to go home for days. We take comfort in a cup of strong coffee with a splash of pride in a job well done.

Our generous and creative clients give us opportunities to prove ourselves. They continue to believe in our good thoughts and hard work, and we continue to think well and work hard for them.

Today the Guild is a broad collection of artists, designers, architects, project managers, developers, carpenters and painters. We come together to lend our talents to making dynamic environments and unique experiences.

There are changes we would make if we had to do it again. The learning curve is sharp at times and the growing pains hurt like hell. In spite of proverbial skinned knees, we absolutely love what we do and are glad that it shows. "
design  theguild  losangeles  brooklyn  miami  making  environmentaldesign  projectmanagement  architecture  art  construction  portland  oregon 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Art Museum Teaching | A Forum for Reflecting on Practice
"ArtMuseumTeaching.com is a collaborative forum for reflecting on practice in the field of art museum education. It is the goal of this site to connect educators, ideas, and resources around a dialogue about what we do in our practice of teaching. For those who visit this site, I invite you to post your comments and reflections — and if you have content you would like to submit from your own practice or perspective, please contact me via Twitter @murawski27 (I’m constantly searching for guest writers and collaborators)."
museums  education  teaching  art  artmuseums  arteducation  learning  glvo  mikemurawski  susecairns  jessicabaldenhofer  julinechevalier  felicecleveland  jenndeprizio  lauradisciullo  allifeigen  jessicadelagarza  carloinegoeser  chrsitinehealey  chelseaemeliekelly  danacarlislekletchka  shannonmurphy  jenoleniczak  seanolsen  brileyrasmussen  rachelropeik  lindsaysmilow  gregstuart  katesitlive  nyc  portland  oregon  resources  practice  openstudioproject 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Publication Studio
"We print and bind books on demand, creating original work with artists and writers we admire. We use any means possible to help writers and artists reach a public: physical books; a digital commons (where anyone can read and annotate our books for free); eBooks; and unique social events with our writers and artists in many cities. We attend to the social life of the book. Publication Studio is a laboratory for publication in its fullest sense—not just the production of books, but the production of a public. This public, which is more than a market, is created through physical production, digital circulation, and social gathering. Together these construct a space of conversation, a public space, which beckons a public into being.

Currently there are eight Publication Studios, in Portland (run by Patricia No and Antonia Pinter), the San Francisco Bay Area, CA (run by Ian Dolton-Thornton, with sage advice from Colter Jacobsen), Vancouver, BC, Canada (run by Keith Higgins and Kathy Slade), Toronto, Ontario, Canada (run by Derek McCormack, Alana Wilcox, and Michael Maranda), Boston (run by Sam Gould), Portland, Maine (run by Daniel Fuller and the Institute for Contemporary Art), Philadelphia (run by Robert Blackson and the Tyler School of Art), Los Angeles (run by Sergio Pastor, Matthew Schum, and Lizzie Fitch), and Malmö, Sweden, run by Ola Stahl. To contact one of the Publication Studios, click on its name on the home-page of this site."
art  artists  books  diy  publishing  portland  oregon  bayarea  sanfrancisco  vancouver  britishcolumbia  toronto  boston  maine  philadelphia  losangeles  publicationstudios  selfpublishing  ebooks  publication  self-publishing  publishers  bc 
february 2013 by robertogreco
The Basement | cabel.me
"Somewhere in Portland, there’s a very old building, and that very old building has a very, very old basement. An incredible basement, a video-game-level basement, a set-decorator’s dream basement.

And when you walk past the janitors office, with the wonderfully decked halls…

And tromp down a sunken hallway…

You find a old room. Mostly empty, dusty, and dead quiet.

And then you start to look closer at the walls.

And you start to see things. …"
2012  history  layering  layers  photography  cabelsasser  oregon  portland 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Mapping the World's Most Seductive Shrines to Coffee - Claire Cottrell - The Atlantic
"We've rounded up some of the most beautiful purveyors of coffee around the world in virtual guide form, meaning not only have we included the eye candy you know and love, but we've also added addresses and handy links to Google Maps."

[Little Nap Coffee Stand - Tokyo, Japan]
2012  toronto  switzerland  basel  porto  portugal  silverlake  hungary  busapest  brooklyn  bluebottlecoffee  sanfrancisco  oregon  portland  tokyo  sweden  denmark  telaviv  paris  poland  nyc  losangeles  us  japan  architecture  design  intreriors  openstudioproject  glvo  srg  coffee  cafes 
october 2012 by robertogreco
The dream of the internet is alive in Portland: inside the XOXO Festival | The Verge
"Should XOXO happen yearly, or never again? Should current attendees have first dibs on future festivals, or be discouraged from returning to make room for new people and ideas? My friend Leonard Lin imagined an OLPC model, where those who can afford to attend help pay the way for new makers, to ensure that the next Julia Nunes or Super Meat Boy can have a better chance to blossom. I might like to see more hands-on activities, more attendee diversity, and more Q&A sessions. These are standard questions for exciting new events: How do you keep the energy going? How do you reach more people?

SUMMER CAMP ISN'T SUPPOSED TO SCALE

But maybe the usual questions miss the point of XOXO. You go to summer camp to see old friends, to make new ones, and —if you're in Portland — to eat locally sourced, organic s'mores. Summer camp isn't supposed to scale, and you don't always come away with merit badges or a clear plan of action. But you re-energize the best part of yourself. You share ideas, stay up late, find a new crush, eat pizza or poutine, and laugh. You depart PDX inspired, with a head full of ideas, a belly full of tacos, and a heart full of Twitter handles.

XOXO wasn't really a conference. It was a face-to-face reminder of what's possible, a Sex Pistols gig of legend for modern creative geeks. That's the internet we should all live in."
summercamp  doers  makers  internet  oregon  portland  glvo  openstudioproject  events  conferenceideas  conferences  lcproject  andybaio  2012  xoxo 
september 2012 by robertogreco
PDX671
"Taking its name from Portland’s airport code and the island of Guam’s area code, PDX671 is a food cart that fuses seasonal ingredients of the Pacific Northwest with the flavors and cooking techniques of Guam.

Our mission is to provide an outlet for enjoying Guamanian cuisine and hospitality, while supporting environmental respect, promoting local food sources and showing appreciation for our customers and community."

[via: http://kottke.org/12/09/some-thoughts-about-xoxo ]
oregon  guam  portland  foodcarts  restaurants  food 
september 2012 by robertogreco
XOXO Festival by Andy Baio » XOXO: The Food Carts — Kickstarter
"For a festival about independent art and technology, food carts are the culinary equivalent. The barrier to entry and costs are low, letting you experiment with new ideas and build a following without falling into deep debt. And several carts in the last year — like Lardo, Salt & Straw, and Nong’s Khao Man Gai — have leveraged their fan base to open brick-and-mortar restaurants.

About 75% of XOXO attendees are coming from out of town, many for the first time, so we wanted to do something special. So we’re closing down the street in front of XOXO on Friday through Sunday to build our own pod, with our favorite carts around the city. Three of them are even leaving their own pods, towing themselves out to settle in for all three days!  Here's the full lineup:"
2012  foodcarts  oregon  portland  food 
september 2012 by robertogreco
To the Teens | Justin The Librarian
"In your teens and twenties, a lot of people will look at you and your ideas and think they’re a bit bizarre and out there.  However, when you get into your late twenties/thirties something interesting happens…now that you’re older, people start to understand that you’ve had the experiences and matured enough that what you’re doing must be legit.  It’s kind of awesome.  Remember how I helped bring video games into the library for people to play and borrow?  When I talked about how libraries should be doing that when I was younger, people thought I was crazy.  When I got older and did it people thought it was a really great move.  Being 28 years old and having gone through years of video gaming helped me get to do that “crazy thing.”  So, yes, your bones may hurt a bit more (it happens) but you get to do a lot of cool shit when you’re older."
growingup  videogames  gaming  games  families  ideas  change  maturation  2012  adolescents  teens  youth  portland  maine  librarians  libraries  justinhoenke  aging  advice 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Curious Terrain | Explorer's Deck
"This deck of cards is your companion for exploring all kinds of places — streets, gardens, trails, parks, plazas, buildings, even entire neighborhoods. Use these cards as a creative catalyst and as a tool for sharpening your appreciation of the world around you.

Discover cards draw your attention to the unique elements and qualities that define a place. Record cards inspire you to try a wide range of techniques for capturing and sharing a place. Wild cards provoke thought about how issues of time and perspective affect your experience of a place.

Develop a more insightful eye for new places, and gain fresh perspectives on familiar places. Go somewhere and open the box."
oregon  portland  curiousterrain  noticing  discovery  situationist  gifts  cards  exploration 
august 2012 by robertogreco
ShareBrained Technology | Electronics for Curious Brains
"Hi, I’m Jared. I have a little company called ShareBrained Technology. It’s just me right now, designing timekeeping, radio, and music hardware and software I think is cool. I subscribe to the open-source hardware philosophy — if you buy a product, you should be able to modify it in whatever way you imagine. Encouraging hacking of hardware and software is the best way I can think of to promote the advancement of useful technology.

Have a look around the Web site — at my blog, or at my products, and let me know what you think via e-mail, Facebook, or Google+. If you live in Portland, Oregon, catch me at a Dorkbot PDX meeting."
music  radios  sharebrained  hacking  portland  oregon  jaredboone  make  microcontroller  kits  steampunk  timepieces  clocks  diy  hardware  electronics 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Portland is where young people go to retire? Economic renaissance in Portland - Slate Magazine
"So what went right? To an extent, Portland’s benefited from the fact that some of its local enthusiasms—bicycles, food trucks, microbrews, artisanal whatnot—have become more popular nationally, giving a boost to some growing local companies. The Portland area has also benefited from the region’s green proclivities. Renewable energy has been a growth industry nationwide, and Portland is home to the North American base of Germany’s SolarWorld and Denmark’s Vestas, one of the world’s largest wind-turbine manufacturers."
portland  economics  via:lukeneff  oregon  jobs  employment  2012  booms  busts  education 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Courier Coffee Roasters
"Our bar is arguably a lot of work. We bake scratch on bar, make ice cubes, offer any one we think is thirsty a mason jar of water (even if they are getting coffee to go), melt chocolate for drinks, make vanilla syrup, handwrite menus and business cards, and painstakingly make every cup of drip individually (while pre-rinsing to go cups, and getting cream and sugar for everyone (instead of leaving it out). And we handwash all dishware, while actively keeping track of our record player. Working bar is a dance. Enter Niko, our newest member, who came along with good words from former Little Red Bike Cafe worker.

With a flat of strawberries we ride Farmers Market to bar. With fifty burlap coffee bags we stack high on our porteur racks and deliver to friends for their projects. Hundreds of pounds we are moving in a day by bicycle. Pouring rain keeps us wet and tired, yet still everything is pretty awesome."

[Also: http://couriercoffeeroasters.com/ http://couriercoffeeroasters/wordpress ]
howwework  2012  couriercoffeeroasters  oregon  portland  coffee  handmade  glvo  srg  cafes  openstudioproject 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Dill Pickle Club | Portland, Oregon
"The Dill Pickle Club is a 501(c)3 nonprofit that organizes educational projects that help us understand the place in which we live. Through tours, public programs and publications, we create nontraditional and interactive learning environments where all forms of knowledge are valued and made readily accessible. Founded in 2009, we are a volunteer-driven organization, with a shared belief in the vitality of community education and democracy."
democracy  education  community  future  history  nonprofit  oregon  portland  nonprofits 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The 'Interesting' Conferences
"The Interesting Conferences started with this post in March 2007. I'd been inspired by TED but wanted to do something cheaper, closer to home and less, well, zealous. So, I booked the Conway Hall, asked some people to speak and hoped people would want to come. It seemed to go well.

We did it again in 2008 and 2009 but had a break in 2010. (We had PaperCamp 2 instead). Fortunately in that year the Boring folk started up, giving the world's journalists the chance to say that Interesting had been cancelled due to lack of interest. We did another one in 2011 - with a slightly different format.

We also managed to inspire other, similar, events around the world. I can't take much credit for those, they did them all themselves.

I'm not quite sure what to do next. Last summer we organised Laptops and Looms which was smaller, longer and in Derbyshire but had a similar feel. Maybe Interesting will morph into something like that.

Or maybe it's over. That'd be fine too."
london  nyc  vancouver  oregon  portland  papercamp  laptopsandlooms  2011  2010  2009  2008  conferences  events  russelldavies  interesting 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Fall of the Creative Class
"“Life is totally clear cut. It’s exactly what the research is. All the research says go live with your friends and fam­ily. Oth­er­wise, you have to look at why you’re not doing that. If you want to look at a city that’s best for your career, it’s New York, San Fran­cisco or Lon­don. If you’re not look­ing for your career, it doesn’t really mat­ter. There’s no dif­fer­ence. It’s split­ting hairs. The whole con­ver­sa­tion about where to live is bullshit.”"

"“Even as an arts advo­cate,” said Mel Gray, “I want to do it for the right rea­sons.” The right rea­son, we can now say, is that these things are good in them­selves. They have intrin­sic value. They make the place we live more inter­est­ing, live­lier, health­ier and more humane. They make it better.

They do not make it more profitable."

>>>> "I know you could go down it for­ever and never quite arrive. And I know now that it may be wiser to try to cre­ate the place you want to live, rather than to keep try­ing to find it."
community  families  creativity  arts  economics  sociology  pseudoscience  oregon  portland  madison  society  grassisgreener  place  cities  living  life  2012  richardflorida  creativeclass 
june 2012 by robertogreco
XOXO Festival by Andy Baio — Kickstarter
"Hey Kickstarter! We're organizing XOXO, an arts and technology festival in Portland, Oregon this September 13-16th.

XOXO is a celebration of disruptive creativity. We want to take all the independent artists using the Internet to make a living doing what they love — the makers, craftspeople, musicians, filmmakers, comic book artists, game designers, hardware hackers — and bring them together with the technologists building the platforms that make it possible. If you have an audience and a good idea, nothing’s standing in your way.

XOXO is in three parts:

Conference (Saturday – Sunday). Talks from artists and creative technologists around the country that are breaking new ground.
Market (Saturday – Sunday). A large marketplace with a tightly-curated list of the best of Portland's arts and tech scenes, sharing and selling their work, with food supplied by the best of our thriving food cart scene…"
via:caseygollan  togo  oregon  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crosspollination  crossdisciplinary  technology  arts  collaboration  hackerspaces  hackers  hardware  design  2012  events  andybaio  kickstarter  disruption  disruptive  conferences  portland  xoxo 
may 2012 by robertogreco
YALE UNION (YU)
"YALE UNION (YU) is a center for contemporary art in Southeast Portland, Oregon. It is led by a desire to support emerging and under-acknowledged contemporary artists, propose new modes of production, and stimulate the ongoing public discourse around art."

"A center for contemporary art in South East Portland. It is led by a desire to support emerging and under-acknowledged contemporary artists, propose new modes of production, and stimulate the ongoing public discourse around art.

We are a small organization in a large building. At this point in our development stage, it would be disingenuous to say that our building, a handsome brick block, isn’t as much an albatross as it is an instrument. While still in renovation (see PLAN section) Yale Union will demonstrate that a contemporary art center does not need to be architecturally complete to foster culture."
lcproject  glvo  oregon  design  art  portland 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Abra Ancliffe
"Abra Ancliffe is an artist working primarily in printmaking & drawing, and is based in Portland, Oregon. She is interested in how language and architecture intersect, the beauty in gaps & voids and translations of translations. She received her MFA in printmaking from Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia and her BFA in printmaking from the Pacific Northwest College of Art. Abra teaches in the BFA and Continuing Education programs at PNCA."
glvo  architecture  language  pnca  libraries  printmaking  iceland  translation  translations  oregon  portland  artists  art  abraancliffe 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Personal Libraries Library
"The Personal Libraries Library is a specially-curated lending library located in Portland, Oregon. The Library is dedicated to recreating the personal libraries of artists, philosophers, scientists, writers and other thinkers & makers. The collection has commenced with the personal libraries of Maria Mitchell, the 19th-century astronomer, librarian, educator and suffragist and Robert Smithson (1938-1973), the influential artist, writer and thinker. Recent additions to the Library are the personal libraries of Italo Calvino & Jorge Luis Borges. Subsequent personal libraries of interest to collect belong to: Buckminster Fuller, Hannah Arendt, Lady Bird Johnson and Yoko Ono.

Members can check out books for an initial three-week period, with additional renewals possible. The Library resides in NE Portland, and has Reading Room Hours monthly. Please see Membership and Reading Room information below."
presonallibrarieslibrary  personallibraries  books  writers  lcproject  literature  philosophy  philosophers  yokoono  ladybirdjohnson  abraancliffe  mariamitchell  robertsmithson  italocalvino  borges  buckminsterfuller  hannaharendt  science  art  oregon  portland  library  libraries 
may 2012 by robertogreco
GPS presentation pre-intro
"Hi! Here you will find slides from a short presentation on GPS tracks that I gave at Portland’s sixth dataviz meetup, 19 October 2011. They may be a bit hard to understand as-is – to emphasize internal patterns and relationships, I deliberately left out things like basemaps and axis labels. You might want to try following along with this video of excerpts from the talk, in which I attempt to break the world’s record for saying “like”. I want to make a more complete, coherent, and rigorous showcase of this data and the ways I like to work with it, but sadly I’m embedded in a manifold where time is at a high premium."

[Video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiXJRqm6BSc ]
geodata  data  2011  dataviz  walking  oregon  portland  quantifiedself  mapping  maps  gps  charlieloyd 
march 2012 by robertogreco
Newspace Center for Photography
"Newspace Center for Photography is an educational and cultural nonprofit that is dedicated to promoting photographic education and appreciation to the public as well as providing a space and building a community where photo enthusiasts can learn, create, discuss and show their work."
via:charlieloyd  oregon  galleries  education  art  portland  photography 
march 2012 by robertogreco
portland: projections
"For two months in a basement, I lived in Portland. With me, I had my camera, a slide projector, and hundreds of found transparencies of people and homes, decades old, and blue with age. I spent my days in darkness illuminated by children and families, interiors and landscapes, events and narratives (patterns and densities) automatically processed, cast out and lined across the cracks and textures of foundational walls. Daydreaming, repeatedly, in passing, these photographic remnants — summer vacations, birthday parties, holiday dinners, reunions — I sensed my memory shift upward, flatten out and onto my eyes. Like this, I watched, in time, my camera, recollect everything."
recollection  oregon  portland  memory  jamesluckett  dreaming  seeing  photography 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Village Home Educational Resource Center
"The Village Home community learning environment is best suited for self-directed, intrinsically motivated, lifelong learners who actively participate in their educational plans with their families. All learners are welcome at Village Home regardless of race, age, religion, creed, gender, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disabilities, or education philosophy. Village Home is currently located on church property, but is an independent, secular organization."
homeschool  education  portland  beaverton  oregon  lcproject  freeschools 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Know Your City: Portland's Social History App by dill pickle club — Kickstarter
"Know Your City will be a free phone app and Website providing a tour of downtown Portland's cultural heritage. The program utilizes mapping and smart phone technology to create greater awareness of Portland's history, culture and diversity through video, audio, photos and text. The project aims to provide a holistic view of how neighborhoods change over time to deepen our understanding of place."
portland  oregon  history  socialhistory  ios  applications  katebingamanburt  dillpickleclub  open  2011 
november 2011 by robertogreco
PICA | ArtPlace
"Building on years of popular success with its itinerant programming, Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA) is developing infrastructure that will allow it to relocate on a frequent basis, so it can play a role as a civic collaborator in ways that fixed institutions cannot. PICA’s lightweight solutions will spark revitalization in a series of neighborhoods, while demonstrating an approach that is particularly suited to mid-size cities and younger organizations."
pica  portland  oregon  artplace  mobility  place  relocation  pop-ups  pop-uporganizations  pop-upculture  2011  portlandinstituteforcontemporaryart  art  lcproject  glvo  popup 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Community of Writers :: Every kid's a writer.
"Community of Writers, Inc. is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the writing/literacy skills of elementary and middle school students throughout Oregon by raising the standard of writing instruction.

Community of Writers (COW) was started in 1999 by author and teacher Larry Colton, a Pulitzer Prize nominee. In the last eight years, over 1,160 teachers have participated in our program, and over 30,000 students in five districts have been impacted."
education  writing  portland  oregon  professionaldevelopment  literacy  lcproject 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Write Around Portland
"Through a unique model of writing workshops, published anthologies and public readings, Write Around Portland helps people transform their lives and our community.

Our traditional workshops are held in partnership with social service agencies. They are offered at no charge to people living with HIV/AIDS, survivors of domestic violence, adults and youth in addiction recovery, low income seniors, people in prison, homeless youth and others who may not have access to writing in community because of income, isolation or other barriers.

We also offer special workshops designed for new and seasoned writers who want to participate in a Write Around Portland workshop and support the communities we traditionally serve. We offer two workshops with an associated fee: Prompt at Powell's City of Books and monthly workshops at HOTLIPS Pizza."
teaching  writing  community  literature  portland  oregon  lcproject  education  learning 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Portland Built: Design, Architecture, Art, Green, and Sustainable...a Portand Blog, made in Oregon
"Portland Built is a site dedicated to the great things being built in and around Portland, Oregon. We’re writing about smart development, sustainability, design, architecture, and the outstanding businesses and artisans of the region.

Portland Built is divided into three main focus areas: Products, Design+Build, and Partners."
design  architecture  sustainability  portland  oregon  cascadia  making  building  construction 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Jelly Helm Studio
""We are a communication studio in Portland, Oregon.

We work with purpose-driven people and companies to authentically and powerfully express their stories.

Our work builds community.

Clients include the Portland Timbers, Chinook Book, Oregon Humanities, Wikipedia, Imperial Woodpecker, Infectious Diseases Research Institute, Forest Ethics, Nike, Red Hat, Dell, University of California and Youth, Rights & Justice.

Jelly Helm is formerly Executive Creative Director of Wieden+Kennedy in Portland and Amsterdam, Associate Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University Adcenter, Group Creative Director at The Martin Agency, and Founder/Director of W+K 12, Wieden+Kennedy’s experimental in-house school.

I’m interested in story, artisan values, and the open/free/sharedknowledge movement.I’m interested in the role of story in the emerging culture."
design  art  film  advertising  portland  oregon  jellyhelm  wk  wk12  wieden+kennedy 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Caldera
"…started as a summer camp in the mountains. The idea was to bring kids w/ limited opportunities, both from the city & country, together to make art. Turns out it was a pretty good idea. Kids who said they couldn’t draw found out they were artists. Students who were at risk of dropping out of school kept w/ it, graduated from high school, won college scholarships & came back to work at Caldera.The artists who worked w/ the kids found the experience made them better artists, so we invited them back during the winter to work on their own projects. & because art isn’t just for summertime, we started working w/ students every week, expanding our activities into their schools & communities in Portland & Central Oregon. Today, we work year-round w/ thousands of students, & we invite artists from all over the world for month long residencies at our arts center near Sisters. Caldera’s mission is to be a catalyst for transformation through innovative art & environmental programs."
residencies  oregon  portland  sisters  wk  wieden+kennedy  lcproject  education  art  writing  youth  teens  srg  edg  glvo  caldera  creativity  arts  expression  learning  apprenticeships  mentorships  danwieden  mentorship 
august 2011 by robertogreco
tiny houses | pdx : rlingard.com
"This project provides an affordable, infill development alternative for entry-level Portland, Oregon home buyers. On a single 50'x100', 4 compact single family houses share the space of a typical, single family residence. The operable fence partitions and interior layout of these homes allows each living space to open either to the communal garden space, the private courtyard or both. Modular construction is used to minimize construction waste, increase quality and performance, and maintains the project's tight budget goals."
ryanlingard  portland  oregon  architecture  homes  housing  tinyhouses  small  design  architects 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Blogfather
"I’m OK with this lifestyle business. It’s a put-down for a lot of people, especially in Silicon Valley. I think it’s the best thing in the world. You don’t have to kill yourself…

I never got that message anywhere in the tech community. Like, what is wrong with making a decent living in doing something you love forever? And then people put that down as a “lifestyle business.” Or ask, “How are you going to change the world or make the next Facebook?”

It’s like nobody sings unless they want to be Britney Spears. That’s stupid—we should all sing in bars three nights a week if we like it and get paid as professional musicians. Who says you have to be a superstar? I hate the whole “rock-star programmer” thing where you have to make the next Facebook. 

It’s very Portland to do sustainable things that are here for a long time. You can do sustainable things and not have to slash and burn and sell."
sustainability  blogs  blogging  matthaughey  portland  oregon  business  glvo  lifestyle  lifestylebusiness  2011 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Telling Room: the place where stories grow
"The Telling Room is a nonprofit writing center in Portland, Maine, dedicated to the idea that children and young adults are natural storytellers. Focused on young writers ages 6 to 18, we seek to build confidence, strengthen literacy skills, and provide real audiences for our students’ stories. We believe that the power of creative expression can change our communities and prepare our youth for future success."
writing  education  maine  creative  stories  storytelling  nonprofit  lcproject  portland  youth  826  nonprofits 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Self Enhancement, INC.
"We are Self Enhancement, Inc. (SEI), a nonprofit organization supporting at-risk urban youth. In 29 years, SEI has grown from a 1-week summer basketball camp to a flourishing agency serving thousands of students each year in the greater Portland, Oregon area, with plans to replicate across the country.

Whereas others see only statistics, we see strong individuals, tomorrow’s business owners and leaders, teachers and citizens. We help our students see themselves and their potential the same way. Then we help them find their strengths, ignite their passion and identify the plan that will move them in the direction of their dream. And we stay with them every step of the way, 24/7, 365 days a year from age eight through 25."
education  schools  services  portland  oregon  youth  partnerships 
july 2011 by robertogreco
ADX / Portland, OR / Building a Community of Thinkers & Makers
"Equal parts workspace and incubator, our membership-based community unites multiple creative disciplines within a 10,000 square-foot facility that is accessible, collaborative & affordable."
portland  oregon  coworking  community  art  design  work  collaboration  incubator  lcproject 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Summa Institute | Dedicated to the Wholeness of Children and Families | Portland Oregon
"The Summa Institute is a 501(c)3 non-profit established in 1985, launching a new vision in Portland Oregon. We use Natural Learning Relationships to change the world through authentic relationship based education, conscious parenting, research and professional development."
summaacademy  summainstitute  portland  oregon  holisticapproach  holistic  education  teaching  learning  children  unschooling  deschooling  parenting 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Summa Academy | An Extraordinary School for Children 5-12 and Their Families | Portland Oregon
"The Summa Academy is a unique educational environment for students age 5-14 and their families. Using the holistic approach of a Natural Learning Relationships, the Academy nurtures the physical, social, emotional, spiritual, and intellectual development of its students in multi-age classrooms that have a low teacher-to-student ratio."
portland  oregon  schools  education  learning  holistic  holisticapproach  teaching  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  summainstitute  summaacademy 
june 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - Audubon Society of Portland: Marmot Cabin on the Joe Miller Wildlife Sanctuary
"Experience an unforgettable overnighter at our rustic cabin in the foothills of Mt Hood, Groups will meet our Naturalists at the "Marmot Cabin" (near Sandy) & have the site to themselves as they explore a remote Wildlife Sanctuary. Children will seek out signs of Beaver, Deer & Elk as they venture through the lush vegetation of a pristine riparian zone. Students learn to read animal sign, identify plants & interpret the landscape, honing their own naturalist skills along the way. After dinner, students will venture into the darkness in search of bats & owls, & return for an educational program on these nocturnal creatures. In the morning, children will get to learn even more about our native animals via a hands-on study of pelts, skulls & specimens. We will design a program that builds, expands & enhances your environmental curriculum."

[More at: http://audubonportland.org/trips-classes-camps/school-programs/overnight AND http://trackerspdx.com/youth/outdoor-school.php ]

[See also: http://www.flickr.com/photos/audubonkidspdx/5759352809/ ]
portland  outdoors  outdooreducation  audubon  oregon  marmotcabin  sandy  mthood  naturalists  nature  education  camps  cabins 
june 2011 by robertogreco
PNCA : programs  ce  youth  [Youth Programs at PNCA]
"PNCA Continuing Education offers a comprehensive program of art courses for children and teens (ages 4-18) including Saturday classes during the fall and spring. YOUTH CLASSES provide artistic skill building and exploration for students, ages 4-18. Courses offer a wide variety of media, each providing basic skill and vocabulary. During the fall and spring semesters, classes are held on Saturdays with an exhibition of student work at the end of each semester. During the summer, classes are one and two week workshops."

[via: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pnca_youth/ via: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lizettegreco/5512468824/ ]
education  art  lcproject  portland  oregon  pnca  children  teens  youth 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Streetsblog.net » Is Driving on the Decline in the Pacific Northwest?
"Driving on the Decline in the Pacific Northwest? Orphan Road offers a set of data showing that traffic volumes throughout the Northwest are declining, at least according to a local news source. Data show a reduction in traffic in Seattle and Portland, and statewide in Washington and Oregon. Earlier reports showed a decline in metro Seattle, but this is the first news we’ve seen pointing to a regional trend. And Orphan Road adds that in at least one case the decline precedes the 2008 recession or the rise in gas prices. Sightline Daily, which first reported the data, said it’s important that traffic engineers take note. “It may not make sense anymore — and might, in fact, be financially risky — for transportation planners to assume that demand for car travel will rise in the future the way it did in the 1950s.”"
cars  transportation  pacificnorthwest  cascadia  trends  driving  2011  seattle  portland  oregon  washingtonstate 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Gaia University
"Gaia University is a unique un-institution for higher learning. We offer access to accredited degrees and diplomas arising from your work in personal and planetary transformation. Through action learning you pursue a pathway of your own design - in the location of your choice - while supported by a global network of skilled advisors and mentors. Come join our vibrant international community and learn and unlearn with us through an integral blend of residential intensives, online exchange, digital documentation and hands-on project work."
sustainability  permaculture  education  activism  agriculture  unschooling  deschooling  gaiauniversity  via:steelemaley  the2837university  agitpropproject  lcproject  highered  highereducation  learning  mexico  chile  portland  oregon  international  puertorico  tennessee  germany  austria  california 
february 2011 by robertogreco
First Friday Art Walk - Portland, Maine
"JOIN US for a free self-guided tour of local art galleries, art studios, museums, and alternative art venues on the First Friday of every month from 5-8 pm.

OUR MISSION is to open the doors of Portland's visual arts community by joining together and introducing a wider audience to the unique vitality of the artists and venues of Portland. Promoting interest with non-exclusivity and easy access, thereby strengthening the arts and community through diversity and celebration."
maine  art  portland  events 
february 2011 by robertogreco
LiveWork Portland
"LiveWorkPortland is an effort to increase the visibility of the creative community in Portland, Maine, with the explicit goal of growing that community both in its numbers and it’s economic impact on the city. LiveWorkPortland is an ongoing marketing campaign—and advertisement for Portland, updated daily. Who is our target audience? Primarily talented and resourceful people who are living and working in other metro areas that have the means and drive to set up shop here and add to our community. As a virtuous benefit, we believe that the same kinds of content and community engagement that will make Portland more attractive and knowable to people “from away,” will also help us know ourselves better here and further integrate and energize the existing creative economy in Portland."
maine  portland  local  live  work  culture  marketing 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Portland Museum of Art
"As the largest and oldest art museum in the state of Maine, the Museum serves as a vital cultural resource for all who visit. The Museum's collection of more than 17,000 objects is housed in three historic and remarkable buildings showcasing three centuries of art and architecture. Whether this is your first visit or 131st, our changing exhibitions and permanent collection offer you a diverse selection of fine and decorative arts to view."
portland  maine  art  museums 
february 2011 by robertogreco
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